Rose played key role in bonding meal despite Poch pushing him to brink

first_imgDANNY ROSE took the lead in planning Spurs’ team bonding trip to swanky Mayfair restaurant Novikov last Thursday.The left-back was linked with a move away from the club all summer but still stepped up to the plate to organise the night out.2 Danny Rose was heavily involved in organising Spurs’ night out to posh Mayfair restaurant NovikovThe struggling Tottenham stars showed their support for under-fire Pochettino by treating him to a slap-up meal at the posh Mayfair eatery.Spurs players texted the Argentine boss asking him to meet them at Novikov – a favourite dining spot for millionaire Premier League footballers.And Rose was heavily involved, according to the Mail.It comes just months after Spurs made it clear they were ready to let Rose leave the club.The left-back, 29, was left out of Tottenham’s pre-season tour of Asia so he could find a new club to join.FALTERING FORMPoch’s future and morale among the squad has been heavily called into question this season following a worrying drop in form.And Rose himself was criticised for Liverpool’s second goal at Anfield on Sunday in Tottenham’s latest defeat – a 2-1 loss at the Premier League leaders.But the Argentine boss is confident the team trip will boost results on the pitch.Speaking after the jaunt, he said: “It was very good, it was very nice, very kind of them to invite the coaching staff.MOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’NEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for him”It was busy. We spent a few hours there and it is always nice to see people in a different environment.”It is going to help in the long-term. You cannot measure how much it will help, 20 per cent, 30 per cent.”In the dynamic of the group, this team bonding, for different players or the new players, makes the group stronger.”2Harry Kane tells Spurs they must be ‘braver’ as striker admits there are NO positives to take from Liverpool losslast_img read more

Notorious elephant poacher, ‘The Devil’, sentenced to 12 years in jail

first_imgAnimals, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Trade, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poachers, Poaching, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Mariango was arrested in October 2015 with his brothers Lucas Mathayo Malyango and Abdallah Ally Chaoga while attempting to smuggle 118 tusks worth over $863,000.Aged 47, Mariango was one of the poachers featured in the Netflix documentary film, The Ivory Game, produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio.He also stands accused of supplying ivory to Yang Feng Glan, a Chinese national nicknamed “Queen of Ivory,” who is on trial in Tanzania for smuggling ivory worth $2.5 million. On March 3, a Tanzanian court sentenced one of the country’s most wanted elephant poachers to 12 years in prison.Boniface Matthew Mariango, nicknamed “The Devil” by law enforcement officials (or “Shetani” in Kiswahili), stands accused of killing thousands of elephants and of having links to 15 poaching gangs in five countries: Tanzania, Burundi, Zambia, Mozambique and southern Kenya.He was arrested in October 2015 with his brothers Lucas Mathayo Malyango and Abdallah Ally Chaoga while attempting to smuggle 118 tusks worth over $863,000. Tanzania’s National and Transnational Serious Crimes Investigation Unit (NTSCIU) caught the men on the outskirts of Dar es Salaam after a manhunt that lasted over a year.Mariango, aged 47, was one of the poachers featured in the Netflix documentary film, The Ivory Game, produced by Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio.“WWF congratulates the Tanzanian authorities involved in Shetani’s arrest and successful prosecution,” Amani Ngusaru, WWF-Tanzania Country Director, said in a statement. “Poaching elephants for ivory is robbing Tanzania of its heritage. This prosecution sends out a strong message that Tanzania’s authorities are taking it seriously and are working to eliminate poaching in the country.”#Tanzania jails notorious #elephant poacher, nicknamed #Shetani, has been sentenced to 12 years in prison https://t.co/lUoKQURJPR pic.twitter.com/UD2d15xCDE— WildLeaks (@Wildleaks) March 6, 2017Mariango has a few other pending cases against him. He also stands accused of supplying ivory to Yang Feng Glan, a Chinese national nicknamed “Queen of Ivory,” who is on trial in Tanzania for smuggling 706 elephant tusks with a street value of $2.5 million in 2015.“This sentencing is a message to the people that the government of Tanzania is serious, and is going to catch and make sure that the big guys are prosecuted,” Robert Munde, Assistant Director of Tanzania’s anti-poaching unit, told CGTN Africa.About 30,000 African elephants are killed for their ivory every year, with Tanzania being one of the worst affected areas. A recent report found that the country lost 60 percent of its elephant population in just five years, between 2009 and 2014.China is one of the world’s biggest markets for ivory. But in December last year, the Chinese government announced that it would close its domestic commercial ivory market by the end of 2017, a move conservation groups have called a “game-changer” for elephants.About 30,000 elephants are killed for their ivory every year. Photo by Rhett Butler.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesian agribusiness giant APRIL outed in Paradise Papers

