Jones doubts Lions can win

first_imgThe Lions face a daunting task as they take on the world champions on their own soil across June and July, having suffered a whitewash on their last visit.Jones claims Wales boss Gatland’s approach will be too rigid to get the better of the All Blacks, who are heavy favourites to triumph.”I think it’s going to be very tough for them [the Lions],” Jones told The Telegraph.”They picked their squad to play a certain style based on the influence of Wales.Breakdown practice…Eddie Jones puts England’s back row forwards through their paces in training #O2InsideLine pic.twitter.com/o6phHZN1Nb— England Rugby (@EnglandRugby) May 25, 2017″They are looking to attack like Wales, with big gain line runners, not much ball movement. You’ll struggle to beat the All Blacks like that.”If they win the first Test they could win the series. If they don’t, it might be a tough old series for them.”Jones led England to an 18-match winning run – which started under predecessor Stuart Lancaster at the 2015 World Cup – to equal the record set by Steve Hansen’s side.The Australian has not ruled out the possibility of one day becoming Lions coach.last_img read more

La Roma, by Gonzalo Villar

first_imgThe pearl of the 21-year-old Elche is the objective of Rome, which sees in it a player capable of directing the operations of a Champions team from the center of the field. Villar, international U21 with Spain, is a midfielder of great management, with leadership skills to carry the weight of the team and a very high quality quota. It would not be strange to see him at the next Tokyo Olympics. “We’re going to sign a young midfielder, someone who can be the future of this team.” Gianluca Petrachi, sports director of Rome, yesterday set his team’s goals in the market before the duel against Juventus. The giallorosso club wants to maintain its commitment to youth and quality. In that sense, as AS has learned, the managers of the capital entity have set their sights on Gonzalo Villar. The interest is strong. Valencia has an option.Its termination clause is now 25 million euros and 80% of its economic rights belong to Valencia. Although the player is not assigned in Elche. It is owned by the Illicitano club until June 2021. Valencia also has a right of first refusal on the Murcia midfielder, in the event that a third team wants to take it, as is the case. Villar is being one of the great sensations of Second Division under Pacheta. A player already with hierarchy in the team’s engine room despite his youth.Villar is also an adaptable player. In Elche he has been able to form in the double pivot, his most usual position, or to advance his position somewhat to form in a 4-2-3-1 closer to the tip. With Paulo Fonseca, Rome has been moving precisely more in that last drawing, which would fit perfectly with the characteristics of Murcian talent.last_img read more

More than 25,000 elephants were killed in a Gabon national park in one decade

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Elephants, Environment, Forest Elephants, Illegal Trade, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poaching, Protected Areas, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img A decline of somewhere between 78 and 81 percent in the park’s forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) population over the span of just one decade was largely driven by poachers who crossed the border into Gabon from its neighbor to the north, Cameroon, according to a new study led by researchers with Duke University and published in the journal Current Biology this week.The fact that Cameroon’s national road is so close to the park makes it relatively easy for poachers to slip into the park, make their illegal kills, and then transport elephant tusks back to Cameroon’s largest city, Douala, which has become a major hub of the international ivory trade.Nearly half of Central Africa’s estimated 100,000 forest elephants are thought to live in Gabon, making the loss of 25,000 elephants from a key sanctuary a considerable setback for the preservation of the species, according to John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment and the lead author of the study. New research suggests that more than 25,000 forest elephants were killed for their ivory in Gabon’s Minkébé National Park, one of the largest and most important wildlife preserves in Central Africa, between 2004 and 2014.That’s a decline of somewhere between 78 and 81 percent in the park’s forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) population over the span of just one decade, and it was largely driven by poachers who crossed the border into Gabon from its neighbor to the north, Cameroon, according to a new study led by researchers with Duke University and published in the journal Current Biology this week.“With nearly half of Central Africa’s estimated 100,000 forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of 25,000 elephants from this key sanctuary is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species,” John Poulsen, assistant professor of tropical ecology at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment and the lead author of the study, said in a statement.This is a small group of forest elephants in Gabon’s Minkébé National Park. Poaching for the illegal ivory trade has reduced their numbers by 80 percent, according to a new study. Photo Credit: John Poulsen, Duke University.Thanks to booming consumer demand, particularly in Asia, wildlife trafficking operations are so militarized today that poachers are frequently armed with enough weaponry and other equipment to outgun local park rangers. The most dangerous poachers in Africa are often employed by professional wildlife trafficking rings and have access to resources well beyond what was available to poachers during earlier crises, from financial support to military-grade equipment such as armored vehicles, helicopters, and machine guns.Poulsen and his colleagues arrived at their estimate of forest elephant population losses in Minkébé National Park by comparing the results of two large-scale elephant dung surveys. The researchers identified two distinct “fronts” of poaching pressure after analyzing the surveys’ data on abundance and distribution of elephant dung in the park.“Elephant numbers in the south of the park, which is 58 kilometers from the nearest major Gabonese road, have been somewhat reduced,” Poulsen said. “By comparison, the central and northern parts of the park — which, at one point, are just 6.1 kilometers from Cameroon’s national road — have been emptied.”The fact that Cameroon’s national road is so close to the park makes it relatively easy for poachers to slip into the park, make their illegal kills, and then transport elephant tusks back to Cameroon’s largest city, Douala, which has become a major hub of the international ivory trade.This is a lone forest elephant in Gabon’s Minkébé National Park. From 2004 to 2014, an estimated 25,000 elephants in the park were killed for the illegal ivory trade. Photo Credit: John Poulsen, Duke University.Poached ivory makes its way into the illegal market very quickly. A September 2016 study found that as much as 90 percent of the elephant tusks seized in Africa comes from elephants killed within the past three years, as opposed to the illegal trade being fueled by older ivory leaking into the market, as was previously believed to be the case.Poulsen notes that the Gabonese government has made several major moves intended to rein in poaching in Minkébé National Park, such as elevating forest elephants’ to “fully protected” status, creating a National Park Police force, doubling the national park agency’s budget, and burning all of the ivory it has seized from illegal traders (becoming the first African nation to do so).While these initiatives are commendable and may have helped reduce poaching activities that originate from within Gabon, according to Poulsen, he says that his team’s research demonstrates that the illegal cross-border trafficking of poached ivory has not been curbed and that new approaches to protecting elephants may be called for.“To save Central Africa’s forest elephants, we need to create new multinational protected areas and coordinate international law enforcement to ensure the prosecution of foreign nationals who commit or encourage wildlife crimes in other countries,” Poulsen added.“Studies showing sharp declines in forest elephant populations are nothing new, but a 78 to 81 percent loss in a single decade from one of the largest, most remote protected areas in Central Africa is a startling warning that no place is safe from poaching.”Forest elephant in Gabon. Photo by Rhett Butler.CITATIONSCerling, T.E., et al. (2016). Radiocarbon dating of seized ivory confirms rapid decline in African elephant populations and provides insight into illegal trade. PNAS. doi:1073/pnas.1614938113Poulsen, J.R., Koerner, S.E., Moore, S., et. al. (2017). Poaching empties critical Central African wilderness of forest elephants. Current Biology 27(4). doi:10.1016/j.cub.2017.01.023FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Indigenous leaders denounce Ecuadorian government over mining conflicts

