FIFA announces its video council before the fight with UEFA and CSF

first_imgAfrica key. In the middle of this noise, FIFA has taken another step that has not liked anything in UEFA. The holding company has reached an agreement with the African Confederation (CAF) to mount a Club Super League on your continent UEFA says that the FIFA-CAF tournament is a test bench to repeat the model in Europe. Come on, that the FIFA I would be in contact with the best clubs on the continent to move forward with what European Club Association (ECA) He has been trying unsuccessfully for many years.The money. The European Leagues suspect that in the medium term, if the FIFA-UEFA schism is not resolved, a Super League may not be a utopia, which would end the national championships, since the money would go in mass to the new tournament, a mana. World schism. Sheltering in excuses such as the coronavirus or excessive spending on airplanes and hotels, the FIFA, in an unprecedented decision, has decided to suspend the Council that was to hold in South America and organize a videoconference among its 37 members on March 20. Beyond the excuses, behind the decision is the deep division between the holding company, the FIFA and some of its most powerful investees, singularly the UEFA and the South American Confederation (CSF), who have joined forces with a collaborative plan that has not sat well at Zurich, host city of the headquarters of the FIFA.The differences. The anger between the FIFA and the UEFA It has been intensified by the interference of one in the competences of the other, and vice versa. Basically This is the entry of FIFA in club football and UEFA in the national team. Ceferin, which will meet in early March Amsterdam to the Assembly of the UEFA, has received as an affront the announcement of the FIFA to organize the Club Supermundial from next year with the participation of 24 of the best teams in the world (the continental champions) in a new tournament in China that will distribute millionaire figures and which in UEFA they see as a concentrated Champions, that is, as an attack on the star competition in Europe. On the other hand, FIFA has refringed by the attempt of the UEFA and the CSF to organize a tournament of selections on dates FIFA booked in the last week of March.last_img read more

Jokowi cancels appearance at rare indigenous peoples congress

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This week marks the fifth congress of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago. The event takes place once every five years.Indonesian President Joko Widodo had been scheduled to deliver a speech. He would have been the nation’s first top official to attend.Last last year, Jokowi recognized the rights of nine communities to the forests they call home. The development was welcomed by indigenous groups even as they called for him to replicate it on a far larger scale.“This congress is a deadline for Jokowi to keep his promises. Otherwise there will be a political decision.” TANJUNG GUSTA, Indonesia — Abdon Nababan, head of the world’s largest indigenous peoples alliance, was telling reporters today why it had supported Joko Widodo’s bid for the nation’s top job in 2014 when he received a Whatsapp message from the president’s office. He read it aloud.“‘President Jokowi will not attend’,” Nababan told the room, an airy meeting hall set up to hold the main speakers at the indigenous peoples congress now underway in this village on the outskirts of Medan, the capital of North Sumatra. A silence hung in the air; someone pierced it with a whistle.“‘He will send Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya in his place. Presidential Chief of Staff Teten Masduki will also appear.’ That’s it.”It was a deflating moment. Jokowi, as he is known, had been scheduled to speak on Friday at the congress and perhaps deliver a major policy pronouncement in line with his campaign platform, which had earned him the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago’s (AMAN) first-ever endorsement of a candidate. Would he establish a long-awaited task force on indigenous rights? Would he recognize the the tenure of more communities over the forests they call home?“Of course it is a surprise,” Nababan said of this latest development. “We don’t need to ask why [it happened]. It says something.”Joko Widodo is surrounded by reporters in 2013, the year before he won the race for president. Photo by Eduardo M.C./FlickrAMAN holds its congress every five years. Each event is a grand cultural display that sees hundreds of communities in one of the world’s most diverse nations come together to decide who will lead the alliance.Three years ago Jokowi became Indonesia’s first president without ties to the military dictatorship that fell in 1998, the year before AMAN’s establishment. While the regime had developed the archipelago country mainly by setting companies loose on its vast natural resources, the former furniture salesman earned AMAN’s support by promising to fight for a law on indigenous peoples, to create a national mechanism for resolving conflicts pitting communities against firms and the state, to end the criminalization of indigenous persons, and more.Last year AMAN threatened to withdraw its backing, citing a lack of follow-through on his pledges. The president’s subsequent acknowledgement of nine “customary forests” “[rekindled] our hope in Jokowi, which had dimmed,” Nababan, a Batak man from Sumatra, said at the time.The customary forests — the first the state has recognized — cover a total of around 13,000 hectares (32,000 acres), but AMAN has mapped more than 8.2 million hectares it says belongs to the nation’s adat groups, as those who practice ancient modes of knowledge, belief, community and economy are called here.Asked by a reporter at Wednesday’s opening of the congress what “gift” she thought Jokowi might announce at the event, AMAN deputy Rukka Sombolinggi quickly corrected him.“Our rights are not a ‘gift’,” said Sombolinggi, a Torajan from Sulawesi. “They belong to us. What he will do is return those rights to us because they were confiscated by other parties. Thirteen-thousand hectares is small part of our rights. We respect his intentions, but we expect millions of hectares.”Rukka Sombolinggi, AMAN’s international advocacy coordinator, speaks at a Food and Agriculture Organization event in Italy in 2014. Photo by Roberto Cenciarelli for FAO/FlickrJaleswari Pramodharwardani, deputy head of the president’s staff, said in a speech at the congress on Wednesday that Jokowi had established a team to help pass a draft law on indigenous rights that has languished in the notoriously corrupt Indonesian parliament. That announcement was the first Nababan had heard of it, he said, adding that he was seeking details.Herenemus Takuling hails from Halmahera island in eastern Indonesia, where his community is resisting a French-owned nickel miner he says grabbed its land. He was sitting in the meeting hall when Nababan announced Jokowi would be a no-show.Takuling said his community had already sent its own letter to Jokowi — and to the French president and parliament — asking for an audience with him.“He has all the power of the president, so there must be some way he can fix this problem,” Takuling said. “If the company won’t cooperate, revoke its permit.”AMAN’s leadership remains hopeful Jokowi will deliver on the commitments enshrined in the “Nawacita” list of priorities he campaigned on.“This congress is a deadline for Jokowi to keep his Nawacita promises,” said Melda Sitompul, a press officer seated next to Nababan at today’s event. “Otherwise there will be a political decision.”Banner image: Elders from the Dayak Benuaq community of Muara Tae perform a ritual in the forest. Photo by Tom Johnson for the Environmental Investigation Agency Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Activism, Community Forestry, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

