Orangutans find home in degraded forests

first_imgThe study leveraged three years of orangutan observation in the field and airborne mapping of the forest structure using laser-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology.The research team found that orangutans make use of habitats that have been ‘degraded’ by logging and other human uses.The research is part of a larger effort in collaboration with the Sabah Forestry Department to map carbon stocks and plant and animal biodiversity throughout the Malaysian state of Sabah with the goal of identifying new areas for conservation. Scientists and conservationists have long believed that the rapid loss of Southeast Asia’s old-growth, “primary” rainforests in recent decades would leave one of its most iconic inhabitants, the orangutan, with no place to go. The evidence seemed clear: In places where people take over the rainforest, orangutan populations tend to drop off.But new research on the island of Borneo demonstrates that orangutans can survive in human-altered rainforests, pointing to the underappreciated value of these “degraded” lands.“If species like orangutans can survive in degraded forests, this means that, even after the forest is degraded, it is still worth protecting,” said Marc Ancrenaz, a biologist and the director at the orangutan-focused conservation organization HUTAN. He and his colleagues published their findings online Tuesday with the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.A young Bornean orangutan in Sabah. Photo by John C. Cannon.Ancrenaz has been studying the Critically Endangered Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in the Malaysian state of Sabah for two decades along the banks of the Lower Kinabatangan River, an area that bears many of the signs of human use. Its forests are dotted with human settlements. They have been logged – in some cases multiple times – and oil palm plantations dominate much of the landscape. And yet, a sizeable population of orangutans in the region has persisted.To understand how these animals have survived the changes from the dense rainforests that once covered much of the island to what exists now, Ancrenaz partnered with researchers from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) at Stanford University in California.CAO ecologist Greg Asner and his team mapped the three-dimensional composition of the rainforest using LiDAR from their specially designed airplane. Short for “light detection and ranging,” LiDAR uses the time it takes laser pulses to reflect back to determine such aspects of the forest as the height of the trees and the shape and size of the canopy, providing a window into the underlying structure of the forest.Then, they paired that information with three years of on-the-ground observations of orangutans around the Lower Kinabatangan River by Ancrenaz’s team in Sabah.“We figured out that the orangutans are using the better parts” of degraded forests, Asner said in an interview. They prefer “tall trees and lots of canopy cover,” he added, “meaning the more mature individual trees that are out there.”Forest cleared for oil palm in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Those preferences indicate that not all degraded forests are suitable for orangutans. But if they provide enough food, adequate resources to build their nests (which they do on a daily basis), and the ability to move from tree to tree through the canopy, these forests can be viable habitats.“Orangutans are smart animals,” Ancrenaz said. “They are great apes, so of course they are able to adapt their behavior,” at least over the relatively short period amount of time they’ve been closely studied.As a “slow-breeding species,” he added, “It is still quite early to say that degraded forests can sustain viable orangutans over the long term.” But the signs are promising.Although they seem to prefer interlocking canopies that allow them to move from tree to tree, orangutans will descend to the forest floor to reach another tree in search of food or branches for their nests. That behavior does, however, come at a cost: It takes more energy, and the stroll makes them vulnerable to predators and diseases that can’t reach usually them in the treetops.Field observations have also revealed that orangutans change their diets to suit the mix of plants that colonize degraded or razed forests.“This doesn’t mean that primary forests should be exploited,” Ancrenaz said. “We still need to protect primary forests because there are a lot of other species that cannot really adjust to habitat degradation.”But in a place like Sabah, a lot of the wildlife has little choice but to make their homes in degraded forests that have been logged, or areas that have been cleared completely and are growing back – what are known as secondary forests.“We definitely need to protect primary forest wherever possible,” Asner said, “but for a lot of regions, if it’s primary, it’s already in a park or some other protected area.”That’s especially true for Sabah. Two large banks of protected primary forest remain in Danum Valley Conservation Area and Maliau Basin Conservation Area. Beyond that, the state is mostly a mosaic of oil palm plantations, areas set aside for timber and agriculture, and spots where the rainforest is beginning to come back.Now, Asner said, “The Sabah Forestry Department wants to know, what other forests can we protect?”More than 70 percent of Borean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) live in human-altered or fragmented forests. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.This study is part of a larger project led by Asner and the Forestry Department to figure out the best areas for conservation in Sabah. With the data collected from the CAO aircraft, they can also identify the spots with the highest carbon stocks and the most plant species.By combining those maps with information about the habitats of key animal species, such as orangutans in this instance, they can say to the Forestry Department, “Take these. These are the ones where things are already working well enough for the most species,” Asner said. “Let them regrow and become mature forest.”The effort aims to safeguard about 400,000 hectares (approximately 1 million acres) of previously unprotected land in Sabah. It will allow the forests to come back and provide a more robust habitat – not just for orangutans, but many other animals. And it will address perhaps the greatest threat that orangutans currently face.When people move into forests, they’ll often hunt the animals found there, in addition to altering the habitats. When that happens to animals like orangutans, Ancrenaz said, “Of course they are wiped out.”That’s one reason scientists have suspected that secondary or degraded forests couldn’t support orangutans. But it turns out that it’s one of the associated impacts – more so than the changes to the habitat itself – that’s most responsible for sending their numbers tumbling.The team’s research shows that orangutans are flexible enough to adjust to recovering forests. “What they cannot adapt to is hunting,” Ancrenaz said.CITATIONSDavies, A. B., Ancrenaz, M., Oram, F., & Asner, G. P. (2017). Canopy structure drives orangutan habitat selection in disturbed Bornean forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Advance online publication. doi:10.1073/pnas.1706780114Banner image of an orangutan in Sabah by Rhett A. Butler.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Agriculture, Animal Behavior, Animal Intelligence, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Borneo Orangutan, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Degraded Lands, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Fragmentation, Great Apes, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, LiDAR, Logging, Mammals, Megafauna, Old Growth Forests, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Palm Oil And Biodiversity, Parks, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Research, Rivers, Secondary Forests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Tropical Rivers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

Even as Trump and Modi clash on energy, India and U.S. are partnering