first_imgBanner image: Drainage canals bisect a peatland planted with pulpwood trees on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Article published by mongabayauthor Anonymous Companies, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corruption, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Journalism, Plantations, Rainforests, Transparency, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Leaked corporate records reveal the offshore dealings of APRIL, one of Indonesia’s largest pulp and paper companies.APRIL is one of 12 Asian forest-products giants that appear in the Paradise Papers.APRIL is owned by the super-rich Tanoto family. Indonesia’s second-largest pulp and paper firm routed billions of dollars through a network of offshore shell companies, likely to minimize its tax burden in the Southeast Asian country, where it has drained vast swaths of carbon-rich peatland in order to establish vast timber estates.The company, APRIL, also sought the removal of an environmental condition from a $600 million loan it received from major banks in 2011.The revelations were published last week by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) as part of its reporting on the Paradise Papers, a leak of 13.4 million files that shine new light on how the world’s richest individuals and corporations hide their wealth in secrecy jurisdictions. Most of the documents come from the Bermuda-based law firm Appleby. They were leaked to a pair of reporters at the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung and then shared with the ICIJ and its media partners around the world.“[APRIL] has shuffled billions of dollars through a web of offshore companies stretching from the Cook Islands in the South Pacific to the British Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. … Experts told ICIJ that such arrangements often shift taxable profits away from jurisdictions that bear the social costs of resource exploitation to others that simply charge lower taxes,” the article reads.“They also said that the use of shell companies in loan transactions enables banks to claim only limited involvement with natural resources companies that flout environmental laws. When loans are provided to offshore subsidiaries, identifying responsible parties and holding them to account becomes much harder.”A drainage canal cuts through a Sumatran peat forest being cleared for pulpwood production. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.APRIL is controlled by the billionaire Tanoto family, whose patriarch, Sukanto Tanoto, rose to prominence during the 32-year regime of dictator Suharto. When Suharto held power, Indonesia lost an area of rainforest larger than Thailand, as conglomerates like APRIL ate through its natural wealth with the strongman president’s consent. Suharto topped Transparency International’s list of the world’s most corrupt leaders in 2004.Under consumer pressure, APRIL announced in 2015 that it had stopped deforesting. To feed its mills, it now sources timber grown on huge plantations in Sumatra and Borneo, where it is often mired in conflict with local communities.In a statement, APRIL said it follows all the rules in the jurisdictions where it operates, and cares about the environment and people more than profits.“RGE operates on the 5Cs business philosophy, which states that whatever we do must be good for the Community, good for the Country, good for the Climate, good for Customer, then only will it be good for the Company,” Royal Golden Eagle, the Tanoto-owned firm that manages APRIL, said in a separate statement.ICIJ deputy director Marina Walker tweeted, “Many of the offshore structures revealed in the #ParadisePapers are legal — and that, precisely, is the scandal.”Greenpeace said it wasn’t surprised by the news about APRIL’s offshore dealings.“April likes to publicly claim in its PR that its ‘good for the community’, yet here it is depriving the Indonesian Government of tax revenue by siphoning funds offshore. The company’s double standards are beyond outrageous,” Rusmadya Maharuddin, a forest campaigner with the NGO, said in a statement.Indonesia’s state-run conservation efforts and even its law enforcement regime are notoriously underfunded. A massive nature reserve in Borneo where a new population of critically endangered helmeted hornbills (Rhinoplax vigil) was recently discovered is patrolled by just three forest rangers, according to a scientist working there. Budget cuts at the environment ministry were cited as a reason that President Joko Widodo is running behind on his campaign pledge to rezone 127,000 square kilometers of land to be managed by local communities.“Every dollar locked up in a tax loophole is people’s money stolen from protecting Indonesia’s rainforests and peatlands,” Rusmadya said.The ICIJ wrote that APRIL is one of a dozen Asian forest-product giants that appear in the Paradise Papers. Their names are likely to be revealed in coming weeks as the organization continues to publish its findings.center_img FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Agroforestry boosts rice and biodiversity in India

