Environmental lawyer killed in the Philippines

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Mia Mascariñas-Green, a lawyer with the NGO Environmental Legal Assistance Center who also handled civil and criminal cases, was ambushed in broad daylight.Police believe her death was connected to her work on a property-dispute case in the resort island of Panglao.The Philippines is one of the world’s most dangerous countries for environment and land defenders; according to tallies by rights groups, more than 100 have been killed since 2002. Environment and human rights advocates in the Philippines gathered Tuesday to honor their colleague Mia Mascariñas-Green, who was shot dead Feb. 15.Mascariñas-Green, a lawyer for the NGO Environmental Legal Assistance Center (ELAC) who also worked on civil and criminal cases, was ambushed while driving her three young children in Tagbilaran City, on Bohol Island in the Central Visayas region.“We condemn the unspeakable cruelty and act of sheer cowardice by the murderers and the masterminds who shot Mia more than 20 times in front of her .. daughter and her two-year-old twins and their nanny,” her colleagues at ELAC said in a press statement. “Such ambush in broad daylight by still unidentified assassins riding motorbikes fits the pattern of violence that has become an all too familiar scene that has petrified our nation.”The Philippines is one of the most dangerous countries in the world for environment activists. At least 100 environment and land defenders were killed between 2002 and 2015, according to data collected by Global Witness. According to local rights groups, 10 Filipino environment activists were killed in the seven months following the inauguration of President Rodrigo Duterte on June 30, 2016.A banner demands justice for Mia Mascarinas-Green. Photo courtesy of LezGrIB New Gen Unlimited, one of the many groups that attended a Feb. 18 mass held on the stretch of road where the 49-year-old environmental lawyer was assassinated. A public memorial service was also held in Manila on Feb. 21.A dangerous professionInvestigators believe Mascariñas-Green’s death was linked to her legal work on a property-dispute case in Panglao, a resort island off Bohol. Police have pointed to the opposing party in that case, Lloyd Lancer Gonzaga, as the alleged mastermind of her murder and raided Gonzaga’s property on Friday. Gonzaga and an alleged accomplice remain at large.Mascariñas-Green’s family and supporters recall her as a devoted advocate for the environment and for women’s and children’s rights. “From a young age, Mia always believed that everyone, young or old, rich or poor had rights and that ultimately the legal system would work for them,” her family said in a statement.According to her family, Mascariñas-Green had received death threats in the past as a result of her work, reflecting the extreme risks facing activists in the Philippines. “She said that getting a death threat was to some extent just part of the job of being a lawyer … But she never backed down from any situation, dutifully doing her work and faithfully following the creed of her profession as a lawyer,” they recalled.Mourners lay flowers for Mascariñas-Green on Feb. 18. According to her family, “thousands of people from all walks of life – the fishers, farmers, tricycle drivers, community workers, public servants, civil society members, religious groups, the young and old, men and women,” paid their respects. Photo courtesy of LezGrIB New Gen Unlimited.The murders of environment and other rights activists in the Philippines occur within a broader climate of impunity. According to Human Rights Watch, more than 7,000 Filipinos have been killed in a brutal anti-drug campaign launched during Duterte’s presidency. As of last month, HRW was not aware of any police officers being prosecuted for extrajudicial executions or other crimes related to the campaign. Under previous administrations, the country was also gained notoriety for un-punished killings of left-wing activists and journalists.Mascariñas-Green’s ELAC colleagues said her death will not deter them from their work: “We honor Atty. Mia’s death with a renewal of our own vows to pursue the passion for the environment that she had left, and more than that, to fight the culture of impunity that has blanketed our society today.” Activism, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Environmental Law, Land Conflict, Murdered Activists center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: A deep dive into the study of marine wildlife through bioacoustics

first_imgHere at the Mongabay Newscast, we’re very interested in acoustic ecology, perhaps for obvious reasons: Acoustic ecology, sometimes known as ecoacoustics or soundscape studies, is the study of the relationship between human beings and the natural environment as mediated through bioacoustics, or the sounds that are produced by and affect living organisms.In order to highlight the findings of this exciting line of research, we’ve created our ongoing Field Notes segment. And in this particular Field Note, which takes up the entire episode, Leah Barclay plays for us several of the underwater recordings she’s made of humpback whales, the Great Barrier Reef, water insects, and more.Find all that plus the top news in this episode of the Mongabay Newscast! On this episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we speak with Leah Barclay, a sound artist, acoustic ecologist, and researcher with Griffith University in South East Queensland, Australia, for