Poch comforts Aurier and subs him off after Gomes injury while star prays for ace

first_imgMAURICIO POCHETTINO comforted Serge Aurier and subbed him off after the Ivorian was involved in Andre Gomes’ horrific leg injury.Spurs’ right-back was also spotted praying as stricken Gomes was stretchered off with a suspected broken leg.Aurier praying for Andre Gomes after sustaining that horrific injury. 🙌💪💪😭https://t.co/aA29li7LSt— Azeez Olajide ❼ (@zeezish_) November 3, 2019 4 Mauricio Pochettino was spotted comforting Serge Aurier after he was involved in Andre Gomes’ horror injuryAurier was visibly disturbed as Gomes lay on the ground with his foot in a gruesome and unnatural position.And he was even spotted performing a praying gesture as he saw his fellow pro in real trouble.Son Heung-min also broke down in tears after his mis-timed tackle on the Portuguese.Although it was Son’s tackle that brought Gomes down, Aurier careered into the midfielder as he was on his way down.Given the harrowing scenes after the tackle, Poch clearly saw the effect it was having on his right-back and decided to sub him off.The Argentine threw Juan Foyth on to replace him and was seen consoling Aurier on his way off the pitch.Quotes on Andre Gomes’ injuryMichael OwenShocking decision to send Son off but that’s insignificant in the scheme of things. The wellbeing of players is the most important thing. Get well soon Andre Gomes.Gary LinekerSon clearly massively upset. Without the injury he wouldn’t have been shown a red card. He’ll care less about that than injuring a fellow professional so seriously. Such a shame.Pat NevinThis is horrible, horrible. Players look devastated and there is utter confusion here. Players with their heads in their hands. Son was distraught before he was sent off and Aurier can’t watch and is praying. There is so much confusion. He is being led straight to the corner to the ambulance to take him to hospital.Son was initially going to be awarded a yellow card for a foul on the 26-year-old who was immediately taken to hospital.But Martin Atkinson upgraded it to a red as medics rushed to Gomes’ aid.A Premier League statement said: “The red card for Son was for endangering the safety of a player which happened as a consequence of his initial challenge.”Son’s tackle forced Gomes to ground, with Aurier then colliding with the former Barcelona ace just as he hit the deck.MOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’NEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for himSeamus Coleman instantly called for medics to arrive to treat his team-mate, as Dominic Calvert-Lewin cradled Gomes’ head as he laid screaming on the floor.Dele Alli – who netted the opener before Cenk Tosun equalised in stoppage time – revealed it was too much for him to watch.He told Sky Sports: “I didn’t want to look too much at what happened [to Gomes]. All I can do is send him my best wishes and wish him a quick recovery.”4 Serge Aurier collided with Andre Gomes as the midfielder hit the deckCredit: Rex Features4 Aurier was clearly disturbed by the incidentCredit: Getty Images – Getty4 The right-back was subbed off soon after the gruesome injuryCredit: Getty Images – Gettylast_img read more

Atlético de Madrid won its first league 80 years ago today

first_imgThe team was second, but a door was opened for him back to First: the Oviedo had the destroyed stadium and asked for a moratorium. His place should be for him Athletic by sporting criteria, but Osasuna had been promised for Navarrese merits in the War. The promotion would be resolved with a match: Atleti won 3-1.In First, the team settled in Chamartín, allowing members of Madrid to enter for free, and finally in Vallecas. And he arrived on the last second day, awaiting the ruling of Sevilla. The people of Madrid, 80 years ago today, they beat Valencia in Vallecas (goals from Campos and Elícegui) and awaited news from Hercules-Sevilla. ORna call reported: 3-3, the Atlético was champion.Eleven was formed by Tabales; Captain Pepe Mesa, Aparicio; Urquiri, Germán, Machín; Enrique, Gabilondo, Elícegui, Campos and Vázquez. Tabales, Aparicio, Germán, Machín, Campos and Vázquez were of ‘aviator’ provenance. A sample of how the alliance changed Atlético’s face. From being evicted, without a field, partners, money or almost players to winning that League and the next one. The April 28, 1940, the Atlético beat Valencia (2-0) to conquer your first league. A special title because, in addition to the first, it came in one of the seasons what else has conditioned the history of the club. It was the first of the postwar period and the reconstruction of a Athletic very destroyed.That 39-40 was the premiere of Athletic Aviation. Atleti had dropped in 1936 and the War (debts, destroyed Metropolitan …) survival complicated. The solution came with Aviation, a team formed during the War with recruited footballers and soldiers, who played in Matacán (Salamanca) and Zaragoza.He gave a good level and to compete formally looked for a merger. After trying with Madrid, the October 4, 1939, the absorption of Aviation by Atlético (until 1940 it was Athletic), whose shield incorporated wings. The aviators contributed to Zamora as a technician.last_img read more

Human-wildlife conflict is decimating leopard numbers in one of their last African strongholds