U.S. bans Brazilian beef imports

first_imgThe United States has banned fresh beef imports from Brazil due to food safety concerns.Brazil is one of the world’s largest beef exporters and is the fifth biggest supplier of beef to the United States.Clearing of forests for cattle pasture is the biggest driver of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. The United States has banned imports of fresh beef from Brazil due to food safety concerns.On Thursday the United States Department of Agriculture suspended fresh beef imports from Brazil until the country “takes corrective action” to address “public health concerns, sanitary conditions, and animal health issues”, according to a statement from the agency.The USDA stepped up inspection of Brazilian beef in March following revelations of sub-standard practices among some the country’s largest meatpackers, including JBS, the world’s biggest meat processor. JBS, which has acquired several U.S. meat companies over the past decade, is currently caught up in a corruption scandal that has entangled President Michel Temer, among other officials.Until Thursday’s suspension, the USDA had been inspecting 100 percent of all meat imports from Brazil and had refused entry to 11 percent of Brazilian fresh beef products, a figure more than ten times higher than the global norm, according to the agency. The Brazilian government says it is working to address these issues.Brazil is one of the world’s largest beef exporters and is the fifth biggest supplier of beef to the United States. Most of Brazil’s beef production is consumed domestically.Clearing of forests for cattle pasture is the biggest driver of deforestation in Latin America and accounts for more than 70 percent of rainforest loss in the Brazilian Amazon. Still larger areas of forests are cleared to produce feed for livestock. Cattle Ranching, Deforestation, Livestock Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Amazonian manatee migration at risk from disruption by proposed dams

