New study provides a blueprint for engaging indigenous peoples in REDD+ forest monitoring

first_imgAccording to the authors of the study, using well-trained indigenous technicians is more cost-effective, takes less time, and, of course, helps meet the requirement for full and effective participation by indigenous peoples in REDD+ programs.For the study, a team of thirty indigenous technicians performed a forest inventory in order to measure the forest carbon sequestered in five Emberá and Wounaan territories in Darién, Panama.The researchers then compared the tree height and diameter data gathered by expert technicians and trained indigenous technicians and found no significant differences.Meanwhile, access to Darién’s forests was only possible because the study was managed by the Organización de Jóvenes Emberá y Wounaan de Panamá (OJEWP) in coordination with traditional indigenous authorities, in accordance with the principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent. During the UN climate talks in December 2015 that would ultimately produce the Paris Climate Agreement, indigenous leaders from Africa, Asia and Latin America presented a fairly simple proposition: give indigenous communities rights to their ancestral forests and end the criminalization of their efforts to protect those forests, and negotiators would have a powerful but affordable climate solution to work with.There is an abundance of research to support this claim. It’s been estimated that as much as 10 percent of total global carbon emissions are due to deforestation. And according to an analysis by the World Resources Institute, by securing indigenous land rights in Bolivia, Brazil, and Colombia alone, we could avoid the release of up to 59 megatons of carbon emissions every year — the equivalent of taking 9 to 12 million passenger vehicles off the road.In other words, “Securing indigenous forestlands tenure has significant potential for cost-effective carbon mitigation,” as WRI put it.It’s not just in Latin America that huge carbon savings are to be had by securing land rights for indigenous and other local forest communities, either. In order to bolster their pitch at the climate talks in Paris, the indigenous leaders pointed to an analysis by the Woods Hole Research Center that found Indigenous territories in the Amazon Basin, the Mesoamerican region, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Indonesia comprise more than 20 percent of the carbon stored above-ground in Earth’s tropical forests.The global community clearly signaled that keeping forests standing will be a key strategy in combating global warming by including REDD+, the UN program for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, as a standalone article in the final Paris Climate Agreement.“Given that large swaths of tropical forests, and forest carbon stocks, are held in indigenous territories, both recognized and under claim, it behooves national REDD+ programs to engage with these communities in culturally appropriate ways that will ensure their legitimate participation, generate clear benefits for them, and leave a legacy of capacity for future REDD+ related endeavors,” Smithsonian predoctoral fellow and McGill University Ph.D. Candidate Javier Mateo-Vega, lead author of a new study published in the journal Ecosphere last month, said in a statement.Accurately evaluating forest carbon stocks is difficult to do in remote rainforests where researchers are afforded limited access, however. It is widely believed that only experts can properly measure forest biomass, but Mateo-Vega and team found that local, non-expert field technicians are just as effective at collecting the necessary data to monitor forest carbon variability. What’s more, using well-trained indigenous technicians is more cost-effective, takes less time, and, of course, helps meet the requirement for full and effective participation by indigenous peoples in REDD+ programs, the researchers said.For the study, a team of thirty indigenous technicians performed a forest inventory in order to measure the forest carbon sequestered in five Emberá and Wounaan territories in Darién, Panama. (Six of the indigenous technicians are co-authors of the Ecosphere paper describing the results of the study.) At the same time, data was also collected by forest ecologists with study co-author Catherine Potvin’s Neotropical Ecology Lab at McGill University.The researchers then compared the tree height and diameter data gathered by the expert technicians and the trained indigenous technicians and found no significant differences. Meanwhile, access to Darién’s forests was only possible because the study was managed by the Organización de Jóvenes Emberá y Wounaan de Panamá (OJEWP) in coordination with traditional indigenous authorities, in accordance with the principle of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent.“We were invited to provide scientific leadership to the project, while administration of the grant and the logistics of our expeditions fell squarely in the hands of our indigenous counterparts,” Mateo-Vega said.He added: “The forest inventorying method devised through this study not only proved to be cost-effective, rapid and accurate, but also serves as a legitimate mechanism for indigenous communities to actively participate in climate change mitigation strategies such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+).”The global climate isn’t the only beneficiary from this forest inventorying model. The indigenous communities themselves enjoyed substantial benefits, as well, including knowledge of forest carbon stocks, ownership of the data they collected, income (by directly participating in the forest inventories or by providing services such as food, lodging, and transportation), and the capacity for participation in future REDD+ initiatives that might direct funding and other resources their way.One Emberá chief, Elibardo Membache, told the researchers that participating in the forest inventory was an invaluable opportunity for the technicians and tribal authorities to get experience directly managing a conservation project and will help prepare them for discussing forest carbon with government officials.While the study provides a blueprint for carrying out this process in eastern Panama, Mateo-Vega said that it is applicable to other indigenous territories across the tropics, though modifications will have to be made to suit each context it is deployed in. (Indeed, a 2015 study done in Guyana found similar results.)“The experience this paper documents demonstrates that it is not necessarily complicated or expensive — it’s actually cheaper — to include indigenous peoples in REDD+ related activities and monitoring,” Chris Meyer, a study co-author with the Environmental Defense Fund, said. “The idea that inclusion is complex and costly unfortunately seems to be a common myth held by some experts who are assisting countries in developing their systems and programs.”Aerial view of tropical rainforest in Panama. Photo by Rhett Butler.CITATIONMateo-Vega, J., Potvin, C., Monteza, J., Bacorizo, J., Barrigón, J., Barrigón, R., López, N., Omi, L., Opua, M., Serrano, J., Cushman, K. C., & Meyer, C. (2017). Full and effective participation of indigenous peoples in forest monitoring for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+): trial in Panama’s Darién. Ecosphere, 8(2). doi:10.1002/ecs2.1635Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Research, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Leaked terms of huge EU-Japan trade deal spark environmental alarm