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Sustainability, Sustainable Development Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img In the past, and under Pres. Trump and Prime Minister Modi, the U.S. and India have often been at odds environmentally, especially regarding climate change, with the U.S. saying that developing nations need to do more to cut emissions, while India says that the U.S, as biggest historical carbon emitter, must take a primary role.However, the two countries, under Obama and now under Trump, have quietly done trade agreements to enhance the transfer of liquid natural gas and nuclear power plant technology via sales from U.S. high tech companies to India.India’s Modi, a proponent of solar energy, was also convinced in talks with Pres. Obama to be a big supporter of the Paris Climate Agreement. Though, with the ascendance of Pres. Trump, and his rejection of the landmark accord, the two countries have again parted ways.Trump’s plan to renege on a US $2 billion Green Climate Fund (GCF) commitment made by Pres. Obama could somewhat slow India’s drive to quickly embrace green technologies. President Trump and Prime Minister Modi talk at the G20 summit in Germany this summer. Photo courtesy of the White HouseIndia and the United States have traditionally not seen eye-to-eye on climate change and energy policies. Since the Kyoto Protocol negotiations of the 1990s, diplomats of the two nations have fought many a fierce battle in air-conditioned rooms during international summits arguing over emission cuts and their cost to both economies. And they haven’t come away with much to show for their work.Recent political events have done little to reveal any new common ground between two of the world’s largest democracies, and carbon polluters.Two days before President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. would pull out of the Paris agreement, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi warned him that “playing with the wellbeing of future generations would be an immoral and criminal act,” emphasizing the need for the world’s nations — including the U.S. — to strive towards protecting the planetary environment.On the 1st of June, President Trump showed that, to his mind, calls to morality and shared responsibility, did not hold water: “The bottom line is that the Paris Accord is very unfair at the highest level to the United States,” said Trump in his White House Rose Garden speech. “India will be allowed to double its coal production by 2020. Think of it. India can double their coal production. We’re supposed to get rid of ours!”In essence, not a lot has changed diplomatically between India and the U.S. since the years leading up to Kyoto: India believes the U.S. should shoulder more responsibility, as it is the highest historic contributor to carbon emissions, and the second highest emitter now, after China. But the U.S. holds that developing countries, especially those with large populations, like India and China are shirking their obligation to cut emissions while gaining huge economic advantage.Smog near Delhi. India suffers from severe air pollution due to its past commitment to coal burning power plants. Public outrage over severe urban smog has helped push India’s leaders toward clean energy solutions. Photo by Saurabh Kumar licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licenseRegardless of the high level rift, observers have long hoped that bipartisan solutions to climate change would eventually emerge from market forces and greater awareness of global warming risk. The sharply falling price of renewables, for example, coupled with an understanding by businesses and the public in both nations could eventually bring cooperation to reduce emissions.“Renewable energy becoming affordable is the game changer,” said Chandra Bhushan, Deputy Director General of the Centre for Science and Environment, a New Delhi based research and advocacy organization. “The market is doing what endless discussions of world leaders cannot easily achieve.”In reality — even though the rhetoric of Trump and Modi seems worlds apart — the international energy trade is bringing the two countries together. Put simply, India possesses a huge potential market and need for clean energy technologies, an that’s a need which U.S. tech companies would love to fill.India’s Carbon Reduction ChallengeOf India’s more than 1.2 billion citizens, more than 360 million live in poverty. That population is projected to grow to 1.45 billion by 2028, surpassing China’s, with India becoming the world’s most populous country. As that population grows, and also hopefully prospers, energy demands will soar.India’s challenge: maintain high levels of economic growth despite the burgeoning population by increasingly reducing its carbon footprint. Keeping that goal in mind, the country unveiled its long-range climate change plan in October 2015, pledging to source 40 percent of its electricity from renewable and other low-carbon sources by 2030 — a tall order for a nation in the developing world.The Kudankulam nuclear power plant, currently India’s largest was built with Russian cooperation, and became operational in 2013. Even as U.S, nuclear plant construction stalled this year, India sanctioned ten new nuclear plants, with an estimated generating capacity of 7000 megawatts (MW). U.S. companies hope to profit from some of this new construction. Photo courtesy of indiawaterportal.org licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.One way to achieve those ambitious targets is by relying on cleaner energy sources like natural gas and nuclear energy. But that means tapping into the international community’s clean energy entrepreneurs and their first world technologies. And that means global partnerships that include the United States.One example: Gas Authority India Limited (GAIL), the largest state-owned natural gas processing and distribution company in India, is currently contracted to purchase 5.8 million metric tons per year (MMTPA) of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from a US terminal. However, the approved price of the gas could be higher than what India could get from West Asia or Africa. However, analysts say U.S. gas suppliers are very likely to renegotiate price because India is a very important potential LNG market.As a result, President Trump, even as he loudly proclaims a rebirth of U.S. coal, has also pushed for long-term contracts with India to purchase American natural gas.By 2020, India will potentially be importing 50 MMTPA of natural gas. “If the price were right, in principle there would be a lot of scope for additional gas imports [to India]. Almost up to 88 percent of projected net natural gas exports from the United States,” revealed Arunabha Ghosh, CEO for the Council on Energy, Environment and Water. “There is [potential for] a broader scope in bilateral energy partnership [between India and the U.S.], especially when we count in nuclear technologies.”In 2008, during the Bush administration, the two countries signed a civil nuclear agreement, ending India’s nuclear isolation, and allowing civil nuclear trade with New Delhi. This is seen as a huge market opportunity for the U.S. nuclear energy industry, and just in time. Even as U.S, nuclear plant construction stalled this year, India sanctioned ten new nuclear plants, with an estimated generating capacity of 7000 megawatts (MW).While many environmentalists will argue that neither nuclear or natural gas represent the best alternative energy way forward for India, such cooperative international agreements certainly represent a definite move away from both coal and oil.U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in India to conclude the 2008 Agreement on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy. Photo by Michael Gross / U.S. State DepartmentPast energy cooperation between India and the U.S.The initiation of cooperation between India and the U.S. to create clean energy solutions certainly cannot be credited to President Trump. Since Prime Minister Modi took office in May 2014, he has made five official visits to the U.S., with four of them occurring during the Obama years. Only one visit, which showed little in the way of outward policy advances, came under Trump.Amidst all the awkward hugging and handshaking, Modi and Obama made immense progress on the clean energy front during their meetings. Modi’s state visit to Washington in September 2014 was soon reciprocated by Obama’s in January 2015 on occasion of India’s Republic Day. In a joint press conference then, Modi notably changed his stance on climate change by agreeing that India too had to reduce emissions for the sake of its own population. It was a significant move away from his entrenched “developed countries must do more” line.When President Trump took over, observers were unsure of what to expect. But true to his campaign promise, the new administration withdrew from the Paris Climate Agreement. India, the world’s fourth-largest carbon emitter, ratified the Paris Agreement in October 2016, becoming the 62nd nation to do so. Now, with Nicaragua’s joining the agreement, only Syria and the U.S. stand outside.Under the Accord, most developing nations agreed to cut emissions in return for financial support, technology transfer and capacity building from the developed countries. According to some estimates, the sum total of such needed support would be an estimated $2-$4 trillion.To meet its voluntary emissions reductions under the Paris Agreement, India will have to shift significantly from coal-based generation to renewable energy sources. According to one source, it will need to ultimately produce 100 gigawatts (GW) from solar, 60 GW from wind, 10 GW from biomass and 5 GW from small hydropower by 2022. To make that shift, it will need significant international assistance. But for now, little of that help will be coming from the United States.U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement could have immediate effects on the creation of a clean