first_imgIndigenous leaders and activists gathered in Quito, Ecuador, last Thursday to denounce the Ecuadorian government for its complicity in allowing international mining companies to take over indigenous territory.The main topic of discussion was the current conflict in Ecuador’s southern Amazon region.In recent months the indigenous Shuar community there has come head to head with Ecuador’s armed forces over a new large-scale Chinese-funded mining project. Indigenous leaders and activists gathered in Quito, Ecuador, last Thursday, March 9, to denounce the Ecuadorian government for its complicity in allowing international mining companies to take over indigenous territory.The biggest topic on everyone’s minds was the current conflict in Ecuador’s southern Amazon region. In recent months the indigenous Shuar community there has come head to head with Ecuador’s armed forces over a new large-scale Chinese-funded mining project.“We are being persecuted by the military and the police who are invading the territories of the Shuar communities,” Elvia Dagua, a local indigenous woman who is a member of the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of the Ecuadorian Amazon (CONFENIAE), told the media Thursday. “They have destroyed homes. So the Shuar people, women, men, and children have had to flee.”The Chinese company Explorcobres S.A. (EXSA) installed a camp in the southern province of Morona Santiago in August, preparing to begin construction of a large open-pit copper mine known as the San Carlos-Panantza Project. Hundreds of police officers entered the region of Santiago de Panantza and evicted a small Shuar community called Nankints, saying the property now belonged to EXSA.Several other Shuar communities have since been affected in the same area of the Cordillera del Cóndor mountains, including San Juan Bosco and San Carlos de Limón. At least 35 families have been evicted from the area, according to Mario Melo, the lawyer who represents them, speaking at Thursday’s press conference. Locals contend that nearly 100 families have been evicted or forced to flee their homes.Overview of the Chinese EXSA mining camp, based in the Nankints community. Photo by Lalo CalleIn December the conflict reached a peak when the Shuar attempted to take over the mining camp, resulting in a violent standoff with the military and police. As a result, one police officer was killed under unclear circumstances. The national government then imposed a 30-day state of exception across the entire province and reportedly mobilized up to 1,000 military and police to the region.According to Melo, this increased militarization violates the Shuar’s human rights as it has altered their lives and caused them to live in fear.The events have created a “state of panic in the region,” said Tuntiak Katan, a Shuar leader and a member of the Coordinator of the Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin (COICA).“People are very scared, it’s very tense,” he told Mongabay, adding that some people are scared to leave their homes out of fear of the military presence or being targeted by police and arrested.According to Melo, the lawyer, around 80 people have been “indicted” since August in relation to protesting the mining project. These include indigenous leaders arrested for “inciting discord” among citizens, which is punishable with a prison sentence of one to three years.A small checkpoint at the entrance of San Carlos de Limón. Photo by Lalo CalleEcuador’s Ministry of Justice did not respond to questions for this story by press time.But President Rafael Correa has stated in radio and television appearances that it was the Shuar community that incited violence against local authorities, not the reverse, and that this lead to the police officer’s death. He also accused indigenous leaders of supporting violent “paramilitary and semi-criminal” activities.Correa has also denied that the area belongs to the Shuar, saying the EXSA mining corporation legally purchased the land.Ecuador’s Ministry of Mining did not respond to questions for this story. A spokesperson told Mongabay that ministry representatives were currently in Canada and unavailable to comment.While ministry personnel were on this northern trip, Ecuador received international recognition for its commitment to sustainable development in the mining sector. In a press release earlier this week the Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Minerals, Metals and Sustainable Development welcomed the country to join and become the organization’s 57th member because of its “good governance of the mining sector.”“Our goal is to attract the right kind of investment from socially responsible companies which maintain high environmental standards,” said Ecuador’s Mining Minister, H.E. Javier Córdova, in the press release.This announcement outraged local indigenous and environmental rights groups, which released their own press statement denouncing the government for the forced evictions of Shuar communities in Morona Santiago and silencing dissenting voices through arrests and intimidation.The debate around resource extraction has been controversial in Ecuador, where much of the country’s success in poverty alleviation and social programs over the past decade can be attributed to funding from publicly managed oil and mining projects. In the last 10 years, inequality in the country has decreased significantly and poverty rates have almost halved — from 42.2 percent in 2005 to 22.5 percent in 2014, according to the latest numbers by the World Bank. Cash transfers to the poor and investment in health care and education have increased. Infrastructure, such as highways and schools, has also improved.However, according to Carlos Mazabanda, field coordinator for the NGO Amazon Watch’s Ecuador branch, these successes don’t justify ignoring indigenous and environmental rights.“Without a doubt you have to recognize that good things have happened,” he told Mongabay. “But if you need those natural resources, you still need to strictly comply with the constitutional mandates. You can’t choose which rights to comply with and which ones not too.”According to Mazabanda, President Correa implemented a very progressive constitution in 2008, when the socialist government still had close ties to human rights, indigenous rights, and environmental groups. At that time, Ecuador became one of the first countries to acknowledge the rights of nature in the constitution, which states that indigenous communities must be consulted before any extraction projects happen near their land.But the relationship between social movements and the state soon crumbled because the Ecuadorian government “wasn’t complying” with these new laws, said Mazabanda.“The truth is we have the best constitution in the world, but the worst constitution in its application in daily life,” the Shuar leader Katan told Mongabay.This struggle isn’t unique to Ecuador. Indigenous leaders from Bolivia and Venezuela were also present at Thursday’s press conference in Quito and spoke of similar happenings in their communities. The leaders were representing the international indigenous group COICA, which includes the nine Amazonian countries of Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela, Suriname, English Guyana, and French Guyana.Participants at a press conference in Quito last Thursday included Shuar community members Tuntiak Katan, far right, and Elvia Dagua, second from right. Photo by Kimberley Brown for MongabayThe group, along with the Peruvian organization Rights, Environment and Natural Resources (DAR), presented a new report highlighting the similar struggles that all these nations face. A chief complaint is the rarity of prior consultation for extraction projects in indigenous territory and the lack of territorial rights and access to healthcare and education in indigenous communities.The group plans to present their findings to various U.N. bodies in Geneva at the end of the month.“We fight for the things that we all have in common,” said Katan “we are organized as indigenous people to tell the world what is happening in each country.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kessler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Amazon Mining, Amazon Rainforest, Indigenous Rights, Mining last_img read more

New research provides baseline for evaluating effectiveness of US ban on ivory trade