first_imgAmazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis) spend the high-water season feeding in flooded forests, but migrate to deeper permanent water bodies to see out the dry season.Researchers have found that as the dry season approaches, manatees time their migration out of the floodplain to avoid bottlenecks that would block their route, and doom them.But, the scientists warn, those bottlenecks will become far more common, and less predictable, if the hundreds of hydropower dams planned for the Amazon go forward.The dams, and the bottleneck problem they create, “generates profound concern for the conservation of manatees,” the scientists write. An adult Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis) in captivity. The species lives in muddy water, which means it is rarely glimpsed. Photo credit: HBarrison via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SAAfter a day of feverishly hard work to free his boat from Amazon basin mud, scientist Eduardo Arraut suddenly became inspired to study the timing — and hazards — of Amazonian manatee migration.Arraut, a Brazilian biologist, was doing fieldwork and travelling by boat along river channels connecting two lakes in the floodplains of Brazil’s western Amazon. As the dry season approached, water levels dropped and Arraut found his route blocked where a channel had gone dry. Three hours spent hauling his boat across 300 meters of mud caused Arraut to wonder how the local manatee population timed their journey along the same route to avoid getting stuck.Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis) spend the high-water season feeding on vegetation in the region’s flooded forests but then migrate to deeper permanent stretches of water to see out the dry season. Although food is scarce in these deeper lakes, remaining in the shallower, isolated lakes of the floodplain would leave manatees vulnerable to both human and jaguar attacks.An Amazonian manatee has a radio-collar fitted by researchers studying their seasonal migration. Photo by Eduardo ArrautIn his subsequent study, Arraut, of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at the University of Oxford, and his colleagues, found that bottlenecks like the one that blocked his boat are a frequent occurrence along manatee migration routes.And, the researchers warn, those dry season bottlenecks will certainly become more common, and less predictable, if the hundreds of hydropower dams planned for the Amazon go ahead — adding another serious stressor to this already threatened species.The study, published in Acta Amazonica, focused on the floodplain lakes and channels connected to Lake Amanã, in the mid-Solimões region of the state of Amazonas, where water levels fluctuate by as much as 16 meters (over 50 feet) annually. Lake Amanã is a deep lake known as a ria, which serves as a manatee refuge during the dry season.An oxbow lake in the Amazon. The Amazon’s network of lakes, channels and flooded forests are home to the Amazonian manatee, a threatened species which spends the high-water season in floodplain lakes where food is abundant, before migrating to deeper lake refuges during the low-water season. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayArraut and his team combined radio-tracking data from 10 wild manatees (followed for various time periods between 1994-2006) with a detailed, three-dimensional depth study of the lakes and channels of their high- and low-water habitat. This data was complemented by satellite images at the peak low-water season each year, showing where bottlenecks formed, and calibrated with a hydrograph produced by a water gauge in one of the lakes.Using this information, four bottleneck locations were identified, varying in length from 800 meters (more than 2,600 feet) to 10 kilometers (6.2 miles). Three of these occurred every year, or nearly every year, with the fourth occurring just twice between 1992 and 2005. Data also revealed a new 5 kilometer (3.1 mile) bottleneck created over the course of just 15 years.The radio-tracking data allowed the research team to note when manatees started their migration, and to estimate the water depth of the bottlenecks when the animals passed through them. Migration began abruptly in almost every case, with manatees appearing to respond to local water depth as the signal to travel out of the lake. This precise timing meant that the manatees passed through the bottlenecks just a few days before they dried out, maximizing their time in the abundant feeding grounds of the floodplain lakes.Timing it right is crucial, say the researchers, but this could become much harder — even impossible — if dams planned across the Amazon basin are built, something that “generates profound concern for the conservation of manatees,” the team writes.Amazonian floodplain during the extreme drought of 2010. As water levels drop, and lakes shrink, manatees become vulnerable to predation by jaguars and hunting from local communities, so they seek refuge in deeper lakes. A recent study found that manatees timed migration to maximize their time in abundant feeding grounds, leaving just before the formation of bottlenecks that would block their route to safety. Photo by Eduardo ArrautDams disrupt natural flood cycles and the flow of sediment downstream, which together shape the Amazon floodplain. The potential impact of multiple planned dams within just one of the Amazon’s sub-basins, the Tapajós, has been called a “crisis in the making.”Although manatees are capable of responding to the dynamic nature of the floodplain, including the creation of new bottlenecks within their lifetimes, their behavioural adaptability is unlikely to be enough to survive the erratic water retention and release from the dams, explained Arraut, who is also affiliated with the Remote Sensing Division of the National Institute for Space Research, Brazil.“First, if one looks at the systemic effect of these dams on the basin, the flooding will not only change, it will become quite unpredictable,” he said. “This unpredictability makes behavioural adaptation much harder. Second, many individuals will surely die before some of them have learned how to cope with this new environment, which is a problem for a species that is already threatened with extinction.”The Amazonian manatee is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN, a consequence of centuries of hunting after the European discovery of the Amazon, along with modern day local hunting, trade, and entanglement with fishing gear. (Six out of the ten radio-tagged manatees studied were hunted by local communities over the course of the research.) Dams can exacerbate these threats, as the human population — and therefore the demand for meat — increases during and after dam construction.The Santo Antônio dam on the Madeira River in Brazil, part of the Madeira Hydroelectric Complex. A wave of dam development across the Amazon basin, if carried forward, could do irreparable harm to freshwater and forest ecosystems, say scientists. Photo by the Brazil’s Growth Acceleration Program (Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento (PAC)) on flickr, used under a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licenseAmazonian manatees are “at serious risk of disappearing, once again on account of human actions,” said Maura Sousa, who studies manatee conservation in the Amazon estuary at the Federal University of Pará, and who was not involved with the study. “What once may have been a mistake, without any warnings of the dangers the species were facing” is now a clearly visible threat.Beyond any single species, “the real issue at stake is a beautiful, complex and very [rich] ecosystem,” she added. Another major new study has determined that the many dams proposed for the Amazon Andes headwaters alone could be catastrophic for Amazon basin ecosystems and millions of people.“One of the major problems with dams is their environmental impact studies,” which do not convey the extent of the damage that they will cause, Sousa said. “And even those [dams] that have predicted major damage to the ecosystem are still licensed.” In addition, the extreme lack of data about wild manatee populations “means hands are tied with regards to making claims about the threat a particular dam might impose upon them,” Arraut explained.Approximate distribution of the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis), an animal found only in the Amazon basin. Webbotwill CC BY-SA 4.0The downstream environmental impact of dams means that even if manatees are not directly affected by a dam’s construction, they may still suffer consequences in addition to altered flood cycles. Changes to water chemistry and sediment flows will, for example, affect the “growth of aquatic macrophytes, manatees’ staple diet,” said Miriam Marmontel, of the Mamirauá Institute of Sustainable Development and co-author of the study.Dams “also create a more lentic [still water] environment, where mercury becomes more available to the food chain, and as macrophyte roots accumulate that metal, it may be transferred to manatees, with as yet undocumented but likely damaging consequences,” she said.Because existing dams have mainly been built on rivers with rapids, which manatees cannot travel over, population subdivision is not yet a major problem, said Marmontel. But Arraut fears that if new dams are built, then manatees will be isolated upstream, downstream, or between the structures, making the animals vulnerable to “a suite of problems that affects small populations.”For the manatees of Lake Amanã, dams are not an immediate threat because the closest rivers, the Solimões and Japurá, “are wide and devoid of falls,” Marmontel explained. But “as entrepreneurs run out of [dam site] possibilities in other rivers, they are looking into a series of smaller, sequential dams, that might be implemented even in lowland areas, such as the mid-Solimões River,” she said.A baby Trichechus inunguis at the Instituto Brasileiro de Meio Ambiente e Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA) in Breves, Pará State, Marajó Island, Brazil. It is unknown how young animals would adapt to the erratic changeability of water levels brought by new dams. Photo by KCO3, image in the public domainArraut sees an uncertain future for manatees: “My feeling is that the outlook is quite dire for the Amazon as a whole. Having said this, Brazil is going through a very important cleansing process when it comes to institutional corruption, and internal and international pressure with regards to finding a less destructive plan for the Amazon [is] increasing.”Aside from cancelling planned dams, and promoting an economy based on environmentally friendly livelihoods, “[p]erhaps the best conservation measure for manatees would be one that improved the lives, educational background, and environmental conscience of people in Brazil and elsewhere,” Arraut said. “One immediate consequence of this would probably be the abolishment of a development plan for the Amazon that sees it as a deposit of minerals, oil, gas and valuable wood.”Both Arraut and Sousa agree that a better understanding of manatee populations is needed, because “we don’t even have a marginally reliable population estimate for the species,” said Arraut. Without that baseline data, it is impossible to gauge impacts as they unfold.Getting local people on board with conservation efforts is another priority, said Sousa, who is involved with environmental education, along with manatee rescue and rehabilitation work.Marmontel sees a brighter future, if the right actions are taken quickly. “After the commercial hunting period [in the past, manatees] became more nocturnal, shy and inhabitants of back, calm and quiet waters, where they keep reproducing,” she said. “If allowed favorable, pristine and protected habitat, manatees may share this planet with us for several [more] millions of years.”Citation:Arraut, E. M., Arraut, J. L., Marmontel, M., Mantovani, J. E., Novo, E. M. L. M. (2017) Bottlenecks in the migration routes of Amazonian manatees and the threat of hydroelectric dams. Acta Amazonica 47: 7-18FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A manatee calf nursing. The animal pictured here is a West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus), a marine species. It is related to the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis), a freshwater species that inhabits murky Amazon rivers, and rarely offers itself up for dramatic photo opportunities in the wild as in the image seen here. Photo by Galen Rathbun / USFWS Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Charismatic Animals, Controversial, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Politics, Flooding, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Freshwater Animals, Freshwater Ecosystems, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Mammals, Monitoring, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Corridors center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Two scientists and a NASA astronaut just biked across the Brazilian Amazon and want to tell you about it