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Mammals, Predators, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A research team led by Dr. Samual Williams of the Department of Anthropology at Durham University in the UK conducted a long-term trap survey from 2012 to 2016 in order to study the leopard population in South Africa’s Soutpansberg Mountains, one of the leopard’s last strongholds in Africa.They found that the cats’ population density decreased by 44 percent between 2012 and 2016. That means that, based on a previous estimate of their abundance, the leopard population in the Soutpansberg Mountains has decreased by two-thirds since 2008, Williams and his co-authors note in the study.While the researchers argue that, based on their findings, a current ban on leopard hunting in South Africa should not be lifted in areas where the species is facing sharp declines in numbers, they add that efforts to reduce often-lethal conflicts between leopards and humans might have an even bigger impact. South Africa banned the hunting of leopards last year amid uncertainty over the species’ numbers and ongoing threats to its survival posed by mismanagement of the trophy hunting industry and the illegal trade in its fur.Leopards (Panthera pardus) are notoriously difficult animals to study in the wild due to their secretive nature. They are primarily nocturnal creatures who live solitary lives and range over vast areas of land in search of food and mates. The hunting ban in South Africa is still in effect as more information on the leopard abundance is collected by authorities. The species is currently listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.According to the authors of a study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science last month that seeks to shed light on the population dynamics and conservation status of leopards living outside protected areas in South Africa, the species is declining in greater numbers and at a much more rapid pace than has been previously understood. But while the researchers argue that, based on their findings, the ban on leopard hunting should not be allowed to resume in areas where the species is facing sharp declines in numbers, they add that efforts to reduce often-lethal conflicts between leopards and humans might have an even bigger impact.A research team led by Dr. Samual Williams of the Department of Anthropology at Durham University in the UK conducted a long-term trap survey from 2012 to 2016 in order to study the leopard population in South Africa’s Soutpansberg Mountains, one of the leopard’s last strongholds in Africa. The team used 23 camera traps that ran continuously throughout the four-year study period and identified individual leopards by their unique coat markings to determine leopard numbers in the area. They found that the cats’ population density decreased by 44 percent between 2012 and 2016.That means that, based on a previous estimate of their abundance, the leopard population in the Soutpansberg Mountains has decreased by two-thirds since 2008, Williams and his co-authors note in the study — down from 10.73 leopards per 100 square kilometers in 2008 to 3.65 per 100 sq. km. last year.That is a pace of loss that the population simply cannot sustain for long, Williams said. “If the current rate of decline is not slowed down then there will be no leopards left in the western Soutpansberg Mountains by 2020. This is especially alarming considering that in 2008 this area had one of the highest leopard population densities in Africa.”As a means of establishing what exactly is driving leopard abundance down so rapidly, Williams and team fitted eight adult leopards with GPS collars, allowing them to track the cats’ movements. Six of those leopards died before the study was completed. The researchers discovered that the chief cause of those deaths was illegal, retaliatory killings by people who feared the leopards posed a threat to their livestock.“Illegal human activities like shooting, snaring and poisoning were the leading cause of death in the leopards we tracked,” Williams said. “This was often in response to a perception that leopards were a threat to livestock. There is a clear need for conservation efforts to address these illegal killings. Educating communities and supporting them to adopt non-lethal techniques to help protect their livestock is essential.”Williams adds that trophy hunting in areas like the Soutpansberg Mountains is still “a luxury that cannot be afforded.” “Large carnivores like leopards are hugely important to the ecosystem of an area and also carry significant economic and cultural importance,” he said. “Their loss would impoverish both the ecology of the area and human culture so it is vital that we understand the threats leopards face and act on this.”Protecting leopards in areas where they still exist in substantial numbers, like the Soutpansberg Mountains, is especially important given that their range has shrunk drastically in recent years. Large carnivores have, on average, lost 53 percent of their historic range, the researchers note in the study. Leopards are facing even worse circumstances, having lost 63 to 75 percent of their range worldwide. That figure is even higher in South Africa, where leopards have lost some 80 percent of their historical range.Combined with this sharp drop in habitable territory, trophy hunting has had an undeniable impact on leopard populations. But Williams and his co-authors write in the study that conflicts with humans are perhaps the more urgent threat to the survival of the species: “While improving the management of trophy hunting is important, we suggest that mitigating human–wildlife conflict could have a bigger impact on carnivore conservation.”Given that close to 70 percent of remaining leopard habitat in South Africa is outside of legally protected areas, the researchers argue, “leopard conservation efforts should be focused outside of protected areas, where leopards are most at risk.”An African leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) at the Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONWilliams, S. T., Williams, K. S., Lewis, B. P., & Hill, R. A. (2017). Population dynamics and threats to an apex predator outside protected areas: implications for carnivore management. Royal Society Open Science, 4(4), 161090. doi:10.1098/rsos.161090Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Research suggests less affluent countries more dedicated to wildlife conservation than rich countries

