Jokowi reiterates commitment to indigenous rights

first_imgInstead of attending the fifth congress of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago last week in Sumatra as planned, Jokowi invited representatives of the organization to meet in Jakarta on Wednesday.He told them he would push parliament to pass a law on indigenous rights and said he would form a task force to support the movement.The administration is planning to recognize the rights of 18 more communities to the forests they call home, an area spanning a total of 590,000 hectares, the president said. Indonesian President Joko Widodo addressed a contingent of indigenous leaders in Jakarta on Wednesday, reassuring them of his commitment to their civil rights movement in a Muslim-majority archipelago nation of 250 million people.The meeting came a few days after the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN) staged its fifth congress in North Sumatra. Jokowi, as he is popularly known, had been scheduled to attend the event but backed out at the last minute to inaugurate a border post in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo island. So he invited them to the Presidential Palace instead.Flanked by Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar and Presidential Chief of Staff Teten Masduki, Jokowi said he would strive to accelerate the passage by parliament of a long-awaited bill on indigenous rights.He also said he would instruct the Ministry of Home Affairs to push district heads around the country to recognize the indigenous groups in their jurisdictions, a prerequisite before the government can acknowledge these communities’ customary land rights.Last December, Jokowi recognized the rights of nine communities to the forests they call home, presumably giving them control over an area spanning a total of around 13,000 hectares (32,000 acres). On Wednesday he said was preparing 18 more orders covering a total of 590,000 hectares.Jokowi has promised to rezone 12.7 million hectares of land under the various “social forestry” schemes; AMAN has mapped more than 8 million hectares out of what it says is a total of around 40 million hectares that belongs to the nation’s indigenous groups.“I’m sure that if this land is given to indigenous peoples, it will be better protected and better maintained — I’ve seen it myself,” Jokowi said in his remarks, earning a round of applause.Jokowi addresses indigenous leaders on Wednesday. Photo courtesy of the Presidential Press BureauThe president also reiterated his commitment to form a task force on indigenous rights, which AMAN leaders had hoped he would announce at their congress. The task force is seen as key to coordinating the administration’s often unwieldy efforts toward indigenous rights.“Even though the government’s intentions are good, the results are not necessarily good,” said Rukka Sombolinggi, who was selected as AMAN’s next secretary general last week. “That’s why the task force is crucial for us.”Banner image: Indonesian President Jokowi addresses indigenous leaders at a meeting in Jakarta on Mar. 22. Photo courtesy of the Presidential Press Bureau Community Forestry, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