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Rainforest, Amazon Soy, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Fires, Interviews, Logging, Mining, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests Article published by Mike Gaworecki On Sept 26, two scientists and a NASA astronaut completed TransAmazon +25, a bike trek across the Brazilian Amazon.What makes this trip particularly interesting is that one of the cyclists, Osvaldo Stella, a mechanical engineer with the non-profit Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM) in Brazil who works with small-scale farmers and other landowners to preserve and restore forests, did the same ride 25 years ago.Stella was accompanied on the journey by Paulo Moutinho, a co-founder and senior scientist at IPAM and a Distinguished Policy Fellow at the Woods Hole Research Center in the USA; as well as Chris Cassidy, an astronaut with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Navy SEAL.“Gold mining, deforestation, and pastures covered many of the areas that were covered with forest 25 years ago,” Stella told Mongabay. ”The cities are larger but have not changed much in their overall appearance. One more sign that the current economic model generates much impact to the environment but little improvement in the quality of life of the people.” On Sept 26, two scientists and a NASA astronaut completed TransAmazon +25, a bike trek across the Brazilian Amazon.What makes this trip particularly interesting is that one of the cyclists, Osvaldo Stella, a mechanical engineer with the non-profit Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM) in Brazil who works with small-scale farmers and other landowners to preserve and restore forests, did the same ride 25 years ago. That means he was able to observe firsthand the environmental and social changes that have occurred in the region over the past quarter century.On that first ride, Stella was joined by a couple of friends who were also inspired to venture across the Amazon after having witnessed the outcomes of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit. This time around, though, Stella was accompanied on the journey by Paulo Moutinho, a co-founder and senior scientist at IPAM and a Distinguished Policy Fellow at the Woods Hole Research Center in the USA; as well as Chris Cassidy, an astronaut with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Navy SEAL.For Transamazon +25, the three cyclists covered 1,000 kilometers (about 620 miles) of the Trans-Amazonian Highway in the Brazilian states of Pará and Amazonas. They made a documentary film about the trek, but they were also on a scientific fact-finding mission — and they are now eager to report the changes to the landscapes and local communities that they bore witness to.Their larger goal, however, is to inspire the conservation of the Amazon and support the people and wildlife who live in the rainforest. “Home to 25 million Brazilians, this vast region is a treasure of inestimable value,” according to the TransAmazon +25 website. “The adventurers will open a window on the region and inspire people to preserve the forest and protect the rights of the people who call it home.”“Gold mining, deforestation, and pastures covered many of the areas that were covered with forest 25 years ago,” Stella told Mongabay. “During this period more than 340,000 km2 of forests were cleared throughout the Amazon. Currently, the total deforested area in the Amazon is 700,000 km2, an area equivalent to the entire state of Texas. The cities are larger but have not changed much in their overall appearance. One more sign that the current economic model generates much impact to the environment but little improvement in the quality of life of the people.”Mongabay interviewed Stella, Moutinho, and Cassidy about what it was like biking — sometimes for 12 hours a day — through a rainforest in 100-degree-Fahrenheit heat, what they saw during their trip, and the changes that have occurred in the Amazon over the past 25 years.From left: Stella, Moutinho, and Cassidy on the Trans-Amazonian Highway. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: What was it like to bike through a rainforest? I imagine hot and sweaty, but it would be great to hear your firsthand take.Stella: In Amazonia we have two well defined seasons: the winter, the season of the most intense rains, which runs from September to April; and summer, which is hottest and least rainy and runs from May to August. This year, the dry season is prolonged and the weather is drier than normal. These two factors plus deforestation contributed to a year with record fire outbreaks in the region.Moutinho: The rainforest can fascinate and scare pretty much anyone. At the beginning of the trip, I was not expecting the enormous hills. It scared me a bit, and during the two first days, I was worried that I was not physically prepared for it. The Amazon is not flat terrain!Cassidy: The route was surprisingly hilly, much more so than I was expecting. And the lack of rain made for a very dry, hot, and dusty ride. However, the interaction with the local people along the way far surpassed my expectations in terms of how welcoming they were. That made the heat, sweat, and thirst much more bearable.Mongabay: Was it the rainy or dry season when you did the rides in 1992 and 2017? How big a logistical hurdle was the rain, if it was the rainy season? What other challenges were there, and how’d you overcome them? For instance, were you on roads most of the time, or did you have to do some trailblazing?Stella: The first trip in 1992 began in December and lasted until the end of February 1993, during the rainy season. Although the heat is strenuous and there is a lot of dust, mud makes the trip more complicated. Even the road being in better condition this time around, the few days of rain that we had reminded me of the hell we went through on the first trip. At that time, many stretches of the road were not ready for cars and we walked in the middle of the woods. This year, the entire section of road was dirt, but quite passable for cars.Moutinho: It was the dry season [for the 2017 ride] — and a very extreme one, no less. So, the most critical logistical issue to overcome was to find the water that we needed. We had to find small rivers with water good enough to drink.With our bikes we were on the roads all the time. However, at night we had to trailblaze a bit to clear places in the forest to hang our hammocks.The cyclists frequently had to trailblaze at night and clear places in the forest to hang their hammocks. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: Did you have a support team pacing you as you did the ride and/or helping with logistics?Stella: Other than the first couple days, no. In both trips, we went alone and the only logistical support we had was the sending of spare parts and food to some points along the way.Moutinho: We had a truck with the photographer and film maker only for the first couple of days. The rest of the ride was without any kind of support or help with logistics.Mongabay: What was the main objective of the ride? What were some of your personal reasons for wanting to do the ride?Stella: On the first trip, the main objective was to discover and know the region that was very distant from the majority of the population of the country. As a result of, and since, that experience, I have worked for many years in different projects in the region. On the second trip, the main objective was to see firsthand the changes that are taking place in the region and raise awareness of the importance of the Amazon and the need to develop new economic activities in the region that are not linked to environmental degradation.Moutinho: One objective was to better understand — on the ground — the dynamic of land use and deforestation in an area still largely covered by forest. Unlike other parts of the Trans-Amazonian Highway, the area we were passing through is still relatively well preserved. However, the forest is very quickly being destroyed by logging, gold mining, and cattle pasture creation. Only a bike trip can give you a real perspective about what is going on with the local population and the forest.Cassidy: T25 appealed to my adventurous spirit and scientific curiosity. I wanted to see from the ground this important ecosystem and what is happening there, after having already seen it from space.Stella on the original TransAmazon ride in 1992. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: Did you see much wildlife on the ride? Any notable wildlife encounters? Overall did you see more or less wildlife than you did 25 years ago?Stella: In general, it is not common to see large animals on a trip like this because with the truck noise they move away. During the first trip, the encounters with wild animals were more frequent because the road was less used. Back then, there were stretches in which there was no vehicle traffic, and it was possible to find more animals. However, we saw lots of macaws, parrots, and other species of birds.Moutinho: On the road it’s not easy to see wildlife due the car and truck traffic. However, we had a chance to see wide range of bird species (macaws and parrots particularly; they are beautiful and noisy), monkeys (including one common species that makes a very spooky sound during the night), and many jaguar paw prints. We also had to deal with a snake inside a room in which we were sleeping one night.Mongabay: Did you pass many cow pastures, soy plantations, etc. that were rainforest on the original ride 25 years ago? Or rural landscapes that are now cities, even?Stella: In the region that we crossed in this trip, we could observe a diversity of alterations in the landscape. Gold mining, deforestation, and pastures covered many of the areas that were covered with forest 25 years ago. During this period more than 340,000 km2 of forests were cleared throughout the Amazon. Currently, the total deforested area in the Amazon is 700,000 km2, an area equivalent to the entire state of Texas. The cities are larger but have not changed much in their overall appearance. One more sign that the current economic model generates much impact to the environment but little improvement in the quality of life of the people.Cows block the Trans-Amazonian Highway as the cyclists approach. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: Did you witness any impacts on indigenous and traditional people’s lands and livelihoods as a result of these changes to the landscape?Stella: Indigenous lands and local populations are directly impacted by this dynamic. Indigenous lands are increasingly under pressure from both mining and deforestation.Moutinho: A large portion of the lands along the road is Munduruku and Parintintins indigenous lands. They are surrounded by the forested areas being converted to extensive pasture. A large portion of indigenous villages are exposed to smoke from fires used by the ranchers to clean pasture areas. The effects on their health (breathing problems) are potentially enormous.Cassidy with his bike near a patch of forest that was recently burned. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: Were there any signs of transnational corporations like Cargill, ADM, Bunge, or Amaggi operating in the region? Or any evidence of how consumerism has infiltrated the region?Stella: The border of soy production has not yet arrived in this region but in several places like Itaituba and Humaita, it is possible to see the huge silos to store the soy that is already being drained by the rivers and roads of the region. This economic model based on the production of commodities for export is impracticable both for the preservation of the environment and for the reduction of social inequalities in the country.Moutinho: Close to Humaitá city (in the state of Amazonas), there is a growing expectation that the soy industry can be established in the region. Many land owners reported their interest in selling their lands to “sojeiros” (soybean planters). The Amaggi seem to be present in Humaitá.Mongabay: Did you see many programs to prevent deforestation on the ride? Stella: No, the environmental agenda in Brazil is in one of its biggest crises ever. People who profit from mining, land sales, and illegal logging elect officials who are actively working to dismantle all the environmental legislation that has been built in recent decades.Moutinho: Not really. We found the [Brazilian environmental agency] IBAMA coordinating a fire control brigade with members of an indigenous people. But, the law enforcement there seems to be weak. It’s very easy to find illegal gold mining activities at the roadside.Stella, Moutinho, and Cassidy each consumed as much as 10 liters of water per day during the ride. Because they couldn’t carry that much water with them, they had to find it in local streams and creeks. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: Overall, did you feel the rainforest is as healthy as it was 25 years ago?Stella: Visibly the forest is suffering. Deforestation and climatic changes together have created this scenario of record forest fires this summer, three times more than last year in the state of Pará. We pedaled hundreds of miles under a thick layer of smoke. The “lungs of the world,” as the Amazon rainforest is known, is full of smoke.Moutinho: I would say that the rainforest is much more threatened than 25 years ago. It’s the same industries that have been destroying the forest and consuming its natural resources over the last two or three decades, but that consumption is happening much more quickly now.Mongabay: The Amazon has been hit by big droughts and major wildfires lately. Did they see any signs of that?Stella: The first report of the 1997 IPCCC predicted that one of the impacts of climate change would be more intense and frequent extreme climatic events in the Amazon. So, as in the United States, it is possible to see that they were right.Moutinho: The dry season in this year was very strong. We saw large areas being burned, and during one four-day period, we pedaled in the middle of dense smoke.Cassidy: Yes, and we captured some amazing drone footage of some of them. The number and extent of the fires also surprised me, given that this is a “rain” forest. Obviously, I knew that cattle farmers were using fires to clear pasture, but I was surprised by the extent of it.The TransAmazon +25 team saw large areas of the Amazon being burned, and even endured a four-day period during which they had to pedal through dense smoke. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Mongabay: How did you use the ride to raise awareness of what’s going on in the Amazon?Stella: When traveling on a bicycle, you can feel the environment. Because of the heat, each of us needed at least 10 liters of water per day and it is not possible to carry that much water due to its weight. So, we needed to stock up at streams and creeks on the way. In the mining areas, it was difficult to find suitable water sources. It struck me that they are destroying fresh water in order to get gold, but in the end, it is impossible to live without water and gold is of no use. Showing the contradiction of our model of life can be a good way to draw attention to the Amazon.Moutinho: The combination of extreme sport (mountain biking) with environmental protection seems to be a powerful way to attract attention to the issue. And when you have an astronaut pedaling with you, that increases the interest even more. He brings a unique perspective, having seen the region from space, and now seeing it close up, on the ground. Everyone has some idea about what’s going on in the Amazon, but they are not really paying attention to it. So, we hope that by including a new element (sports), we will be able to reach many more people and make more of them actually care about preserving the rainforest.Cassidy: Hopefully the documentary that we’re making will reach a large audience. T25 is not a group of elite athletes doing something that regular people could never do. It’s just three regular, middle-aged guys pushing their limits, and doing so in an important region of the planet. It should appeal to a broad range of people, including those interested in sports or adventure travel — regular people who perhaps don’t currently give much thought to the Amazon, or the environmental challenges we face in general.Additionally, when I speak to students and adults during future Astronaut appearances, I now have direct on-the-ground Amazon experience to go with the perspective I gained from my time living on the International Space Station. Just as the ISS is a spaceship sustaining the life of those living on board, Earth is a spaceship sustaining the life of all 7.5 billion of us. And Spaceship Earth is fragile, we need to take better care of it. Hopefully T25 will help more people realize this.From left: Stella, Cassidy, and Moutinho on the Trans-Amazonian Highway. Photo courtesy of Team TransAmazon25.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New monkey species found in Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearing

