Scientists sequence plant DNA in the field to identify species within hours

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists can now rapidly read the genetic code of an organism, even a plant, in the field.A portable real-time DNA sequencer speeds the process of reading the genome—an organism’s complete set of DNA—with minimal equipment, enabling scientists to identify and distinguish between closely related plant species, in the field.Rapid species identification of plant and animal tissue samples could greatly assist trade inspections, biodiversity studies, invasive species detection, and field research. Scientists can now rapidly read the DNA of an organism—even a plant—anywhere.Researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, have recently reported on their use of a handheld real-time DNA sequencing device that allowed them to identify the various species of an entire field of plants far faster than could be done using previous methods.This was the first time genomic sequencing of plants has been performed in the field. They highlight the new opportunities that real-time nanopore sequencing (RTnS) offers for plant research and conservation.DNA sequencing equipment in the field lab in Snowdownia National Park in Wales, U.K.. Photo credit Royal Botanical Gardens, KewSpeeding the process of species identificationIdentifying similar-looking plants has traditionally been difficult and time-consuming, requiring plant samples to be collected in the field, transported to a lab, and analyzed with large, expensive equipment, a process that took weeks or months. The lengthy process limits how fast decisions can be made regarding species newly found in forest corridors or found in international shipments of plant or animal products.Students work to identify as many plant species as possible during a plant inventory. Photo credit: U.S. National Park ServiceReading the genetic code of a plant or an animal is regarded to be the most reliable way to identify its species. New DNA analysis technology has decreased the time and cost of identifying the species of a given organism. Technology to sequence DNA, which is used to determine the order of four base nucleotides—adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine—in a strand of DNA, has improved dramatically over the past decade. This order, or sequence, of these building blocks of an organism’s DNA is unique to each organism, so knowing the order of the DNA of a sample allows scientists to identify its species.DNA barcoding—the collection, extraction, sequencing, and translation of a species’ DNA into a unique digital barcode—is increasingly being used to identify species, assess composition of natural communities, and combat poaching and illegal wildlife trade. Research teams are testing applications of DNA barcoding for identifying closely related animal species, such as sharks and rays, as trade in some, but not all, species is illegal. Efforts are also ongoing to apply the technology to plant products that have been processed, such as timber.DNA barcodes for four species. The barcodes for the two butterflies are not identical but more similar to each other than to the birds. Image credit: Sitfu.com, CC-3.0The advantage of barcoding is its ability to read short strands of DNA, which is often what are  available to scientists analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) from soil, water, or fecal samples. To compare species, the technology requires a recoverable segment of DNA that can serve as an identification marker across species. Scientists have identified the Cytochrome C Oxidase 1 or CO1 gene region of DNA as universally usable for animal species. However, the C01 gene region evolves too slowly in plants, so scientists are still searching for the single best gene region for plants. This has limited species identification of plants in the field.Improving the precision of species identificationReal-time nanopore sequencing (RTnS)—a relatively new DNA sequencing method—may enable rapid species identification at a relatively low cost and with minimal equipment. Nanopore sequencers add to the utility of barcoding because they can read longer strands of DNA with less preparation, such as PCR amplification or chemical labeling, of each sample.Laptops process genetic data in the tent that served as a portable field lab. Photo credit: Royal Botanical Gardens, KewStreamlining preparation makes the technology potentially cheaper, faster, and smaller than other DNA sequencers and, thus, useful for monitoring disease outbreaks, environmental changing, food safety, and antibiotic resistance. It also facilitates the sequencing of whole human, animal, and plant genomes.The capacity to read longer DNA strands gives the nanopore sequencer more genetic information to work with, which enables it to more precisely distinguish samples and thus more accurately identify their species.The Kew scientists used the MinION, a portable RTnS DNA sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies, to analyze plant species in the U.K.’s Snowdonia National Park. This was the first time genomic sequencing of plants has been performed in the field.Researcher Alex Papadopolous working with test tubes in the portable plant DNA analysis lab. Photo credit: Royal Botanical Gardens, KewThe MinION runs off a USB cable attached to a laptop and is small enough to be portable for fieldwork. A tiny sample of blood, feces, plant tissue, or other sample is mixed with reagents and placed into the handheld device. It generates data about the sample’s DNA within minutes, which is a big advantage for investigating wildlife crimes and identifying the species of traded wildlife and plant products.MinION has been used in field surveys to sequence animal DNA to identify species, but plant species identification through DNA has been more difficult.“Identifying species correctly based on what they look like can be really tricky and needs expertise to be done well,” said Alexander Papadopulos, Kew scientist and co-author on the paper. “This is especially true for plants when they aren’t in flower or when they have been processed into a product.”The research team achieved its aim of identifying and distinguishing between two closely-related, similar-looking plant species of the genus Arabidopsis—Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata—in a single day of collecting and sequencing samples entirely in the field.Arabidopsis lyrata flowering in the field. Snowdownia National Park, U.K.. Photo credit: Royal Botanical Gardens, KewAdding flexibility to species identificationThe new RTnS technology allowed the team to sequence random parts of the plants’ genomes, which avoids the time-consuming process of targeting specific regions of DNA, the more traditional approach for identifying species with DNA.“Our experiments show that by sequencing random pieces of the genome in the field, it’s possible to get very accurate species identification within a few hours of collecting a specimen,” said Papadopulos in a media release. “More traditional methods need a lot of lab equipment and have often only provided enough information to identify a sample to the genus level.”The researchers compared their field-generated DNA sequences to a freely available database of reference genome sequences, created using traditional methods, to make their identification. Once confirmed, the field-sequenced data can then themselves be used as reference samples for DNA sequences to help future identifications of those species in the field.Another Arabidopsis in flower. Photo credit: Alex PapadopolousIn their paper, the authors state, “Our analyses demonstrate that correctly identifying unknown reads from matches to a reference database with RTnS reads enables rapid and confident species identification.”Lead author of the paper Joe Parker said in a media release, “This research proves that we can now rapidly read the DNA sequence of an organism to identify it with minimum equipment. Rapidly reading DNA anywhere, at will, should become a routine step in many research fields. Despite hundreds of years of taxonomic research, it is still not always easy to work out which species a plant belongs to just by looking at it. Few people could correctly identify all the species in their own gardens.”ReferenceParker, J., Helmstetter, A. J., Devey, D., Wilkinson, T., & Papadopulos, A. S. (2017). Field-based species identification of closely-related plants using real-time nanopore sequencing. Scientific reports, 7(1), 8345. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08461-5center_img DNA, Genetics, Plants, Research, Species, Technology, Wildtech last_img read more