Healthy soils can boost food security and climate resilience for millions (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Agriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change And Food, Climate Change Policy, Commentary, Deforestation, Desertification, Deserts, Drought, Editorials, Environment, Food Crisis, food security, Grasslands, Livestock, Researcher Perspective Series, Savannas, Soil Carbon, Subsistence Agriculture, Sustainability center_img Drylands take centre stage this week as world leaders gather in Ordos, in the Inner Mongolia region of China, for the thirteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD COP13).The health of many dryland ecosystems has declined dramatically over recent decades, largely due to unsustainable farming methods, increasing drought, deforestation, and clearance of natural grasslands.Changing the way drylands are farmed to conserve life underground is the only way of restoring these ecosystems and the agricultural outputs they sustain.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Tougou village in northern Burkina Faso has a challenging climate for farming. During the dry season, which lasts from November to May, the Harmattan blows — a dry, dusty wind coming in from the Sahara. Drought alternates with periods of flooding, sapping soil fertility and destroying crops.Despite the climate, villagers in Tougou have recently been able to double their crops of millet and sorghum within just a year, largely thanks to a checkerboard pattern of pits filled with manure they dig across their fields. These pits, known as zaï, help concentrate precious water and nutrients at the plant’s base and attract termites, whose tunnels break up the soil, bringing it back to life.Drylands take centre stage this week as world leaders gather in Ordos, in the Inner Mongolia region of China, for the thirteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD COP13).When healthy, drylands like those stretching across northern Burkina Faso are covered in a rich but fragile fabric of life, most of which is hidden underground. Rain-fed agriculture in these regions depends on underground ecosystems of bacteria, fungi, termites, and other species that keep the soil fertile.But the health of many dryland ecosystems has declined dramatically over recent decades, largely due to unsustainable farming methods, increasing drought, deforestation, and clearance of natural grasslands. Burkina Faso is hardest hit of all of Western Africa, with 40 percent of its soils severely degraded. Desertification is costing the country nine percent of national agricultural GDP annually.The problem extends far beyond Burkina Faso. Drylands — including deserts, grasslands, and savannahs — stretch over 40 percent of the Earth’s surface and are home to a third of the global population, including some of the poorest communities in the world. Changing the way drylands are farmed to conserve life underground is the only way of restoring these ecosystems and the agricultural outputs they sustain.From the savannahs of Africa to the Mongolian steppe, traditional farming methods such as zaï, nomadic livestock herding, and agroforestry, which involves planting trees alongside crops to maintain soil moisture, work in symbiosis with nature. Conservation agriculture is another sustainable farming method based around maintaining vegetation cover, rotating crops, and minimising soil disturbance.Making of zaï pits in Tougou village, Burkina Faso. Photo Credit: IUCN/Sylvain Zabre.Globally, sustainable farming methods are on the rise. Agroforestry and conservation agriculture are both increasing, with over eight percent of all cropland estimated to be under conservation agriculture (Friedrich et al., 2012; Jat et al., 2014) and as much as 43 percent under agroforestry, according to estimates (Nair et al., 2009; Zomer et al., 2014).Certain regions are lagging far behind, however, most notably sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. These areas face the greatest demand to increase food production due to their low current production levels combined with some of the highest rates of population growth in the world. Traditional methods such as zaï, implemented by local communities with support from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), help develop sustainable agriculture based on living soils.Restoring soil biodiversity and reviving ecosystem services is necessary to reverse land degradation, which is costing up to $10.6 trillion every year, equivalent to 17 percent of global gross domestic product. These efforts increase soil’s resilience and ability to rebound to functional health after a severe disturbance. Wider society also benefits when farmers help conserve soil biodiversity: healthy soil mitigates climate, makes food production more resilient, and reduces the risk of drought and flood. These benefits may hold the key to promoting good practices and a shift towards large-scale adoption of more sustainable land management.Sustainable farming methods conserve biodiversity both above and, crucially, below the earth’s surface. This is especially important in dryland areas. Underground-dwelling creatures play a vital role in infiltrating and storing moisture. They also accelerate the decomposition of plant residues, converting organically held nutrients into mineral forms, like nitrogen, available for renewed plant uptake.Local researchers in Peru participating in a project to manage grasslands more sustainably. Photo Credit: Anelí Gómez.As global momentum to conserve drylands gathers in Inner Mongolia this week, we are reminded that these ecosystems are crucial to sustaining the global food supply and mitigating and adapting to climate change. One global goal that countries are striving to achieve to this effect — Land Degradation Neutrality — will directly depend on changing the way the agricultural sector conserves soil biodiversity. The goal, which aims to maintain or even improve the amount of healthy and productive land resources over time, has multiple benefits, simultaneously addressing food and water security, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and biodiversity conservation. It feeds directly into the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change. But it will fail without appropriate policy and investment mechanisms to conserve soil biodiversity.More attention is also required from national policy makers to encourage farmers to protect and increase soil organic carbon — the microbes, fungi, and invertebrates, as well as root matter and decomposing vegetation, found in soil. Soil organic carbon is used as a principle indicator of land degradation. It contributes to the fertility of the soil and to its capacity to hold water, determining the soil’s capacity to produce food and to support other biodiversity. Many countries lack the facilities to routinely monitor soil organic carbon, which tends to be treated as a useful by-product rather than an explicit objective of sustainable land management. At the same time, some agricultural practices lead to large losses in soil organic matter that are not monitored or regulated, despite the major cost they represent to society.The benefits of sustainable land management, and of conserving soil biodiversity, are felt across multiple sectors, including agriculture, water, cities, and wildlife, and may not be effectively safeguarded if they are made the sole responsibility of one sector. Policies are needed to guide investments that provide multiple benefits and these benefits need to be monitored and rewarded.The importance of conserving soil biodiversity is becoming clearer thanks to dialogue at the UNCCD conference in Ordos, although it is well understood by millions of farmers around the world.Pacodé Savadongo is among the villagers of Tougou, Burkina Faso, who have struggled to feed their families in the challenging dryland conditions. “Practices like zaï help us live better,” he says.Pacode Savadogo, farmer, Tougou village, Burkina Faso. Photo Credit: IUCN/Fabiola Monty.Horses in Mongolia. Photo Credit: Goska Bonnaveira.Inger Andersen is Director General of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).last_img read more