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Conservation Finance, Environment, Extinction, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Megafauna, Research, Sixth Mass Extinction, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A team of researchers with Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and non-profit conservation organization Panthera looked at 152 countries and compiled what they call a Megafauna Conservation Index in order to evaluate each country’s contributions to the conservation of the world’s biodiversity.African countries Botswana, Namibia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe, together with South Asian nation Bhutan, were the top five megafauna conservation performers, the researchers found.Norway came in at sixth, the top-ranked developed country, followed by Canada, which came in at eighth. The United States ranked nineteenth, lower than countries like Malawi and Mozambique that are among the least-developed in the world. Studies have shown that, due to human activities, species loss over the past century was at least 100 times higher than historical levels, fueling speculation that we’re witnessing a sixth global extinction event.There’s still time to save many of the world’s most recognizable large animals, or megafauna — species like elephants, gorillas, lions, rhinos, and tigers. But of those species still with us, 60 percent of the world’s largest herbivores and 59 percent of the world’s largest carnivores have been found to be currently threatened with extinction due to threats like habitat destruction, human-wildlife conflicts, over-hunting, and the growing wildlife trade — in addition to the impacts of climate change.Given these circumstances, you’d think that countries across the world would be dedicating resources to protecting wildlife, and you’d be right. But of course there are varying levels of commitment to conserving threatened species, and research published in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation last month suggests that rich, developed countries are frequently doing the least.A team of researchers with Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) and non-profit conservation organization Panthera looked at 152 countries and compiled what they call a Megafauna Conservation Index in order to evaluate each country’s contributions to the conservation of the world’s biodiversity.“Our index provides a measure of how well each country is doing, and sets a benchmark for nations that are performing below the average level, to understand the kind of contributions they need to make as a minimum,” Professor David Macdonald, director of WildCRU, said in a statement. “There is a strong case for countries where mega-fauna species have been historically persecuted, to assist their recovery.”The team’s results, Macdonald said, show that “Every country should strive to do more to protect its wildlife.” But that is particularly true of more affluent countries.The Megafauna Conservation Index factors in three chief measures of countries’ conservation efforts: the proportion of each country occupied by surviving megafauna species; the proportion of the range for each of those megafauna species that has been placed under some sort of protected status; and the amount of money each country spends on conservation initiatives, both domestically and internationally, relative to its GDP.The researchers say that their findings show that poorer countries tend to be more active in protecting biodiversity than richer nations. African countries Botswana, Namibia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe, together with South Asian nation Bhutan, were the top five megafauna conservation performers, for instance. Norway came in at sixth, the top-ranked developed country, followed by Canada, which came in at eighth. The United States ranked nineteenth, lower than countries like Malawi and Mozambique that are among the least-developed in the world.Graph via Lindsey et al. (2017) doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2017.03.003.Fifty-six of the 152 countries studied contributed less than the average amount, including 28 ranked as below-average and 28 identified as major under-performers. The contributions of the remaining 96 countries were above average, including 19 ranked that ranked as major performers.Some 70 percent of African countries and 67 percent of South America countries were classified as either above-average or major performers based on their Megafauna Conservation Index scores, while nearly one-fourth of Asian and European countries were classified as underperformers.Chart via Lindsey et al. (2017) doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2017.03.003.The authors recommend that these kinds of rankings be published regularly “to recognise major-performers, foster healthy pride and competition among nations, and identify ways for governments to improve their performance.”Peter Lindsey, a research associate with Panthera and the lead author of the study, said that there are three ways countries can improve their score on the Megafauna Conservation Index: “Firstly, they can ‘re-wild’ their landscapes by reintroducing mega-fauna