first_imgA new trade deal between the European Union (EU) and Japan is set to become one of the biggest ever.The deal would alleviate certain trade barriers, improve access to automobile and machinery industries for both Japan and the EU and establish new protocols for the resolution of investment disputes.Conservation NGOs are critical of the deal’s terms, which they say lack “any binding obligations” to environmental protection, and will result in lower standards against illegal logging. A new trade deal between the European Union (EU) and Japan is set to become one of the biggest ever. But leaked documents are making conservationists worry about its environmental repercussions.The documents reveal the terms for the Japan-EU trade agreement (JEFTA), and were published June 23 by Greenpeace on trade-leaks.org. Expected to be signed in the next several weeks, the deal would alleviate certain trade barriers, improve access to automobile and machinery industries for both Japan and the EU and establish new protocols for the resolution of investment disputes.But environmental NGOs are raising the alarm, saying the deal would likely result in increased illegal logging and timber smuggling.“New trade deals bring great risks for lowering environmental standards, unless they contain strict safeguards,” said Alexander von Bismarck, Executive Director of the watchdog NGO Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA). “The JEFTA is extremely weak in this regard, and threatens to derail the global effort against illegal timber trade by placing Japan’s ineffective voluntary measures on par with the mandatory EU Timber Regulation.”The world’s fourth-largest importer of wood products, Japan recently enacted its Clean Wood Act, which consists of a voluntary system of registration for timber companies without clear penalties for those found in violation of logging standards. In contrast, other major importers like the EU, U.S. and Australia have more stringent monitoring and enforcement systems in place to help ensure the timber they import comes from legal sources.Illegally logged tree in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayThe JEFTA documents do reference environmental protection. However, the EIA is labeling such efforts as “vague” and lacking “any binding obligations,” according to their statement.The document leak was preceded by an analysis of JEFTA by the European Commission. The analysis found the deal would result in an overall positive impact on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. However, it warns there may be risks when it comes to timber imports from non-EU countries.“The European Commission’s own experts concluded that JEFTA will increase trade in illegally sourced timber, with severe consequences for the world’s forests and for legitimate forest producers in the EU,” von Bismarck said. “Japan’s import laws need to be brought in line with international standards – not the other way around.”The documents also don’t include reference to other environmental concerns, such as Japan’s controversial whaling industry nor the country’s fisheries.Requests for comment sent to the European Commission and Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs were unanswered by press time.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Environment, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Trade, Habitat Loss, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Rainforests, Temperate Forests, Timber, Timber Laws, Trade, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Forests can beat humans at restoration, new study finds