Can the Javan rhino be saved before disaster strikes?

first_imgThe Javan rhinoceros has been reduced to a single population of around 60 individuals in an area prone to natural disasters.Although the entire species now lives in a single national park, Javan rhinos are difficult to study and researchers are still working to understand the behavior of both individual animals and the population as a wholeWork to expand the existing habitat is underway, but experts agree establishing a second population is critical for the species’ survival. As the old saying warns, it’s bad enough to put all your eggs in one basket. If you have to, though, at least try not to leave that basket sitting on the beach under an active volcano.Unfortunately, that’s basically the situation of the last population of the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus).The Javan rhino was once found throughout Southeast Asia, but since the poaching of the last member of its mainland subspecies in Vietnam in 2009, its only population is found in Ujung Kulon National Park on the western tip of Indonesia’s Java Island. Such a limited geographic distribution puts any species at risk, but to make matters worse, this location is subject to a number of hazards. One is the volcano Anak Krakatau, growing basically right next door where the famous and deadly Krakatoa once stood.Recently published work also shows that the locations the rhinos prefer are at high risk from tsunamis. On the bright side, this research is collecting previously unknown information that’s crucial for ensuring the future of this little-known species. However, the findings also add to the pressure to find a location for a second population — a process that’s far from simple.Ujung Kulon National Park sits on the western tip of Java Island, and is one of a few intact forested areas on the densely populated island. Map created using Map For Environment.Where the rhinos areAlthough they are all in a limited area, it’s not easy to study these animals, and their exact distribution and number remain unclear. Recently published work analyzing data collected through 2013 from 160 camera traps has shed some light on these questions, as well as revealing important details about the population.Analysis of the data showed that rhino density within the park varies according to the terrain. To put it simply, coauthor Barney Long said, “Rhinos in Ujung Kulon National Park like lower elevation forest with lots of wallows.”This preference for lower elevations near the coast is what puts them at risk. Java lies in a part of the world where earthquakes, which can cause tsunamis, are frequent. More than 30 quakes of magnitude seven or more have occurred in the last 30 years, and these have commonly caused tsunamis of 20–30 meters above sea level at their furthest point inland along the coasts of Java and Sumatra.A tsunami of 30 meters would inundate all of the rhino’s preferred habitat, and even smaller ones would affect a substantial proportion of the population. These are far from unheard-of events: both the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and 2006 West Java Tsunami produced wave heights and run-up that would have drowned most of the world’s remaining Javan rhinos if they’d occurred in the right (or wrong) place.One of Ujung Kulon’s rhinos. The species enjoys spending time in wet, muddy areas. Image courtesy of Sugeng Hendratno/WWF.Who the rhinos areBecause of these risks, conservationists agree on the urgent need to move some rhinos to appropriate habitat elsewhere. “All stakeholders, including key senior level officials of Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry, agree that at least one new population needs to be established,” said Long. “It is critical for the long-term survival of the species that a second population is established as the rhinos in Ujung Kulon are too vulnerable to too many significant threats.”What recent research has found about their numbers adds to the importance of such a plan, because although the rhinos are breeding successfully, the size of the population is not increasing.“The population appears to be stagnant at about 60,” Long said, and there’s a likely reason for this: “When rhinos hit carrying capacity, their breeding stops.”Moving some of the rhinos, then, will not only remove part of the population from risk, but also means that the ones that remain are likely to breed faster. As Long observes, such translocations have been successful in increasing numbers for the greater one-horned rhino (Rhinoceros unicornis) in India and Nepal. “Where there is high density, breeding is low. Move some and both breed faster.”But once a suitable location is decided on, you can’t simply scoop-up and move the first rhinos you happen to catch. To ensure that populations in both locations are viable, it’s crucial to have detailed information about individual rhinos — something researchers are still working to gather and analyze.“This monitoring gives us an idea of what’s going on the ground — we’ll see where rhinos are moving, which females have bred, which males are wandering around not meeting any females,” said Long.The information about individuals will give them an idea of which rhinos should be moved and which left behind. “Old male rhinos often become sterile, but are keeping other males away from their females,” said Long. “A female of breeding age that isn’t breeding right now can be moved — conversely don’t move the ones that are breeding successfully.”Rhino patrol in Ujung Kulon park. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Renovations for rhinosEfforts are also being made to increase the carrying capacity of the park by improving the condition of the habitat. One important strategy is removal of an invasive plant, the arenga palm (Arenga 0btusifolia), whose presence reduces the food available to rhinos.