first_imgAgroforestry is an ancient agricultural method covering 1 billion hectares globally; it combines trees and woody shrubs with crops to increase food security, mitigate the effects of climate change, and boost biodiversity.India has set a goal to increase its tree cover from the present 24 percent to 33 percent of its total area, primarily by promoting agroforestry in croplands.In West Bengal, the adoption of useful trees into paddy fields has boosted crop yields and crop diversity, and has also sparked a movement that champions organic cultivation methods.Agroforestry has been hailed as one of the top solutions to climate change because it sequesters much carbon dioxide above and below the soil surface. WEST BENGAL, India — For the tough, weather-beaten farmers in the rural heartland of West Bengal, agroforestry is an age-old tradition that even finds mention in their folklore.In the remote village of Bhattadighi, a group of women farmers observes a unique ritual, known as Paakh Pakhali or “welcoming birds,” in which they fill an earthen urn with water and top it with mango leaves and green coconut. Placed under a freshly planted neem tree sapling, it symbolizes the goddess of farming, Bhumi Lakshmi, whose mythical mount is a barn owl. The holy site is adorned with facsimiles of owls, painted storks, herons, egrets and other birds, all painted on white terracotta plates.Villagers adorn a sacred site with terra cotta birds beneath a freshly planted neem tree, beckoning them to the fields. Photo by Sudipto Mukherjee.“Our paddy plants are set to bloom within the next few days. We pray to the Goddess not just for a bountiful harvest, but also to send many owls and birds [to] our fields, to eat away the insects and rats,” says Malati Burman.The neem tree (Azadirachta indica) is also revered by the farmers during the festival for its strong pest-repellant properties. “The bitter leaves of the plant are added to our locally prepared insecticide and its branches are perfect for birds,” Burman says.For the farmers of this village within the Raiganj block of North Dinajpur district, paddy cultivation is not about modern industrialized monoculture farming, but developing multi-crop diversity. Here, miles of tender rice plant seedlings stretch out amid a maze of sprawling trees, shrubs and vines that conjure the appearance of a forest: Dhaan Bagan, or paddy garden, as locals call it.But the trees aren’t there just as scenic dressing. “With forest covers dwindling and giving way to agricultural lands, such landscapes can largely compensate for environmental loss and mitigate climate change impacts,” says Om Prakash Chaturvedi, director of the Central Agroforestry Research Institute. Trees also help retain moisture in the soil and put a check on erosion from storms and gales, he says.Paddy ponds surrounded by trees in Ramchandrapur village of South Dinajpur. Photo by Moushumi Basu for Mongabay.India has set a high target for increasing its tree cover from the present 24 percent to 33 percent of its total area, primarily by promoting agroforestry in croplands, says Chaturvedi. Some 174,500 square kilometers (67,375 square miles) of land in India is cultivated through agroforestry, according to the latest remote sensing data from the Central Agroforestry Research Institute. In West Bengal alone, agroforestry is practiced across 1,800 square kilometers (695 square miles) of the state, according to Pratap Kumar Dhara of the Bidhan Chandra Agricultural University.The benefits of agroforestry are widely acknowledged, including by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In its manual “Agroforestry in rice-production landscapes in Southeast Asia” (pdf) it states: “Integrating trees into rice-production landscapes [helps] reduce temperatures and improve infiltration of water into the soil, store more carbon and diversify farm production, which lowers both climate and market risks. This adds up to greater adaptability and resilience not only for individual farmers and communities but also their environments.”Boon for biodiversityBiodiversity also flourishes in these diverse croplands. In West Bengal in October, golden yellow butterflies could be seen, while a fork-tailed black drongo bird (Dicrurus macrocercus) made its presence felt with raucous calls from atop miniature scaffolds supporting gourd vines. Nearby, egrets strutted around the watery fields, occasionally popping their heads in and out of the paddy seedlings, the young rice plants that haven’t sprouted grain yet, as a group of black-and-white myna birds hopped merrily on Sesbania pea plants.Edging the fields were trees like papaya, mango and banana, which provide nesting sites for migratory avian guests from the nearby Kulik Bird Sanctuary — Asian openbill storks (Anastomus oscitans), cormorants, herons and egrets, which also forage in the ponds.Black drongo perched on dried Sesbania pea plant above paddy. Photo courtesy of Chinmoy Das.“Birds, insects and butterflies seem to love our fields as there is no trace of chemical fertilizers or pesticides in them. Our paddy is of indigenous, folk variety,” says Chinmoy Das, a farmer from Hatia village in North Dinajpur. The trees and shrubs planted in and around the fields form an essential ecosystem developed with the right mix of multi-utility plants that also provide excellent perches for predatory birds, Das says.“Our paddy ecosystem harbors varied birds such as kingfishers, storks, little green bee-eaters [Merops orientalis] and insects [such] as spiders, dragonfly and damselfly, which control grain-eating pests and aphids,” says Shourin Chatterjee, from Abhirampur village in Bardhaman district.Ancient rice varietiesLike Das, more than 1,000 farmers from across 11 districts of West Bengal have taken to organic cultivation of folk rice varieties (FRVs), spread over more than 1,180 square kilometers (456 square miles) of land, says Anupam Paul, director of the Agricultural Training Centre (ATC) at the West Bengal Agriculture Department. Unlike modern, high-yielding varieties of rice, FRVs can to a great extent withstand weather aberrations due to climate change, while also cutting down on costs. Paul has helped revive more than 420 indigenous varieties of rice from the brink of extinction, with nearly 300 varieties of FRVs now grown by farmers across the state. These include 40 strains of aromatic and red rice each, 25 kinds of fine paddy, 10 high-yielding indigenous types, and 12 deep-water paddy varieties, among others.