China, EU are importing soybeans from unregistered Brazil farms: report

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Soy, China’s Demand For Resources, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Karla Mendes Considered one of the main drivers of deforestation in the country, soybean is Brazil’s main commodity, with exports valued at more than $33 billion in 2018.Padding this figure, however, are soybean crops grown on unregistered farms skirting environmental regulations.Twelve percent of soybean farms in the Amazon rainforest and Cerrado savanna lack land registration, but two-thirds of crops from the municipalities with the most blind spots are exported, mostly to China (39 percent) and Europe (12 percent), with 33 percent going to the domestic market.U.S. commodities traders ADM, Bunge and Cargill are the biggest exporters of crops from these areas, along with Brazil’s Amaggi, the world’s biggest private soybean producer. More than 2.6 million hectares (6.4 million acres) of soybean plantations — an area almost the size of Belgium — are cultivated on unregistered lands in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado biomes and exported to China and the European Union, according to a report released today by supply chain transparency initiative Trase in partnership with the NGO Imaflora. Mongabay had access to the report ahead of its release.Considered one of the main drivers of deforestation in the country, soybean is Brazil’s top commodity, with exports valued at more than $33 billion in 2018. But behind this figure are soybean plantations operating on unregistered lands and likely dodging environmental regulations, contributing researcher and agricultural engineer at Imaflora Luis Fernando Guedes Pinto says.In the Amazon rainforest and in the Cerrado savanna, 12 percent of soybean farms still lack land registration. Yet two-thirds of crops from the municipalities with the highest concentration of these blind spots of Brazilian agriculture are exported, mostly to China and Europe, the study shows, exposing importing countries to a high risk of buying irregular soy.“We found that 88 percent of the soy plantations in the Amazon and Cerrado are registered, but 2.6 million hectares [the equivalent to 12 percent] still aren’t,” André Vasconcelos, a researcher at Trase and Global Canopy who contributed to the report, told Mongabay. “That was a huge surprise, especially to see that 67 percent is being exported,” he added.The findings come amid a huge environmental crisis in Brazil, including escalating deforestation and August’s Amazon fires that triggered an international outcry, as President Jair Bolsonaro makes good on his promises to weaken environmental protections since taking office in January 2019.Soybeans plantation in Sorriso, a municipality in Mato Grosso state. Sorriso is Brazil’s largest producer of soybeans and calls itself the Brazilian capital of agribusiness. Photo by Thaís Borges, November 2016Brazil’s Environmental Rural Registry, known by its acronym CAR, gives landowners access to credit and land titles, but also holds them responsible for conservation on parts of their properties. Implemented in 2012, the measure requires all rural properties to georeference and declare their land as a primary requirement to comply with the country’s Forest Code.At the time, it was a breakthrough in Brazilian transparency and accountability, to be fulfilled by all landowners by 2015. But the deadline came and went amid multiple delays, and a measure finally approved this year simply dropped any specific target date for registration.Soybeans and deforestationOf the unregistered soybean production in Brazil, China imports 39 percent, the EU 12 percent, and 33 percent goes to the domestic market largely as feed for livestock, the study found. “We calculate the proportion that is exported from each municipality, and apply this to the percentage of unregistered areas there,” Vasconcelos said. “The exporters don’t know whether they are buying soy from registered or unregistered farms.”U.S. food processor and commodities trader ADM and China’s COFCO are at a high risk for exporting soybeans to China  from unregistered farmlands; Bunge and Cargill, two other U.S. commodities traders, and Brazil’s Amaggi, the world’s biggest private soybean producer, are the main exporters of high-risk soybeans to Europe.In a statement, Amaggi said that 95% of its suppliers are registered with CAR, adding that it has a georeferencing system in place for evaluation and monitoring of its suppliers. Bunge, Cargill, ADM, and COFCO declined to comment, deferring to the Brazilian Association of Vegetable Oil Industries (Abiove).Abiove challenged the report, claiming that data of soybean plantations not registered with CAR is overestimated  and that the percentages of unregistered areas in the report are questionable. “The most recent CAR data show that by the end of August 2019 there were 498 million hectares registered in the SICAR base. This means a void of only 4 million hectares… not 180 million hectares,” Abiove said in a statement.In addition, Abiove said that soy-driven deforestation represents just 1.4 percent in the Amazon and 7 percent in the Cerrado biome, citing an agro satellite study and INPE data.Soybeans field with one Brazil nut tree standing in the Amazonian state of Rondônia. Image by Shanna Hanbury.By overlaying their research with satellite data on deforestation from the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE), the report’s authors also found a strong correlation between the number of unregistered soybean farms and deforestation. “[N]early all the recent deforestation linked to soy expansion has been in the Cerrado and Amazon biomes,” the report notes.With Bolsonaro’s visit to China last week in search of stronger commercial relations, and a free-trade deal between the EU and Mercosur, the South American trade bloc, in the works, the study’s authors have called for the Environmental Rural Registry to be included as a basic requirement for international trade deals in order to curb illegal deforestation. “China is the largest importer of forest-risk commodities and they have the power to implement measures for more conformity in Brazil,” Vasconcelos said. “We see this as a huge opportunity for increased transparency in Brazilian agriculture.”But for Fabio Feldmann, a prominent conservationist responsible for much of the environmental legislation in the Brazilian constitution of 1988, domestic pressure is just as important. “One-third is for domestic use. Who is buying this? We need more pressure from Brazilian society as well,” he said. This is also important on a political level, he added, so that pressure for conservation isn’t labeled a trade conspiracy against Brazilian agribusiness.On Oct. 17, Bolsonaro signed a bill into law removing the registration deadline and penalties for noncompliance. His decision comes amid a series of measures that loosen environmental protections, including expanding permission for mining in the Amazon, paving roads that cut through pristine jungle, and approving hundreds of pesticides.The bill’s rapporteur, Senator Irajá Abreu, defended the measure, saying that many parts of rural Brazil lack a strong government presence and thus farmers have no other option but to shirk their obligation to register.But although land regularization can be difficult for small landowners without resources, soybean is a commodity that only makes sense on a large scale of production, according to Pinto. “For soy, it’s a simple requirement because these are big farmers. We know that small farmers often don’t have access to georeferencing and the internet, which is a barrier. But for soy, with big farmers, it’s the first step,” he said.Pinto warns that without a farm registration deadline, the Forest Code is no longer binding for unregistered farms. “If there is no deadline, then there is no pressure,” he said. “These farms aren’t illegal even though they are outside of the law.” He compared it to driving a car without a license plate and not having to follow any rules.The report shows that soybean farms are concentrated in a handful of municipalities in a few specific regions of Brazil, which should make registration easier. In just one municipality, Formosa do Rio Preto in Bahia state, more than 70,000 hectares (173,000 acres) of unregistered soybean farms and more than 260,000 hectares (640,000 acres) of deforestation were identified.In a statement in reply to a Mongabay request for comment, Formosa municipal officials said they “have not encountered any large soy or other plantations without the Environmental Rural Registry,” adding that the local administration was working toward sustainable growth and had participated in several state-level environmental registration campaigns for smallholders.According to Feldman, the Cerrado has been used as a trade-off for the Amazon by agribusiness. “Today, the Cerrado may be the most threatened biome,” he said. “But there’s a negotiation with agribusiness: We’ll preserve the Amazon but use the Cerrado.”Update (October 31, 2019): This article was updated to include a link to the report and statements from the traders and Abiove.Banner image caption: With exports amounting to $33 billion in 2018, soybeans is Brazil’s main commodity but is also considered one of the main drivers of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon and Cerrado biomes.  Image by David E. Mead in the Public Domain.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