first_imgAn analysis of 133 studies found natural regeneration was more effective than active, human-driven restoration at restoring tropical forests.The study refutes conventional wisdom that holds that actively restoring a forest is better than letting it grow back by itself.The authors say previous research didn’t control for key factors, which skewed results and made it seem like natural regeneration was less effective than it actually may be.The say large-scale restoration projects, which tend to favor active restoration, should consider natural regeneration as a way to more effectively achieve their goals while saving money that could be used to scale-up forest restoration worldwide. When it comes to restoring deforested landscapes, letting them regenerate naturally through passive means is generally cheaper than human-driven, so-called “active,” restoration techniques like re-planting. But a new study finds it can actually also be more effective in tropical ecosystems.The authors say that letting tropical forests regenerate by themselves could help further large-scale restoration goals while at the same time saving money that could help scale-up forest restoration worldwide.The study, published recently in Science Advances, analyzed the findings from 133 other studies conducted across 115 landscapes to compare natural and active regeneration of tropical forests. Its results indicate natural restoration techniques were more successful than active restoration at restoring the biodiversity levels of birds, plants, and invertebrates, as well as vegetation structure.Specifically, the study found biodiversity in naturally regenerated landscapes was 34 percent to 56 percent higher and vegetation structure 19 percent to 56 percent higher than in areas that had been actively restored.“These findings suggest that lower cost approaches to restoring biodiversity and vegetation structure in tropical forests can actually be more effective than active restoration,” study lead author Renato Crouzeilles, an associate researcher at the International Institute for Sustainability, said in a statement.Letting this razed peat forest grow back by itself may be better than actively re-planting it, according to the results of the Science Advances study. But it authors caution against a one-size-fits-all approach.Crouzeilles clarified that the success of natural regeneration over active restoration only became apparent when certain factors were controlled; namely, the amount of forest, precipitation levels, time passed since restoration activities began and previous disturbance. The authors write that these need to be controlled to avoid misleading results, which they say may be to blame for the common perception that natural regeneration of tropical forests “has limited conservation value.”The study comes with caveats. One is that its analysis of biodiversity took into account species abundance and richness but not composition, which is the proportional presence of each species. The authors explain that species composition takes “orders of magnitude” more time to bounce back than abundance or richness, and can mean that biodiversity levels may not be as restored as their study purports.Crouzeilles also says he and his team did not look at the socio-economic contexts of the study areas, which could be important to restoration success. “Large-scale forest landscape restoration will therefore be reached only if cost-effective approaches are spatially identified and competition with agricultural land uses is minimized.”Still, the authors write that their findings indicate natural regeneration may be a more effective way to restore damaged tropical forests than previously assumed, and should be considered when developing future restoration projects and policies.Forest restoration is currently playing a big role in international climate agreements as governments band together to lower greenhouse gas emissions. The general reasoning behind this is that as forests recover, they will sequester carbon and mitigate climate change while at the same time providing habitat for wildlife and ecosystem services for human communities.The authors say their findings show passive regeneration could be just as or even more effective than the active techniques often employed in large-scale tropical restoration – and could potentially save money that could be directed at conserving more degraded forests.“One of the major international and national policy priorities for the upcoming years is to align the identified patterns of biophysical and ecological conditions where each or both restoration approaches are more successful, cost-effective and compatible with socio-economic incentives for enabling scaling up tropical forest restoration,” Crouzeilles said.“Clearly, both approaches are urgently needed to achieve ambitious global forest restoration targets.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Citation:Crouzeilles, R., Ferreira, M. S., Chazdon, R. L., Lindenmayer, D. B., Sansevero, J. B., Monteiro, L., … & Strassburg, B. B. (2017). Ecological restoration success is higher for natural regeneration than for active restoration in tropical forests. Science Advances, 3(11), e1701345.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Degraded Lands, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Environment, Forest Regeneration, Forests, Global Warming Mitigation, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Loss, Rainforests, Research, Restoration, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Sea Around Us: Global fisheries data and the goose that laid the golden egg (commentary)