energy industry in India. President Obama had promised US$3 billion (out of $10.13 billion pledged by 43 nations) to the Green Climate Fund, an entity under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.In April, the fund announced US$34 million for solar micro-irrigation and watershed management projects in the eastern Indian state of Odisha. But since President Trump’s publicized plan for a complete withdrawal from the Green Climate Fund (reneging on $2 billion out of Obama’s $3 billion promised total), the future of those projects looks unsure, according to the National Bank for Agricultural and Rural Development, which is handling the Indian projects.Who will fund such projects now? Most observers feel that the financial responsibility should be shouldered by other developed countries. “China and India do not have historical responsibility, [for the bulk of past emissions], writes Indrajit Bose of the Third World Network, “So, making [China and India] fill the gap will disrupt the delicate balance of differentiated responsibilities of developed and developing countries achieved in the [Paris] agreement. In fact, they are already doing more than their fair share of climate action. The only way to ensure equitable climate action is that developed countries step in and fill the gap left by the U.S.”Most Indian experts, however, aren’t overly worried by the $2 billion GCF loss represented by Trump’s reversal. They feel that this amount is too little to seriously affect the larger strides that India is making to usher in a clean energy economy.Prime Mininster Narendra Modi with US President Barack Obama. The two men met four times and found common ground in their talks regarding climate change and carbon emissions. Photo by VinyS licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licensePressure on India to act on climateEven before the Paris Summit in December 2015, India had pledged to reduce its carbon intensity by 35 percent by 2030 and to develop 175 GW of renewable energy capacity by 2022.In line with that, India’s Environment Ministry commissioned research this summer on decoupling greenhouse gas emissions from economic growth. The Energy Research Institute, Observer Research Foundation and Centre for Study of Science, Technology and Policy have been asked to recommend future low carbon growth scenarios for the country. If they stick to schedule, these organizations can present their findings to the Ministry even before the implementation of the Paris Agreement begins in 2020.“These changes are happening not because of political will, but despite it,” said Srinivas Krishnaswamy, Chief Executive Officer of the Vasudha Foundation, an organization actively involved in climate negotiations occurring under the aegis of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). “Climate change was never an election issue in India,” he explained. “We still fight elections on the basis of economy, jobs and caste,” he said.That’s one reason why, when Trump met Modi in June, talks hovered around visas and other strategic issues. “PM Modi knows better than to talk to President Trump about [the] environment,” said Krishnaswamy. “H1B1 will bring in election funding and votes, not climate change talks,” he added, referring to the U.S. visas for IT professionals.However, in the past few years, since air pollution in Delhi has made headlines throughout the world, the government has found itself under pressure to act. And it has taken baby steps in the direction of clean energy.Coal mine in Dhanbad, India. While India has a good supply of coal, air pollution produced by coal-burning power plants has caused the country to move away from this dirty source of energy. Photo found on flickr licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseIndia has, for example, abandoned its previous commitment to coal. Instead of building coal-fired power plants, it is now canceling many that were planned. In May, the government lowered its annual coal production target from 660 million tons to 600 million tons. The country has also committed to only sell electric cars by 2030.Another boost to India’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions has been Modi’s sustained interest in renewables. As chief minister of Gujarat state for three terms, he instituted more than 900 MW of solar power across the region. Since India receives more sunlight than any other G-20 country, he has expressed a desire to push solar across the nation.In regard to its greenhouse gas emissions and policies implemented to curb them, the Climate Action Tracker has rated India as a country “compatible” with its stated Paris Agreement goals. While, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the United States are rated “critically insufficient.” However, a lot more needs to be done if India is to achieve its Paris commitments.Bhushan noted that it will be tough for developing countries to keep up with their twin goals of economic development and carbon emissions reduction without U.S. financial backing. He added that, “since the rules are being framed right now for the Paris Agreement, countries of the world should get together to discuss how to reprimand the U.S.” Such discussions might occur at the Bonn climate summit this November.Global warming is now a matter of concern around the world. And at the heart of that concern lies the question of how to drastically curb energy emissions without stalling economic growth and prosperity, especially in the developing world. Rhetoric aside, neither the U.S. under Trump or India under Modi have yet taken the huge practical steps required to meet this daunting challenge. Immense supplies of political will, international cooperation, and money will be needed to speed up the effort exponentially in order to avoid potentially catastrophic climate change.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The India One solar thermal power plant in Brahma Kumaris. Prime Minister Modi has made a strong commitment to solar power. Photo by Bkwcreator licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenselast_img read more

FSC mulls rule change to allow certification for recent deforesters

first_imgMotion 7 passed at the FSC General Assembly meeting in Vancouver on Oct. 13, indicating that the organization will pursue a change to its rules allowing companies that have converted forests to plantations since 1994 to go for certification.Current rules do not allow FSC certification for any companies that have cleared forested land since 1994.Proponents of a rule change say it would allow more companies to be held to FSC standards and could result in the restoration or conservation of ‘millions of hectares’ in compensation for recent deforestation.Opponents argue that FSC is bending to industry demands and that a rule change will increase the pressure for land conversion on communities and biodiversity. The certification organization Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) took a step toward allowing timber companies that have cut down forests since 1994 to apply for the organization’s stamp of approval.Since its inception 23 years ago, the FSC has refused to certify any company that has deforested areas in order to convert them to timber plantations. While the passage of Motion 7 at the General Assembly meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, on Oct. 13 does not change this, its approval by the organization’s membership – comprising private companies, individuals and conservation NGOs – indicates that the council’s requirements could change. Proponents argue that the measure would increase access to certification in developing economies. But some question how effective certification actually is and say that changing the cutoff date could increase the destruction of forests.A timber plantation in Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.“I think it’s becoming more and more apparent for FSC that this 1994 rule is becoming like a blockage,” said Aditya Bayunanda of WWF Indonesia. “The FSC should be open to all.”Bayunanda proposed the motion, which allows discussions about changing this regulation to continue.In his view, a rule change would allow the participation of companies from developing countries, whose economies were just getting going around the time the FSC was created.“It wasn’t by design,” Bayunanda said in an interview. “It was just like that.”Allowing these companies to earn certification would require them to adhere to the FSC’s standards regarding biodiversity conservation and the protection of human rights, Bayunanda said, and he cautioned that just because certification would be possible doesn’t mean it would be easy.At this point, the motion does not specify what FSC would require of companies that had converted forests after 1994 to attain certification, but Bayunanda said that they would likely have to “restore or conserve equivalent” areas of land to what they had cleared. Additionally, they would need to compensate the communities for “the social damage” that the land conversion caused. He said both would be “game-changing.”