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Mammals, Mining, Monkeys, New Species, Primates, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img From a stretch of the Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará, researchers have described a new-to-science species of marmoset.The marmoset, with its distinct white tail, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós–Jamanxim interfluve.At the moment, given the scarcity of information on M. munduruku, the researchers recommend listing the marmoset as data deficient on the IUCN Red List.However, the Amazon forest that’s home to the newly described species is being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion, logging, mining, and infrastructure development. From an area of southern Amazonia, where forests are rapidly being cut for gold mining, agriculture, cattle pastures, and construction of dams, researchers have described a species of marmoset that’s new to science.“The spread of deforestation is pretty visible,” said Rodrigo Costa Araújo of the National Institute of Amazonian Research, Brazil.Araújo and his colleagues had been surveying the stretch of Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará for primates when they first spotted the marmosets, they report in a recent study published in PeerJ.“The first time I recorded the new species was a very exciting moment!” Araújo, lead author of the study, said in an email. “I saw a small group of three marmosets in the border of the forest, before entering the trail so I was surprised with such a lucky encounter. Immediately I took my binoculars and my heart started to beat hard when I saw their white tails.”White tails are very rare among primates that live in South America; only one other primate species, Leontocebus melanoleucos, is known to have one, Araújo said. (Leontocebus melanoleucos is one of the synonyms for Leontocebus weddelli melanoleucus, commonly known as the white saddle-back tamairn.)So the tail was an indication that the marmoset could be a new species. To confirm this, Araújo and his colleagues trekked through the forests and canoed up streams, recording details of every individual marmoset or troop they observed. They also collected five specimens of the monkey as well as samples of their muscle tissue in the field under appropriate permits. They later analyzed the specimens to confirm that the marmoset species was indeed new to science.The marmoset, with its distinct white tail, beige-yellowish lower half, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós-Jamanxim interfluve.A boat on Tapajós River with a view of the forest where Mico munduruku is found. Image courtesy of Rodrigo Costa Araújo.The discovery of M. munduruku wasn’t entirely unexpected. Only a handful of primate and mammal surveys have been conducted in the region between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers, the researchers say, and no marmosets have ever been collected from there. The forests in the area are also largely isolated from the range of other similar species by the rivers, Araújo said.“These facts triggered the expeditions to the Tapajos-Jamanxim interfluve and, although finding new species is quite unpredictable, I had a strong sense that a distinct species could be found,” he said.Moreover, people living in the region, including those who spend time in the forests mining gold, had told the researchers about the species. “They are aware of the marmosets and were able to give accurate descriptions of the species — locally these marmosets are called as soins,” Araújo said.At the moment, given the scarcity of information on M. munduruku, the researchers recommend listing the marmoset as data deficient on the IUCN Red List.A sketch of Mico munduruku. Image by Stephen NashHowever, the Amazon forest that’s home to M. munduruku is under tremendous pressure. The forests are being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion and logging, and four hydroelectric power plants have been approved for construction there, Araújo said. Gold mining is also rampant.“The region is a hotspot for gold miners, so there is dredging and digging of the river bed and its tributaries,” Araújo said in a statement. “It is a little-studied region and the biodiversity there is poorly known. Having a new primate species described here clearly demonstrates that the habitat of still unknown species are being destroyed.”It’s a race against time, but the researchers plan to continue to survey southern Amazonia and collect more data on all the marmosets that occur in the region, so that effective conservation actions can be designed.Rodrigo Costa Araújo was part of the surveying team that described the new-to-science species of marmoset. Image courtesy of Rodrigo Costa Araújo.Citation:Costa-Araújo, R., de Melo, F. R., Canale, G. R., Hernández-Rangel, S. M., Messias, M. R., Rossi, R. V., … & Farias, I. P. (2019). The Munduruku marmoset: a new monkey species from southern Amazonia. PeerJ, 7, e7019. doi:10.7717/peerj.7019last_img read more