“The palm contains sodium oxalate which helps defend it against herbivores such as rhinos, wild cattle and deer,” said Sectionov Inov, Indonesia liaison for the International Rhino Foundation (IRF). “Also, where arenga palm dominates, the growth of other plant species, including many Javan rhino food plants, is suppressed.”A successful ongoing project to increase the usable habitat is the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area (JRSCA or JaRhiSCA), a joint project of the Rhino Foundation of Indonesia (YABI), the IRF and the Ujung Kulon National Park.The JRSCA, an area of about 5,300 hectares (20.5 square miles) in the southern part of the Gunung Honje area along Ujong Kulon’s eastern boundary, is fenced on the sides close to villages to prevent access by livestock. It’s estimated that about 1,730 hectares are dominated by arenga palm. But since 2011, about 95 hectares of arenga have been removed, and the number of individual rhinos observed to use the area has increased from two to nine, according to Inov.This program demonstrates that it could be possible to renovate additional habitat, and that other areas are suitable, but conflicting needs must be resolved first. “It would be ideal if the National Park could free the illegally occupied lowlands of the National Park Gunung Honje and restore the land into another extension of the habitat,” said Widodo Ramono, executive director of YABI. People were successfully relocated from the current reserve, but this needs to be done thoughtfully, both for humanitarian reasons and to ensure their support for the park.A rhino protection unit patrols Ujung Kulon National Park by water. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Expansion isn’t enoughStill, no matter how much habitat can be made useful, it’s clear that the risks of having the entire population in one geographic location are just too high. In addition to tsunamis or earthquakes, a single population could be wiped out by disease, including those transmitted by nearby livestock.But the question is where. A joint workshop of conservation organizations in 2015 set in motion a project to assess potential sites. Political, human, and environmental considerations all need to be juggled, and there’s no perfect solution.“From the options that we’ve looked into on Java, we have shortlisted two locations, namely Cikeusik and Cikepuh,” said Ramono. “And then we inclined more towards Cikepuh because it is the most viable.”“Most viable” doesn’t mean “no problems,” however. Although the area is safer from tsunamis and is already a wildlife reserve, there are many conflicting interests. “Number one it’s a military zone, number two it’s been nominated to be an eco-park by the Sukabumi district office,” said Ramono. “And then, the area is used by locals for shepherding, for seasonal agricultural farming, and many other issues that need to be resolved.”Ramono said he hopes a final decision will be made by the end of the year, but he estimates that once settled, it will take 15 years to make the Cikepuh safe for rhinos.He also believes that locations outside Java also need to be considered for additional populations, but this is politically difficult and will require more education and outreach, “so that regions that have rhinos are willing to let go of the rhinos to other locations,” he said. “What we are concerned about is the species — about how to save the species.”And many who share this concern feel there is no time to lose. “Protection and activities that promote the growth of the rhino population in Ujung Kulon are critical to the survival and recovery of the species, but being satisfied with a single population that can only expand to a handful more individuals is not sensible,” said Long. “We must manage the species or population growth and establish new populations to reduce the species’ extinction risk concurrently with good management of Ujung Kulon. All stakeholders must accelerate their efforts in this regard before tragedy strikes.”The shore of Pecuang Island, part of Ujung Kulon National Park. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Citation:Setiawan, R., Gerber, B. D., Rahmat, U. M., Daryan, D., Firdaus, A. Y., Haryono, M., Khairani, K. O., Kurniawan, Y., Long, B., Lyet, A., Muhiban, M., Mahmud, R., Muhtarom, A., Purastuti, E., Ramono, W. S., Subrata, D. and Sunarto, S. (2017), Preventing Global Extinction of the Javan Rhino: Tsunami Risk and Future Conservation Direction. Conservation Letters. doi:10.1111/conl.12366.Mongabay staff writer Basten Gokkon contributed to this report.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Correction: this article was modified Sept. 27 to correct the name of the species of arenga palm affecting Ujung Kulon National Park. Article published by Isabel Esterman Animals, Biodiversity, Camera Trapping, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Javan Rhinos, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Rhinos, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Brazil’s new deforestation numbers confirm the “Bolsonaro Effect” despite denials (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Just released preliminary figures for “2019” Brazilian Amazon deforestation (covering the August 2018-July 2019 period) show a 29.5 percent increase over the previous year, with 9,762 square kilometers (3,769 square miles) cleared, more than double the rate when Brazil’s famous deforestation decline ended in 2012.Despite this deforestation surge, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro government claims the increase is not unusual and equivalent to high deforestation rates seen several times since 2012. However, critics point to the administration’s rhetoric and environmental deregulation as part of the “Bolsonaro Effect,” leading to rampant deforestation.The government’s assertion of innocence fails to note that the new data only covers through July. In August 2019 the deforestation rate was 222 percent above the 2018 value; in September it ran 96 percent higher. The full “Bolsonaro effect” on deforestation won’t be on view until the complete “2020” numbers are released next November.To date, the administration has done nothing to change its inflammatory rhetoric or its anti-environmental polices, so there is every reason to expect that Brazilian deforestation levels will continue to soar. This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. INPE data showing deforestation within an August 1-July 31 timeframe. 