“Now they have to be a leader in restoration and conservation,” Bayunanda added.An acacia timber plantation in Colombia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Rainforest Action Network’s Bill Barclay said that any change “requires a very high-bar set of compensation standards, indicators and procedures if the 1994 rule is ever to be replaced and approved by all chambers of the FSC General Assembly.” That would mean a comprehensive assessment of how the forest clearing hurt not just the environment but also communities, Barclay added. Rainforest Action Network is an FSC member.A new rule with those kinds of stringent requirements could result in the “[restoration] and conservation of millions of hectares of forest and social restitution for communities,” said Grant Rosoman, a global forests solutions senior advisor with Greenpeace, in an email. Greenpeace is also a member of FSC.But others involved in rainforest conservation see moving the cutoff date up to the present as capitulating to the desires of the timber industry and plantation companies.Simon Counsell, executive director of the Rainforest Foundation UK, called the passage of the motion “a clear and major turning point for the FSC” because it is considering allowing “FSC certification of wood products that are from areas of forest that have been destroyed, not managed sustainably.”“It ought to be the final nail in the coffin of FSC’s credibility,” Counsell added in an email.Chris Lang of the website REDD-Monitor expressed concerns about what a rule change might mean for people directly affected by forest conversion.“The advantages to the pulp and paper industry are clear, but it’s extremely difficult to imagine how this decision helps indigenous peoples and local communities who are struggling against the spread of monoculture tree plantations on their lands,” Lang said.Proponents of Motion 7 say that its passage would see the restoration or conservation of millions of hectares of forest that had been lost to timber plantations. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.But Greenpeace’s Rosoman said that the support for Motion 7 came largely not from plantation companies, but from “other stakeholders.” He said that some companies may be against a change to the 1994 rule because it serves as “a trade protection measure,” keeping competitors from receiving the certification.Still, Lang said that FSC’s goal seems to be increasing the percentage of timber companies that are certified, not the sustainability of the industry.“With Motion 7, FSC will no doubt be able to certify even more destructive industrial tree plantations, and therefore increase the percentage of certified industrial timber,” he said. “But the chances of Motion 7 leading to meaningful changes in the pulp and paper sector are approximately zero.”“That highlights a key question about FSC certification: whether FSC-certified operations are in fact sustainable,” said Cyril Kormos, vice president of policy at WILD Foundation, in an email. “There is very strong evidence that even certified logging operations are not sustainable – and that making them truly sustainable would require massive subsidies.“FSC certification is obviously better than conventional logging – there is little question about that,” Kormos added. “But that doesn’t mean that it is good enough, let alone truly sustainable.”Banner image of an industrial timber plantation in Indonesia by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: A previous version of this article contained an incorrect hyperlink. The text ‘Motion 7’ is now linked to the correct page on the FSC General Assembly website. We regret the error. Article published by John Cannon Biodiversity, Certification, Community Forestry, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, FPIC, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Logging, Plantations, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Redd, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New carbon maps of Sabah’s forests guide conservation in Borneo

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Airborne LiDAR mapping combined with satellite imagery analysis has provided scientists, government agencies and NGOs with a “wall-to-wall” account of the carbon held in Sabah, a Malaysian state on the island of Borneo.The study, led by ecologists from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, revealed that more than 40 percent of the forests with the highest carbon stocks aren’t covered by the state’s most stringent protections.The findings give wildlife biologists the chance to examine how carbon stocks correlate with the presence of biodiversity; NGOs the opportunity to identify new high-carbon areas to set aside under oil palm certification schemes; and the Sabah government the information to determine which forests are the most valuable and therefore need further protections. Airborne mapping of the northern part of the island of Borneo has revealed that forests there pack some of the highest levels of carbon on the planet, even in a place that has been heavily used by humans.“I was surprised when we found such high forest carbon stocks in areas with observably high levels of past logging,” said ecologist Greg Asner, who heads the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) in Stanford, California, and was the study’s lead author.Asner and a team of colleagues had previously reported in 2016 that 50 of the world’s tallest tropical trees live in Sabah, in Malaysian Borneo. In part, that helps explain why there’s more carbon here “than almost anywhere we have mapped and measured around the global tropics,” he said in an email. “It all comes down to really tall trees packed together spatially.”Intact forest in Sabah on the island of Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.For this study, old-growth forests averaged more than 200 metric tons of carbon per hectare (89 tons per acre) and topped out at 500 metric tons in each hectare. The scientists reported their findings online Nov. 22 in the journal Biological Conservation.As they’ve done elsewhere in the tropics, Asner and his team used a laser-based technology known as “light detection and ranging,” or LiDAR, mounted on CAO’s airplane to measure the density of carbon in nearly 30 percent of Sabah’s forests. They then combined that data with satellite imagery of the region and built a statistical model to extrapolate their findings to all of the Malaysian state’s forests.In the end, they came up with a “wall-to-wall” map of carbon stocks in Sabah down to 30-meter (98-foot) resolution, or about 5,500 percent finer resolution than mapping that others have done on a global scale, Asner said.Many of Sabah’s degraded forests still pack substantial amounts of carbon, despite a long history of logging in Sabah, as well as a substantial amount forest that has been cleared for oil palms. Sabah’s oil palm plantations produce 10 percent of the world’s supply.The researchers found that Sabah’s logged forests still hold large amounts of carbon. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Areas that had been logged still had carbon stocks as high as 140 metric tons per hectare (62.5 tons per acre).“[That] tells me that these logged forests are important current habitat,” Asner said, “and they could become even more important if allowed to recover.”The government of Sabah and a consortium of NGOs are working to bring all of the palm oil exported from Sabah up to the standards of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil by 2025. Cynthia Ong, head of the NGO Land Environment Animals People (LEAP), is at the forefront of this effort, and LEAP is one of the organizations “playing a vital role in connecting the science to conservation action,” Asner said.Ong recently wrote a report indicating that Asner’s team of scientists from CAO was working with researchers on the ground in Sabah to validate the latest findings. Their hope is that the data can contribute to the identification of high-carbon stock areas that would be “no-go” zones for oil palm under the state’s new certification standards.Results of the research could help biologists understand how animal populations and carbon stocks are correlated. Photo by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.Asner is also working with wildlife biologists to figure out how these stores of carbon link up with the biodiversity they contain, such as the orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and elephants (Elephas maximus borneensis) still found in parts of Sabah.Along with biodiversity levels, this new carbon data is helping the Sabah Forestry Department work out “where to place new maximum protections,” Asner said. The forestry department has set a goal of raising the proportion of protected land area in Sabah from 25 percent to 30 percent by the year 2025.At the same time, Asner found in this study that around 40 percent of the areas with the most carbon don’t lie in areas with the strongest protections. That discovery creates a new opportunity to zero in on the most valuable forests to safeguard. Setting those areas aside would help lock away carbon and shore up wildlife habitat, but they also serve as a hedge against the uncertainty of rising global temperatures, Asner said.