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, Illegal Trade, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Monitoring, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) announced a “near-total ban” on the commercial trade of elephant ivory last year.Now, new research led by wildlife trade monitoring NGO TRAFFIC released last week provides a baseline for the state of the ivory market in the U.S. at the time the ban went into effect — which future monitoring efforts will rely on in order to determine the impacts of the legislative and regulatory changes made by the FWS a year ago.Researchers found that a total of 1,589 elephant ivory items, including figurines (780 items), jewelry (417), and household goods (261), were being sold by 227 different vendors in six major American cities from May to July 2016.They also also found that some 2,056 elephant ivory items were available on six major online auction sites and marketplaces between June and August 2016. Last year, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) announced a “near-total ban” on the commercial trade of elephant ivory after years of campaigning by environmental and conservation groups who said the closure of ivory markets in the United States and other major hubs in the international ivory trade were necessary to help halt the poaching crisis decimating elephant populations across Africa and Asia.Now, new research led by wildlife trade monitoring NGO TRAFFIC released last week provides a baseline for the state of the ivory market in the U.S. at the time the ban went into effect — which future monitoring efforts will rely on in order to determine the impacts of the legislative and regulatory changes made by the FWS a year ago.The final rule issued by the FWS — which revised the Endangered Species Act — was enacted on July 6, 2016, limiting the legal ivory trade to antiques more than 100 years old (as well as some pre-existing manufactured products that contain less than 200 grams of ivory). Prior to the new rule, sales of ivory were permitted if it was imported to the U.S. before 1978, the year the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was first listed as endangered in the country, which critics said created a loophole that facilitated the laundering of ivory from newly killed elephants.To establish a baseline for US elephant ivory markets, researchers with TRAFFIC, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) surveyed both physical markets and online classified ads in six major US cities from May to July 2016. They also looked at the ivory offered by sellers based in the US on six major e-commerce platforms from June to August 2016.They found that a total of 1,589 elephant ivory items, including figurines (780 items), jewelry (417), and household goods (261), were being sold by 227 different vendors in Boston, MA; Los Angeles, CA; New York, NY; Portland, OR; San Francisco, CA; and Washington, DC, which was found to have 658 items for sale from 68 vendors, the most for any of the cities the researchers examined.Pianos with ivory keys were the most common item for sale via online classified ads in those cities, with 205 listings.Map courtesy of WWF.New York and California are among the states that have adopted their own rules restricting intrastate commercial sales of elephant ivory. These state laws appear to have been effective, as the authors of the TRAFFIC study say they discovered a sharp decline in the number of elephant ivory items available in Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco, the top three US ivory markets as of a decade ago. A 2006-2007 survey by Care for the Wild International and Save the Elephants found 16,758 ivory items in physical retail in those three cities, compared to just 489 items documented by the TRAFFIC researchers in 2016.Just last week, hundreds of pieces of jewelry, sculptures, and vases made of elephant ivory — weighing nearly two tons in total and estimated to be worth $8 million — were crushed in New York City’s Central Park.“Ivory is coming off the shelves in the US, which is a win for elephants,” Rachel Kramer, a senior program officer with TRAFFIC/WWF and the lead author of the report, said in a statement. “But as state and federal law enforcement crack down on illegal sellers, trade is apt to move online and into back rooms. Further investigations will be essential to learn who’s responsible for the trading, where the stocks are, and to deliver future seizures, arrests and prosecutions.”Kramer and team also found that some 2,056 elephant ivory items were available on six major online auction sites and marketplaces between June and August 2016. These items were offered by sellers based in 47 different states, with California (93 online vendors, 173 items), Florida (74 online vendors, 573 items), and New York (62 online vendors, 117 items) topping the list.There is growing momentum toward shuttering ivory markets around the world. Like the US, China is a major hub for the international ivory trade, but the country announced late last year that it would close its domestic ivory markets by the end of 2017. Similarly, Hong Kong said it would phase out its ivory trade by 2021.While the poaching crisis decimating African elephant numbers that began in earnest in 2006 appears to have peaked some time around 2011 to 2013, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) reported last year that levels of illegal killings still appear to be too high to allow for the recovery of elephant populations.Peter LaFontaine, campaigns manager for IFAW, said that elephants “need all the help they can get,” especially from the tech companies that have the power to halt sales of ivory online. “IFAW has been monitoring online sales of ivory since 2004, and we are glad to see more and more companies implementing policies to reduce illegal trade on the web,” LaFontaine said in a statement. “This survey shows that there’s still much work to be done, but the groundwork is in place for these efforts to bear fruit.”Ivory photo frame. Photo © TRAFFIC.CITATIONSKramer, R., Sawyer, R., Amato, S., & LaFontaine, P. (2017). The US Elephant Ivory Market: A New Baseline. TRAFFIC. https://c402277.ssl.cf1.rackcdn.com/publications/1081/files/original/TRAFFIC_US_Ivory_Report_2017.pdf?1501007952Martin, E. & Stiles, D. (2008). Ivory markets in the USA. Care for the Wild International, Save the Elephants. http://savetheelephants.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/2008IvoryMarketsUSA.pdfFollow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