US Open : Minella hérite de la 13e mondiale d’entrée de jeu

first_img Partager Versée dans le premier quart du tableau, où on retrouve la n°1 mondiale, la Japonaise Naomi Osaka, Mandy Minella a hérité au 1er tour de l’US Open (26 août- 8 septembre) de la Suissesse Belinda Bencic, la 13e joueuse mondiale et tête de série n°13 sur les courts de Flushing Meadows.Dans le clan de la joueuse eschoise, on faisait un peu grise mine. «Ce n’est pas ce qu’on peut appeler un bon tirage», glisse Tim Sommer, le mari et entraîneur de la n°1 luxembourgeoise. «Bencic a montré de belles choses cette saison. Et puis, c’est une joueuse qui a tendance à prendre la balle très tôt, frappe très fort et vous laisse très peu de temps. Bref, typiquement le genre de jeu que Mandy n’aime pas affronter… On aurait préféré une autre adversaire, mais on va tout faire pour quand même saisir cette opportunité.»La Suissesse a remporté les deux confrontations entre les deux joueuses, la dernière à Stuttgart cette saison sur terre battue. La semaine dernière, à Cincinnati, elle avait abandonné, en pleurs, lors de son 1er tour face à Azarenka. Touchée apparemment au pied. Mais depuis, elle a apparemment déjà participé à un match exhibition…Julien Carettelast_img read more