our latest Field Notes segment.Here at the Mongabay Newscast, we’re very interested in acoustic ecology, perhaps for obvious reasons: Acoustic ecology, sometimes known as ecoacoustics or soundscape studies, is the study of the relationship between human beings and the natural environment as mediated through bioacoustics, or the sounds that are produced by living organisms.In order to highlight the findings of this exciting line of research, we’ve created our ongoing Field Notes segment. In this particular Field Note, which takes up the entire episode, Leah Barclay plays for us several of her underwater recordings of marine wildlife and ecosystems.We met Leah at the Smithsonian’s Earth Optimism Summit in Washington, D.C. a couple weekends ago, where she gave a great presentation about her work. We wanted to hear more of her thoughts on the field of bioacoustics, plus the new spectrogram app she’s developing, and all the ways she uses her interactive soundscape art to get kids excited about engaging with nature. Leah also plays a number of recordings she’s made of dolphins, humpback whales, the Great Barrier Reef — and even what it sounds like to a humpback whale when a ship goes by.Here’s this episode’s top news:Canceled: Plans for a bridge in a critical wildlife area in Borneo have been scrappedBrazil moves to cut Amazon conservation units by 1.2 million hectaresBP’s Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused $17.2 billion in environmental damage to the Gulf of Mexico2 wildlife rangers shot and killed by poachers in Congo parkRange maps used by IUCN for endemic birds in India’s Western Ghats lead to underestimated threats, study findsIf you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, Android, or RSS.A humpback whale. Photo by Christopher Michel.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Acoustic, Amazon, Amazon Conservation, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Conservation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Forests, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Oil Spills, Podcast, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Research, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Trump’s policies could put Cambodia’s environment on chopping block

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Under President Donald Trump’s proposed 2018 budget, Cambodia could experience a 70 percent cut in aid from the United States.For Cambodia, this would mean a combined cut of $11.7 million from the budgets of the U.S. State Department and USAID, with the latter involved in a host of projects meant to help sustain and protect the Cambodian environment and help curb and adapt to climate change.Trump’s isolationism and “America First” policies could create a political vacuum in Southeast Asia, with China stepping in to replace the U.S., with major repercussions. China has historically been less transparent and less concerned about environmental impacts in nations where its government and corporations are at work.Trump’s authoritarian and anti-environmental policies are possibly being interpreted as a green light by autocratic leaders in the developing world. Cambodia, for example, has lately stepped up dissident arrests and sought transnational corporate partnerships to build large infrastructure projects — such projects often see high levels of corruption and do major environmental harm. Supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump rally in Washington, D.C. against the Paris Climate Agreement. Trump’s drastic cuts to USAID in Cambodia and other countries, if approved by Congress, would end projects aimed at increasing carbon sequestration and decreasing deforestation, contributing to a rise in global carbon emissions. Photo by Stephen D. Melkisethian via Visualhunt“I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris,” U.S. President Donald Trump declared during a speech announcing his decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement.In so doing, Trump sent a message to the world: that his administration — as promised during his campaign — was putting America first, and prioritizing American economic prosperity over everything, including the collective environmental preservation efforts of nearly the entire planet.But the U.S. remains — at least for now — the world’s foremost power, so the economic impacts of Trump’s policies will reverberate around the globe, affecting nations big and small, such as the burgeoning Southeast Asian nation of Cambodia.Though the six month old Trump administration has barely begun engaging Southeast Asia even on a nominal level — with Trump speaking to leaders of the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore in recent months — Cambodia is already preparing itself for the environmental ramifications of the U.S. leader’s isolationist agenda.A village meeting in Takeo Province, Cambodia. Rural populations could be hurt by deep USAID and U.S. State Department cuts, and by an influx of large infrastructure projects including dams, roads and mining operations that may be financed and implemented by China rather than the United States. Photo by Brett Matthews under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Generic licenseForeign aid to take a hitIn late April, Foreign Policy reported that Cambodia could experience a 70 percent cut in aid from the U.S. in 2018 as part of the Trump administration’s proposed plan to cut aid to developing countries by more than a third overall.Proposed budget cuts