and/or by allowing the distribution of such species to increase. They can also set aside more land as strictly protected areas. And they can invest more in conservation, either at home or abroad.”There are a number of reasons why the loss of megafauna species is “particularly worrisome,” Lindsey and his co-authors note in the study. For one thing, they have immense cultural and social importance to humans. “The idea that large charismatic animals still persist in their natural habitats is greatly valued by large sectors of human society,” the researchers write. “Megafauna thus have existence values that arguably surpass those of most other species. The charisma of megafauna means they are disproportionately important in terms of engendering interest and willingness to pay for conservation among sectors of the general public.”This inherent value ascribed by humans to megafauna can be “harnessed” by countries, the researchers say, citing Botswana, Kenya, and South Africa as countries that have translated the appeal of large mammals into wildlife-based tourism industries that represent significant sectors of their economies.Megafauna species also tend to play important roles within their respective ecosystems, helping to regulate nutrient cycles and preserve healthy predatory-to-prey ratios while also being key to seed dispersal and other vital ecological processes. And because these bigger species tend to require larger areas for their conservation, they frequently act as what’s called “umbrella species,” meaning that conservation initiatives aimed at those species indirectly benefit a number of others in the process.But Lindsey added that it’s imperative for countries, especially under-performing rich countries, to scale up their efforts quickly. “Scores of species across the globe, including tigers, lions and rhinos, are at risk of extinction due to a plethora of threats imposed by mankind,” he said. “We cannot ignore the possibility that we will lose many of these incredible species unless swift, decisive and collective action is taken by the global community.”Leopards have vanished from at least 49 percent of their historic range in Africa and 84 percent of their historic range in Eurasia, according to Panthera. Image via Pixabay, licensed under CC0 1.0.CITATIONSGerardo Ceballos, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anthony D. Barnosky, Andrés García, Robert M. Pringle, & Todd M. Palmer. Accelerated modern human–induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction. Science Advances, 1(5), e1400253. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1400253Lindsey, P. A., Chapron, G., Petracca, L. S., Burnham, D., Hayward, M. W., Henschel, P., … & Ripple, W. J. (2017). Relative efforts of countries to conserve world’s megafauna. Global Ecology and Conservation, 10, 243-252. doi:10.1016/j.gecco.2017.03.003Ripple, W. J., Estes, J. A., Beschta, R. L., Wilmers, C. C., Ritchie, E. G., Hebblewhite, M., … & Schmitz, O. J. (2014). Status and ecological effects of the world’s largest carnivores. Science, 343(6167), 1241484. doi:10.1126/science.1241484Ripple, W. J., Newsome, T. M., Wolf, C., Dirzo, R., Everatt, K. T., Galetti, M., … & Macdonald, D. W. (2015). Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores. Science Advances, 1(4), e1400103. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1400103Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Worst-case scenario: There could be only 30 wild Sumatran rhinos left

first_imgIn 1986, scientists estimated there could be as many as 800 Sumatran rhinos left. That fell to 400 in 1996, then 275 in 2008.Today the official estimate is 100 rhinos, but almost all experts believe that figure is overly optimistic.Adding up the minimum estimate for each of the four known wild populations yields a total of just 30 wild Sumatran rhinos left on earth, plus another nine in captivity. This is the first article in our four-part series “Is Anyone Going to Save the Sumatran Rhino?“WEST JAVA, Indonesia — As we sit cross-legged at a restaurant in Java over plates of local delicacies — cow brains, avocado juice and dried fish you eat whole — Haerudin R. Sadjudin tells me a little about his life. Lanky, weathered, with a welcoming demeanor and an open smile, Haerudin, 62, started studying rhinos — both Indonesian species, the Sumatran and the Javan — in 1975. I tell him he’s been doing this job longer than I’ve been alive.Haerudin, program manager at local rhino NGO YABI, has had the pleasure of seeing Javan rhinos (Rhinoceros sondaicus) 31 times in the wild. He’s been attacked by them three times, including once when he had to abandon his canoe and cling to a tree. But this isn’t what really takes my breath away. He’s actually seen Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in the wild — but only once in his 40-plus years of studying the animal.This highlights just how endangered the Sumatran rhino has long been. Already by the 1970s they were virtually impossible to encounter. And today they are so rare, so nearly lost, as to be almost mythical: they’ve become like the Tasmanian tiger in the 1920s or Steller’s sea cow in the 1760s.The world knows exactly how many Javan rhinos are left: 67, including four calves this year. We know this because of consistent surveys using camera traps, and because all the Javan rhinos survive in a single park, Ujung Kulon. Despite such a small population, the Javan rhino is still far better off than the Sumatran today. Its population is stable, even growing every year.By contrast, the Sumatran rhino is vanishing before our eyes, and we have no idea know how many have disappeared or how many are left to lose.In 1986, the same year the species was added to the IUCN Red List as Endangered, scientists believed there were 425 to 800 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth. In 1996, when the species was listed as Critically Endangered, that number dropped to 400. Then, in 2008, the estimate fell to 275.  Just seven years later, the official figure became 100 individuals, nearly two-thirds lost just like that.As grim as that figure is, the reality is likely much bleaker.last_img read more