[Mondiaux] Les cyclistes luxembourgeois peuvent s’illustrer

first_imgKevin GenietsL’expérience des récents championnats d’Europe est intéressante. Le coureur luxembourgeois de l’équipe Groupalma-FDJ avait pris le 7e rang du chrono. Un bon résultat, assurément. Cela montre aussi que même si on se défend plus qu’honorablement en World Tour, le podium espoirs de tels championnats reste difficile à accrocher.Cette fois, dans le Yorkshire, Kevin Geniets double chrono et course en ligne. Ses sorties sur les classiques canadiennes, où il prit sa place dans le top 50 mondial font de ce garçon de 22 ans, un candidat naturel au podium. Rien de plus logique.Christine MajerusLogiquement, elle a délaissé le chrono. Elle se concentre donc sur la course en ligne, prévue samedi. Comme en ce qui concerne, Bob Jungels, on est enclin à penser que Christine Majerus, peut très bien devenir championne du monde. Elle a les armes pour et l’infériorité numérique du Luxembourg pourrait très bien être un atout car d’un point de vue tactique, elle ne sera obligée en rien sur le plan tactique.Elle est en grande forme et possède désormais beaucoup d’expérience. Il s’agira de ses huitièmes Mondiaux. On retiendra sa 6e place en 2017 à Bergen et ses deux 15e places en 2015 et 2016.Denis Bastien Le programmeCe lundi :Contre-la-montre juniors filles, circuit à Harrogate, 14 km (12 h 10 – 13 h 45)Contre-la-montre juniors garçons, circuit à Harrogate, 28 km (15 h 10 – 18 h 40)mardi :Contre-la-montre espoirs messieurs, Ripon – Harrogate, 32,5 km (12 h 10 – 14 h 30)Contre-la-montre élites dames, Ripon – Harrogate, 32,5 km (16 h 40 – 18 h 50)Mercredi :Contre-la-montre élite messieurs, Northallerton – Harrogate, 54 km (13 h 10 – 17 h 50)Jeudi :Course en ligne juniors garçons, Richmond – Harrogate, 147 km (14 h 10 – 17 h 45)Vendredi :Course en ligne juniors filles, Doncaster – Harrogate, 92 km (10 h 40 – 13 h 20)Course en ligne espoirs messieurs, Doncaster – Harrogate, 193 km (14 h 10 – 21 h 05)Samedi :Course en ligne élite dames, Bradford – Harrogate, 150 km (13 h 40 – 18 h)Dimanche :Course en ligne élite messieurs, Leeds – Harrogate, 285 km (10 h 40 – 17 h 40) Partagercenter_img Les championnats du monde qui se sont ouverts dimanche avec le relais mixte auquel le Luxembourg n’a pas participé pour d’évidentes difficultés à rassembler l’effectif requis, le pays n’ayant manifestement pas les ressources d’une grande nation, peuvent néanmoins valoir d’ici la fin de semaine de belles satisfactions avec trois têtes d’affiche.Bob JungelsIl vient de fêter ses 27 ans et il ferait assurément un très beau champion du monde. Et s’il n’a jamais été jusqu’alors véritablement dans le coup dans le final d’un championnat du monde élite (en quatre participations, il n’a terminé qu’une fois, 71e, à Bergen, abandonnant à trois reprises, que ce soit à Innsbruck, Doha ou à Lucca, contrairement au chrono (il a terminé 10e en 2016 et 11e en 2017), on pressent que cette fois-ci, il piaffe d’impatience.Son sens de l’attaque et de l’anticipation, sa puissance de rouleur et sa capacité à passer les bosses feront vraisemblablement du coureur luxembourgeois un des acteurs du Mondial dimanche.Il trouvera forcément à qui parler, inutile de rappeler toutes les têtes d’affiche, innombrables têtes d’affiche mais selon les différents scénarios, un Bob Jungels dans un grand jour se retrouvera sur le front de l’attaque. Auparavant, il va roder sa machine mercredi dans le chrono.last_img read more