La finale de futsal arrêtée après des échauffourées

first_imgOn avait droit en effet à un spectacle digne d’une finale entre deux belles formations qui pratiquent un jeu alléchant. Mais parfois le stress et la nervosité prennent le dessus et les émotions font survenir des choses qu’au moins un des deux clubs va regretter amèrement.Bref, la tension de cette finale était visiblement de trop pour un Differdangeois qui a craqué lorsqu’il a voulu récupérer un ballon sorti en touche à côté du banc du Racing. Il est sorti de ses gonds et a agressé physiquement un joueur du Racing qui a été touché au visage.Ce fut la goutte d’eau qui a fait déborder le vase. Il n’en a pas fallu plus pour que cela entraîne une grosse altercation. Tous les joueurs s’en sont mêlés et pratiquement personne n’a essayé de stopper cette triste affaire. On a même pu voir le portier differdangeois piquer un sprint pour… donner un coup à un adversaire.Les arbitres tentaient tant bien que mal de calmer les ardeurs des joueurs et lorsqu’on a cru que la tension baissait enfin, ce sont quelques supporters differdangeois qui sont entrés en scène pour échauffer les esprits. Des mots d’oiseaux fusaient de tous les côtés, ces supporters étant survoltés, impossible de les stopper.Cela allait décidément trop loin et plus personne n’arrivait à mettre un point final à cette situation, qui va encore s’aggraver lorsqu’un supporter jette avec violence un bâton en bois sur le terrain. Un des quatre arbitres sera touché sur le haut du corps ce qui lui vaudra un bel hématome.Deux patrouilles de police nécessaires pour sécuriser le périmètreIl n’en faut pas plus à Fabio Aguiar, arbitre du match, pour mettre un terme à la rencontre. Pendant quelques minutes, tous les joueurs ont cru que le match allait se poursuivre, mais la décision sera définitive, Fabio Araujo ne reviendra pas sur sa décision : «J’ai arrêté la rencontre pour la simple raison qu’il y a des objets dont des bâtons, bouteilles qui ont été jetés de la tribune. Il y a des joueurs et un arbitre qui ont été touchés. On n’avait plus les conditions pour poursuivre la rencontre.»Une décision sans appel donc. On a senti que les membres de la direction de Differdange étaient dépités. Ils ont encore essayé de parler aux arbitres, mais rien à faire.Et la décision était sans doute la bonne puisqu’on a même eu un peu peur que les débordements ne continuent à l’extérieur du hall omnisports. Mais le calme est finalement revenu, deux patrouilles de police étant arrivées pour sécuriser le périmètre. Elles n’ont d’ailleurs pas eu à intervenir.La question, qui reste sans réponse à cette heure, est de savoir ce que la fédération va décider concernant cette situation. Est-ce que la partie sera rejouée? Est-ce que Differdange va perdre ce match sur tapis vert, puisqu’il accueillait la rencontre et que ses fans ont été directement identifiés?En tout cas, le président de la section de Futsal de Differdange, Filipe Costa, ne croit pas à un tel scénario. «Si on doit perdre par forfait, cela arrivera, mais je ne crois pas que cela va se produire, car c’est un fait de match qui s’est déroulé en dehors du terrain. On n’a pas d’influence. Maintenant on attend la décision. Si on doit jouer le match avec un huis clos on le jouera.» Filipe Costa devra attendre pour avoir sa réponse. Mais ce qui est certain, c’est que Differdange n’a plus son destin en main.Regrettable pour ce joli sport qui d’année en année prend de l’ampleur et s’améliore au niveau de la qualité. Mais pas encore assez au niveau de l’état d’esprit, visiblement…Jessy Ferreira Partager FUTSAL La première manche de la finale du championnat, dimanche à Differdange, entre le FCD03 et le RFCU, n’est pas allée à son terme. L’arbitre a stoppé la rencontre après de graves échauffourées.Un arbitre agressé, des joueurs qui s’écharpent, des supporters d’une bêtise dramatique. Que va-t-il advenir de cette finale qui devait être une fête?On joue la 17e minute de ce choc qui a vraiment fière allure lorsque tout bascule. Pourquoi en arriver là, alors que jusqu’à présent, tout se passait à merveille?last_img read more

Neymar reprend l’entraînement au PSG, sur fond de tensions

first_imgLe joueur brésilien a ensuite multiplié samedi les clins d’œil en direction du FC Barcelone, où il espère revenir, allant jusqu’à réveiller le souvenir traumatisant de la “remontada” de 2017 dans un entretien accordé au site américain Oh My Goal. Des propos qui sonnent comme une provocation pour les supporters parisiens qui ont encore en travers de la gorge l’élimination de leur club en 8e de finale de la Ligue des Champions cette année-là après l’invraisemblable défaite 6-1 au Camp Nou alors que le PSG avait réussi une démonstration à l’aller (4-0). Neymar avait marqué deux buts et délivré une passe décisive sur l’ultime but du match retour dans le temps additionnel de la seconde période.LQ/AFP Partager Neymar, comme l’avait annoncé son service de presse, a fait son retour à l’entraînement au PSG lundi, dans un climat lourd, entre son club qui l’attendait il y a une semaine et les récents propos polémiques du crack sur la “remontada”.“Il se présentera (lundi) au club”, avait annoncé dimanche un membre de son service de presse. Selon la radio RMC, le joueur le plus cher du monde (222 millions d’euros) “est arrivé lundi matin vers 9h10” pour une séance prévue à huis clos.Le joueur et le Paris SG s’affrontent par média interposés depuis lundi dernier, date de la reprise de l’entraînement du club parisien, auquel Neymar ne s’était pas présenté. L’entourage de la star avait justifié son absence par des engagements prévus de longue date, dont un tournoi de football à cinq au bénéfice de sa fondation, l’Institut Neymar au Brésil, une situation que le club parisien avait déploré en promettant de “prendre les mesures appropriées”.last_img read more