“The success story of folk rice cultivation is, however, incomplete without our agroforestry practices,” says Das, noting the importance of having a tiered system of planting with trees that block winds while letting sunshine through to the paddy seedlings.Banana forms a windbreak for vegetables and paddy. Photo courtesy of Chinmoy Das.On his 5.7 hectares (14 acres) of land in Hatia village, Das displayed his four-tiered “paddy forests.” The first level includes pulses (peas, beans or lentils), carrots, potatoes, various kinds of spinach, tomatoes, onions and garlic, all of which grow to a maximum height of 60 centimeters (2 feet). The second tier includes bay leaf, turmeric, ginger, eggplant, mustard and vining vegetables that reach a maximum height of 1.5 meters (5 feet). The next step has taller plants growing above 1.8 meters (6 feet), such as Sesbania peas, maize, bamboo, bananas, papayas and sugarcane.Towering timber trees like mahogany and teak grow beside older mango, jackfruit, neem, drumstick (Moringa oleifera) and full-grown bamboo, making up the fourth tier. Das says such plantings are ideally grown on the western and northern side of croplands because hot and dry afternoon winds from the west reduce soil moisture and increase the rate of evapotranspiration from the plants. “Our plantings, while obstructing such winds, enable the paddy to enjoy ample sunshine for its growth,” he says.Other plants are interspersed among the paddy seedlings, says Gaurav Mandal, a farmer from Bamongola village in Malda district. Shrubs and vegetable-bearing vines on his 1.5 hectares (3.6 acres) are perched on mini scaffolds between rows of paddy. These scaffolds, initially erected with dry bamboo, are gradually replaced with grafts of such multi-utility trees as agati (Sesbania grandiflora) and betel nut (Areca catechu). This way, vegetable vines are then supported on the growing trees’ trunks.Fertilizers au naturelTo achieve a sustainable rice yield, local farmers make their own organic fertilizers. Madanmohan Aich, from Dewanhat village in Cooch Behar district, recounts the recipe for his liquid organic manure: soil, preferably from his agroforest; leaves from at least five pest-repellant plants he grows, such as custard apple (Annona reticulata) and neem; plus cow manure and more. Leguminous plants as Sesbania peas, pulses and azolla are thrown in to maintain the natural health of the soil.Madanmohan Aich displays maize amid climbing vegetables in his agroforestry plot. Photo courtesy of Rajat Chatterjee.Sesbania seedlings are planted at a regular distance of 60 to 90 centimeters (2 to 3 feet) from each other across the field, and 30 to 45 centimeters (1 to 1.5 feet) away from paddy seedlings. They can withstand waterlogged soil, growing rapidly, and their leaves form an excellent green compost that enriches the soil. They also serve as a “catch crop” whose bright yellow flowers attract insect pests away from the paddy plants.Quick stick (Gliricidia sepium) is another effective nitrogen-fixing tree grown here. Pest-repellant trees such as Chinese chastetree (Vitex negundo) and neem are also a part of Aich’s paddy forest. Banana trees, meanwhile, help enrich the soil with their succulent stem parts and fruit peels.A treasure trove of usesThese multi-layered agroforests are storehouses of many varieties of fruit and vegetable that can be sold. Chinmoy Das says he grows at least 36 types of brinjal eggplant along the edge of his paddy field, as well as eight types of okra and more than six varieties of pulses and even cherries. All of these provide food security and nutrition for his family, with the surplus sold at the market to supplement their income.Many of the trees grown in these agroforests provide firewood, livestock fodder and timber. Lumber from the rain tree (Albizia saman), for example, is used as a substitute for more expensive woods for building and household purposes.Betel nut forms mustard field boundary. Photo by Moushumi Basu for Mongabay.The bounty grown here also has medicinal benefits. The leaves of Sesbania, rubbed on a fresh wound, help clot blood, says Shantirani Burman, a farmer from Hatia village. Water clover (Marsilea quadrifolia), which abounds in the fields, is not only tasty and rich in beta-carotene, calcium, iron and phosphorus, but is also used to treat bone disorders, eye ailments, anemia and more, Burman says. Kadam (Neolamarckia cadamba) leaves provide snakebite anti-venom and are also useful for treating worms. Both of these latter ailments are common in the villages.In Pratappur village, Bardhaman district, the farmers also practice aquaculture in their paddy ponds, where they grow FRVs that require at least 1.8 meters (6 feet) of standing water. Enterprising farmers like Abhro Chakroborty make the most of the ponds to cultivate catfish. His 200 square meters of land, about 2,200 square feet, yields 60 kilograms (132 pounds) of paddy and almost as much catfish, he says.Edible crabs, mollusks and carp have also been introduced into these ponds, amid the floating edible water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) and the useful and sturdy mat grass (Cyperus tegetum Roxb.).Another interesting diversification is led by tribal women from Gangarampur block in South Dinajpur district, who are now cultivating mushrooms on paddy and wheat straw.Many varieties of brinjal (eggplant) are grown. Photo courtesy of Apoorva Sarkar.The future is organicMotivated by such agroforestry success stories, nearly 100 women and men from at least 20 villages have established the Forum for Indigenous Agricultural Movement (FIAM). Aimed at spreading organic farming and promoting the conservation of indigenous paddy, fruits and vegetables, its membership is fast increasing with young people, too.“The Green Revolution of the 1960s that led to cultivation of modern high-yielding varieties of paddy [compelled] our farmers to go for mono-cropping,” says Partha Das, 22, an English honors graduate from Palaibari village in North Dinajpur.This required the extensive use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers, Das says, adding he was shocked by incidents of farmer suicide across the country as a result of debt from the rising cost of fertilizers, insecticides and seeds. At FIAM, he is joined by the likes of Anima Mandal, who, at 83, has also witnessed these changes and more, and now envisions an organic future.“Our forefathers practiced organic, low-cost, intensive and healthy farming,” agreed Bablu Barman from Bhattadighi village, another passionate organic farmer. “We believe this is sustainable and here to stay.” Healthy eating is the order of the day, he adds, and there is a growing demand for organically grown farm produce in the big cities.Given all of the environmental and social trends and challenges, agroforestry looks set to help deliver on that growing demand in this part of India.FIAM leader Anima Mandal (second from left) posing with members. Photo courtesy of Chinmoy Das.This article is from Mongabay’s series on global agroforestry, view all the features here.Banner image: Tipu Mandal (left) and Chinmoy Das (right) display diverse paddy varieties. Photo courtesy of Pintu Ghosh. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Archive, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation Solutions, Featured, Natural Resources, Organic Farming, Soil Carbon center_img Article published by Erik Hoffnerlast_img read more