2019 thus reflects the 12 months ending July 31 and doesn’t include deforestation from August through October. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.On November 18th the Brazilian government released a preliminary figure for “2019” Amazon deforestation — the August 2018-July 2019 period — showing a 29.5 percent increase over the previous year. A total of 9,762 square kilometers (3,769 square miles) was cleared in this period, more than double the rate when Brazil’s famous deforestation decline ended in 2012.The announcement was made jointly by the Brazilian ministers of science and technology and of environment, with the latter claiming that the numbers indicate that the Jair Bolsonaro presidential administration that came into office in January 2019 has not resulted in an increase in clearing rates. His argument was that this year’s increase is just part of the upward trend that has held since the low point in 2012.Unfortunately, the 2019 deforestation surge can definitely be blamed on the Bolsonaro administration, despite the changes in deforestation rate since 2012 having approached the percentage increase seen this year twice (in 2013 and 2016).Although this year’s percentage increase is only slightly higher than those in the two years with similar percentages, it should be remembered that the PRODES data released on November 18, 2019 only cover the year through July 31st. However, the deforestation rate in the succeeding months has exploded to levels far above those for the same months in the previous year: in August 2019 the deforestation rate was 222 percent above the 2018 value, and the September value was 96 percent higher. As a result, this part of the “Bolsonaro effect” will only be reflected in the data from the PRODES program of the National Institute of Space Research (INPE) when the “2020” numbers are released a year from now.Deforestation for the August 1-October 31 period in 2019 is pacing well ahead of the historic norm for the period. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.Deforestation for the January 1-October 31 period in 2019 is pacing well ahead of the historic norm for the period. Bolsonaro took office in January 2019. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.The surge of deforestation and burning is the result both of the constant anti-environmental rhetoric and of concrete actions in dismantling the country’s environmental agencies and effectively halting fines for illegal clearing. The rhetoric and institutional setbacks have been documented in detail in a paper published in Environmental Conservation.The discourse of the president and his minister of environment repeatedly suggest that environmental laws can be violated with impunity. A clear message was sent that there will be no consequences for such violations when the ministers of environment and agriculture visited an illegal soy plantation in an indigenous area in Mato Grosso, where they posed for photographs with the machinery and praised the operation.People at the deforestation frontier do not follow the publication of decrees and laws in the government’s official gazette or read the details of legal changes reported in major newspapers. Instead, their information comes from social media that rapidly spreads the news of each inflamed tirade by the president and his ministers against the government’s environmental agencies and against environmentalists and environmental NGOs. It is the climate generated by this discourse that influences behavior. This year, many people caught red-handed violating environmental laws responded immediately that the president has “liberated” everything.Deforestation has risen since 2012 due to the continual increase in forces driving forest loss, such as new and improved roads giving access to the forest, more population and more investment. The indirect effect of soy expansion has undoubtedly played an important role, with soy planters purchasing many cattle ranches in Mato Grosso state, including ranches in the Cerrado savanna in addition to those in former Amazon forest. These ranchers use the money from the land sales to then buy much cheaper land in Amazon forest farther north, especially in the state of Pará, where they clear forest on a large scale to establish new ranches. Pará has been the biggest contributor to deforestation since 2006, when it surpassed Mato Grosso as the champion deforester.Accumulated deforestation from August 1, 2013 through July 31, 2019 for the Brazilian Amazon. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.Prospects for 2020 are grim. The PRODES data for the nominal year “2020” will include the deforestation that has already occurred from August 2019 onward, which now totals 3,929 square kilometers (1,517 square miles) based on the DETER monitoring system. (The official total to be produced by the PRODES system will be even higher, since the DETER system misses some of the clearing.)The rainy season has now begun, but when the dry season comes again in 2020 one can expect another surge in deforestation. Nothing has changed in the presidential administration’s discourse, and the dismantling of the country’s environmental institutions continues. Various planned roads, dams and other projects in Amazonia imply more deforestation.Banner image: The Amazon rainforest on fire in August 2019. Most Amazon fires are intentionally set, often to clear new lands for cattle and crops. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Rodange de retour en DN : “L’expérience va servir”