[Roud Léiwen] Battu à Belfast, le Luxembourg a-t-il aussi perdu Gerson Rodrigues?

first_imgGerson Rodrigues sort en boitant, Malget a un pépin musculaire…Mais la plus mauvaise nouvelle de la soirée est survenue dans les arrêts de jeu de la partie, avec la sortie en boitillant de Gerson Rodrigues, la meilleure arme luxembourgeoise sur la première moitié de ces qualifications de l’Euro-2021. Touché apparemment dans les environs de la cheville ou du tendon d’Achille (on a vu qu’on lui posait de larges poches de glace à ce niveau-là). Toute la question est maintenant de savoir si le joueur du Dynamo Kiev sera retapé pour la venue des Serbes mardi prochain. Après la rencontre, l’attaquant avait trop mal pour que le staff médical puisse le manipuler. Ce qui n’est franchement pas bon signe…Il faudra aussi s’occuper du cas Kevin Malget. Si le défenseur est sorti à la pause, ce n’est non pas pour sa boulette sur le but mais bien pour un problème musculaire.Julien Carette Les hommes de Luc Holtz ont cédé ce jeudi soir 1-0 à Belfast sur la pelouse du Windsor Park. Mais la mauvaise nouvelle pourrait être la blessure de Gerson Rodrigues.Cinq jours avant de recevoir au stade Josy-Barthel la Serbie dans le cadre des qualifications pour l’Euro-2021, le Luxembourg se déplaçait ce jeudi soir en Irlande du Nord. Un match amical face à une nation qui marche plutôt bien en ce moment, puisque les Nord-Irlandais trônent actuellement en tête du Groupe C de ces mêmes qualifications, juste devant l’Allemagne et les Pays-Bas (qui comptent, il est vrai, des matches en retard). Pas simple donc.Un rencontre qui s’est décidée, au final,  sur un but contre son camp signé juste après la demi-heure par l’infortunité Kevin Malget. Une phase partie d’un corner où Moris bondit pour boxer le ballon devant un joueur nord-irlandais, avant que le défenseur de Virton, placé dans les six mètres, ne se trompe complètement de sens et marque dans son propre but vide… Un but que les hommes de Luc Holtz ne sont jamais parvenus à rattraper par la suite malgré une prestation correcte. Avec pas mal de déchets tout même, face à une équipe nord-irlandaise pas bouleversante d’inventivité. Il faut le dire aussi. Le fiche technique Windsor park. Très belle pelouse. Arbitrage de M. Markham-Jones (Pdg). 14 108 spectateurs payantsLe but : Malget csc (37e)Cartons jaunes : Magennis (82e), Flanagan (90e)  à l’Irlande du nord. Da Mota (81e), Hall (84e) au LuxembourgIRLANDE DU NORD : Peacock-Farrell (67e McGovern) – McLaughlin, Flanagan, Brown, Ferguson – C. Evans (68e Donnelly), Thompson, Saville (60e McCalmont) – Whyte (88e Galbraith), Magennis, Lafferty (60e Lavery). LUXEMBOURG : Moris – Jans, Malget (46e Hall), L. Gerson, Carlson – Barreiro (73e Philipps), O. Thill (85e Bohnert), V. Thill, Gerson R. – Sinani (73e Da Mota), Deville (60e Turpel). Partagerlast_img read more

[BGL Ligue] Derby eschois : le Fola se paie la Jeunesse

first_imgC’était la rencontre attendue de cette 6e journée de DN, jouée sur trois jours : le derby eschois a tourné court pour la Jeunesse dimanche, victime du Fola, chez elle à la Frontière.Un score de 3-0, lourd à encaisser pour la Vieille Dame qui pensait pouvoir faire mal au Fola. Elle a pu croire un peu en ses chances durant une heure. Puis, la 10e défense du pays encore pris beaucoup trop de buts dimanche. La faute à Sinani, auteur d’un doublé (63e, 71e) et Seydi qui a enfoncé le clou (86e). La Jeunesse – rétrogradée en 6e position – voit s’envoler l’occasion de monter sur le podium, laissant la 3e place au Fola (12 points).Autre désillusion, la veille, pour le F91 qui espérait lancer sa reconquête nationale à Hostert. Raté, les Dudelangeois tournés vers les poules de l’Europa League s’inclinent 1-0 et restent coincés dans le bas du tableau. Differdange, qui prend provisoirement la tête du classement (le Progrès, actuel leader, jouera lundi), s’est imposé tranquillement à Muhlenbach (2-0).LQRésultats de la 6e journée :US Hostert – F91 Dudelange : 1-0Etzella Ettelbruck – Una Strassen : 3-2Racing FC Union Luxembourg – Victoria Rosport : 2-2Jeunesse Esch – Fola Esch : 0-3Titus Pétange – US Mondorf : 2-2FC Muhlenbach – FC Differdange 03 : 0-2Progrès Niederkorn – FC Rodange 91 : lundi à 20hClassement provisoire :1. FCD03 (16 points)2. Progrès (13)3. Fola Esch (12)4. Titus Pétange (12)5. US Mondorf (11)6. Jeunesse Esch (10)7. Victoria Rosport (7)8. Una Strassen (7)9. RFCU (6)10 Etzella Ettelbruck (6)11. FC Muhlenbach (6)12. F91 (4)13. US Hostert (3)14. FC Rodange (1) tweetcenter_img Partagerlast_img read more