to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), if approved by Congress, would eliminate an estimated 30-35 field missions worldwide, while slashing the agency’s regional bureaus by roughly 65 percent, according to a 15-page State Department budget document that Foreign Policy had obtained.For Cambodia, this would mean a combined cut of $11.7 million from the budgets of the U.S. State Department and USAID, with the latter involved in a host of projects meant to help sustain the Cambodian environment.In February and March 2017, USAID Cambodia Mission Director Polly Dunford conducted a four-day site visit to Eastern Plain Landscape in Mondulkiri Province, to see how the Supporting Forests and Biodiversity project is helping Cambodians protect rich natural resources. A loss of funding could end such projects. Photo courtesy of USAID CambodiaCambodian rainforest at dawn. Though economically poor, Cambodia is rich in natural resources, forests and biodiversity. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerUSAID’s efforts in Cambodia include support for entrepreneurs who make and market non-timber forest products, as well as projects that help the Cambodian government and local communities source financial opportunities created by forest carbon sequestration and the avoidance of carbon emissions as the result of deforestation.USAID also works to strengthen Cambodian legislation and policies aimed at improving the implementation, enforcement and compliance with the country’s international environmental commitments — efforts critical to preserving forests and areas of significant biodiversity, of which Cambodia has many. The organization has worked to provide sustainable development in Cambodia’s Prey Lang Forest and has supported local community government negotiations in the Kompong Phluk commune within Siem Reap Province, to name a few examples.Cambodia has one of the world’s highest rates of deforestation, and widespread corruption has allowed an illegal logging industry to flourish. Sand dredging, illegal fishing and other harmful practices also wreak environmental havoc, and the country’s poverty makes U.S. financial assistance crucial to environmental protection.The costs to the worldSince Foreign Policy published their initial report in April, Trump’s detailed budget has been released to the public. Cambodia’s aid numbers for 2018, though slightly different than those detailed last spring, still paint the same grim picture: with aid at just a fraction of past years.While Trump’s budget could still face bipartisan opposition in Congress — as politicians on both sides of the aisle oppose the president’s proposed draconian cuts to foreign aid — experts have said that the president’s budget still sends a strong and disruptive message to the world: that the U.S. no longer cares about any other nation beyond itself.When Foreign Policy’s report was released, one government careerist publically lambasted the cuts as a death knell for positive U.S. influence abroad: “What you’re basically doing is eviscerating the most important tool of American influence in the developing world, which is our development program,” Andrew Natsios, a former USAID administrator under the Bush administration told Foreign Policy when the budget document was leaked. “I don’t think they understand what the role of USAID is, what USAID’s mission directors are. USAID’s mission directors are among the most influential foreigners in the country.”The Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity (ACCB) provides education activities in local Cambodian schools. The organization says that foreign assistance is still crucially needed to protect Cambodia’s environment. Photo courtesy of ACCBA tiger in Cambodia. The withdrawal of the majority of USAID funding from this Southeast Asian nation could do lasting harm to the country’s sustainability and climate change adaptation projects. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerWhen Mongabay reached out to USAID’s Cambodia mission, Jay Raman, a spokesman for the U.S. embassy in Phnom Penh, said that USAID would be unavailable for an interview and that the State Department was not able to comment on Trump’s proposed budget. Nor did the White House respond to requests for comment. A call to the State Department in Washington, D.C. yielded this email attributed to an anonymous “State Department official”: “The FY 2018 budget request for the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) supports the President’s commitments to make the U.S. government more efficient by streamlining efforts to ensure effectiveness of U.S. taxpayer dollars.”While the Trump administration has gone virtually silent regarding the impending impacts of its proposed aid cuts, others are more vocal, saying that the people and environment of Cambodia — both heavily reliant on foreign aid — are being put at risk.Michael Meyerhoff, Project Manager at the Angkor Centre for Conservation of Biodiversity in Siem Reap, Cambodia, told Mongabay that foreign donations remain an integral part of keeping Cambodia’s infrastructure growing and its environment safe. “Due to Cambodia’s past [history of conflict], most of the governmental infrastructure and capacities to manage the country’s natural resources effectively were not existent a few years ago,” he explained. “NGOs and funding from foreign countries have helped, and are still supporting the government in the development process with funding, but also with expertise and equipment. This process is by far not completed, and