[BGL Ligue] La Jeunesse rate sa balle de match face au FCD03

first_imgRésultats de la 24e journée et classementMondorf – Hostert : 2-2; RFCU – Progrès : 5-0; Strassen – Etzella : 2-1; Fola – RM Hamm Benfica : 2-0; Pétange – Rumelange : 2-1; F91 – Rosport : 2-0; Differdange – Jeunesse : 2-0. Mais les Bianconeri ont de moins en moins d’armes en main. Eux qui ont déjà lancé cette saison avec un cadre étriqué, voient encore la somme des solutions s’amenuiser à deux semaines de la fin. Si, si, c’est possible. Après Luisi et Kyereh, qui ne jouent plus depuis des lustres, ce sont Portier (mollet) et N’Diaye (adducteurs), deux piliers proclamés de la reconquête de l’après-Thomé, qui font défection au pire moment, celui de conclure.Sur le terrain, ça se sent un peu. Cette Vieille Dame-là ne dégage pas du tout la même sérénité qu’à Hamm une semaine plus tôt. Elle continue de jouer, de posséder le ballon et de chercher à en faire des choses, mais elle y parvient moins. Cela s’est déjà senti contre le Racing (victoire 1-0), en semaine. Le manque d’expérience offensive ne se compense pas qu’avec la fraîcheur et l’explosivité de garçons comme Deidda ou Klica. Jouer sur ce genre de qualités face à la lenteur de l’axe differdangeois est en soi un calcul tout à fait raisonnable, mais se faire prendre sept fois au piège du hors-jeu en première période en dit long sur le besoin de jouer à l’extrême limite de cette attaque improvisée. En tout cas… si elle veut créer du danger.Les hommes de Sébastien Grandjean s’offrent tout de même deux petits coups d’éclat pour donner le chance en première période. Une passe de Deidda sur la profondeur pour Klica, qui met son plat du pied juste à côté, seul face à Weber (20e). Puis une remise en talonnade de Klica permet à Natami de tirer à ras de terre. Weber s’offre une parade compliquée mais main ferme (25e).Halili était chaud, Garos aussiDifferdange, invaincu depuis sept matches, a, lui, un peu bluffé. Annoncé Jänisch et Caron absents. Ils sont finalement là. Et son attaque animée par le dernier nommé, combatif en diable, ainsi que par un Halili, recrue hivernale que l’on découvre seulement vraiment maintenant. Le Kosovar est parvenu à se rendre dangereux sur pratiquement chaque phase arrêtée, mais a souvent fait le spectacle dans le jeu. Un ciseau acrobatique pas cadré de peu (16e), mais surtout une ouverture extérieur pied droit dans la course de Caron, qui déstabilise toute la défense eschoise. On se demande encore comment Almeida, servi en retrait avec le but vide, est parvenu à mettre son plat du pied sur Todorovic, replié sur sa ligne (12e). Mais c’est finalement sur un accrochage saugrenu (a-t-il vraiment eu lieu, d’abord?) de Natami, en retard sur un centre qui met Garos en bonne position, que le FCD03 va prendre la tête, sur un penalty en deux temps de Muratovic (1-0, 23e).Il se passe tellement peu de choses dans les 20 premières minutes de la seconde période que Grandjean se résout à changer sa ligne d’attaque à la 65e minute. Cela aurait pu être un coup de génie si Menaï, entré en même temps qu’Er Rafik, n’avait pas manqué de quelques centimètres pour couper le centre de son coéquipier, rentré quelques secondes plus tôt avec lui.À la place, Amodio et ses gars vont emballer définitivement cette histoire qui aurait pu mettre un terme à la course au podium. Sur un contre impeccable, Jänisch dépose le ballon sur la tête de Garos, seul aux six mètres (2-0, 74e). Et tout, absolument tout, reste ouvert…Julien Mollereau BGL LIGUE (24e JOURNÉE) La remontada du FCD03 se poursuit. Voilà le club differdangeois, vainqueur courageux de la Jeunesse, revenu à la 4e place et surtout à un point du podium. Il ne doit désormais plus rien s’interdire à 180 minutes de la fin du championnat.La Jeunesse est entrée sur le terrain avec le poids d’une certaine responsabilité, dimanche soir. Elle, qui n’a plus foulé une pelouse européenne depuis le mois de juillet 2016 et sa double confrontation contre les Irlandais de Saint Patrick’s, sait qu’en vertu de la victoire du RFCU sur le Progrès, sa longue et chaotique course pour enfin revenir sur un podium de DN peut s’arrêter là, au Parc des Sports d’Oberkorn, et avec le sentiment du devoir accompli.Une victoire et elle en finit avec trois ans d’une gênante (si l’on s’en tient à son standing) mais logique (si l’on s’en tient à ses moyens) absence.center_img Partagerlast_img read more