Indonesia investigates oil spill in Java Sea by state energy company

first_imgEnvironment, Environmental Crime, Fisheries, Fossil Fuels, Marine, Marine Ecosystems, Oil, Oil Spills, Pollution, Water Pollution Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored An oil well operated by Indonesian state-owned energy company Pertamina has been leaking crude into the Java Sea for nearly three weeks now.The slick has spread as far as 84 kilometers (52 miles) to the west and covers an area of more than 4,500 hectares (11,100 acres), according to satellite imagery.Pertamina says it may take eight weeks to shut off the leaking well, and three months for affected areas to recover from the environmental damage.The leak is the latest involving Pertamina. Five people were killed in March last year when oil from a ruptured Pertamina pipeline caught fire in Borneo. JAKARTA — A newly drilled oil well operated by Indonesian state-owned energy company Pertamina has been spilling thousands of barrels of oil into the sea and the northern Java coast for nearly three weeks now.The spill is believed to have been caused by a pressure imbalance in the well bore, known as a well kick, at Pertamina’s Offshore North West Java block on July 12. The company says it has deployed 30 boats, 3,500 meters (11,500 feet) of offshore oil boom, 3,000 meters (9,800 feet) of shoreline oil boom, and 700 meters (2,300 feet) of fishing net to contain the spill. It also says it has scooped up 17,830 sacks of oil-contaminated sand.The extent of the oil spill caused by Pertamina’s well as of July 18, outlined in red. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).The well was still leaking oil as of July 31, according to an environment ministry official.“It’s still in the emergency phase,” Rasio Ridho Sani, the ministry’s head of law enforcement, told reporters on the sidelines of an event in Jakarta. “[Pertamina] has to stop the spill and we have no idea when that will happen.”Rasio said the ministry had deployed a team to monitor Petamina’s management of the spill and investigate the cause.Pertamina says it expects to shut off the well in eight weeks. The spill has pumped an estimated 3,000 barrels of oil a day into the sea since it began, according to the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s biggest green NGO. Satellite imagery from Walhi also shows that the slick has spread across an area covering more than 4,500 hectares (11,100 acres). The energy ministry said separately that the oil was now dispersed as far as 84 kilometers (52 miles) west of the well.Pertamina says the oil has affected 11 villages, including in the districts of Karawang and Bekasi, which are satellite cities of the capital, Jakarta. Up to 80 percent of the fishing communities in Karawang and Bekasi have incurred some degree of economic losses as a result of the spill, Walhi says, and some 300 people involved in the local tourism industry have also been impacted by the oil washing up on beaches. The spill has also impacted on fish and shrimp farms in the coastal flats off Karawang and Bekasi, according to Meiki Paendong, Walhi’s executive director for the province of West Java.“The oil spill in the ocean and coast of Karawang is threatening the sources of livelihood and the sustainability of the environment,” he said.A beach on the northern coast of Java is covered with crude oil from the damaged well operated by Pertamina. Image courtesy of the National Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam).U.S. well control company Boots & Coots, affiliated with the U.S. oil well services contractor Halliburton, has begun the process of shutting off the damaged well with a cement injection, according to the energy ministry.The government’s priorities are to minimize the impact from the spill and close the damaged well quickly, according to Dwi Soetjipto, the head of the national oil regulatory agency.“Our target is that the spill won’t reach the beach by increasing the number of oil boom. And then to close down immediately the broken well,” he said as quoted by the Jakarta Post.Pertamina said it would take at least three months for affected areas to recover from the environmental impacts of the oil spill.Walhi plans to assist affected residents in filing a lawsuit against Pertamina over the spill. “Pertamina must fully restore the marine ecosystem, beaches and mangroves that are affected by the oil spill,” Meiki said.Clumps of oil and sand on a beach in Karawang. Image courtesy of the National Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam).The north Java spill is the latest such incident involving Pertamina. In March 2018, a Pertamina pipeline in Balikpapan Bay, in the Bornean province of East Kalimantan, ruptured and leaked crude oil after being hit by a ship passing through the area. Five people were killed after the oil caught on fire. The slick also contaminated a mangrove forest, prompted thousands of health complaints, and was blamed for the death of an endangered dolphin.An official investigation of the Balikpapan Bay spill found faults in the company’s operations. Among the findings by the environment ministry: the Pertamina refinery in Balikpapan that the pipeline served lacked both an early-warning system and an automated monitoring system. The latter would have alerted Pertamina immediately to changes in the pressure level in the pipeline and thus allowed the firm to respond swiftly to the leak.The ministry’s investigators also found that Pertamina failed to carry out routine inspections of the pipeline. Instead, the company only did so when needed or when required for certification purposes once every three years. The investigation also uncovered omissions from Pertamina’s environmental impact assessment document, including a lack of studies on the pipeline’s maintenance.A beach in Karawang covered with crude oil from the Pertamina well. Image courtesy of the National Mining Advocacy Network (Jatam).