A rich person’s profession? Young conservationists struggle to make it

first_imgArticle published by Rebecca Kessler Mongabay interviewed young conservationists about their experiences launching their careers.Many of them related similar stories of having to reconsider their career choice as a result of the conservation sector’s tight job market, high educational and experience requirements, and often-temporary entry-level jobs.To meet prospective employers’ demands for experience, many graduates become stuck in full-time unpaid internships or long-term volunteering.As a result of these trends, the field of conservation may be hemorrhaging passionate, qualified, and innovative young people. Nika Levikov swore she would never work as a waitress again. But, today — with a master’s degree in conservation science from Imperial College London — she’s taking orders, delivering drinks, and cleaning tables to support herself.After two years of looking for paid work as a conservationist around Europe and ten months doing unpaid work in East Africa, Levikov moved to the island of Malta to work at Greenhouse Malta. Levikov, who owes over $100,000 in student loans, described her work at the small environment NGO as “casual” and “freelancing” — some hours are paid, others are volunteer — while the group looks to secure more funding.“The reality many of us face is that we will have to babysit, clean toilets, and serve drinks as we try to gain the experience we need in conservation to finally get that dream job,” said Levikov, a former intern at Mongabay, who just turned 30.“I’m not blaming anyone for my current situation in which I am utterly broke and still crossing my fingers that in the near future my career will finally take off,” she told Mongabay. “Indeed I was wrong in thinking that all my hard, unpaid work would lead to something or that having a degree from a…highly-respected university would give me a leg-up.”Levikov is not alone.Mongabay interviewed over a dozen conservationists for this article, many of whom related a depressingly similar story: serial unpaid internships, crippling student debt, short-term work for little or no pay, dismissive attitudes, and entry-level job requirements that include expectations of considerable field time and experience.Other young conservationists declined to comment out of fear that their candidness would come back to haunt them in their job hunt.Nika Levikov searching for Grevy’s zebras (Equus grevyi) in Kenya. Photo by Mathew Mutinda/Marwell Wildlife.“A rich person’s profession”The world is undergoing vast ecological change. Last year, the international NGO WWF’s “Living Planet Report” declared that wildlife populations have dropped 58 percent in the last 40 years — at least among the 3,706 vertebrates (out of around 10,000) that it surveys. Added to all this, as if we needed it, is climate change: biologists have already catalogued its mark on thousands of species worldwide. Scientists have also declared that we are in a new age, the Anthropocene, that may see a mass extinction as devastating as the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. What this will mean for humanity no one really knows.Amid this upheaval, conservationists are our environmental doctors. They are trying — against all odds — to mitigate the damage humans have inflicted by saving species and safeguarding ecosystems. There are already many species that would not be here at all if not for conservationists’ steadfast work.Yet today’s rising conservationists are at risk of being forced out of their career by trends, structures, and decisions they had no part in. Of course, conservation isn’t the only career facing hardship — art, coal mining, postal work, and journalism are other examples. But there’s a bigger problem here: if young conservationists can’t turn their education, experience, and passion into a lifelong career, what will become of life on Earth?“Conservation is a vocation as well as a profession,” said E.J. Milner-Gulland, a biologist at the University of Oxford. “Young people entering the job market are more highly trained than ever, and they tend to have a lot of experience as well…But because of the vocational aspect, it is really hard to get paid work.”Unfortunately, there is no hard data on conservation employment or pay. For a job that requires an advanced degree and research skills, it’s surprising how little research has been done.Conservation Careers, the field’s biggest jobs website, says it shares around 6,000 jobs a year. Its director Nick Askew said there may by as many as 30,000 jobs available annually. He calls this his “best guesstimate.” There is no data on how many people are seeking these jobs.Part of the difficulty of estimating the ratio of conservation jobs to demand is the sheer breadth of conservation work, everything from grant writing at a climate NGO to caring for rhinos at a zoo to doing field research on tree kangaroos in Papua New Guinea — and all that lies between.Still, conservationists interviewed for this piece — some of them professors, some young people who have spent months to years looking for work, and some who gave up altogether on conservation — all agreed that jobs are often few and far between.“Many of the jobs which are entry level are unpaid, low paid, or temporary, yet have high expectations of your education,” explained Jessica Williams, 35 and Cornwall-based, who left a career in retail management to pursue conservation in the U.K. To achieve her goal, she spent six years getting a second bachelor’s in natural science while working full time. She is now volunteering while looking for a job that actually pays.“It’s more competitive than ever before,” Askew said of the conservation job market — one of the reasons why so many young conservationists are willing to work for nothing. Conservation Careers did a survey in 2014 asking if it has gotten tougher to get a job in conservation: 94 percent of surveyed conservationists said “yes”.Lucas Ruzo. Photo courtesy of Lucas Ruzo.Lucas Ruzo, 26, with a master’s degree in conservation science from Imperial College London, spent a year searching for jobs before he “threw in the towel” and started his own NGO, Citizen Zoo — “admittedly still unfunded,” he said.Ruzo, who lives in Cambridge, England, said that structural problems have made it increasingly difficult for young conservationists to get good jobs. In his view non-profit donors contribute to the problem by being unwilling to put money into core funding. This pattern leads organizations to “lose the ability to grow, innovate, and retain a competent workforce,” he said.Of course, donors aren’t the only funders of conservation work: governments are also a big source. Yet in an age of neoliberal austerity, interviewees said that government funds were either shrinking or nonexistent, especially in developing countries.“Conservation is not a priority in my country, even though Mexico is considered one of the mega-diverse countries in the world,” said Lucero Vaca, 29, a Mexican conservationist studying for her PhD at the University of Oxford. She pointed out that in 2016 Mexico only invested around 0.5 per cent of its GDP in the sciences.Nick Askew of Conservation Careers pointed out that most conservation jobs, and NGO headquarters, are in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand, making it especially difficult for conservationists living outside the industrialized world to make their way along their chosen career path.“I envy the countries where it is possible to work in nature conservation and it is a career for [one’s] whole life,” said Juraj Svajda, a conservationist in Slovakia. Svajda had worked for Slovakia’s environment ministry and national park system, but lost his job along with many government conservationists after political purges in 2007. Today he works as an assistant to a professor.“[In Slovakia] we are now living in era of early capitalism so environmental issues are at the bottom position of social importance,” he noted.A 2011 overview of the master’s program at Imperial College London gives a look at some of the challenges. Based on interviews with 63 people who graduated between 2007 and 2011, the analysis found that less than half (32) had actually been employed by a conservation organization. More than half had their first “job” under voluntary circumstances. Yes: volunteering with a master’s degree.By their second job over 70 percent were doing paid work. Still, most jobs were temporary. Fewer than 30 percent of first jobs and fewer than 50 percent of second jobs lasted longer than a year.Exacerbating the dismal job market is this trend of graduates becoming stuck in full-time unpaid internships or long-term volunteering.“Internships are an extremely valuable way for people to test-drive their chosen role, to build their experience for their CV, and to grow their network. If done well an internship really can launch a career of a young conservationist,” said Askew.But many of these internships aren’t given to college students testing a career during the summer, but to graduates with advanced degrees and a long CV already. Some young conservationists are even paying to work, handing money over to nonprofit volunteer tourism outfits, like London- and California-based Frontier, to participate in research for months at a time.It has become a vicious cycle. Students, even those with advanced degrees, are told that they need more experience, especially field experience, before they can get a job. But just about the only experience available is through unpaid internships or volunteering. Pretty soon one unpaid internship isn’t enough and now two, three, or more has become the unspoken standard.After he got his master’s, Ruzo did two four-month-long internships before he “buckled under the weight of the financial pressure.” He has friends who spent an entire year doing unpaid work.“This is completely unrealistic for most people,” he said.What happens next? Most people interviewed had not yet secured jobs. Some young conservationists give up and move on to something else. Some try to build their own NGO, like Ruzo. Many continue to look while working other jobs to pay the bills. And some shrug their shoulders and get a PhD, largely to support themselves financially for a few years, however low the pay, before entering the humiliating job market.A source who spoke on condition of anonymity has been looking for a job since December 2015 with no success. During that time the person worked for free with WWF, the Nature Conservancy, the Tropical Biology Association, and the Whitley Fund for Nature, and did short-term paid gigs with BirdLife International. The source claimed to have applied for more than 70 jobs and interviewed 15 times, coming in second four times.“One of the jobs I came second for was at an NGO I had volunteered full time for at that stage six months prior to the interview. Devastating,” the source said. “It has been beyond exhausting. Many tears have been shed.”The source eventually moved back home with the parents to reevaluate.Milner-Gulland said she worries that conservation is becoming a “rich person’s profession,” that only people with a wealthy background can survive the years of higher education followed by months or even years of unpaid work.“It does feel like a field you have to be able to buy your way into,” Williams said.Lucero Vaca with a jaguar (Panthera onca). Photo courtesy of Lucero Vaca.“We will never be able to do all the conservation work we want to”In 2015, Auriel Fournier co-wrote an opinion piece entitled “Volunteer Field Technicians Are Bad for Wildlife Ecology”. Her team’s argument was this: not paying field technicians excludes anyone who is unable to work for free, undermining science and conservation by erecting financial barriers to a creating a truly diverse pool of students.Currently a PhD candidate at the University of Arkansas, Fournier, 26, said she co-wrote the paper because she has seen how unpaid internships, volunteering, and pay-to-work schemes have made it impossible for colleagues to advance their careers.