first_img Partager Pourquoi ne pas avoir repensé du tout la défense ?On s’est attachés à observer la situation telle qu’elle était : on parle quand même de la meilleure défense de Promotion d’honneur de la saison passée. On peut faire avec parce que dans ce secteur, on a la quantité et la qualité. Cela n’aurait pas été logique de ramener du monde dans ce secteur, même si l’on sait qu’on parle de la DN et plus de la PH. Avant de signer, j’avais analysé l’équipe de près et j’ai vu des joueurs très concentrés quand l’équipe adverse a le ballon, des gars qui savent jouer sans ballon, qui savent gérer les moments faibles et qui ont surtout beaucoup de kilomètres dans les jambes. Domenico Micarelli a bien fait son travail dans ce domaine. Maintenant, on va juste essayer d’apporter quelques nouveautés, quelques idées supplémentaires.Vous allez jouer d’entrée Strassen, Etzella et Mühlenbach : condamnés à être performants dès le début ?Je sais très bien ce que tout le monde du football dit tout le temps : il n’y a aucun match facile. Mais bon, c’est surtout que quand on commence une saison, il faut un objectif clair, une philosophie de jeu qui fasse qu’on n’ait pas besoin de faire trop de différence, justement, entre la façon d’aborder un match d’un club à l’autre. Pour ça, on doit structurer. Tout le club. Il n’y a pas que le travail de terrain qui rapporte des points, mais aussi tout le travail autour et de ce point de vue-là, il est interdit de se relâcher, pas même lors d’une trêve internationale. L’expérience d’il y a deux ans (NDLR : Rodange avait été relégué un an après son accession à la DN) va servir. Quand on a un des plus petits budgets de DN, chaque détail compte. Et il faut beaucoup de réunions pour améliorer les choses. Et à plusieurs. Tout ne doit pas venir d’une ou deux têtes pensantes. Tout le monde va peser dans la balance, pas seulement les joueurs.Qu’est-ce qui peut faire la différence pour Rodange cette saison ?Un choix stratégique très intéressant. Nous avons décidé de limiter le groupe à 19/20 joueurs seulement au lieu des 23/24 qu’on trouve ailleurs. Il y aura bien un ou deux juniors avec nous mais on voulait réduire le cadre. Oui, ce sera peut-être un peu court, mais on espère bien travailler physiquement pour éviter les blessures.On a privilégié la qualité à la quantité.C’est votre première fois en DN vous l’abordez comment ?C’est un travail que je souhaitais obtenir pour pouvoir travailler enfin dans de bonnes conditions. Il faut que je m’adapte le plus vite possible, mais je m’y suis préparé longuement, je ne pense pas devoir passer par un temps de découverte. J’ai beaucoup appris en PH, notamment à devoir composer avec des difficultés financières. J’ai pu améliorer des choses dans des situations pas faciles et j’ai appris de tout le monde et de tous mes clubs, que je remercie d’ailleurs. Cette expérience-là ne s’achète pas au supermarché et elle va me servir tout particulièrement avec Rodange : il y a toute une partie psychologique très importante. Je sais par avance quand les joueurs auront des coups de mou et quand ça ira mieux. Je sais à quel rythme cela surviendra.Entretien avec Julien Mollereau Champion de PH pour la première fois, Rodange retrouve la BGL Ligue avec à sa tête un nouvel entraîneur, Vitor Pereira, qui succède sur le banc à Domenico Micarelli.Pourquoi avoir repensé toute l’attaque ?Vitor Pereira : Nous étions face à une certaine situation avec le départ d’El Guerrab, qui amenait sa vivacité. Cela nous a forcés à nous dire qu’on allait rechercher des gars dynamiques pour amener de la rapidité. Cela a été pensé. En plus, nous avions des opportunités pour prendre des joueurs de valeur. Et ce n’est pas si facile pour un club comme Rodange de les attirer. On a des limites budgétaires, il nous faut bien étudier notre affaire, ne pas se tromper. On ne peut pas se créer des problèmes. Mais on est bien organisés, il y a une bonne structure dans ce club et les joueurs commencent à le remarquer. Ce ne sont pas que les conditions d’entraînement, mais aussi un comité large qui apporte des réponses aux besoins de chacun. Cela commence à se savoir.last_img read more