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 16, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsA free-trade deal between the United States and Brazil could be disastrous for the Amazon and forest communities, one commentator argues (The Hill).The continent of Africa emitted more carbon dioxide than the United States in 2016 (Carbon Brief).Ancient earthworks in the Amazon clue scientists into how societies used and protected the rainforest (Ensia).Brazil’s lawmakers are considering a law allowing hunters to go after jaguars and other iconic rainforest wildlife (The Independent).The Amazon is approaching a tipping point, according to one climate scientist (The New Yorker).Komodo dragons in Indonesia could become victims of their own popularity (The New York Times).Investors could be pivotal in stopping deforestation for soy in Brazil (Ethical Corp).A film tells the story of one man’s restoration of a small piece of rainforest in Ecuador (Yale E360).Other newsSome coal miners in the U.S. are looking for alternatives to coal mining (The Guardian).Microplastics are turning up in Arctic snow (The Atlantic) …… And the tiny pieces of trash are also leading to increases in air pollution (Los Angeles Times).Average temperatures in parts of the U.S. have already breached the 2-degree-Celsius (3.6-degree-Fahrenheit) mark (The Washington Post).New research shows that populations of river giants like catfish and stingrays are down by 97 percent in the past 50 years (The Guardian).Young climate change activist Greta Thunberg is sailing across the Atlantic Ocean for the upcoming U.N. climate talks (The New York Times).The baleen plates of dead whales are helping scientists learn more about threatened species (CBC).Fishing and shipping threaten whales as much as renewed hunting by countries such as Japan (Scientific American).The Trump administration in the U.S. has removed some of the protections of the Endangered Species Act (The Washington Post, The New York Times, EnviroNews Nigeria, Vox).July 2019 was hotter than any other month in recorded history, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported (The New York Times).Banner image of a jaguar by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

Malaysian attempt at Sumatran rhino IVF fails on low quality of sperm

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Extinction, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img A recent effort to produce a Sumatran rhino embryo from egg and sperm samples taken from the last of the species in Malaysia has failed, officials said.The low quality of the sperm, extracted in 2015 and 2016 from an aging rhino that has since died, was cited as the main cause of the failure to fertilize the egg.Malaysian officials say they will continue to improve and attempt their in vitro fertilization attempts, and have called on Indonesia to send sperm samples from younger rhinos held in Sumatra.Indonesia has refused to send any samples, citing the need for a formal agreement, but conservationists say that captive-breeding of Sumatran rhinos is the only feasible solution to protect the species from extinction. JAKARTA — A recent effort by scientists to produce a Sumatran rhino embryo using egg and sperm samples taken from the last of the species in Malaysia has failed, according to officials.Those involved in the attempt had previously cautioned that there was a low chance of success, given the poor quality of the genetic samples they had to work with.The egg cell was extracted on Sept. 30 from Iman, the last known Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in Malaysia. The scientists then injected the egg with sperm from Malaysia’s last male rhino, Tam, who died this past May. His semen had been collected in 2015 and 2016 and preserved in liquid nitrogen.But the in vitro fertilization attempt on Oct. 1 failed to produce an embryo after 72 hours of incubation, Augustine Tuuga, the director of the Sabah state wildlife department, said as reported by the New Straits Time.“What we have gathered from the experts is that possibly Tam’s sperm was not of good quality,” Tuuga said. Tam’s age would have been around 60 years in human terms when his sperm was harvested.Given these circumstances, the rhino experts were not hopeful about the results. “Given that IVF in Sumatran rhino has been tried only about 6 times, we expect a high failure rate,” John Payne, the head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA), which was involved in the effort, told Mongabay in an email.