“These [unpaid] positions are often the first step towards paying work” in a field where entry-level jobs often require considerable field experience, Fournier said. Many people simply can’t afford to take them, particularly people from underrepresented groups, such as people of color, foreigners, and parents, she added.Spokespeople for the world’s largest conservation groups — Conservation International, the Nature Conservancy, WWF, and the Wildlife Conservation Society — were largely reluctant to discuss their internship policies in detail for this story. But all four groups offer both paid and unpaid internships. (Unpaid ones can sometimes be used for college credit; paid ones are sometimes dependent on funding).These groups are also big employers in the field with sizeable bottom lines (WWF-US brought in $248 million and paid its CEO $730,666 last year). Williams said that “it can seem like a cynical move” for larger organizations to offer full-time work for no pay when the higher education requirement to get even unpaid internships often comes with “high personal cost.”Some smaller NGOs argue they are financially unable to offer paid internships. And obviously even unpaid internships represent an investment of an organization’s staff time, overhead, and sometimes hard cash, that can be substantial.Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust offers only unpaid internships in order to focus its funding on its conservation mission, according to spokesperson Alexandra Shears. But she said the small Jersey island-based NGO is “clear and upfront” with potential interns about the financial realities and does “try to help with accommodation and travel.”Juraj Svajda measuring erosion of trails in High Tatras National Park in Slovakia. Photo courtesy of Juraj Svajda.The group recently offered a six-month internship in Bath, England, requiring at least a bachelor’s degree and full-time hours, but with zero pay. Interns may be able to secure help with rent, daily transportation, and lunches equaling at most about £3,500 ($4,550). But that’s all, so they live way below the poverty line.“Many sectors, including conservation journalism, use unpaid internship programs…to provide an opportunity for those looking to get practical experience, build a resume, network, and receive coaching and support,” Shears said, pointing out quite rightly that Mongabay also runs an unpaid internship program — one I work as an editor for. (Mongabay’s is not meant to interfere with a full-time job; the program requires a commitment of approximately 10 hours a week.)Shears also noted that most internships with Durrell last two to three months to accommodate students and the financial challenges of interning.Still, not all small conservation groups depend on unpaid internships. Blue Ventures, a London-based marine conservation NGO, recently offered a six-month internship with a pay of £8,750 ($11,400).“I am very aware of the controversy around unpaid internships and the risk of taking advantage of volunteers,” said Cathy Dean, the head of Save the Rhino International, which runs a well known paid internship.It comes with an annual salary of £18,000 ($23,400)— but the intern spends 11 months in London, one of the most expensive cities on Earth, as well as a month in Namibia. Dean said she feels the pay is fair considering that other salaries at the group range from £21,000 to £39,000 ($27,300 to $50,700) — and of course it’s miles better than working for free and above the U.K. poverty line. The internship is highly competitive; Dean says there are usually around 250 applicants.“I can’t speak for other organizations; I can only say that the paid internship program works very well for us,” she said.Conservation remains hugely underfunded compared to many other non-profit sectors. According to the website Charity Navigator, environmental and animal-rights groups raised $10.68 billion in 2015 in the U.S., representing only 3 percent of the total amount given to charities that year. And if you look at what’s needed to save life on Earth (one report put the figure at $150-430 billion annually) the current funding is laughable.So perhaps unpaid work is a necessary evil? When asked if paying interns could hamper conservation efforts, Fournier responded: “Yes.”“So could paying for gasoline, truck repairs, and for the equipment to ethically care for and handle the animals we study,” she added. “That is not an excuse for doing it. We will never be able to do all the conservation work we want to, we need to ensure the work we are doing is being done in a way that moves conservation forward.”“Egos and attitudes”Of course, many of these financial trends are not unique to young conservationists. The Millennials have become a generation of super-educated individuals doing customer service jobs. In many countries, salaries have stagnated or fallen even as the cost of higher education and health care skyrockets. Students often graduate saddled with debt while having fewer options for good jobs, many of which come with less pay. That story of a science PhD applying to Starbucks — oh, it’s real.But the conservation sector has exacerbated these issues due to high educational requirements, super high experience quotas, and low salaries for entry-level jobs.On top of all that, many sources also said that early job experiences were demoralizing as they encountered difficult personalities and disrespectful work conditions.Natasha Ballal. Photo courtesy of Natasha Ballal.“The biggest challenge is dealing with other conservationists’ egos and attitudes,” said Natasha Ballal, 29, who currently works at an NGO in India as an education officer.Early in her career Ballal said she found herself stuck taking on all aspects of a conservationist’s field work, including daily logistics and visiting around a thousand villages to conduct interviews. All this, she said, for “extremely low pay with very little appreciation.”Ballal’s early experience was echoed by a number of other sources, who said one of the biggest issues young conservationists face is dealing with the egos of their elders. Working for free only exacerbated the disrespect and humiliation.“What always got me the most was the fact that because you’re working for free, your time is essentially considered worthless, and so you might be asked to do things that are absolutely pointless, but no one cares because they didn’t pay for it,” said Soizic le Courtois, 30. Despite obtaining a master’s in conservation science and spending nearly a year doing volunteer work overseas that she had to pay for, le Courtois eventually left conservation for education.“Conservation is like any other profession, we’re just people after all,” Milner-Gulland said, noting that any prevalence of egos may be caused by conservation being a purpose-driven field that promotes “a bit too much of a sense of our own moral superiority.”Despite impressive credentials, including various awards, and being one of the first Mexican women to attend Oxford for conservation, Vaca said senior conservationists still refused to hear out her ideas.“If we stop underestimating people based on their age and let young conservationists [carry] out their innovative ideas, we will have awesome results in conservation,” she said.One area where young conservationists could be especially effective is in employing technologies.“As an extreme example, a member of a board of trustees I sit on once asked [me] what we needed a webpage for, I was lost for words to say the least,“ said Ruzo.The world changes. It may just be that kids who grew up in this increasingly technological, globalized, and complex world have big ideas that could transform conservation for the better — if only we valued them.“It is extremely saddening to see many young individuals who have been bullied and over-worked with low pay… realize they cannot continue in this field,” said Ballal.“Being useful”“I kept on going back to this idea of being useful. If I left, there would be ten people to fill my shoes,” said le Courtois of her decision to leave conservation for teaching.“I tried to think of what the limiting factor was. There aren’t enough jobs in conservation because everyone is always fighting for the same pots of money. So how do you make the pot of money bigger? You fundraise, or you spend public money, but those are limited too. The only way you can increase it is by getting more people to care. So how do you make people care? Documentaries. Awareness raising. Or you teach kids to care about the environment. That’s how I became a teacher,” she said.Today, le Courtois is three years into her teaching career and pursuing a master’s degree in educational research. She landed on her feet — and she’s teaching children to care about the environment. But she also gave up a career in conservation.So, what’s the risk in all this?It’s pretty straightforward: the risk is that conservation may be hemorrhaging passionate, qualified, and innovative young people.Pretty much all interviewees agreed: the first things to do are to start paying early-career conservationists for their time, scrap the unpaid internship model for highly-educated applicants, and dump the expectation that entry-level conservationists should somehow have years of experience. One source suggested new government regulations to keep NGOs from having unpaid interns do highly skilled work.Next, sources said, conservation employers should set up more entry-level positions and make sure they hire entry-level applicants to fill them — not people with years of experience and a PhD.A number of interviewees also said they believe NGOs should prioritize hiring local people rather than bring in conservationists from developed countries to run projects. This, they said, could dramatically lower salary costs and create on-the-ground conservation champions who stay put.Seth Wong. Photo courtesy of Seth Wong.“Foreign researchers and students arrive, conduct a project, publish a paper after returning home, and never go back again; is this conservation?” said Seth Wong, 26, who’s working on a graduate degree at Mississippi State University.To help globalize conservation, Milner-Gulland called for more grants for students from developing countries to study conservation as well as for disadvantaged students at home. She proposed a program that would sponsor graduates to go to other continents for conservation training in a one-to-two year paid position, which she compared to the “type of fast-track graduate-level training that the big firms and civil service offer to their best and brightest.“For Lucas Ruzo conservation is stuck in a non-profit model that is limiting.“We need to move beyond the charity model, and embrace different legal operating structures,” he said. “Let’s fund innovation, innovation of the kind that doesn’t have a publication attached to the end of it.”Of course, the one thing most of these ideas require is money. And that is always limited.But the onus isn’t just on the system. Young conservationists — and you know who are — also need to take a look at themselves, sources said.“Individuals looking to break into the conservation world should probably consider what they bring to the table,” said Wong. “What does conservation actually need and how could you achieve this? Perhaps more research and science isn’t the answer, and as a teacher, businessperson, entrepreneur, or social worker you could genuinely contribute more.”But in the near-term, before any real solutions can be enacted, young conservationists are likely to come up against obstacles — one might even say financial impossibilities — that make it difficult to stay the course. Many will understandably give up, taking away talent and potential from an occupation vital for maintaining life on Earth as we know it.The casualties are already mounting.“I am trying and sending my applications worldwide,” said Svajda. “And for hundredth times comes the answer — you have amazing and impressive CV but we are not hiring you.” Archive, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bold And Dangerous Ideas That May Save The World, Conservation, Conservation Finance, Controversial, Ecology, Environment, Environmental Education, Featured, Green, Innovation In Conservation, Philosophy, Science Correction 8/16/17: This story was updated to correct the spelling of Juraj Svajda’s surname.Correction 8/18/17: This story was updated to correct the conversion of Save the Rhino International’s base salary into U.S. dollars. £21,000 is equivalent to around $27,300, not $15,600 as was previously reported.Editor’s note 8/19/17: At one interviewee’s request, this article has been amended to omit an employer’s name.Correction 8/22/17: This story was updated to omit the assertion that Lucero Vaca was the first Mexican woman to attend Oxford for conservation. At least one other preceded her.Correction 8/29/17: This story was updated to correct the number of months Nika Levikov spent in East Africa (it was ten months, not four as was previously reported) as well as the location where her photograph was taken (it was Kenya, not Tanzania as was previously reported). FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