Découvrir le «Shot Out» à Hesperange ce samedi

first_imgLe programme17 h – 17 h 50 : échauffement18 h : présentation des athlètes18 h 10 : qualifications puis KO système20 h : remise des prix Le poids sera à l’honneur samedi avec la participation de Bob Bertemes et de Tom Habscheid à un “Shot Out” au centre sportif d’Hesperange. Les deux Luxembourgeois font partie de l’élite mondiale de leur discipline. Rendez-vous dès 16 heures, entrée libre !Le «Shot Out» est une manifestation originale née dans l’esprit de Nico Peters, sponsor des deux lanceurs luxembourgeois. L’idée est de proposer une compétition de haut niveau mais également ludique pour faire découvrir la discipline du poids.Élimination directe Contrairement à un concours traditionnel, ici seuls deux lancers de qualification ont lieu à l’issue desquels un classement est effectué. Par la suite, on se sert de ce classement pour établir la liste des rencontres en mode KO avec des quarts de finale, demi-finales puis finale à la fois en valide et en paralympique.Ce samedi, les Luxembourgeois auront face à eux des adversaires redoutables dont le Serbe Asmir Kolasinac, qui a déjà lancé à 21,58 m pour Bob Bertemes, ou l’Allemand Niko Kappel, champion du monde en 2016 pour Tom Habscheid.L’événement débute à 16 h par un programme social afin de faire découvrir la discipline aux spectateurs (entrée libre).Romain Haascenter_img Partagerlast_img read more

Klopp : «La plus grande qualités de mes garçons, c’est qu’ils n’écoutent pas vraiment»

first_imgJürgen Klopp n’est donc pas du genre à vendre la peau de l’ours avant de l’avoir tué.LQ/AFP Partager L’entraîneur de Liverpool en a marre qu’on lui dise que le titre de champion semble tendre les bras aux Reds.Vainqueur jeudi soir à Leicester, son dauphin, sur un score sans appel (0-4) lors de la 19e journée de Premier League, Liverpool compte désormais 13 points d’avance sur son premier poursuivant.Si le club de la Mersey est idéalement parti pour décrocher le 19e titre de champion d’Angleterre de son histoire, le premier depuis 30 ans, Jürgen Klopp se veut prudent. Pire, le technicien allemand s’est montré agacé, jeudi soir, par un journaliste lui demandant si le titre était déjà joué. «Je n’en ai vraiment rien à faire. J’ai été confronté à cette question un certain nombre de fois déjà, et avec tout ce qui nous entoure, la plus grande qualité de mes garçons, c’est qu’ils n’écoutent pas vraiment. Nous sommes entièrement concentrés sur ce que nous avons à faire. Je suis très doué pour faire la fête, mes amis vous le diront, mais je ne veux jamais faire la fête sans raison. S’il y a quelque chose à célébrer, je vous le dirai. En attendant, on continue à travailler.»last_img read more

[BGL Ligue] Mathias Jänisch à Niederkorn : la signature est imminente !

first_imgLe Quotidien Le capitaine du FC Differdange, Mathias Jänisch, devrait signer “en début de semaine prochaine” son transfert vers le Progrès Niederkorn.Le FC Differdange a donc cédé : selon nos informations, le défenseur international devrait signer en début de semaine son transfert vers le Progrès. Chez le rival donc. Son envie de partir dans un club mieux positionné pour jouer le titre (2e du championnat) était trop forte. Mathias Jänisch était initialement plutôt attendu pour cet été. Seul un accord arrangeant a pu permettre un transfert plus rapide.«Nous sommes évidemment intéressés [par un transfert dès l’hiver] mais pas à n’importe quel prix», nous confiait le directeur sportif de Niederkorn, Thomas Gilgemann, il y a deux semaines. Voilà qui est fait ! Partagerlast_img read more