Mondial féminin/Bleues : l’exigeante Corinne Diacre, en mission première étoile

first_img“Elle se protège beaucoup parce qu’elle sait aussi que si ça ne marche pas, elle va se faire étendre. Ce sont des postes difficiles, donc elle fait attention”, complète Claude Michy. Surtout pour cette Coupe du monde, où elle est chargée d’offrir une première étoile à la France, pour donner un grand coup d’accélérateur au football féminin. LQ/AFP Jugée sur le terrain Mais en interne, ses joueuses nuancent l’image caricaturale d’une Corinne Diacre stricte, voire dure. “Ce n’est pas quelqu’un de froid, elle aime rigoler et nous faire rire. Quand il y a des périodes où on est plus détente, elle est dans ce rôle de personne qui aime bien la vie”, décrit la latérale Marion Torrent. “Elle n’a jamais été forcément dans l’affect. Quand elle était capitaine, elle n’était pas là pour nous passer la pommade dans le dos. C’est normal. Un leader, on est obligé de la suivre”, raconte encore Marinette Pichon, à propos de “Coco”. Modeste et loyale “Elle est exigeante envers elle-même et a la même exigence envers les autres. Elle fait ce qu’elle a envie de faire. Elle dit : Moi je n’ai encore rien gagné, laissez-moi travailler”, décrypte encore Claude Michy. Sous ses ordres, le rythme peut être soutenu à Clairefontaine, avec certains jours, trois entraînements, dont le premier dès 7h. En attendant d’obtenir ses diplômes, elle commence sur le banc de Soyaux et en tant qu’adjointe chez les Bleues de Bruno Bini. Puis deux coups de fil de Claude Michy, le président de Clermont, en font la première femme à entraîner une équipe masculine en France (en L2), de 2014 à 2017. La presse veut l’ériger en symbole; elle demande à être jugée sur le terrain. “Elle ne le vivait pas obligatoirement très bien. Les questions (des journalistes) étaient toujours à la con. Chacun lui demandait quand est-ce qu’elle rentrait dans le vestiaire, quoi… C’était quand même bas niveau”, se souvient Claude Michy. Les débuts sont en demi-teinte, puis les résultats, probants, finissent par arriver. Diacre fait grandir le club et obtient la reconnaissance de ses joueurs comme Gaëtan Laborde, qui dira dans la presse qu’elle a tout simplement “sauvé sa carrière”. Mais sur cette anecdote comme sur d’autres, la native de Croix, dans le Nord, répond avec modestie. “C’est réducteur de m’accorder cette victoire, c’est plutôt une victoire collective ou alors on fait 50/50 avec Marinette Pichon qui avait marqué au match aller !” Après sa carrière de joueuse, Diacre se tourne assez naturellement vers le métier d’entraîneur. “Avant de démarrer mon cursus de formation dans le football, j’ai toujours voulu être prof’ d’éducation physique donc enseigner, ça faisait partie de moi”, souligne-t-elle. Le parcours de Diacre est d’abord associé à Soyaux, petite ville non loin d’Angoulême et bastion historique du football féminin. C’est le club qu’elle a rejoint dès ses 14 ans et où elle a bâti toute sa carrière de joueuse, en défense, jusqu’à devenir une taulière de l’équipe de France. Avec le maillot bleu, son plus haut fait fut son but contre l’Angleterre en novembre 2002, permettant à la France de décrocher pour la première fois une qualification en Coupe du monde, lors de l’édition 2003. “Elle se protège” Un an plus tard, rebelote après l’échec des Bleues à l’Euro. Cette fois, c’est la bonne. Diacre prend le poste, qu’elle sait particulièrement exposé avec cette Coupe du monde. Comme à Clermont, elle fait des choix forts. Elle retire le brassard de capitaine à Wendie Renard, pour le confier à Amandine Henry. Elle recadre publiquement certaines jeunes joueuses, inconstantes. Et finit par se passer de Marie-Antoinette Katoto, certes meilleure buteuse du championnat de France, mais trop irrégulière et pas assez combative à ses yeux. Partager Noël Le Graët, le président de la Fédération, tente de la débaucher une première fois en 2016, sans succès. Diacre préfère poursuivre l’expérience clermontoise. “Elle m’a dit, ‘Moi je suis fidèle et je reste avec vous’. C’est tout de même assez exceptionnel, surtout dans ce milieu”, la complimente Claude Michy. Rigueur, c’est le mot qui revient en boucle dans la bouche de ses joueuses pour décrire la technicienne de 44 ans. C’est avec cet ingrédient qu’elle a construit sa carrière, de capitaine de l’équipe de France à première femme à entraîner une équipe d’hommes à Clermont (L2), jusqu’à prendre les commandes des Bleues depuis août 2017. Avec elle, “tu suis, et si tu suis pas, tu te fais défoncer”, plaisante son ancienne coéquipière Marinette Pichon. Réputée pour son exigence, la sélectionneuse Corinne Diacre a la délicate mission d’apporter enfin un grand titre à l’équipe de France, pour la Coupe du monde à domicile (7 juin-7 juillet). last_img read more

[Cyclisme] Bob Jungels remporte un cinquième titre consécutif

first_imgA noter que le jury des commissaires avait décidé de raccourcir toutes les courses d’un tour sur le circuit final, soit 19,9 kilomètres pour la série élite. Le coureur de l’équipe Deceuninck-Quick Step s’est néanmoins méfié jusqu’au bout de Kevin Geniets. Le jeune coureur de l’équipe Groupama-FDJ a résisté jusqu’à cinq kilomètres de l’arrivée, là où Bob Jungels (26 ans) a placé dans un faux plat montant une énième accélération, la bonne. « Je n’avais pas dix cartouches à jouer, il m’a fallu bien calculer mon coup. Une fois parti face au vent, j’étais un peu plus rassuré », a observé Bob Jungels. Denis Bastien De son côté, Kevin Geniets (22 ans) s’est plu à jouer jusqu’au bout son rôle d’outsider. « Sur le final, j’ai compris qu’il était le plus fort mais je suis content d’avoir tenu le coup », notait-il à l’issue de la course. Le podium élite est complété avec Pit Leyder (Leopard) qui s’est placé troisième.center_img Et de cinq ! Bob Jungels a remporté ce dimanche un cinquième titre consécutif de champion national de course en ligne, le sixième depuis qu’il est professionnel. Partagerlast_img read more

[Football] Ibrahimovic s’engage 6 mois avec l’AC Milan !