first_imgHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?Having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals).Many of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. With the Sea Around Us data set, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The end of the 2010s will be remembered as the time when the world realized that we are in the midst of a global biodiversity crisis, as illustrated by the widespread collapse of insect populations.A similar realization occurred about two decades earlier, when it became obvious to anyone with a passing interest in the matter that fish populations were collapsing all over the world under the onslaught of out-of-control fisheries. The generality of this pattern had long been contested: fish population collapse had long been seen as isolated events, each with its own cause, usually attributed to environmental fluctuations.However, the 1980s had also seen a slowing down of the global catch increases, which, since the post-WWII period, had masked localized fisheries collapses. Later, this stagnation of global catches — occasionally if optimistically described as “stabilization” — turned into a continuous decline now known to have started following 1996, the year of peak catches.For global marine catches to decline in spite of the massive increase in the size and power of international fishing fleets implies that we are essentially everywhere past the amount of fishing that generates Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). Thus, the biomass (or abundance) of fish everywhere is well below that which can generate MSY.This is confirmed by multiple single species “stock assessments,” i.e., the estimation of time series of abundance of fish “stocks” based on their catch, ancillary information, and mathematical models representing the growth and decline of fish populations.Government subsidies and fisheries collapseHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?As in the case of the proverbial goose that laid the golden egg, this destruction was driven by short-term greed. But this alone is not a sufficient explanation. Another driver was (and still is) government subsidies. These subsidies are given to fisheries for two reasons:Because politicians can, on the short term, buy votes and/or social peace when subsidies are given to the fisheries sector (e.g., Spain, Japan, France, China); andBecause politicians and many high-ranking civil servants, many of whom are trained engineers or agronomists, appear to sincerely believe, all evidence to the contrary, that subsidies should enable fisheries to increase declining catches.The latter belief stems from a misunderstanding due to the fact that, in most economic sectors (e.g., manufacturing, agriculture), more “input” (investments, machinery, fertilizer, and other factors of production) lead to more “output.” This is not so in fisheries: Past a certain point (MSY, see above), more fishing boats reduce the catch from an exploited fish population.The solution to what seems like a riddle is that boats are not a factor of fish production — wild fish are produced by nature in functioning ecosystems. Boats are only the means by which the fish produced by nature are collected.Thus, having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals). These and other problematic issues are covered in a book I recently published through Greystone Books, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries.There is always some data to work withMany of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. However, decidedly global studies of fisheries were rare in most of the 20th century, and became common only in the 1990s.Before that, most fishery scientists were content to study and write about a single fishery for decades, detailing their ups and (mostly) downs in isolation from other fisheries. In the 1990s, contributions began to appear that demonstrated a massive impact of fisheries on their underlying ecosystem on a global basis, and these inquiries became a flood in the early 2000s.Many of these global analyses were based in part or completely on the database of “catches” (actually “landings”) supplied annually since 1950 to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, which then harmonized and disseminated them. This was, at