Football : Virton et ses Luxembourgeois ont raté la dernière marche

first_img“On a manqué d’un peu de chance” Dino Toppmöller (entraîneur de Dudelange) : “Louvain termine en tête du classement et nous a battus deux fois sur cette première moitié de saison. On se doit donc de dire que la qualification de cette équipe  pour la finale est méritée. Il faut l’accepter. Après, concernant le match, cela s’est joué sur des détails comme on dit. On a très bien commencé durant un quart d’heure et puis, un de mes joueurs (NDLR: l’arrière gauche Sylla) a raté un contrôle et notre adversaire en a profité pour marquer. Derrière, jusqu’à la pause, cela n’a pas été le meilleur Virton. A la pause, on a tout faire pour mobiliser les dernières forces des joueurs. Et tout le monde a tout donné sur la deuxième mi-temps, mes joueurs comme les supporters. On a sans doute manqué un peu de chance pour inscrire en fin de match ce petit but. Il y a des jours comme ça, il faut pouvoir l’accepter.” Partager Avec un onze de base comportant pas moins de 8 joueurs passés par le Luxembourg (Moris, Jordanov, Malget, Prempeh, Stelvio, Turpel, Couturier et Soumare), Virton a raté sa “finale” vendredi soir en D1B belge. La D1A s’est, à nouveau, éloignée.La donne était connue bien avant le coup d’envoi dans ce match au sommet de la dernière journée de la première partie du championnat en D1B belge : s’il y avait un vainqueur dans ce duel entre les deux premiers, Virton et Louvain, celui-ci était qualifié directement pour la finale du championnat (qui opposera, en mars prochain, les vainqueurs des deux parties de la compétition). Et à ce petit jeu, les Virtonais de Dino Toppmöller ont donc perdu. Tandis que Louvain a, lui, effectué un petit pas dans la direction d’un retour en D1A.Ce match s’est joué sur un petit but, tombé à la 19e. Une phase marquée par une grosse erreur individuelle de Salimo Sylla, l’arrière gauche virtonais. Ce dernier appréciait mal un ballon, laissant Mercier partir seul dans son dos. Il ne le revoyait jamais, celui qui avait élu meilleur joueur du championnat de D1B voici deux saisons servant parfaitement devant le but Henry qui poussait la balle au fond des filets. Le Louvaniste, meilleur buteur de la série, inscrivant ainsi son huitième cette saison.center_img La première montée au jeu de JoachimUn but qui a cassé un peu les jambes de Virtonais qui avaient pourtant bien commencé cette partie, combinant plutôt bien.  Si sur le plan technique on n’a pas vraiment assisté au match au sommet qu’on pouvait espérer, sur le plan de l’engagement, de l’intensité, de l’émotion, du suspense et du stress, cela a tenu toutes ses promesses. Ce fut même d’une excitation rare, supérieure même peut-être au Dudelange – FC Séville de jeudi dernier en Europa League. L’enjeu, la passion d’une enceinte comble et … un stade sans piste d’athlétisme y étaient forcément pour quelque chose. Et l’interruption de cinq minutes de la rencontre à la 55e, un juge de ligne ayant apparemment pris quelque chose sur la tête, et les coups de sifflet pas toujours faciles à suivre de l’arbitre n’ont fait que  rajouter un peu plus de dramaturgie à l’ensemble.Au final, c’est peut-être bien tout ça qu’on retiendra essentiellement de cette partie, au même titre que deux arrêts de classe mondiale d’Anthony Moris et que (surtout) la première montée au jeu cette saison d’un Aurélien Joachim qui est sorti du banc à la 73e. Parce que sur le terrain, malgré une bonne volonté évidente, quelques jolis mouvements et une bonne deuxième période où ils ont poussé, les joueurs de Dino Toppmöller n’ont pas assez souvent mis en danger leur adversaire.Désormais, l’entraîneur gaumais et ses joueurs savent ce qu’il leur reste à faire s’ils veulent évoluer en D1A l’an prochain et retrouver cette équipe louvaniste en finale, il faudra remporter une deuxième partie du championnat qui débute dés le week-end prochain par un déplacement (pas simple) à l’Union Saint-Gilloise.Julien Carettelast_img read more