first_imgMême look, même carrure impressionnante, même ego surdimensionné…et même efficacité? Le Suédois revient, pour un ultime défi, à l’AC Milan pour prouver qu’à 38 ans, il est toujours la mégastar qu’il clame être.Entre son départ des Etats-Unis début novembre et l’officialisation de son retour vendredi, il fallait scruter la rubrique des faits divers pour trouver la trace de l’attaquant. La statue de bronze à son effigie dans sa ville natale de Malmö a été régulièrement dégradée par des fans qui ne lui ont pas pardonné son entrée au capital d’un club rival de Stockholm.Ses sens de la provocation et du contre-pied sont, eux, bien intacts, au point que Zlatan a perdu certains de ses fans de la première heure, qui avaient jusque-là toujours défendu le surdoué du quartier populaire de Rosengard. Aujourd’hui, que reste-t-il de cet enfant prodige, devenu l’un des meilleurs avant-centres de sa génération? À l’AC Milan, club où il a déjà brillé entre 2010 et 2012, il sera question d’héritage pour le joueur qui revendique avoir changé l’histoire de son sport : «Le foot, c’est moi», a-t-il sobrement intitulé sa seconde autobiographie, publiée en 2018.Les lions ne récupèrent pas comme les humainsIbrahimovic, c’est d’abord des saillies imparables. «Maintenant, retournez voir du baseball», a-t-il lancé en guise d’adieu à ses supporters du Los Angeles Galaxy, où il a été, entre 2018 et 2019, le meilleur joueur du Championnat nord-américain, «et de loin», selon ses termes. En Californie, il s’est refait une santé (54 buts en tout), prouvant qu’il avait encore des jambes après plusieurs blessures qui ont précipité son départ de Manchester United, dont une rupture des ligaments croisés d’un genou en 2017. Partager Zlatan le showman avait auparavant servi les médias français lors de son passage remarqué au Paris SG (2012/16), où il avait promis de rester «s’ils remplacent la Tour Eiffel par (sa) statue», de sa grosse voix avec un accent balkanique qui rappelle ses origines. Au PSG, «je suis arrivé comme un roi, je repars comme une légende», a-t-il encore dit en quittant le club où il n’y avait «rien» avant lui.La France? “Pays de merde” qu’il a «placé sur la carte du monde»… Peu de footballeurs peuvent se targuer d’avoir fait réagir à leurs déclarations des éditorialistes et un Premier ministre. Mais la force d’Ibrahimovic, c’est de posséder ce talent à même d’assumer ses piques verbales. Il parle, mais marque aussi des buts d’anthologie, avec un sens du spectacle qui découle en partie de son apprentissage, enfant, des arts martiaux.Il a délecté les fans de ses buts «kung-fu», en extension, ou de ses inspirations géniales comme son retourné de plus de 35 mètres contre l’Angleterre en 2012, ou son slalom en 2004 avec l’Ajax Amsterdam, dribblant six joueurs avant de battre le gardien, qui a lancé sa carrière. Au PSG, il est devenu le meilleur scoreur de l’histoire du club, avec 156 buts en 180 matches, avant d’être dépassé par Edinson Cavani. Deux fois soulier d’or de la Serie A, en 2009 avec l’Inter et en 2012 avec l’AC Milan, il possède aussi le record de la sélection suédoise (62 buts).Sa première année avec Manchester United a été une réussite, avec 28 buts en 46 matches, avant sa déchirure des ligaments d’un genou. Progressivement mis sur la touche, la faute aussi à la concurrence de Romelu Lukaku, «Ibra» a quitté l’Europe en mars 2018 sur une dernière note mitigée.A l’âge où la plupart des joueurs sont sur le déclin, le natif de Malmö tente d’étirer encore une histoire déjà très riche (Ajax Amsterdam, Juventus, Inter Milan, Barcelone, AC Milan, PSG, Manchester United) où il a presque tout gagné – sauf la Ligue des Champions -, pour s’offrir une porte de sortie à la hauteur de son talent. C’est en outre un professionnel toujours exemplaire, comme l’avait raconté Carlo Ancelotti. Dans un livre, «Mes secrets d’entraîneur», il explique qu’on lui avait présenté Zlatan comme «un joueur difficile à gérer».Mais il a découvert au PSG un joueur «très disponible et professionnel, toujours concentré sur son travail». «Son caractère fascinant et sa constance extraordinaire à l’entraînement ont toujours été des exemples pour ses coéquipiers», exposait encore l’Italienlast_img read more

[Handball] Euro-2022 : Mitrea va jouer son premier match avec la sélection luxembourgeoise