therefore foreign funding is still needed.”Looking to BeijingThe proposed U.S. foreign aid cuts to Cambodia are likely to further strain relations between the two countries. This year, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen openly criticized Washington’s demands that Cambodia pay back a debt stemming from the 1970’s. Many Cambodians feel that the U.S. claim that Cambodia owes it money is hypocritical and rests on shaky moral ground, especially because the U.S. dropped more bombs on Cambodia during the Vietnam War years than the Allies dropped during the entirety of World War II — causing extensive destruction and political instability leading to the rise of the genocidal rule of the Khmer Rouge.The ongoing disputes between Washington and Phnom Penh, have led Hun Sen to reach out to China, which he has dubbed his “most trustworthy friend.” In recent times, China has found Cambodia to be a strategic ally in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and also an important investment partner. Money flowing from Beijing is by far Cambodia’s largest source of Foreign Direct Investment. In turn, Cambodia has become China’s most vocal ASEAN colleague, going against group consensus and supporting Beijing when it comes to issues like China’s claimed dominion over the South China Sea.However, analysts say that fading U.S. influence, and China’s growing influence in Cambodia could spell trouble for the nation’s environment. Beijing in the past has shown a lack of commitment to conservation efforts, especially towards development outside its own borders. Instead, China prioritizes robust economic growth and big-ticket infrastructure projects.Former Secretary of State John Kerry gives a speech at the 9th Lower Mekong Initiative Ministerial Meeting in Vientiane, in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, last July. The LMI has been the United States’ primary environmental spearhead in Southeast Asia. It is expected to vanish under the Trump administration. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of State“I think probably the largest impact on Cambodia’s environment [resulting] from a shift towards China would be… the lack of transparency surrounding projects,” said Courtney Weatherby, a Research Analyst with the Southeast Asia program at the Stimson Center, an international peace and security think tank based in Washington, D.C. “One of the benefits of engaging with either Western countries, or Western investors, is that they tend to have higher standards — environmental and social standards in particular — and they have a more transparent way of operating that allows improvement through critique.“It generally appears that’s not the case with Chinese projects — although there are exceptions, and that’s important to note, and there have been improvements in recent years [concerning] the way that many Chinese investors operate. Still, across the board, they are often criticized for not meeting the same standards.”Weatherby pointed to the Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI) — a U.S.-led organization that includes Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam — as a positive force for environmental protection in Southeast Asia. Though Trump hasn’t yet publicly criticized, or tweeted his disdain for, the LMI, China is ready to step in. It has its own newly-minted organization, the Lancang-Mekong Cooperation Mechanism (LMCM), that could pick up steam in the region in the absence of American money and influence.Cambodia’s forests are highly threatened by illegal logging. USAID cuts could result in China stepping in, a nation not known for its transparency or for environmental sensitivity. Photo by Rhett A. Butler“The United States and China have very different methods and goals in interacting in the region, and also will get different reactions,” she said. “The United States, despite being a major world power, is also not a neighbor for any [Southeast Asian] countries. And, to some extent, [U.S.] engagement in the region — while certainly not selfless — is not viewed as suspiciously as the engagement of China.”“[The LMI and LMCM] serve different purposes,” Weatherby added. But “when you look at the statements that are coming out from China’s LMCM, they really don’t sound all that different from what you hear from “One Belt, One Road,” or its other large infrastructure-focused activities.” The “One Belt, One Road” initiative, by most accounts, is Beijing’s attempt to economically link China to much of the rest of the world — bolstering its position as a global leader through a series of expensive Eurasian infrastructure project.The U.N.’s roleThe United Nations, which has its own environmental protection efforts underway in Cambodia under the aegis of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), is another organization that Trump has spoken out against, with the President once tweeting: “The United Nations has such great potential, but right now it is just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time. So sad!”In Cambodia, UNEP is implementing projects to help reduce the vulnerability of poor urban communities to climate change, is bolstering Cambodia’s protected area system, and is helping reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, among other initiatives.Lumber harvested illegally in Cambodia that was confiscated and stacked at a ranger station. Deforestation is rampant in Cambodia, a problem that could see less oversight by the U.S. during Trump’s tenure as president. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerJonathan Gilman, who works in Strategic Policy and Planning at U.N. Environment Asia Pacific, stressed that Cambodia’s environment and people are at risk because, like so many developing nations, though it has contributed only a small amount to carbon emissions, its poor are largely unable to protect themselves from the onslaught of escalating climate change impacts. Which is why U.N. support and foreign aid are key to helping mitigate ongoing and lasting damage.“The Cambodian people depend heavily on the environment and natural resources for their livelihoods, and environmental sustainability is critical to ensuring sustained and inclusive economic growth and social development in Cambodia,” Gilman said. “The country is highly vulnerable to increased levels of pollution, uncontrolled exploitation of its natural resources and climate change. This vulnerability is most felt by the poorest and most vulnerable.”“The U.N. will support the Royal Government of Cambodia in climate-resilient planning and in its engagement with global initiatives related to climate change,” Gilman asserted.In regards to Trump’s plan to cut aid to Cambodia, Gilman was quick to separate the U.N.’s agenda from that of the U.S. “We are not aware of any cuts, but that’s a decision for the U.S., as to which countries [they want] to prioritize and fund,” he said. “We of course welcome USAID support to [the] environment.”Indochinese lutung (Trachypithecus germaini). Cambodia, its people, forests and wildlife, are still recovering from the ravages of the Vietnam War era, when the U.S. dropped more bombs on the country than were dropped by the Allies during all of World War II. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerThreats from deregulation and big businessTrump has already begun the rollback of environmental regulations in the U.S., repeatedly pushing policies that favor business over environmental protections. While it is still too early to say, those business and industry friendly attitudes and policies could soon begin to be exported to other countries. It seems highly unlikely, for example, that U.S. foreign policy, guided by Secretary of State and ex-EXXON CEO Rex Tillerson, would ever do more than slap a developing nation on the wrist for embarking on large scale infrastructure projects that jeopardize the environment.And Cambodia, in its zealous quest to transform itself from developing to developed nation status, is full of such projects, many of which are already endangering the lives and livelihoods of those living in the countryside. For example, a new “border belt road” linking Cambodia and Vietnam, now under construction in Stung Treng Province, cuts through what is currently a trackless area of Virachey National Park. Such roads often invite exploitation of local populations and forests, with the new highways provide easy access to transnational logging, mining and agribusiness companies.In northeast Cambodia, dams on the Sesan and Srepok Rivers, tributaries to the Mekong River, will displace local communities that fish and otherwise make their livings from those waterways, with illegal logging exacerbating community disruptions. While logging within the proposed reservoir flood zones to be created by the new dams is permitted, logging under the guise of dam construction is allegedly spreading far beyond these zones.The Sambor Dam on the Mekong, which would be Cambodia’s first dam on the river, will likely also wreak havoc on the environment, destroying prime habitat for the Critically Endangered Irrawaddy dolphin, which may number as few as 150 individuals.A floating village on Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia. Upstream dams are impacting the Mekong River, and with it, the lives of those who live downstream. Photo by Jialiang Gao GNU Free Documentation License 1.2 (Wikimedia)Other prioritiesIn the end, Trump’s near-complete disregard for small-ticket countries like Cambodia could create a vacuum that encourages environmental degradation, as aid dollars dry up, and as a lack of U.S. leadership and positive role modeling, combined with weak laws and poor enforcement by Cambodia, lead to environmentally destructive corporate business practices and large scale infrastructure projects, which, with their high cash flow, often invite corruption.Former U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton both pushed a more active U.S. foreign policy in the region under the “Pivot to Asia” initiative. During Obama’s tenure, the United States took a vocal stance on controversial Cambodian policies that U.S. lawmakers said infringed upon human rights, civil discourse and the environment. Members of the U.S. congress often publically expressed their disapproval of Cambodia’s dangerous political climate, and officials made efforts to encourage the Cambodian government to move forward on sustainable environmental development. By some accounts, U.S. engagement in Southeast Asia during the Obama administration was a stabilizing factor in a region rife with divisive politics.Trump has made it clear that he will jettison Obama’s interventionist approach, and will instead focus exclusively on enhancing U.S. “greatness” rather than try to influence the policies of other nations.Cambodia’s Stung Treng Province. A new “border belt road” linking Cambodia and Vietnam that would cut through the province could go through Virachey National Park, one of Cambodia’s largest protected areas. Photo: txikita69 via VisualHuntSome observers worry