the time, the only global database on fisheries statistics.Increased use of the FAO database, however, made its various shortcomings more visible than they had been previously. One example of this was the non-consideration of millions of tons of discarded fish. Another was the widespread omission in most countries’ contributions to the FAO database of the catches of artisanal subsistence and recreational fisheries, wrongly assumed to be negligible.Combined with the lack of geographical resolution (the FAO marine fisheries statistics are allocated to 19 giant FAO statistical areas, with, for example, the Eastern Indian Ocean reaching from Bangladesh to the Antarctic convergence), these shortcomings made it necessary to correct for the incomplete coverage of the FAO data and the coarseness of their spatial allocation. With these corrections, it would be possible to make reasonable assessments to the state of the world’s oceans.The task of implementing these corrections was undertaken by the Sea Around Us, a research project that I have led since mid-1999, which was funded for many years by the Pew Charitable Trusts (and currently by a variety of philanthropic foundations).Sea Around Us and its hundreds of collaborators throughout the world “reconstructed” the marine fisheries catch of all maritime countries of the world (including their overseas territories), an activity that took almost 15 years to complete.The initial reconstructions covered the years 1950 to 2010; this work was subsequently updated to 2014, and is currently being updated to 2016 (i.e., it remains about two years behind the FAO’s database, which produces its statistics with a lag time of about two years). On our side, the delay is due to having to verify the official landing data country by country and territory by territory, add the fish that were discarded, and allocate the complemented catch data to various fisheries sectors and gear. Also, we allocate the catch data to smaller spatial entities such as the Exclusive Economic Zone of the various countries and territories, Large Marine Ecosystems, or other geographic entities.The Sea Around Us dataset subdivides marine catch data by, for example, species, fishing gear, fishing country, and end use (direct human consumption, fish meal, etc.). This information is provided both as tonnage and in dollar terms, i.e., as weight times the dockside prices of the landed fish. These various dimensions are the reasons why this dataset is increasingly used by the scientific community and by civil society, as intended.Indeed, this wide use of the Sea Around Us dataset was the main point of emphasis at the celebration of its 20th anniversary at the University of British Columbia on June 20, 2019. With the Sea Around Us dataset, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This will not solve all fisheries problems. However, being able to provide the advice that they can be expected to give, fisheries scientists will be empowered to do their work and politicians will not be able to claim that they have no basis for making decisions to reduce fishing effort in order to rebuild fish populations. The ball will be in their court, along with multiple golden-egg-laying geese waiting to be resuscitated.Featured Image: Trawlers by John, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Dr. Daniel Pauly, who is both French and Canadian, studied fisheries science in Germany and spent much of his career in the tropics, notably in Philippines. Since 1994, he is a Professor of Fisheries at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada, where he direct the Sea Around Us project. The Sea Around Us, initially funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts, and since 2014 by a variety of philanthropic foundations, is devoted to studying, documenting and mitigating the impact of fisheries on the world’s marine ecosystems. The concepts, methods and software Daniel Pauly developed are documented in over 1000 widely-cited publications, and have led to his receiving multiple scientific awards.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Big Data, Commentary, data, Editorials, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Overexploitation, Overfishing, Researcher Perspective Series Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