“One big worry … is climate change,” he added. “It is thought that increasing temperatures and/or drought could reduce carbon stocks and also push animals out of current forested areas.“This is an important reason for Sabah’s interest in expanding the network of protected areas — to allow for change.”Deforestation for oil palm in Sabah. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.CITATIONSAsner, G. P., Brodrick, P. G., Philipson, C., Vaughn, N. R., Martin, R. E., Knapp, D. E., … & Stark, D. J. (2018). Mapped aboveground carbon stocks to advance forest conservation and recovery in Malaysian Borneo. Biological Conservation, 217, 289-310.Banner image of elephants in Sabah by John C. Cannon/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Borneo Orangutan, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Sequestration, Certification, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Climate Science, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Ecology, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forestry, Great Apes, Impact Of Climate Change, LiDAR, Mammals, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Parks, Plantations, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Research, Rspo, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Labor abuses persist in RSPO-certified palm plantations, report finds

first_imgA new report exposes labor abuses on three plantations owned by Indofood, a subsidiary of the Salim Group conglomerate.The report reveals how workers are routinely exposed to hazardous pesticides, paid less than the minimum wage, illegally kept in a temporary work status to fill core jobs, and deterred from forming independent labor unions.Each of the three plantations has been certified as “sustainable” by the RSPO, which bans labor abuses by its members, but is often criticized for failing to enforce its own standards.Advocates have been pushing for the RSPO to improve its handling of labor issues. JAKARTA – For almost a decade, Bambang has labored on an oil palm estate owned by the Salim Group conglomerate in North Sumatra.Every day, he and his wife rise before 6 a.m. to prepare for work. Bambang cuts the palm fruit bunches from high in the treetops, while his wife gathers what falls to the ground. They usually do this until 4 p.m.But while they both work full time, only Bambang is paid by the company. His wife is a kernet — an unofficial laborer who helps harvesters meet unrealistic quotas, but who have no direct relationship with the company.Bambang says he gets penalized if he fails to collect 90 fruit bunches a day, each of which weighs up to 30 kilograms (66 pounds). He says he can never gather more than 70 bunches on his own.Even Bambang’s salary of 2.4 million rupiah ($175) per month is less than the local minimum wage, forcing the couple to supplement their income with side jobs.“If I got to choose, I’d choose for both me and my wife to get paid, but that never happens,” Bambang, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, said in an interview. “Sometimes I want to scream because I’m so angry.”Bambang is one of 8.4 million workers in the Indonesian palm oil industry. The Southeast Asian country is the world’s biggest producer of the commodity, which is found in products ranging from chocolate to laundry detergent to biodiesel.In the past two decades, oil palm plantations have proliferated in Indonesia, fueling deforestation and land grabbing as politically connected companies operate with impunity.Bambang’s story highlights a different issue: the miserable working conditions at many of Indonesia’s palm plantations. These include excessive working hours, occupational health and safety hazards, and, more seriously, child labor, forced labor and the trafficking of migrant workers.Bambang was one of dozens of workers interviewed for a report by the Rainforest Action Network (RAN), an international NGO; OPPUK, an Indonesian labor rights advocacy organization; and the International Labor Rights Forum (ILRF). (RAN set up Mongabay’s interview with Bambang.)“We see that the issues raised in the palm oil industry are mostly environmental issues,” Fitri Arianti, RAN’s coordinator for Indonesia relations, told reporters in Jakarta. “Labor issues are rarely analyzed.”The report exposes labor abuses on three plantations owned by Indofood, a subsidiary of the Salim Group, whose owner, Anthony Salim, is one of Indonesia’s richest men. Anthony’s father, Liem Sioe Liong, grew wealthy as one of the late dictator Suharto’s most notorious cronies.The report reveals how workers are routinely exposed to hazardous pesticides, paid less than the minimum wage, illegally kept in a temporary work status to fill core jobs, and deterred from forming independent labor unions, among other findings.It follows from a 2016 exposé of labor abuses on Indofood plantations, finding that working conditions remain largely the same, with Indofood only adopting cosmetic fixes that fail to address the root causes of the abuse.For example, to address the issue of undocumented workers — often the wives and children of permanent workers — working on the plantation, the company has put up signs saying kernet are banned, rather than formalizing these workers as employees or lowering harvest quotas.Each of the three plantations scrutinized in the report has been certified as “sustainable” by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the world’s largest association for ethical production of the commodity. The RSPO bans labor abuses by its members, but is often criticized for failing to enforce its own standards.“There are many companies that claim that once they have RSPO certificates, it means they’re sustainable,” Fitri said. “But we see that these are plantations that have been certified by RSPO. Yet there are still many labor violations.”Advocates have been pushing for the RSPO to improve its handling of labor issues. Earlier this year, the roundtable established a task force on labor rights to strengthen its standards and processes.A female maintanance worker sprays pesticides on PT. London Sumatra Plantation in North Sumatra. Phpto by Nanang Sujana for RAN/Oppuk.Critics say the measure is not enough.“In the RSPO’s complaint mechanism, there’s no witness protection,” OPPUK director Herwin Nasution said in an interview. “For example, if a worker reports an abuse, there’s no guarantee that he or she won’t get fired.”Herwin criticized the RSPO’s handling of a prior complaint against Indofood for its treatment of workers, arguing the roundtable should suspend the company’s membership until it addresses the issue.Responding to the latest report, Muhammad Waras, an executive at Indofood subsidiary London Sumatra, said the company had complied with existing regulations on labor in Indonesia, such as minimum wage, child labor, freedom to form labor unions, safety standards and other points.“So far, we haven’t had any dispute with labor unions in North Sumatra and we have a harmonious relationship,” he said in an email. “We also have an internal mechanism of report and complaint if there are violations [of] labor policies. So if there are violations, we could settle them through our mechanism. Our compliance is also monitored by local labor authorities.” Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Activism, Agriculture, Environment, Forced labor, Indonesia, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rspo center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

BOURNEMOUTH VS MAN UNITED

first_imgBOURNEMOUTH (4-1-4-1)FEDERICI,SMITH, COOK, DISTIN, DANIELS,SURMAN,RITCHIE, GOSLING, ARTER, STANISLAS,KINGMANU(4-2-3-1)MARTIAL,FELLAINI,LINGARD, SCHWEINSTEIGER, SCHNEIDERLIN, MATA,DARMIAN, BLIND, SMALLING, McNAIR,DE GEAManchester United must bounce back from Tuesday’s 3-2 defeat in Germany against Wolfsburg, which saw them knocked out of the Champions League.After winning 1-0 at reigning champions Chelsea, Bournemouth should be confident of facing United at the Vitality Stadium. That victory, only their third of the season, took the Cherries out of the bottom three.Indeed, Bournemouth became the first newly-promoted side to beat Chelsea at Stamford Bridge in more than 14 years.United, now fourth in the Barclays Premier League, arrive hoping to shake off their habit of featuring in goalless draws; Louis van Gaal’s men have been involved in no fewer than eight 0-0 stalemates in 2015, their most in a calendar year since 2005 when they notched up 10.However, United also have nine clean sheets this season; in the last campaign they kept 11.This is the first time these teams have met in the league, though in eight cup ties, United have won five, drawn two and lost only one – in the FA Cup in 1984.last_img read more

Indonesia forest-clearing ban is made permanent, but labeled ‘propaganda’