For Papuan villagers practicing conservation, a bid to formalize the familiar

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Indigenous Papuans of Saubeba village last month gave their support for a government-backed program to designate Tambrauw district, rich in biodiversity, a conservation zone.The villagers already practice sustainable management of the district’s lush forests and its resources, on which their lives depend.The discussion also sought to find solutions for land conflicts that often put legally vulnerable ethnic groups in peril as Tambrauw district pushes for the passage of an indigenous rights bill.One anticipated outcome of all this is the prospect of developing an ecotourism industry centered on the region’s natural riches, including its birds-of-paradise. TAMBRAUW, Indonesia — It took more than two hours by boat, through a driving rain, to reach the village of Saubeba from the nearest large town of Sausapor in Indonesia’s West Papua province. There, locals had gathered to discuss a government-backed plan to designate Tambrauw district, of which Saubeba is a part, a conservation zone.On paper, at least, this would seem a no-brainer: 80 percent of the district’s nearly 11,400 square kilometers (4,400 square miles) is lush forest that falls within existing conservation or protected areas; its coast is a hatching ground for the rare leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and its rainforests home to exotic birds-of-paradise (family: Paradisaeidae).The idea to officially designate the entire district a conservation zone came in 2011, following the election of Gabriel Asem as district chief. Tambrauw itself was only established in 2008, as part of the newly formed administrative province of West Papua.Map of West Papua province (green). Photo courtesy of Bwmodular/Wikimedia Commons.Gathered in the downpour that November day in Saubeba, representatives of the various indigenous communities living in the area discussed with local authorities what the conservation designation would mean, not just for the district but also their way of life.“Many of us here still don’t understand what conservation means, it’s still unfamiliar [to us],” said Bernadus Yewen, a community leader. “If it means protecting the forest, then we’ve been doing it since the time of our ancestors.”It was a sentiment widely shared by the others in attendance. In the end, Yewen said, the people of Saubeba fully supported the idea of a conservation district because their lives had always depended on the sustainable management of Tambrauw’s rich natural resources.The program comes amid a major infrastructure and economic development push — which portends massive forest clearing — across the provinces of Papua and West Papua, as part of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s efforts to boost Indonesia’s underdeveloped eastern regions. Plantation companies are also increasingly targeting the Papua provinces, which share the world’s third-largest span of rainforest with Papua New Guinea, to expand their concession after having nearly depleted the forests of Sumatra and Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of the island of Borneo.A bill on the conservation district program is currently working its way through the district legislature, in tandem with a bill that would officially recognize the ethnic groups in Tambrauw and enshrine their civil rights in law.Like many other indigenous rural communities in Indonesia, Papuan tribes have frequently clashed with the government or companies laying claim to their land, whether for public works projects or commercial development. These communities have nothing to back their claims to the land, and are in most cases forced out of their homes by those with greater political and legal power.People of Saubeba village last month discussed with Tambrauw officials a plan to formally designate the district a conservation zone. Photo by Christopel Paino/Mongabay-Indonesia.Yewen cited the case of a local timber company, PT Multi Wahana Wijaya, which has operated in Saubeba since 2004. The company, he said, had logging permits from the national and district governments, but none from the village’s indigenous groups.“The company logs our trees and ships them out of here and even abroad,” he said.Mesak Yekwam, the Tambrauw deputy district chief, who attended the gathering, vowed to look fully into the matter and resolve it. He suggested the company might have been illegally logging beyond its concession, and said his office could shut down its operations if it was found to have violated any regulations or failed to make a positive impact on the local community.Yekwam also said resolving territorial conflicts between rival clans within the local ethnic groups was a top priority to get the conservation program and indigenous rights bills going.“We must focus first on mapping out the customary lands,” he said. “We also need to improve the relationship between clans and tribes.”Tambrauw is home to 156 clans from five ethnic groups. Inter-clan conflicts frequently erupt across Papua, but Saubeba has managed to avoid the problem, according to Yowel Yesnath, the village chief.“We’re pretty lucky that we never fight with each other about territory,” he said. “We’re ready to help other tribes and clans so we can protect our lands together.”Yekwam said his office hoped to get the conservation district and indigenous rights bills through the legislature by next year.One anticipated outcome of all this is the prospect of developing an ecotourism industry based on the region’s natural riches. Once the customary lands are mapped out, prime nature hotspots can be identified for ecotourism development, thereby helping boost the local economy, said Betwel Yekwam, a district tourism board official. He noted that Tambrauw had many sites perfect for birdwatching, diving and snorkeling.He said, “We have many kinds of birds here, including the birds-of-paradise” — colorful avians that, fittingly enough, are a culturally revered species and also a beloved mascot for the Papua region.Coastal forests in Indonesia’s West Papua province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here and here on our Indonesian site on Nov. 25 and 26, 2017.Banner image: A lesser bird-of-paradise (Paradisaea minor) in eastern Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Community Development, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Belize to protect critical wildlife corridor that’s home to jaguars and more