first_img Partager Retenu par Rostock, l’arrière droit a manqué les qualifications du Mondial-2021. L’ex-eschois fera son baptême du feu en sélection, ce jeudi soir, contre l’Estonie. Pas de quoi le faire trembler.Quand sa mémoire flanche, le journaliste fait un petit tour aux archives. Aujourd’hui, celles-ci ne se trouvent plus dans des ouvrages au papier jauni (et sentant le renfermé) mais sur ordinateur. Un logiciel, une barre de recherche et le tour est joué. Mardi, en tapant «Mitrea», l’intelligence artificielle a littéralement fait rejaillir des cartons une petite pépite datant du 22 avril 2008.Ce jour-là, Catalin Mitrea, fraîchement naturalisé luxembourgeois, assurait ne pas être contre une expérience en équipe nationale : «Si on m’appelle, je dirai oui.» Jamais appelé, si ce n’est une fois pour un tournoi amical en Allemagne, Catalin ne s’en formalise pas («J’avais 39 ans, j’étais trop vieux») et verra aujourd’hui son fils effectuer ses grands débuts avec le Luxembourg face à l’Estonie en barrage de l’Euro-2022. Dimitri Mitrea (19 ans) s’est donc ajouté à la liste des joueurs retenus par Nikola Malesevic pour cette double confrontation face à l’Estonie. Le sélectionneur aurait sans doute désiré l’avoir à sa disposition lors des qualifications du Mondial-2021, le week-end dernier, mais l’intéressé était retenu par Till Wiechers, son entraîneur à Rostock, pour le déplacement à Ostsee (19-27), avant-dernier de la 3e Liga Nord-Est. Le tout pour quelque vingt minutes passées sur le terrain.Ces qualifications, le jeune appelé les a donc suivies partiellement, et à distance, visionnant «la deuxième mi-temps contre la Slovaquie (NDLR : 16-22) et le match face aux îles Féroé (22-24)». Son impression? «La défense a été très bonne, les gardiens aussi, note-t-il. Malheureusement, le jeu offensif a été marqué par de nombreuses fautes techniques.»Cette analyse, partagée par Malesevic, est à double tranchant pour Mitrea qui, pour sa première apparition sous le maillot des Roud Léiwen, pourrait se voir confier un rôle à responsabilités comme le laissait sous-entendre, mardi soir, le sélectionneur : «C’est sûr, par sa vision du jeu et ses automatismes avec ses anciens équipiers d’Esch, il va nous faire du bien.»Pas de quoi affoler l’ancien Eschois dont le flegme en dit long sur sa capacité d’analyse et de gestion de ses émotions : «À partir du moment où tu entres sur le terrain, tu as déjà une responsabilité : celle de bien faire. Je m’attends à jouer. Combien de temps? Je ne sais pas, mais je pense que je peux apporter quelque chose à l’équipe.»Malgré son jeune âge, Dimitri Mitrea dégage une maturité certaine et n’est aucunement en quête d’une figure tutélaire. «Je n’ai pas d’idole et, hormis les gros matches, je ne regarde pas de handball à la télé, j’y joue déjà assez», confie ce gaillard suffisamment élégant pour recevoir sans broncher les conseils – qu’il n’avait pas demandés – d’un paternel qui, jadis, essuya ses premiers tirs devant une cage dessinée à la craie sur le mur de la maison. «C’était il y a longtemps…» Une époque où Catalin, considéré alors comme l’un des tout meilleurs gardiens luxembourgeois avec le Berchemois Mike Majerus, était encore en activité.Altruiste et généreuxÀ bientôt 50 ans – il les fêtera le 31 janvier –, le natif de Piatra Neamt suit l’évolution de son fils via un site internet diffusant les matches de 3e Liga. «J’ai toujours aimé voir Dimitri jouer, déclare-t-il avec une évidente tendresse. J’aime son style, sa vision, son altruisme.» Ce sens du collectif pouvait parfois agacer le père qu’il était. «Je lui disais “vas-y, va marquer”, mais il me répondait “je ne joue pas tout seul, c’est un sport d’équipe”.»Un altruisme doublé d’une générosité dans l’effort. «Quand, à 17 ans, je le voyais en équipe première tenter des percées dans les défenses adverses, je me disais “mais il va se faire claquer”. Mais il est courageux.» Ce souvenir fait sourire Dimitri Mitrea : «Au début, les adversaires se focalisaient plus sur mes partenaires. Quand ils me voyaient, vu mon gabarit, ils m’arrêtaient d’une seule main… Mais, par la suite, ils ont commencé à frapper plus fort pour m’effrayer et me faire passer le goût de recommencer. Mais ça ne marche pas. Même si je prends beaucoup de coups, je me relève et je souris…»Rapide et explosif, Dimitri Mitrea pourrait donc apporter un peu d’impact à une base arrière en manque de percussion lors des qualifications du Mondial-2021. Capable de fulgurantes accélérations («sur ses trois premiers pas, il arrache tout», dixit son père), il pourrait ainsi libérer des espaces dans la défense adverse, faciliter la tâche du porteur du ballon et, ainsi, réduire les risques de pertes de balle. «On se comprend bien avec Christian (Bock)», glisse Dimitri Mitrea dont le profil apporte une solution supplémentaire à un poste d’arrière droit occupé le week-end dernier par l’expérimenté Alen Zekan et par Jacques Tironzelli, un autre jeune élément.Ce jeudi soir, et peu importe le rôle que lui confiera Nikola Malesevic, Dimitri Mitrea aura à cœur de mettre en application le conseil de son père : «Plus tu donnes de la confiance à un entraîneur, plus tu joueras. En d’autres termes, c’est quand tu es mené de 2-3 buts à dix minutes de la fin que tu vois qui est joueur et qui l’est moins…» Histoire de marquer les esprits. Et les mémoires.Charles MichelMatch Luxembourg-Estonie jeudi à 19h30 à la Coque. Ouverture des portes à 18h30.last_img read more

Azkals tackle Tajiks

first_imgIn Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery A win by Yemen against Nepal and an Azkals loss will doom the Filipinos’ qualification hopes.The Tajiks also consider the match as their most important yet as they have yet to qualify for the Asian Cup. But they will be up against a relaxed and confident Philippine side, which beat them, 4-3, in their initial meeting at Pamir Stadium in Dushanbe.Interestingly, that was the last win posted by the Azkals in the qualifying round as a run of three straight draws have put them in a tricky position heading into the final matchday.“It gives us confidence knowing that we have a good result against Tajikistan before,” said skipper Phil Younghusband, who will be looking to add to his 49 international goals. “What could be added pressure is that we’ve had two opportunities to qualify and we haven’t gotten any.”The Azkals drew with Yemen twice and bungled a chance to qualify ahead of everyone else in the group when they were held to a goalless standoff by Nepal in Kathmandu.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ For the sport in the country, the result could provide the direction for the next few years.With qualification from the prestigious AFC Asian Cup next year at stake, the Azkals look to complete the mission they started impressively last year when they go up against Tajikistan for the final Group F match at Rizal Memorial Stadium in Manila.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownKickoff is at 7:30 p.m. with the Azkals needing just a draw to secure qualification in the continental showpiece event which features powerhouse Asian sides like Korea, Japan, Australia and Iran.A defeat will not only seal Tajikistan’s entry to the tournament, but also put the Azkals’ fate in the hands of winless Nepal, which faces Yemen in the other game. Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Misagh Bahadoran, shown in this file photo taking on a Fiji defender, echoes the sentiments of PH football team skipper Phil Younghusband: “Philippine football needs another milestone, another successful story and we can do it against Tajikistan.” —CONTRIBUTED PHOTOIt’s a match that could define an era in Philippine football.For the Azkals, there’s no bigger match since they pulled off the “Miracle in Hanoi” eight years ago.ADVERTISEMENT Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES View comments “There are other things that put doubt in your head but there are also other things that give you confidence knowing we’ve beaten this team,” said Younghusband.Azkals manager Dan Palami said they’re trying to downplay the implications of the match as they’d rather have the players focused on getting a result against the Central Asians.“We’re telling everyone in the team that we just have to focus on this game and not worry about the consequence,” said Palami. “Of course, we’ve been through many heartaches and many joys, but I think this is our most important match since the Miracle in Hanoi.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Waiting for Oscar De La Hoya Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victimslast_img read more