[Cyclo-cross] Lex Reichling, l’émotion à fleur de peau

first_img Partager A 27 ans, le coureur de Preizerdaul a croqué dans son premier titre national en cyclo-cross ce samedi à Mersch. Il s’est imposé devant Scott Thiltges et Vincent Dias dos Santos.  Loïc Bettendorff, troisième au scratch, est sacré premier espoir.Il est 16h15 et dans l’aire d’arrivée de ces championnats nationaux, toute la famille Reichling a les yeux rougis par l’émotion. On voit Liz la maman. Addy, le papa accouru depuis le poste matériel. Et Lynn, la fiancée qui se jette dans les bras du nouveau champion. Lex Reichling ne sait pas où donner de la tête. Il s’est jeté à terre, pour reprendre de l’air. Boire un coca qui dégouline sur son visage ravagé par la boue.  Dan Kersch, le ministre des sports ne rate rien de la scène d’où l’émotion déborde, comme toute cette eau qui avait raviné de la prairie. Le nouveau champion ne tient pas longtemps en l’état. Il pleure désormais à chaudes larmes et se confond en remerciements au fur et à mesure que le ballet des félicitations se déroule sur un rythme effréné. C’est le rituel d’un championnat. D’un titre. Surtout lorsque c’est le premier. Autant faire durer le plaisir. Lex Reichling et sa fiancé, Lynn, ont partagé leur émotion.« Je suis content, je l’ai fait, j’ai tellement attendu ce moment », balbutie l’instituteur diekirchois d’une faible voix. Comme si à mesure qu’il avait vidé la batterie de son grand corps, le volume son avait baissé pour presque disparaître.Pour remporter du haut de ses 27 ans ce titre de champion qui le fuyait depuis toujours même depuis ses début à l’âge de dix ans après un premier essai dans le football, Lex Reichling qui avait à lui tout seul rassemblé une bonne centaine de spectateurs nichée au sein de l’épais public qui avait pris possession du circuit merschois, un superbe terrain de jeu, pour qui aime le cross pur et dur, n’a pas fait dans la dentelle. « J’ai vu dès la  reconnaissance que ce serait difficile. Moi, avec mes grandes jambes, je suis avantagé dans les nombreuses parties de courses à pied », confessera ce grand garçon culminant à 1, 93 mètres.Il s’en va après 25 minutes de courseSi pendant 25 minutes, l’excellent Scott Thiltges parvenait à tenir sa roue, le champion national version 2017 allait finir par céder, fracassé par ce jeu de massacre, alors que Loïc Bettendorff, malgré un rapproché impressionnant après deux tours de circuit, se concentrait sur son titre espoirs. Le grand Lex prenait le large et rien ni personne ne pouvait inverser le cours des choses. «Au début, je me retournais, oui j’étais un peu nerveux de voir que Scott restait dans ma roue et que je ne parvenais pas à le décrocher mais j’imaginais que le temps oeuvrait pour moi. J’ai tellement attendu ce moment», confessera le nouveau champion.Un peu avant la demi-heure de course, Lex Reichling entamait sa marche triomphale à grandes enjambées et à petite foulée, puisque oui, il fallait courir sur ce circuit transformé en bourbier, un beau chantier comme l’avait suggéré le tenant du titre Vincent Dias Dos Santos qui s’est incliné, certes rapidement, mais ne s’est pas couché, allant chercher au courage la médaille de bronze. Gusty Bausch, toujours renaissant au championnat tenait le quatrième rang. Sacré Gusty !Le sacre de Lex Reichling n’a souffert d’aucune discussion. «Je vais pouvoir bien fêter ça», promettait l’intéressé qui avait rappelé longuement ces derniers temps qu’il s’était infligé une sacrée diète pour faire le métier.   «Le plus fort l’a emporté, il n’y a rien à dire»,  soulignait pour sa part Scott Thiltges avec la même l’élégance que Vincent Dias dos Santos.Bettendorff sacré chez les espoirsChez les espoirs, le titre est donc revenu à Loïc Bettendorff. Le coureur de Leopard marchait fort. Pardon courait fort. « Je savais qu’avec ce parcours boueux, glissait-il, j’aurais un avantage. Mais bon, je n’ai fait que trois cross cet hiver. Mais je prends ce titre avec bonheur quand même… » Comprenez entre les lignes qu’il était un peu peiné de priver Raphaël Kockelmann d’un titre qui aurait été mérité au vu de sa saison. Le Differdangeois était en effet très marqué à l’arrivée. Sa légitime frustration ne fait que rehausser la valeur du titre de Loïc Bettendorff.Denis BastienLes classementsElite : 1. Lex Reichling (VV Tooltime) en 1h02’42’’ ; 2. Scott Thiltges (LG Alzingen) 1’11’’ ; 3. Vincent Dias dos Santos (LC Tétange) 3’21’’; 4. Gusty Bausch (Velofrenn Gusty Bruch) 4’45’’; 5. Sören Nissen (VC Diekirch) 5’53’’ ; 6. Massimo Morabito (UC Dippach) 7’32’’ ; 7. Claude Wolter (LC Kayl) 9’25’’ ; 8. Tommy Arnoldy (CT Toproad Roeserbann) 11’01’’ ; 9. Pol Weisgerber (LG Alzingen) 1 tour ; 10. Alec Lang (VV Tooltime) ; 11. Eric Gleis (Velofrenn Gusty Bruch) ; 12. Carlos Miguel Moreira Cardoso (CT Aterdaul) ; 13. Patrick Mersch (lG Bertrange) ; 14. Philippe Goessens (VV Tooltime) ; 15. Pol Flesch (CCI Differdange) ; 16. Dan mangers (SAF Cessange), 17. Max Losch (SAF Cessange).Espoirs : 1. Loïc Bettendorff (Leopard) en 1h04’57’’ ; 2. Raphaël Kockelmann (Team Vorarlberg) 1’06’’ ; 3. Cédric Pries (VC Schengen) 4’14’’; 4. Felix Schreiber (VV Tooltime) 6’29’’; 5. Eric Meyers (LC tétange) 7’30’’ ; 6. Mik Esser (CT Aterdaul) 10’15’’ ; 7. Jacques Gloesener (VV Tooltime) 1 tour ; 8. Maurice Thill (VV Tooltime) ; 9. Steven Nederveen (CT Aterdaul) ; 10. Luc Braun (CT Aterdaul) ; 11. Lucas Van den Abeele (CT Aterdaul).last_img read more