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Jaguars, Mammals, Protected Areas, Tapirs, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife The government of Belize has approved a proposal to protect the Maya Forest Corridor, a key stretch of jungle linking some of the region’s largest wilderness areas.Once the corridor is secured, it will create the largest contiguous block of forest in Central America, experts say.The Maya Forest Corridor is home to iconic animals like the jaguar; the critically endangered Central American river turtle; the endangered Central American spider monkey or Geoffroy’s spider monkey; and the endangered Baird’s tapir.There is, however, a lot of work to be done before the Maya Forest Corridor gains official legal protection, including securing key privately owned patches of forest in the area. In a boost to jaguars and other iconic wildlife of Central America, the government of Belize has approved a proposal to protect the Maya Forest Corridor, a key stretch of jungle that could help create the largest contiguous block of forest in Central America.About 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 7 kilometers (4 miles) wide, the Maya Forest Corridor connects two major protected areas: the Manatee Forest Reserve to the south and the Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area to the north. These protected areas, in turn, are contiguous with the larger Maya Mountain Block in central Belize and the northern Maya lowland forests, shared by Belize, Guatemala and Mexico. The corridor also includes small protected areas, such as the Monkey Bay Wildlife Sanctuary and the Labouring Creek Jaguar Corridor, which the Belizean government had previously set aside to provide safe passage for jaguars (Panthera onca).“Together, all these forests comprise the largest contiguous block of forest remaining in Central America, and is the largest block of forest in the neotropics north of the Amazon,” Percival Cho, CEO of Belize’s forestry ministry, told Mongabay.Maya Forest Corridor. Image courtesy of WCS.In addition to jaguars, the Maya Forest Corridor is home to the critically endangered Central American river turtle (Dermatemys mawii), the endangered Central American spider monkey or Geoffroy’s spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi); and the endangered Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii).There is, however, a lot of work to be done before the Maya Forest Corridor gains official legal protection. Most of the area earmarked as the Maya Forest Corridor is privately owned, and it’s in these areas that deforestation is rampant because of agricultural development, Cho said.In fact, more than 65 percent of forest within the corridor has been lost to sugarcane and other agriculture expansion over the past decade, according to a press release by a coalition of organizations assisting the Belizean government in securing the corridor. The coalition includes NGOs such as Global Wildlife Conservation, Panthera, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and World Wildlife Fund, along with the Belize Zoo, Foundation for Wildlife Conservation, Monkey Bay Wildlife Sanctuary and Field School, and the University of Belize and its Environmental Research Institute.The NGO partners will help with both technical support and with raising the funds needed to secure key privately owned forests, Jeremy Radachowsky, director of the Mesoamerica and Caribbean program at WCS, told Mongabay.“Fortunately, some of the private forest owners have decided to protect their forest,” Cho added.A Baird’s tapir. Image by Nick Hawkins.The local communities will not be moved for the official designation of the corridor. Rather, steps will be taken to ensure that “large-scale agriculture does not continue to expand into the remaining forests and that local communities benefit from forest-compatible livelihood opportunities,” Radachowsky said.Once the forests are secured, the coalition will help the government develop a corridor-wide management plan for development and opportunities for communities living in and around the corridor, Radachowsky said, including sustainable tourism, hunting, forestry and agriculture.“With its declaration of the Maya Forest Corridor as an ‘area of natural significance,’ the government of Belize has signaled that this area must be permanently protected for the good of the climate, wildlife, the people living in the corridor area, and the people of Belize generally,” Radachowsky said. “With global trends of biodiversity loss, deforestation, and forest fragmentation, the Belize government is stepping up for all of humanity by keeping this globally important forest intact.”A pair of jaguars in Belize. Image courtesy of Panthera. Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How many fires are burning in the Amazon?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, wildfires center_img The fires raging in the Amazon are nearly double over last year, but remain moderate in the historical context.The 41,858 fires recorded in the Amazon as of Aug. 24 this year are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when deforestation rates were very much higher.However, this year’s numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires.The hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have focused worldwide attention on the soaring deforestation rates in the Amazon as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. While fires burning in the Amazon have garnered worldwide attention due to last week’s midday “blackout” in urban São Paulo, more than 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) from the Amazon, analysis of historical data suggests the fires are well within the historical range of the past 20 years.Mongabay’s analysis of data from Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) shows that the number of fire hotspots recorded this year in the Amazon biome total 41,858 through Aug. 24, an increase of 89 percent over the end of August 2018, with still a week to go in in the month. (If August keeps its current pace, Amazônia will tally nearly 50,000 fires by the end of the month.)Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.The 41,858 fires recorded so far this year in the Brazilian Amazon are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when fire hotspots regularly topped 60,000 through this point in the year. Over the past 20 years, 2005 — a year of severe El Niño-induced drought — holds the record of 94,780 fires through August. 2019 currently stands roughly 4 percent above the 20-year average and is on pace to end the month at around 50,000 fires, or 19 percent above average.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.The situation is similar in the Cerrado, a woody, savanna-like biome that lies east and south of the Amazon. Through Aug. 24, 23,322 fires had been recorded there, which is slightly less than the 20-year average for this point in the year.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.In terms of the extent of burning, INPE releases data on a monthly basis, so Mongabay could only look at numbers through the end of July, before the recent surge in fires. With 18,629 square kilometers (7,193 square miles) burned through July in Amazônia, 2019 was 62 percent higher than 2018, but below the 2016 figure.Area burned in the Brazilian Amazon through July each year since 2002. Data from INPE.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Trailing 12-month moving average of the area burned per biome in Brazil since 2002. Data from INPE.An important caveatThese numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires. This is a significant limitation because the area affected by sub-canopy fires that burn into intact and otherwise healthy forests can be quite substantial: a 2013 NASA study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B found that understory fires burn a larger extent of forest than the area deforested for agriculture and cattle pasture.And these fires do long-term damage to the rainforest, setting the stage for more destructive fires, forest die-off, and eventual deforestation. Long-running research initiated by scientist Daniel Nepstad when he worked at the Woods Hole Research Institute, found that forests that have previously been burned are twice as likely to be deforested as unburned forests.Nepstad, now the head of the Earth Innovation Institute, explained the context of the current situation in a blog post.“Satellites do NOT detect most fires that are burning beneath the canopy of standing forests. And it is these low fires, that rarely reach the knee, that do the most damage, burning slowly across the forest floor, killing giant trees with thin bark,” he writes. “Once these trees die, they fall to the ground, opening up huge gaps in the forest canopy that allow more sunlight to reach the forest floor, drying the fuel layer and making the forest more prone to further burning.”Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. According to Greenpeace’s research, 75 percent of the 23,006 hot spots the group recorded in the Amazon in the first 20 days of August occurred in areas were forest in 2017. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Nepstad notes that we don’t yet have a good understanding of the damage from the current burning season, but there is plenty to worry about based on preliminary evidence. For example, the fires are more persistent than in recent years, indicating that they are burning hotter, meaning they are burning more than pasture and dry scrub. And there’s lots of smoke.“We do not know with confidence how the area of fire compares with previous years, [but] it is important to bear in mind that the fire season has just begun, with most fires occurring from September to December,” he writes. “With forecasts of a long dry season, the number of fires could continue to be greater than usual.“We also know that it is a particularly smoky burning season. This is probably related to the large number of ‘deforestation fires’ — fires set to burn patches of forest that have been felled to make way for cattle pasture or crop fields. The smoke released from a fire that burns a hectare of felled forest releases far more smoke than a fire that burns a hectare of degraded pastureland. We do not know the area of standing forest that has burned. Forest fires, however, usually happen late in the dry season.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.While the current fires aren’t off the charts relative to the historical baseline, they are indeed concerning. But the silver lining to the crisis is that the hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have sparked worldwide attention to the soaring deforestation rates now occurring in the Amazon, as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. High-level political blowback from the EU, street protests, and pressure on Brazilian companies has forced Bolsonaro to backtrack on some of his most heated rhetoric from the past week and start to take action, including sending in the army to battle fires. Volunteer fire brigades formed by landowners, indigenous peoples and NGOs have already been battling the fires for weeks.Cumulative deforestation through July for each year from 2008 according to INPE’s DETER system. Note that the chart switches from DETER to DETER-B in August 2016.According to INPE, deforestation in 2019 in the Brazilian is trending 57 percent ahead of last year through the end of July, the fastest rate of deforestation since 2008. Deforestation appears to be continuing at a high rate through August, but the picture is less transparent than usual because INPE has stopped releasing data publicly since Bolsonaro fired Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the head of the agency, at the beginning of the month.last_img read more