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong A temporary moratorium first issued in 2011 on granting permits to clear primary forests and peatlands for plantations or logging has been made permanent by Indonesia’s president.The government says the policy has been effective in slowing deforestation, but environmental activists blast those claims as “propaganda,” saying that forest loss and fires have actually increased in areas that qualify for the moratorium.They’ve highlighted several loopholes in the moratorium that allow developers to continue exploiting forest areas without consequence.Activists are also skeptical that a newer moratorium, on granting permits for oil palm cultivation, will do much to help slow the rate of deforestation. JAKARTA — Indonesia’s president has made permanent a temporary moratorium on forest-clearing permits for plantations and logging.It’s a policy the government says has proven effective in curtailing deforestation, but whose apparent gains have been criticized by environmental activists as mere “propaganda.”Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar said President Joko Widodo had signed the permanent extension of the moratorium on Aug. 5. The moratorium prohibits the conversion of primary natural forests and peatlands for oil palm, pulpwood and logging concessions, and was introduced in 2011 by then-president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono as part of wider efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation.The moratorium was initially slated to run for two years, but was extended three times since then, with the latest extension signed in 2017 and expiring on July 17 this year.“This is a very good and positive thing,” Siti said in a statement, adding that it was the latest concrete example of Widodo’s commitment to environmental protection.But the moratorium hasn’t helped slow the loss of primary forests, say activists. If anything, they say, the deforestation rate has actually increased within areas that qualify for the moratorium.Newly established oil palm plantation in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Forest loss and firesThe rate of deforestation in areas covered by the licensing ban between 2011 and 2018, the period during which the moratorium has been in force, is down 38 percent from the seven years prior, according to data from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.But analysis of satellite imagery by Greenpeace shows that deforestation rates increased in those areas after 2011. The NGO recorded 12,000 square kilometers (4,630 square miles) of forest loss within the moratorium areas in the seven years after the ban was implemented. This corresponds to an average annual rate of deforestation of 1,370 square kilometers (530 square miles) — higher than the average 970 square kilometers (375 square miles) per year in the seven years before 2011.Greenpeace said the government’s data were neither consistent nor available in a format that can be processed using geographic information system (GIS) software. Instead, it relied on data from the University of Maryland, which has been tracking tropical deforestation rates around the world since 2001.“The Indonesia forests moratorium is a good example of government propaganda on forest conservation,” said Kiki Taufik, the head of Greenpeace’s Southeast Asia forests campaign. “It sounds impressive but doesn’t deliver real change on the ground.”The moratorium has also had a questionable impact on preventing fires in the areas it’s meant to cover, Greenpeace found in its analysis of government data. Nearly a third of the 34,000 square kilometers (13,100 square miles) of forests and land burned between 2015 and 2018 were in moratorium areas, mainly in the provinces of Central Kalimantan, Papua, South Sumatra and Riau.During the particularly intense fire season of 2015, 7,000 of the 26,000 square kilometers (2,700 out of 10,000 square miles) of burned areas were in moratorium areas. So far this year, with the fire season shaping up to be the worst since 2015, a quarter of the hotspots are in moratorium areas, Greenpeace found.Another study, published in 2015 at the peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), also measured the effectiveness of the moratorium in reducing deforestation and emissions from it by evaluating deforestation and emission rates circa 2011 against rates over the period 2000 to 2010.According to the study, less than 3 percent of deforestation and less than 7 percent of emissions would have been avoided had the moratorium been implemented in 2000.“For Indonesia to have achieved its target of reducing emissions by 26 percent [by 2020], the geographic scope of the moratorium would have had to expand beyond new concessions to also include existing concessions and address deforestation outside of concessions and protected areas,” the study concluded.Fires engulf a palm oil plantation in Rokan Hilir district, Riau, Indonesia. Image by Zamzami/Mongabay Indonesia.Lingering loopholesMuch of these problems are down to loopholes in the moratorium, activists say.The policy explicitly prohibits the issuance of new plantation and logging permits for carbon-rich primary forests — but not for secondary forests, defined under Indonesian law as those that have previously been logged to any extent.As a result, some parties are deliberately clearing areas of primary forest within moratorium zones for the express purpose of degrading them. Once that happens, these areas are recognized as secondary forest, and thus fall out of the scope of the moratorium, says Zenzi Suhadi, the head of advocacy at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi).“The moratorium only applies to primary natural forests, but once they’re degraded and became secondary forests, permits can be issued there,” Zenzi said. “This is what makes natural forests keep losing their cover.”He said the government should include secondary forests in the licensing ban. But the government has previously rejected the proposal, saying that doing so would deprive local and indigenous communities of their right to manage the forests on which they depend.There’s also the problem of the moratorium’s shape-shifting nature, with swaths of forest omitted over the years.Greenpeace’s analysis has found that 45,000 square kilometers (17,400 square miles) of forests and peatlands have been removed from the map since 2011. Of these, 16,000 square kilometers (6,200 square miles), or more than a third, have since been licensed out for various commercial uses.Greenpeace’s Kiki attributed this to a requirement that the government revise the moratorium map every six months — what he said amounted to a major loophole that companies could exploit to have areas they’re interested in removed from the map.“Deforestation and forest fires have continued inside moratorium areas, and boundary maps get regularly redrawn to remove forest or peat areas that are of interest to plantation companies,” he said. “Making it permanent doesn’t fix its fundamental weaknesses and won’t stop forest and peatland degradation in Indonesia.”Zenzi of Walhi said he found a similar pattern when analyzing the number of permits issued after the moratorium was enacted in 2011. A huge number of permits were granted that year and in subsequent years under the Yudhoyono administration, he said.The size of permits issued under Yudhoyono, from 2011 to 2014, while the moratorium was in force, amounted to 164,000 square kilometers (63,300 square miles), an area nearly the size of Florida. Under Widodo, who took office in 2014, Zenzi said, the government issued permits for 17,000 square kilometers (6,600 square miles) of land.“The moratorium was established during Yudhoyono’s era, but at the same time, he also issued many permits,” he said. “So what’s the deal with this moratorium? Is it really designed to curb deforestation and emissions, or is it aimed to greenwash the issuance of permits [for exploitation] that’s already happening?”In all, the total area subject to the moratorium has shrunk by 30,000 square kilometers (11,600 square miles), according to Muhammad Teguh Surya, the executive director of the NGO Yayasan Madani Berkelanjutan.“But there’s no explanation on the locations of the omitted areas and for what or whose interests” they were omitted, he said.As long as the moratorium map continues to be subject to revision, Zenzi said, the problem would persist.