[Foot US] : Tennessee détrône New England et Tom Brady

first_imgCe dernier n’a jamais réussi à guider les “Pats” lors d’une seconde période où la défense adverse, entraînée par Mike Vrabel, qui fut trois fois titré en tant que joueur avec… New England, a presque toujours parfaitement lu ses choix. Quid de l’avenir de Brady?La grande question qui se pose à présent est de savoir quelle décision va prendre Brady pour la suite de sa carrière. Agent libre à l’issue de cette saison, le sextuple vainqueur du Super Bowl peut choisir de poursuivre avec New England, mais aussi de changer de club ou alors de prendre sa retraite.A Houston, l’émotion était très forte aussi, mais plus joyeuse après la qualification des Texans, pourtant menés 16-0, avant de renverser la situation et battre Buffalo. Au bout du suspense, dans un match longtemps promis aux Bills, Houston a pu compter sur la botte de Ka’imi Fairbairn pour transformer une ultime tentative au pied durant la prolongation. Auparavant, l’homme fort avait été le quarterback Deshaun Watson, qui a inscrit un touchdown à la course et a lancé une passe décisive pour un autre touchdown de Carlos Hyde, remontant ainsi le déficit de seize points qu’ils accusaient encore au début du troisième quart-temps. “C’est pour vivre ces moments, ces émotions, qu’on se bat pour revenir, avec tous ces gars dans l’équipe. Tout ce dont a besoin cette équipe c’est une petite étincelle, c’est tout ce dont elle a besoin quand son quarterback s’appelle Deshaun Watson”, a réagi le défenseur des Texans J.J Watt.Dimanche, deux autres matches du premier tour sont au programme: New Orleans affronte Minnesota et Philadelphie joue contre Seattle. Plus tôt dans la journée les Houston Texans ont été les premiers à se qualifier pour le 2e tour, en battant les Buffalo Bills après prolongation (22-19). En demi-finale de la conférence américaine, Tennessee aura la rude tâche d’affronter les Baltimore Ravens, meilleure équipe de la saison régulière et exemptée à ce titre de premier tour. Houston aura aussi fort à faire face aux Kansas City Chiefs, également exemptés pour avoir fini avec le deuxième meilleur bilan.Les Titans n’ont pas volé leur victoire, construite avec un touchdown à la course de Derrick Henry, le jour de ses 26 ans, et scellée comme un symbole par un autre touchdown de l’ancien Patriot Logan Ryan, qui a intercepté une passe de Brady à 9 secondes du terme. New England, tenant du titre, a été éliminé (20-13) samedi dès le 1er tour des play-offs par les Tennessee Titans, un cuisant échec qui pourrait précéder la fin de l’ère Tom Brady chez les Patriots, voire de sa carrière à 42 ans. Partagerlast_img read more

Australie : Federer, Nadal et Serena Williams joueront pour lever des fonds

first_img Partager Les superstars du tennis Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal et Serena Williams participeront aux matches-exhibition de levée de fonds pour l’Australie, ravagée par de gigantesques incendies, ont annoncé mercredi les organisateurs.Naomi Osaka, Caroline Wozniacki, Nick Kyrgios et Stefanos Tsitsipas seront également à l’affiche de ces matches-exhibition prévus le 15 janvier à Melbourne où doit avoir lieu une semaine plus tard l’Open d’Australie.Les incendies qui ravagent l’île-continent depuis septembre et ont tué 25 personnes, ont déclenché un élan de solidarité de sportifs face à cette catastrophe environnementale. La numéro un mondiale Ashleigh Barty a promis de reverser ses gains du Tournoi de Brisbane à la Croix-Rouge pour aider les victimes, tandis que les organisateurs de l’ATP Cup, compétition masculine par équipes qui se tient en ce moment en Australie, ont promis de donner 100 dollars australiens (environ 62 euros) par ace.La fumée provoquée par les incendies a un temps fait craindre un report ou une annulation du premier tournoi du Grand Chelem de l’année, mais le patron de la Fédération australienne Craig Tiley a écarté mardi cette hypothèse.LQ/AFPA lire aussi sur ce sujet (cliquer sur l’image) :Minella en Australie : «Il y a une odeur de barbecue»last_img read more