[L2] Orléans veut casser le contrat de Vincent Thill

first_imgEn était-il encore besoin ? Récemment, son coach aurait lui-même appelé Philippe Gaillot, directeur sportif du FC Metz pour mettre fin au prêt de son joueur offensif. Et en Lorraine, on n’aurait pas forcément été trop sensible à l’idée. Même assez hostile et pour cause : La République du centre, quotidien local, a enquêté et découvert qu’a priori, Orléans prend en charge l’intégralité du salaire de son joueur, estimé à plus de 10 000 euros, une rareté dans ce genre de transaction. Un club de L2 aurait tout intérêt à se libérer de ce genre d’obligation pour investir ailleurs, un club de L1 n’a pas vocation à s’imposer une surcharge salariale alors qu’il pensait s’en être libéré.Tout n’est pas de sa faute, loin de làPoussé vers la sortie, avec un espoir de come-back très mince en Moselle, Vincent Thill est donc de retour au rayon des garçons placés devant l’urgence de trouver une solution alternative. On l’imagine en effet mal se farcir six mois au plus bas échelon national français. C’est ce qui lui pend au nez car il n’est clairement plus dans les petits papiers du staff, après un début de saison passable qui l’a vu progressivement épuiser son crédit par manque de statistiques (zéro but et une passe décisive), mais pas que…Il faut bien admettre que le cadet de la fratrie ne fait pas assez de différences à l’heure actuelle en club et, aux yeux de son coach, n’abat pas un travail défensif suffisant. Dans un championnat qui n’est que duel(s), c’est gênant et l’on en revient au constat évident que la Ligue 1 serait sans doute mieux taillée pour lui. Dans la configuration actuelle, c’est une utopie.Mais il va falloir inventer de quoi la faire exister parce que Didier Ollé-Nicolle a peu de chances de changer d’avis. Thill, on le lui a un peu imposé, l’été dernier. Le Luxembourgeois ne faisait pas partie de sa liste, mais le directeur sportif de l’époque, Antar Yahia, a fait le forcing pour prendre la main sur le recrutement de manière unilatérale. A grand coup de petits jeunes attrapés dans les championnats de N1, N2 et N3, il a composé un groupe sans doute prometteur mais pas adapté aux exigences du niveau. Voilà dans quoi Vincent Thill a été lâché. En sélection, coincé au chaud entre son frère, Christopher Martins et Laurent Jans, il lui est plus loisible d’être libre dans sa tête. Là, dans une équipe qui périclite, tout est plus douloureux. La situation du joueur aussi.Julien Mollereau La lanterne rouge de Ligue 2 ne compte plus sur Vincent Thill pour la fin de saison et tente de lui trouver une porte de sortie.Ça ressemblait pourtant à un bon plan. Vincent Thill élu meilleur espoir du championnat de National avec Pau, qui filait à Orléans, l’un des clubs de Ligue 2 les plus joueurs de la dernière saison, c’était du cousu main, l’assurance que deux idées du jeu allaient se retrouver. Et puis ? Et puis rien. Tout a tourné de travers. Pour le club et pour le joueur, dont la dernière titularisation remonte au 1er novembre à Caen. Didier Ollé-Nicolle, son coach, l’a officieusement renié en l’envoyant se changer les idées en réserve, en National 3, pour un match très local le 14 décembre face à Montargis, perdu 0-2 sans que l’international parvienne à y briller.Absent du match amical contre Auxerre ce week-end pour un problème viral, Vincent Thill ne devrait pas non plus être de la rencontre cruciale contre Chambly, pour la reprise du championnat de Ligue 2 vendredi. Et pour cause : Orléans cherche à s’en séparer. Il devrait, dans un premier temps, recruter rien moins que deux joueurs capables d’évoluer dans son couloir, un message assez clair. Partagerlast_img read more

Les matches de BGL Ligue bientôt en streaming ?