Rodange a recruté l’héritier du plus grand syndicaliste du ballon rond

first_imgArthur Njo-Léa, la recrue offensive de Rodange, a un grand-père célèbre, Eugène, footballeur camerounais engagé fondateur du premier syndicat de joueurs en France, l’UNFP.Arthur Njo-Léa voyage incognito dans ce gentil début de carrière qui l’a déjà conduit à Lausanne, Rennes, Virton ou Dender entre autres, avant d’arriver cet hiver à Rodange. Ses coéquipiers ne savent en général pas ce que leur corporation doit à sa famille. «Ils ne connaissent pas l’histoire, ils sont trop jeunes, sourit l’attaquant de 23 ans. Il faut dire que ça remonte un peu. Seuls les plus âgés s’en souviennent.»Eugène Njo-Léa. (photo DR)Ça remonte en fait à novembre 1961. Eugène Njo-Léa, étudiant camerounais recruté par l’AS Saint-Étienne en 1954, vainqueur du championnat de France au sein d’une attaque qu’il compose avec Rachid Mekloufi, fonde avec son ami Just Fontaine, l’UNFP, l’Union nationale des footballeurs professionnels, le premier syndicat de joueurs pour défendre leurs intérêts. À l’époque, les footballeurs sont la propriété de leurs clubs jusqu’à leurs 35 ans et dans l’incapacité de choisir la durée de leur engagement. C’est grâce à cet étudiant engagé, qui arrêtera le football (après 93 buts en 185 matches à l’ASSE, Lyon et le Racing Paris) pour se consacrer à la carrière de diplomate à laquelle il se destinait, que le ballon rond a aujourd’hui en partie la tête qu’il a, avec une solidarité au minimum et des hommes qui peuvent choisir leur avenir et ne sont pas totalement seuls quand ils se retrouvent au chômage. Partager Quelqu’un d’intelligent, avec des convictions«Il a créé quelque chose de bien, même si je n’en ai pas encore eu besoin. Mon grand-père était quelqu’un d’intelligent, avec des convictions. J’étais assez petit quand il nous a quittés, il n’a pas pu voir ce que je suis devenu», reprend Arthur, oublieux de ce que son dernier club, Londerzeel, l’a laissé «dos au mur» et sans option ces six derniers mois.C’est que dans la famille Njo-Léa, il y a aussi William, fils d’Eugène, père d’Arthur. Lui a sévi à Besançon, Brest, au PSG, à Lens surtout et à Caen enfin (178 matches, 54 buts). Sacrée lignée d’attaquants. Qui a complété son apprentissage «philosophique du milieu». «Je suis devenu footballeur par accident», a dit un jour Eugène, le grand-père. «Moi, ce n’est pas du tout par accident. J’ai été plongé dedans depuis tout petit. Mon père m’a formé, il m’a expliqué le milieu. C’est un monde… Enfin, un monde… vous savez bien. On vous oublie vite. Au milieu de ces loups, il faut être un loup.» Quand on sait que William, le paternel, a été empêché de participer à un Mondial avec le Cameroun parce que les idées novatrices d’Eugène avaient agacé en haut lieu et entraîné des représailles administratives («Il n’a pas apprécié», admet Arthur), on comprend mieux que dans la lignée, la volonté de révolution sociale se soit aussi muée en défiance du système.Un instrument de combat contre le sous-développementRodange a donc engagé un carnassier qui a grandi au milieu de ses pairs. De la DN, il connaît les Dudelangeois Lesquoy et Muratovic, fréquentés à Virton, ainsi que le Niederkornois Tekiela, croisé lors d’un essai en Allemagne. En Bundesliga, il a joué avec Denis Zakaria et Nico Elvedi, de Mönchengladbach, ainsi qu’Edmilson Fernandes, de Mayence, trois pros avec lesquels il a grandi dans les sélections jeunes de la Nati suisse puisque Arthur est franco-helvéto-camerounais. Des références donc et une maturité de gars qui connaît la musique : «J’ai signé un an et demi. Rodange cherchait un gars directement opérationnel. Il faut remettre le club sur de bons rails. De toute façon, quand tu es recruté en hiver et par un dernier, tu es tout de suite fixé sur ce qui t’attend. Il va falloir te donner !».Son grand-père voulait changer la vie de tous les footballeurs, Arthur se contentera de commencer par changer celle d’un promu luxembourgeois en manque de points.Eugène avait aussi dit «pour nous autres Africains, le football n’est pas un objet de contemplation mais un instrument de combat contre le sous-développement et pour l’affirmation de notre personnalité». Cinquante ans plus tard, son petit-fils en a tordu le sens mais a fait sienne cette phrase à sa façon : «Cela me parle. Dans ma famille, l’Afrique nous tient à cœur. Le foot aussi parce que c’est comme ça qu’on est arrivés en Europe. Comme beaucoup d’autres. Il faut de la détermination pour ça, mais avoir grandi en Europe aide à relativiser, aussi, quand ça va moins bien.» Ça tombe bien, à Rodange, ça va mal et il y a un club à sauver…Julien Mollereaulast_img read more

Dash cash! – With US$100,000, Thompson among top 10 Diamond League earners

first_imgNot only did the Jamaican win the 100 metres and 200 metres gold medals at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the Diamond League Trophy for the 100m, Thompson has also emerged as one of the top 10 moneymakers of the 2016 IAAF Diamond League with earnings of US$100,000. Thompson capped a brilliant season with a 10.72-second victory in the 100m to win the Diamond Trophy at the Memorial van Damme in Brussels last Friday. The athlete, who is a member of the University of Technology-based MVP Track and Field Club, is in joint fifth place among the Diamond League moneymakers. The Jamaican is tied with 100m hurdles world record holder, Kendra Harrison of the United States; 3,000m steeplechase runner Conseslus Kipruto of Kenya; pole vaulter Renaud Lavillenie of France; and Olympic 800m champion Caster Semenya of South Africa. Only discus thrower Sandra Perkovic of Croatia and Olympic 200m silver medallist, Dafne Schippers of The Netherlands, with US$110,000 each; triple jumper Caterine Ibarguen of Colombia (US$106,000) and Olympic long jump bronze medallist Ivana Spanovic of Serbia (US$102,000) have earned more. The Diamond Trophy winners earn US$40,000, with race winners taking home $10,000 for a first-place finish; $6,000 for second; $4,000 for third; $3,000 for fourth; $2,500 for fifth; $2,000 for sixth; $1,500 for seventh and $1,000 for eighth. In addition to securing the Diamond Trophy, Thompson also won five races throughout the season – in Rabat, Rome, Lausanne, Zurich and Brussels, and finished second in Oslo and third in Eugene. A few other Jamaicans were also among the leading earners in the Diamond League. The 400m Diamond Trophy winner Stephenie-Ann McPherson, with US$75,000, was the 28th highest earner. Former 100m world record holder Asafa Powell was not far behind, having earned US$56,000 to be 32nd on the list. Olympic 110-metre hurdles champion Omar McLeod earned US$29,000 and was 53rd. Simone Facey and Julian Forte earned US$20,500 each at 88th and 89th, respectively; Veronica Campbell-Brown (94th), Damar Forbes (95th) and Janieve Russell (100th), all earning US$20,000. Other Jamaicans who earned above $10,000 in Diamond League winnings were 400m runner Novlene Williams-Mills (US$17,000), triple jumper Kimberley Williams (US$14,500); sprint hurdler Hansle Parchment (US$12,000) and 400m hurdler and former Diamond champion, Kaliese Spencer (US$11,500).last_img read more