“Iman’s egg cells are fine,” Payne said. “Tam’s sperm quality is likely to be the main problem. Imagine taking sperm from a 70 year old man with kidney disease — what do you expect? That is Tam.”Iman, the last female Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Image courtesy of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA).The fact that the team had to rely on “poor quality” sperm from a single aged rhino has highlighted the lack of progress on an agreement between Malaysia and Indonesia that would have allowed Iman’s eggs to be fertilized with healthy sperm from one of Indonesia’s rhinos. At the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia hosts three young males, including one who has already successfully fathered two calves.However, Indonesia insists that to send sperm samples from its rhinos in Way Kambas to Malaysia, both countries would need to sign a memorandum of understanding for an exchange of specimens of protected species, the transfer of which is regulated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).Tuuga said the IVF efforts would continue and be improved, while also urging Indonesia’s help in providing sperm from the Way Kambas rhinos.Christina Liew, the Sabah state minister of tourism, culture and environment, said representatives of both countries have had regular meetings, most recently in August, to discuss the possibility of obtaining sperm from the rhinos in Way Kambas.No more than 80 Sumatran rhinos, a critically endangered species, are believed to survive in the wild, often living in small populations too small and isolated to be reproductively viable. Seven rhinos are held at Way Kambas, one in a sanctuary in Indonesian Borneo, and one in Malaysia. Two calves were born at Way Kambas after being conceived naturally, while previous IVF attempts in Malaysia were unsuccessful.Indonesia’s environment ministry said in August that the two countries had earlier this year agreed on a new partnership that would see eggs shipped from Malaysia for IVF attempts in Indonesia. To date, however, the paperwork to finalize the deal has still not been completed.Iman, the last female Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Image courtesy of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Turpel : “Le plan, dès le début, c’était de rejoindre Virton”

first_imgPenser négativement ? Enfin, serait-on tenté de dire, vous voilà professionnel à l’étranger. Je crois effectivement que c’est un hasard intéressant. Pour moi, c’est un peu l’exemple que j’ai suivi et qui me faisait dire qu’il n’était jamais trop tard pour partir. C’est bien ce qu’il a fait. Maintenant, c’est un peu à mon tour, peut-être. Le niveau ne sera pas foncièrement différent de ce que vous avez connu la saison passée avec le F91… Le plan, dès le début, c’était de rejoindre Virton. Même s’il y a eu l’option Kaiserslautern, on avait choisi Virton. Cela s’est décidé vite parce que j’avais envie de rejoindre Dino Toppmöller en Belgique. Je veux faire mon chemin avec lui. Et là, cela fait trois semaines que je n’ai plus joué au football, je suis vraiment content de reprendre le chemin de l’entraînement. Beaucoup de gens, dans le milieu, se disaient que vous n’auriez jamais l’audace de sortir de votre zone de confort. Ah ça, je sais que j’ai le niveau. Et j’y vais pour marquer des buts ! Mais le but est aussi de prouver à tout le monde que j’en suis capable. Mais je vais fonctionner comme toujours : penser négativement. Je crois que cela ne sera pas plus facile pour moi mais plutôt pour le coach, qui sera dans une situation plus agréable. Tous ces éléments dudelangeois savent déjà ce qu’il va attendre d’eux. Et les autres… il va les convaincre. Le fait de retrouver l’ossature dudelangeoise de la saison passée, cela a-t-il joué ? Entretien avec Julien Mollereau Les internationaux luxembourgeois (ainsi qu’Edison Jordanov) ont intégré les rangs virtonais lundi. Pour Dave Turpel, attendu à l’international depuis des années, c’est enfin le grand saut ! Vous avez l’impression de vous mettre en danger ? En fait, c’est si j’étais resté au F91 que je me serais mis en danger. C’est un peu vrai. Mais je n’ai jamais eu de vraie option concrète. C’est un vrai problème : jamais je n’ai reçu d’offre qui m’ait convaincu. C’est aussi pour cela que cela n’arrive que maintenant. Peut-être. Le coach n’arrête pas de me dire que je dois être plus tueur. Être décisif contre Rumelange, ce n’est pas si difficile. Mais ce qu’on attend de moi, désormais, c’est que je le sois dans un championnat plus relevé et tous les week-ends. Cela va m’aider à progresser et à être immédiatement performant en sélection parce que j’ai toujours besoin de temps pour m’adapter au niveau international. Oui, peut-être que c’est mon tour maintenant. Ce niveau de la D2 belge, vous le connaissez quand même un petit peu : avec le nombre d’amicaux que vous avez pu disputer ces dernières années contre ce genre d’équipe, vous devez bien savoir où vous situer, non ? Oui, je pars du principe que cela sera bien plus difficile que l’étape d’avant et que je ne vais pas forcément y arriver. J’étais parti de ce principe en quittant Etzella pour rejoindre le F91. Je me disais : “Je vais jouer chez le champion du Luxembourg et je suis si jeune (NDLR : à 21 ans), cela va être tellement dur.” Mais finalement, je ne pouvais être que positivement surpris par ma capacité à m’adapter. Vous quittez le F91 à 26 ans. Précisément au même âge auquel Aurélien Joachim était lui aussi parvenu à s’extirper de la BGL Ligue et du F91 pour devenir professionnel. Un signe du destin ? Oui. Comme je n’en ai jamais connu. J’ai déjà eu des concurrents, mais pas de ce niveau. En tout cas, je n’ai pas de certitude de jouer. Je vais devoir montrer beaucoup plus que ce que j’ai montré au F91. Koré, Hadji, grosse concurrence… C’est un passage de témoin ? Ce qui va faire la grande différence, ce que je voulais surtout, c’est avoir à jouer tous les week-ends un match à haut niveau. Au Luxembourg, cela devenait tout le temps la même chose. Partagerlast_img read more

Tennis : Allertova, la chance de Mandy Minella ce lundi?