first_img Partager Interrogée sur la faisabilité de ce projet un peu fou à l’échelle du pays, l’une des chevilles ouvrières de la Ligue, le président de l’US Rumelange Gérard Jeitz, ne s’est pas cachée derrière son petit doigt : oui, c’est ambitieux, mais finalement… pas tant que ça. «Faire du streaming de la sorte, cela se fait déjà un peu partout dans les autres pays. Des sociétés sont déjà venues nous faire une présentation de ce qu’elles pouvaient proposer.» Des dossiers de candidature, la LFL en compte trois sur son bureau, tous issus de pays différents. Qu’en dit RTL ? «Peut-être est-il lui aussi un prestataire intéressant», glisse malicieusement Gérard Jeitz. On en est donc quand même plutôt à l’heure de la finalisation et, très concrètement, les têtes pensantes du projet aimeraient s’offrir une petite phase test d’ici à la fin du championnat afin de s’assurer que le système pourrait être opérationnel dès la reprise du prochain exercice, en août prochain.Un levier marketingLes amoureux du football grand-ducal branchés sur leurs tablettes ou smartphones les dimanches après-midi pour suivre un Mondorf – Hostert ou un RFCU – Mühlenbach ? L’idée est cocasse et la LFL est certaine, apparemment, que cela ne lui coûtera pas de public.Elle ne serait même pas effarouchée à l’idée de la proposer, aussi, à la Promotion d’honneur même si le système encore plus poussé de montées-descentes risque de lui poser quelques soucis d’équipement et de mise à niveau des infrastructures. «Tout dépend des coûts», relativise Gérard Jeitz, qui refuse de se laisser entraîner sur le terrain des budgétisations pour le moment (il est évident que la somme qu’aimerait mettre chaque club sur la table varie énormément). Pas plus que sur celui des montages auxquels il faudrait aboutir car une caméra par stade, c’est bien beau mais qui en serait le propriétaire ?En tout cas, pour défendre son bout de gras, la Ligue ne se limite pas à l’intérêt pour le seul public. L’intérêt principal est peut-être même ailleurs et à chercher dans ce qui ressemble à un magnifique outil de travail pour les clubs, férus de scouting depuis quelques années déjà et qui dépensent une énergie folle en renseignements pour savoir ce que mijotent les adversaires. Ainsi, les clubs cherchent-ils également chez les prestataires le moyen de faire de ces caméras un véritable instrument de mesure pour leurs staffs, à des fins de statistiques et d’analyses, pourquoi pas même pour des séances d’entraînement.En sous-main, les plus enthousiastes imaginent déjà pouvoir faire de cette nouvelle structuration de diffusion un levier marketing a minima. C’est peut-être naïf à l’heure actuelle mais l’idée de pouvoir suivre toutes les rencontres d’une même journée de championnat sur une seule et même plateforme l’était tout autant il y a encore quelques mois. Or on n’en est plus si loin et cela pourrait changer, un peu, le rapport au football dans ce pays.Julien Mollereau La LFL travaille actuellement activement à l’installation d’un système permettant de voir tous les matches de DN en streaming dès la saison prochaine. Chiche ?Cela fait une paire d’années que, de loin en loin, sous l’influence notamment de l’ancien président de la LFL Romain Schumacher, certains clubs de Division nationale s’agacent tout haut ou «off the record» de ce que RTL et la FLF s’arrogent le droit de diffuser tout ou partie de leurs rencontres sans la moindre contrepartie. La réponse concrète est en train de prendre une forme inattendue : la Ligue de football luxembourgeoise travaille en toute discrétion, depuis quelques mois, à l’une de ses innovations les plus ambitieuses, à savoir équiper tous les stades de DN (voire de PH, la discussion est ouverte) en caméras fixes permettant la diffusion en streaming de l’intégralité des matches de BGL Ligue.Le 8 mars, l’émission Goal, petit tour d’horizon du week-end de ballon rond au pays, fêtera ses dix ans d’existence. Et à l’heure actuelle, c’est un match par journée de championnat de BGL Ligue qui est diffusé live sur le site de RTL, quelques autres, piochés au hasard, se retrouvant saucissonnés dans les résumés de la chaîne. L’ambition de la LFL : fournir l’intégralité de la programmation en direct. Fin janvier, début février au plus tard, l’on pourrait en savoir plus puisqu’une grande réunion visant à informer les clubs de l’avancement des travaux préparatoires doit se tenir. Il y sera question de tâter le terrain afin de savoir ce que chacun est prêt à investir dans cette opération qui amènera chaque club de l’élite à «posséder» sa propre caméra fixe.last_img read more

[Cyclo-cross] Des championnats nationaux boueux à souhait

first_img Partager C’était attendu mais c’est devenu une certitude, les championnats nationaux de cyclo-cross qui vont se dérouler à Mersch ce samedi à partir de midi (la course élites/espoirs est programmée à 15h15), se disputera dans des conditions très difficiles. «On va devoir courir à pied sur la moitié du parcours tracé dans les prairies», prévient ainsi Sören Nissen, champion  national à Kayl en 2018 sur un terrain similaire.Mais cette fois, le vététiste est juste un outsider par rapport au trio constitué par le tenant du titre, Vincent Dias dos Santos,  Lex Reichling et Scott Thiltges. Toujours est-il que les différentes reconnaissances, cumulées avec les différentes précipitations des derniers jours ont  eu l’effet escompté. La boue s’est progressivement invitée sur le tracé.Les différentes reconnaissances ont labouré le circuit.En conséquence de quoi, c’est un parcours très physique qui attend les concurrents ce samedi. «Ce sera un chantier», a prévenu justement Vincent Dias dos Santos. Tous les coureurs sont bien prévenus, il faudra avoir le coeur accroché et le bon équipement pour se sortir du bourbier annoncé. On appelle ça les joies du cyclo-cross!D. B.last_img read more