“It shows that this moratorium doesn’t prevent people’s desires to get permits for natural forests in Indonesia, because the map can be adjusted,” he said.Iban dugout canoes on the Utik river in Sungai Utik’s customary forest in West Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Local lobbyingWhile the moratorium is administered by the national government, the revision of the map happens at the local level. Businesses typically lobby local authorities to revise their zoning plans for areas that have been identified as falling inside the moratorium boundary. The pliant local officials then rezone these areas as being for “other-use” purposes, known as APL in Indonesian, where mining and oil palm cultivation are permitted.The local government will then notify the forestry ministry of this change, and once approved, the area in question is dropped from the moratorium map.Zenzi said this was a common practice, particularly in the run-up to election, when local government leaders are seeking funding for re-election. A textbook example of this is the case of Annas Maamun, the former governor of Riau province in Sumatra, one of the most extensively deforested provinces in Indonesia, and the heartland of the country’s palm oil industry.Annas was arrested in 2014 for taking 2 billion rupiah in bribes (about $160,000 at the time) from a palm oil businessman to rezone swaths of forest in the province as APL areas. The move was meant to legitimize the plantations already operating there.In 2015, a court convicted Annas of corruption and sentenced him to six years in prison. An appeals court in 2016 upheld the conviction and added another year to his sentence.Zenzi said this particular practice cleverly exploited another loophole in the forest moratorium: the fact that it explicitly bans the issuance of new permits, but not the conversion of forest areas into APL areas.Between 2009 and 2014, local leaders across 22 provinces proposed the conversion, through zoning revisions, of a combined 122,500 square kilometers (47,300 square miles) of forest. Nearly two-thirds of that land has since been converted, leaving the fate of the remaining 44,500 square kilometers (17,200 square miles) of forest hanging in the balance.“What I’m very worried about is this year, because next year there will be concurrent local elections in some provinces and districts, and many incumbents are running again,” Zenzi said. “If we look back at 2014, many incumbent politicians proposed for forest areas to be released [from the forestry ministry].”Mangrove forests on Bungkutoko Island in Southeast Sulawesi province, Indonesia. Photo by Kamarudin for Mongabay Indonesia.Uncovered forestsAnother shortcoming of the moratorium is that large tracts of primary forest aren’t covered by it and are thus vulnerable to exploitation, according to Greenpeace.It found 333,000 square kilometers (128,600 square miles) of primary forest and more than 65,000 square kilometers (25,100 square miles) of peatland, some of it forested, open to development.Zenzi attributed this to yet another loophole in the moratorium, which doesn’t prohibit the issuance of new permits that have already been applied for or processed — especially if what’s known as a principal permit was issued prior to the moratorium coming into effect.A principal permit effectively marks the start of a company’s formal application process for a forest conversion permit.“In Papua, there’s a lot of APL areas that are still natural forests. There’s a possibility that they’re not included in the moratorium areas because there are already principal permits there,” Zenzi said. “This is a weakness of the moratorium because it doesn’t stop the process of permit issuance if a principal permit has been issued.”Teguh of the NGO Madani also questioned the future of forests outside the moratorium map. The moratorium currently covers 660,000 square kilometers (255,000 square miles) out of the 894,000 square kilometers (345,000 square miles) of natural forests in the country, according to 2018 data from the forestry ministry.“Does it mean that the forests outside those [protected under the moratorium] are ready to be converted?” Teguh said.At the same time the government also plans to expand the size of acacia plantations (for pulpwood to make paper products) by 50,000 square kilometers (19,300 square miles) by 2030, according to the forestry ministry.Teguh said such a plan contradicted the moratorium and if left unaddressed would make the situation “even more confusing.” It could, he said, “become a loophole to deforest and threaten the achievement of our climate commitment.”A birdwatching guide in West Papua, Indonesia. Tourism can bring money into local communities and give an incentive to conservation. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Oil palm moratoriumThe moratorium could, in theory, be shored up by a newer prohibition on issuing licenses for new oil palm plantations. The latter moratorium, issued last September by President Widodo, also bans the clearing of natural forests even if they’ve been zoned as APL areas.But that moratorium applies only to the palm oil industry and will be in force a maximum of three years.And even after the moratorium went into force, the forestry ministry was still granting forest conversion decrees permits without consequences, according to Zenzi. He cited the case of one such decree, issued in May, to convert a forest area spanning 913 square kilometers (353 square miles) in South Sulawesi province into APL.Zenzi said the conversion had been requested by the governor of South Sulawesi as part of a proposal to convert 2,038 square kilometers (787 square miles) of forest areas into APL.While the decree appears to contravene the oil palm moratorium, the forestry ministry can justify its decision by saying that the decree is only for conversion of forest to APL area. “Whether those areas will then become oil palm plantations or not are up to the local leaders,” Zenzi said.In Indonesia, the overwhelming use of APL land is for oil palm cultivation.Zenzi said he had identified another proposal, by the government of Bengkulu province in Sumatra, to convert 500 square kilometers (193 square miles) of forest area into APL. He warned of an influx of similar proposals to the forestry ministry ahead of next year’s local elections, and said the issue needed to be monitored closely.“The window to reduce forest areas is still wide open if local heads propose areas under the moratorium policy to be converted,” he said.Drained, cleared, and burned peat forest in Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Government responseThe government has acknowledged the criticisms about the forest and peatland moratorium, but disputes some of them.Belinda Arunarwati Margono, the director of forest resources monitoring at the forestry ministry and a former researcher at the University of Maryland, acknowledged separately that forest fires were still happening inside moratorium areas. However, she said they were contained mostly to areas without tree cover, such as peatlands, savannas and shrubland.She also said the ministry had identified a similar size of moratorium area that was burned during the 2015 fires, but that only 3 percent of those fires had occurred in forested space, with the rest occurring in non-forested areas.Similarly, she said that of the fires inside moratorium areas this year, only 0.8 percent occurred in natural forest areas.“So from here we can see the effectiveness of the moratorium on forest fires,” Belinda said. “Because the size of forested areas burned keeps getting smaller, and even now declined to less than 1 percent of the total areas burned.”Separately, Abetnego Tarigan, an environmental adviser in the office of the president’s chief of staff, agreed that local governments, with the power to determine the boundaries of moratorium areas, played a crucial role in ensuring the policy was implemented properly.“The role of the Ministry of Home Affairs is very important in making sure the local governments truly comprehend and carry out this presidential instruction” on the licensing ban, he said. “The local governments are the ones who spearhead the implementation of the presidential instruction.”Abetnego also called for a monitoring system that’s more open and publicly accessible so that the civil society can help monitoring areas that were protected under the policy.But Teguh from Madani said it was precisely the opacity and lack of a public monitoring system that allowed for the exploitation of the moratorium’s loopholes.“And the mechanism [of revising the moratorium map] isn’t clear or open for the public to participate in,” he added. Banner image: A Bornean orangutan in Central Kalimantan province, Indonesia. The population of Bornean orangutans has been pushed out of their forest habitats by rampant deforestation and hunting. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Avoided Deforestation, carbon, Carbon Emissions, Climate, Climate Change, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Dry Forests, Emission Reduction, Featured, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rare songbird recovers, moves off endangered species list