Wildfires spread to planned site of new Indonesian capital

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Fires raging across Indonesia have flared up in an area of Borneo where the government recently announced would be the site of the nation’s new capital.The location had been chosen in part because it was believed to be at low risk from fires and other disasters.Haze from the fires has affected local communities as well as a nearby orangutan rescue and rehabilitation center.Authorities have arrested two farmers for setting fires on their land, but activists say they were doing so in a controlled manner and with the permission of local officials. SAMARINDA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s wildfire emergency has spread to the part of eastern Borneo where President Joko Widodo wants to relocate the nation’s capital.On Aug. 26, President Widodo announced plans to move the capital to an area straddling the border between North Penajam Pasar and Kutai Kartanegara districts in East Kalimantan province. The decision was based in part on the area’s low risk of natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides and forest fires, as opposed to the current capital, Jakarta, which is sinking.This month, though, Indonesia faces its worst fire and haze crisis since the catastrophic fires of 2015, which razed 26,100 square kilometers (10,100 square miles) of land across the country — an area nearly the size of Hawaii. And the site of the new capital has not been free of the fires.Shahar Al Haqq, the head of damage control and security at the provincial forestry office, said fires had been burning in the area for the past few weeks. The fires, he said, were relatively small, compared with those in Jambi province on the island of Sumatra, where photos of skies turned an eerie blood-red color have gone viral as fires burn there.Fires in East Kalimantan are typically smaller than elsewhere on Borneo, he said. If the province experiences haze, he added, it’s usually from fires in West and Central Kalimantan provinces elsewhere on the island.“Even though the fires aren’t big, the firefighters are still facing difficulties because of the steep location [where the burning is happening],” Shahar said. “In almost all fire locations there are no groundwater sources.”Based on data from SiPongi, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry’s wildfire monitoring system, the area of land burned in East Kalimantan in 2019 is 67 square kilometers (26 square miles). That figure stands at 448 square kilometers (173 square miles) for Central Kalimantan and 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) for West Kalimantan.A map showing East Kalimantan province (light red) and two districts: North Penajam Paser and Kutai Kartanegara (deep red). Image courtesy of President Joko Widodo’s Twitter account.Fires in North Penajam Paser are concentrated in the Nenang, Mount Seteleng and Lawe-lawe areas, according to the district disaster mitigation office. In Kutai Kartanegara, they’re mainly in the Samboja and Bukit Soeharto areas.“All of our forces are focused on extinguishing these fires,” said Nur Kholis, the head of Samboja subdistrict. He is working with the military, the police and a special subdistrict-level task force on firefighting, as well as local volunteers.The area is home to Samboja Lestari, an orangutan rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction center run by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation. The Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) is a critically endangered species. The center is also home to dozens of sun bears (Helarctos malayanus).“Since March 2019, we at BOSF have sounded the alert of forest and land fires,” said Jamartin Sihite, CEO of the BOSF. “At the moment, thin smoke which is thought to be the result of wildfires has hit Samboja Lestari in the last few days.”The center’s medical team has provided the 130 orangutans under its care with milk and multivitamins to protect their health as the haze spreads. They are also reducing the animals’ outdoor activities and spraying the cages with mist to keep them cool. “Without exception, every one of them is receiving intensive care,” Jamartin said.Fires in Samboja, East Kalimantan. Image by Yovanda for Mongabay.On Sept. 20, two residents of Paser district, not far from the planned site of the new capital, were arrested for allegedly setting forest fires.The arrest was criticized by AMAN, Indonesia’s main advocacy group for indigenous peoples’ rights, because the individuals were setting controlled fires to clear small fields in accordance with local custom. The two people had already obtained permission to set the fires from local authorities, said Margareta Setting Beraan, the head of AMAN’s branch in East Kalimantan.“During the dry season, Paser residents farm their land in accordance with local wisdom,” she said. “We condemn this arrest.”She added, “Don’t look for scapegoats [for the fire and haze crisis] by accusing indigenous people who are farming.”Banner: A Bornean orangutan in Kalimantan. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Crime, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Haze, Indigenous Peoples, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more