Batang Gilas escapes Japan, qualifies for Fiba U17 World Cup

first_imgMLB serves up a frosty start to new season, more snow coming Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Recaredo Christian Calimag. Photo from Fiba.comBatang Gilas booked a spot in the Fiba U17 Basketball World Cup 2018 after surviving Japan, 72-70, in the quarterfinals of the Fiba Asia U-16 championships on Friday in Foshan, China.Top four teams in the Asian qualifiers advance to the World Cup slated in June in Argentina with the Filipinos grabbing one of the semifinals seats along with New Zealand, Australia and the winner of the China-Lebanon duel.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Kai Sotto was in full display for the Philippines, putting up a 20-20 performance of 21 points and 28 rebounds while swatting away three shots.Calimag added 15 points to the Filipinos’ cause.Tanaka finished with 17 points, on 4-of-8 shooting from deep to lead Japan while Keisei Tominaga and Keijiro Mitani added 12 points apiece.ADVERTISEMENT Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback MOST READ Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil LATEST STORIES Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters View comments Recaredo Christian Calimag bailed Batang Gilas out after their fourth-quarter collapse and scored the game-winner with 2.3 seconds left.Calimag got the ball from top of the key, drove to the lane and nailed the tough shot over the outstretched hands of two Japanese defenders.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownChikara Tanaka, who scored 11 straight points for Japan in the last 3:24 and gave the Filipinos a scare, then missed the a baseline fadeaway that could’ve sent the game into overtime with a second left.The Filipinos flirted with disaster, losing a 69-59 lead with 3:33 left as Tanaka lit up for Japan and tied the game at 70 with a triple.last_img read more

Arsenal team to play Crystal Palace: changes to starting XI that lost to West Ham

first_img 11 11. Mesut Ozil (right side attack) 33. Petr Cech (goalkeeper) 11 Stream Crystal Palace v Arsenal live on talkSPORT.com, on Sunday August 16, kick off 1.30pm BSTArsenal were stunned by West Ham in their first game of the 2015/16 Premier League season, losing 2-0 at the Emirates Stadium, but they have the chance to bounce back against Palace today.The Gunners travel to south London desperate to make amends and ensure they don’t fall too far behind the leading pack at this early stage of the season.While the loss seven days ago was deeply disappointing, it was only one game and Arsene Wenger is unlikely to make sweeping changes to hs starting XI for the Palace match,But who will get the nod at Selhurst? Take a look at our possible XI in the slideshow above, listed in squad number order, and let us know the team you would pick by leaving a comment below. 12. Olivier Giroud (striker) 11 11 11 16. Aaron Ramsey (midfield) 18. Nacho Monreal (left back) 11 11 11 11 4. Per Mertesacker (centre back) – take a look at the full line up, in squad number order, by clicking the arrow above! And let us know what you think of our predicted team by leaving a comment below 11 19. Santi Cazorla (midfield) 24. Hector Bellerin (right back) 11 6. Laurent Koscielny (centre back) 17. Alexis Sanchez (left side attack) 34. Francis Coquelin (holding midfield)last_img read more

CON BARES ALL TO WALK THE WALK FOR CHARITY!

first_imgWell-known Newtowncunningham man Con Holmes is going walkies again in his bare feet!This time Con is walking 11 kms from Letterkenny to Newtown on Friday, June 22nd at 5pm. Again Con is doing this in aid of NCDI & The Breast Unit at Letterkenny Hospital.Sponsor cards are availble from Kathleen at the NCDI office 074 91 56898 or by phoning Betty at 087 2905 946. If not there will be a bucket collection on the day.Con is partly raising funds for the Breast Unit in recognition of the work of the unit, Donegal Action Against Cancer and also the fact that we have four daughters and at present four grand-daughters.This walk is a great opportunity for folk to come along join in for a wee bit of the walk, do the whole thing or do what suits you on the day. People are invited to the walk you can keep your shoes on, off or whatever suits you.There will also be a wee cuppa tea & a piece at Coyle’s Bar & Restaurant in Newtowncunningham when Con arrives back there. CON BARES ALL TO WALK THE WALK FOR CHARITY! was last modified: June 2nd, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:bare-feetcancerCon Holmeslast_img read more