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The Kirtland’s warbler, a species that was close to extinction five decades ago, is now thriving and has been removed from the U.S. federal list of endangered species.Where there were fewer than 200 breeding pairs of the warbler in the 1970s and 1980s, today there are more than 2,300.However, the warbler’s continued survival is conservation-reliant, which means it will still depend heavily on continued conservation efforts.Conservationists say the bird’s comeback is testament that the Endangered Species Act works, and warn that current attempts by the Trump administration to roll back conservation policies could lead to other protected species going extinct. The recovery of a rare bird species that was close to extinction five decades ago is now being heralded as a conservation success story.The Kirtland’s warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii), also known as the jack pine warbler, a small songbird that nests only in young jack pine forests in northern Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, was never really considered to be an abundant species. During the first ever census of the bird in 1951, birders and researchers counted 432 singing males (a rough proxy of the number of breeding pairs). A decade later, the number rose to 502 singing males. The third census in 1971, however, revealed a population crash: researchers counted only 203 singing males, a number that saw subsequent slight dips and rises, but remained low throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Consequently, the warbler, known for its distinct yellow throat, chest and belly and blue-gray head and back, became one of the first species to be listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).But thanks to decades of conservation actions, the bird is now thriving, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) says. There are more than 2,300 singing males (or breeding pairs) of the warbler as per latest estimates, and due to its recovery, the species has been removed from the federal list of endangered species.“The delisting of the Kirtland’s Warbler is cause for celebration and proof that the Endangered Species Act works,” Shawn Graff, vice president of the American Bird Conservancy’s (ABC) Great Lakes program, said in a statement.Dan Eichinger, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, added that delisting marked the “latest chapter in a remarkable wildlife success story.”“The bird’s recovery provides dramatic testimony to what conservation organizations, governments and businesses can accomplish when they come together for the good of the resource,” he said in a statement.However, the warbler’s survival into the future is conservation-reliant, conservationists say, which means that it will still depend heavily on continued active management efforts.For example, the warbler needs large stands of young jack pine habitat to nest, and historically, wildfires helped create those vast tracts of habitat. But practices like fire suppression and timber harvesting in the early 1900s reduced the area the birds could breed in, according to the USFWS. To counter this, authorities developed a rigorous management plan that mimicked the natural processes within jack pine forests and increased the warbler’s breeding habitat. In addition, they had to work to control brown-headed cowbirds, birds that lay their eggs in warbler nests, forcing the warbler parents to raise larger cowbird chicks that easily outcompete the smaller warbler babies.“This bird flew off the endangered species list because the Endangered Species Act works,” Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement. “This success story highlights the danger of the Trump administration’s efforts to cripple laws protecting our wildlife and natural landscapes. Without the Endangered Species Act, the Kirtland’s warbler might have vanished forever. Many other species will disappear if we don’t stop Trump’s efforts to gut conservation policies.”A male Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest in Michigan, U.S. Image by Jeol Trick/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Finding hope in ‘extreme conservation’ (Insider)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conflict, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Human-wildlife Conflict, Illegal Logging, Insider, Iucn, Logging, Poaching, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Social Conflict, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Rangers, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by John Cannoncenter_img A Mongabay staff writer shares an account of his trek to see mountain gorillas in the Democratic Republic of Congo.From a low of 250 individuals in the 1980s, the mountain gorilla subspecies now numbers more than 1,000, making it the only great ape whose population is growing.Those gains have come thanks to the “extreme conservation” practiced by a dedicated group of people who have worked to ensure the survival of one of our closest relatives in the animal kingdom.This post is insider content, which is available to paying subscribers. VIRUNGA NATIONAL PARK, Democratic Republic of Congo — Seven meters. It’s one of the first instructions you get from the guides at Virunga National Park, nestled against the eastern border of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Keep that distance, 23 feet, between you and the gorillas when we reach the family group so they don’t… This content is for Monthly, Annual and Lifetime members only.Membership offers a way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting, while getting a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new member article that tells the story behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more.You can sign up for membership Here If you’re already a member: Log InMembers getExclusive, behind-the-scenes articles.Access to our members-only newsletter.Access to periodic conversations with Mongabay journalists.last_img read more

Giro : Bob Jungels en panne sèche

first_imgLe champion national n’a pas pu suivre les autres prétendants du classement général. Une autre course s’annonce désormais pour Bob Jungels, qui a perdu 2’34 sur ses rivaux directs.Il était 16h20 jeudi et les images de la Rai se sont attardées sur le visage en souffrance de Bob Jungels. Le champion national affichait le masque «rien ne va plus» et son visage empourpré renvoyait son impossibilité du moment à donner sa pleine mesure. Il peinait, tout simplement. Son buste renvoyait un mouvement inhabituel, haché, loin de l’image de ce formidable styliste.Le maillot rose Valerio Conti ou encore Alexis Vuillermoz, le leader d’AG2R La Mondiale, n’avaient pas meilleure mine. Ils faisaient peine à voir, images terribles d’un maillot rose en perdition, même si cela relevait d’une certaine logique et d’un prétendant au classement général. Largués pour de bon par le peloton des principaux favoris de ce Giro, ce groupe limitera les écarts, mais évidemment le mal était fait. Deux minutes et demie de lâchées sur le groupe des favoris, ça fait cher pour l’entrée du Giro en montagne ! Les pentes du Montoso, enveloppées dans la brume forestière de cette région du Piémont, étaient bien plus sélectives qu’imaginé. Mais il ne s’agissait que du premier col de ce Tour d’Italie qui s’annonce dans sa chronologie plus terrible encore au fil des jours. Ce que n’avaient pas manqué de réaliser sans tarder Mikel Landa et Miguel Angel Lopez (qui a pourtant essuyé une crevaison au pied du Montoso), les premiers attaquants en montagne pour le classement général.Il s’est donc passé beaucoup et peu de choses à la fois, dans cette 12e étape tant attendue. Si Bob Jungels sera le seul des prétendants au top 10 à n’avoir pu supporter la rudesse de ce premier col, on aura compris que Miguel Angel Lopez et Mikel Landa voulaient tenir parole. Plus prudent s’est montré Simon Yates, mais bien sûr, on eut l’impression qu’il était prisonnier d’un jeu de marquage avec Vincenzo Nibali et Bauke Mollema, les hommes qui vont marquer la course au maillot rose promise ces vendredi ou samedi à Primoz Roglic.Une montée «trop dure pour moi »Alors que le vent du scandale agite le cyclisme slovène avec les remugles de l’affaire «Aderlass», deux Slovènes mènent la course. Nous voilà bien. Trêve de plaisanterie, on ne ferait pas le fier si on était à la place de Roglic, anormalement esseulé hier à partir du seul Montoso.Que se passera-t-il donc à partir de maintenant, lorsque les équipes Bahrain, Movistar et Astana, les plus promptes jeudi à se mettre en action, recommenceront avec un peu plus d’engagement encore ?Le genre de questions que ne se posera sans doute pas Bob Jungels. Alors qu’à l’intérieur du pullman de l’équipe Deceuninck-Quick Step, Eros Capecchi, présent dans l’échappée du jour mais maladroit dans l’emballage final (il prit la cinquième place sur la ligne), venait de se faire passer une soufflante par Davide Bramati, Bob Jungels venait d’arriver. Il s’est confessé sans détour : «La montée de Montoso était trop dure pour moi, releva-t-il. J’ai trouvé mon rythme dès le pied de la pente, mais au moment où la vitesse s’est accélérée, je ne pouvais plus suivre. Je me sentais bien avant ça, je pouvais normalement boire et manger, ce n’est pas une défaillance. Je n’ai pas d’explication.»Évidemment, la perspective pour Bob Jungels de devoir abandonner le projet initial d’un bon classement général, planait. «C’est dur, dès le premier test dans les montagnes, de me trouver là et d’être dans le rouge. Ce n’est pas bon… Je voudrais limiter l’écart sur le groupe Roglic-Nibali, mais je n’ai pas été aidé. Hormis deux ou trois coureurs (NDLR : principalement des coureurs de l’équipe AG2R La Mondiale), personne ne m’aidait. Voilà, pour le classement général et la suite de mon Giro, je n’ai pas encore réfléchi, il faut qu’on analyse ça…»Denis Bastien, à Pinerolo Partagerlast_img read more