Fort St. John starts planning for Canada 150 Mosaic project

first_imgThis session will provide information on how this project will look, as well as how the community can be involved and participate in this new and exciting project.Lunch will not be provided for this session. The City of Fort St. John is seeking input from local community members and groups to help develop the Canada 150 Mosaic project.The City’s involvement in the project will create a time capsule to help celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday – in what is being called a ‘visual storyboard.’“This is an extraordinary opportunity for Fort St. John to be only one of a handful of BC communities selected to participate in this project is an honour,” said Mayor Lori Ackerman. “We are delighted to showcase our community to the Country for Canada’s 150th birthday.”- Advertisement -The work will feature all the 13 provinces and territories and the work of thousands of Canadian participants. Anywhere from 5 to 15 communities to a province/territory will create sections of the overall mural.Each participating city or town will create a section of the mural that symbolizes their community, resulting in 750 individual tiles painted by local citizens.Interested participants are invited to an information session on Monday, November 30th, from noon until 1:00 PM at the Pomeroy Sports Centre’s west meeting room.Advertisementlast_img read more

Arsenal plot £35m raid on Real Madrid, goal-shy Man United target Dortmund hitman – paper review

first_imgHere’s the top transfer-related stories in Wednesday’s newspapers…Arsenal are set to offer £35m to secure the signing of Isco ahead of Chelsea and Liverpool in January. Real Madrid are willing to sell the Spaniard, who has been largely used from the bench this season, and Arsene Wenger is preparing to pounce. (Daily Star)Arsenal are among the clutch of Premier League clubs keeping an eye on Bordeaux midfielder Henri Saivet. Senegal international Saivet, available for £3.5m in January, caught the eye against Liverpool last week when he scored in Bordeaux’s 2-1 Europa League defeat. (Daily Mirror)Manchester United have entered the big-money battle for Borussia Dortmund star Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang. The striker has emerged as one of Europe’s deadliest front-men and the race to try to prise him out of the Bundesliga club is hotting up. Barcelona are also in the hunt for Aubameyang, while he is on the radars of Arsenal and Chelsea. But United boss Louis van Gaal is determined to win the scrap for Aubameyang, who currently has a £42million price-tag, with his side struggling for goals. (Daily Mirror)Manchester City can attract Pep Guardiola to the Etihad with a record pot of gold next summer. Most of the £265million generated on Tuesday by owner Sheikh Mansour selling 13 per cent of the Blues’ parent company, City Football Group, to Chinese bidders will allow the club to offer Guardiola a huge contract and even bigger transfer war-chest. (Daily Mirror)Roberto Mancini will attempt to lure Branislav Ivanovic to Inter by offering him a lucrative TWO-year deal. Chelsea defender Ivanovic’s current contract expires next summer and he can start talking to foreign clubs about a Bosman free transfer from next month. (Daily Mirror)Liverpool have opened discussions with Simon Mignolet over a new contract in further evidence of Jürgen Klopp’s confidence in the goalkeeper. Klopp said he was not looking to sign a No1 despite reports that claimed otherwise. Mignolet, who signed for Liverpool from Sunderland in June 2013 for £9m on a five-year deal, would see his £60,000 a-week salary increased if he agrees a new contract. (Guardian)Alberto Moreno’s agent says the Liverpool defender would welcome interest from Real Madrid in January. The Spaniard was linked with a Bernabeu switch last week as the club seek to solve their left-back crisis. (Daily Star)Sunderland boss Sam Allardyce is ready to fight North East rivals Newcastle for the January signing of Tottenham outcast Andros Townsend. (Daily Mirror)Bournemouth and Middlesbrough are monitoring right-back Matt Lowton’s situation at Burnley ahead of the January transfer window. The 26-year-old joined the Clarets from Aston Villa in the summer for a fee of around £1million but he suffered an injury in pre-season and has figured just once for Sean Dyche’s side. (Daily Mirror)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…Arsene Wenger confirms Arsenal came close to landing Bayern Munich starlet Kingsley ComanNacho Monreal rejects rumours of possible return to SpainMauro Icardi ‘open’ to Inter Milan exit as Arsenal plot January bidChelsea threaten to pull plug on Jeremie Boga’s loan deal with RennesLiverpool’s on-loan forward Mario Balotelli dreams of playing for Real Madrid, according to AC Milan team-mateLiverpool target January deal for ‘unsettled’ Fiorentina midfielder Mario SuarezLiverpool report: Reds to offer Mario Balotelli in swap deal to land AC Milan goalkeeper Diego LopezAnder Herrera dismisses reports he is ‘disillusioned’ with life at Manchester UnitedManchester United transfer report: Bayern Munich’s Arjen Robben dismisses speculation over future Leicester record signing Andrej Kramaric hoping to leave in January, reveals agent‘He’s going nowhere’ – Mark Hughes insists Stoke will not sell Liverpool-linked Jack ButlandNeymar Sr dampens Man United and Real Madrid transfer talk – ‘I’m sure he will renew with Barcelona’last_img read more