first_imgLe tournoi luxembourgeois prend véritablement son envol ce lundi avec le début du tableau final et en tête d’affiche Mandy Minella. L’Eschoise de 33 ans va-t-elle enfin réussir à remporter son premier succès  à Kockelscheuer ? Il y a de réelles raisons d’y croire.Même si on la connaît, la statistique fait mal édition après édition : jamais Mandy Minella n’a encore réussi à remporter un match dans le tableau final de son Luxembourg Open. La n° 1 luxembourgeoise en est cette saison à sa onzième participation à ce tableau final et jamais elle n’est encore parvenue à rejoindre le 2e tour…Mais l’année 2019 pourrait bien être la bonne pour la joueuse eschoise. Pourquoi? Parce que le tirage au sort… auquel elle a elle-même participé samedi lui a été favorable. Pour une fois diront ceux qui ont pris l’habitude de venir la voir jouer à Kockelscheuer…«Cette histoire de victoire ici, c’est un sujet pour les médias», souriait ainsi Tim Sommer, le mari et entraîneur de la 168e joueuse mondiale. «Mandy a souvent affronté des filles d’un gros calibre ici (NDLR : la Chinoise Li, la Danoise Wozniacki, l’Allemande Petkovic, l’Espagnole Navarro, la Serbe Jankovic…). Des filles qu’elle n’a pas pour habitude de battre non plus sur d’autres tournois. Ce n’est pas propre à ce rendez-vous luxembourgeois. Ici, ses matches ont régulièrement été serrés et elle a souvent bien joué. Mais pour en venir à cette saison, j’ai forcément un meilleur sentiment que ces dernières années. Déjà parce que Mandy a déjà battu par le passé son adversaire.»«Si elle joue lent et haut dans son revers» Cette joueuse qui est à la portée de l’Eschoise, c’est la Tchèque Denisa Allertova. Et elle a perdu son seul duel avec Minella. C’était en 2018 sur la terre battue de Nuremberg. À 26 ans, Allertova est actuellement classée 251e à la WTA. Et elle ne doit sa place ici qu’à un classement protégé (de 109e joueuse mondiale) qu’elle possédait avant d’être blessée 6 mois au dos en 2018.«C’est un match qui va se jouer au mental. Si Mandy reste cool et parvient à gérer la vitesse de balle de son adversaire, elle sera la favorite. Car elle possède plus de facilités, plus d’armes que son adversaire.»Une adversaire tchèque qui reste sur trois éliminations au 1er tour depuis qu’elle avait réussi à s’extraire des qualifications de l’US Open fin août. La semaine dernière, elle a ainsi été sortie en qualifications à Linz sur un score sec (6-2, 6-0) par la Belge Ysaline Bonaventure (25 ans, WTA 113). «Bonaventure est une gauchère qui met beaucoup de lift dans ses coups. Ce match, c’est l’exemple parfait de comment il faut faire pour vaincre Allertova! Si Mandy parvient à jouer lent et haut dans son revers, elle peut la battre. C’est d’ailleurs comme ça qu’elle l’avait vaincue à Nuremberg…» Il ne reste plus qu’à le réussir à nouveau…Julien Carette Partagerlast_img read more