that this withdrawal of a U.S. moderating influence, and the move by the United States to embrace authoritarian means and anti-environmental policies, could ultimately be music to the ears of strongmen the world over, particularly in Cambodia. Already, Phnom Penh’s authoritarian government has been delighted to use the Trump administration’s attacks on the press as justification to stifle Cambodia’s own outspoken journalists.The government has “pushed further than ever before, jailing 25 political prisoners, several of whom are human rights defenders. It’s been open season in the [Cambodian] pre-election period. It’s no coincidence,” said Sophal Ear, Associate Professor of Diplomacy & World Affairs at Occidental College, Los Angeles. “The lack of interest from the White House has been devastating to human rights defenders. Plus, [President Trump,] the leader of the free world cavorts with authoritarian leaders everywhere. It’s a bad situation.“The silver lining, if one can call it that, is that Trump has not tweeted about Cambodia,” Ear added. “Either it’s not important enough to be worth a tweet or he can’t point to Cambodia on an atlas of the world.”The final decision on the USAID budget has yet to be made, but if Trump’s isolationist, America First, anti-environmental policies continue to sweep the globe, dictators and unscrupulous corporations could be encouraged to follow his lead. Then the Irrawaddy dolphin, the Mekong River, Cambodia’s forests and rural people could all find themselves in a world of hurt.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Forest along the Prek Piphot River. Dam building and illegal logging along Cambodia’s major rivers are creating a serious conservation crisis for ecosystems and riverside communities. Loss of U.S. aid will only worsen these problems. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Adaptation To Climate Change, China And Energy, China’s Demand For Resources, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Dams, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Illegal Logging, Mekong Dams, Rainforest Logging, Renewable Energy, Rivers, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Traditional People, Tropical Rivers center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Long-term thermal imaging video surveillance records how disease affects hibernating bats

first_imgcameras, Monitoring, Research, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A group of warming Indiana bats are watched by thermal imaging surveillance in an Indiana cave. Image courtesy of: Paul Cryan, USGS. White-nose syndrome alters how and when bats arouse from hibernation, and millions of bats have died since the disease emerged in 2006.Researchers adapted widely used thermal imaging video technology to monitor caves of hibernating bats for complete winters to determine the extent of impact of white-nose syndrome without disturbing the animals’ hibernation patterns.The researchers’ long-term monitoring found that the bats’ arousal patterns have, in fact, been affected. However, the animals may have found a way to adapt to the disease. Visual technology is a key tool for wildlife research and conservation at various spatial scales, as shown by the development of camera traps, live video feeds, high-speed videography and satellite imagery, among many others. However, studying species in the dark requires its own technology, and thermal imaging has emerged from the shadows.Thermal imaging (TI), also referred to as infrared thermography, detects infrared energy, which people, animals or objects emit. The energy increases or decreases with changes in the object’s temperature.The technology senses slight differences in energy and presents them as a range of colors in a photograph or video, called a thermogram. The higher the object’s temperature, the brighter it shows on the image. Dr. David Hayman and a multi-institutional team of researchers used TI technology to perform long-term surveillance of hibernating bats in North America to determine how they stir from hibernation. They conducted their study to increase understanding of how the animals’ hibernation behaviors relate to threats, such as disease.The U.S. military first developed TI for various nighttime purposes, and it has become increasingly available for other uses, including research. Providing the capacity to see at night is especially useful for studying nocturnal, hibernating or cryptic species that are otherwise difficult to observe. It also eliminates the challenge of having to introduce an intrusive light into the study area.The technology is more reliable than several widespread methods, such as night vision goggles or spotlights, which scientists typically use to view nocturnal animals. In a 2001 study that compared the use of spotlights and TI, researchers with spotlights observed roughly 54 percent of animals observed by those using TI.Video surveillance of wild animals has become a key tool in studying their behavior, and thermal imaging gives researchers the ability to view animals that are active in the dark.“Video is a potentially powerful way to [capture crucial moments among wildlife],” Hayman said. “Video technology may allow us to understand everything, from which species predate endangered species, to when disease transmission may occur, when poachers are active and how animals respond to human disturbance.”Studying a disease-threatened animalBats contribute to ecosystems around the globe through several means, including plant pollination and seed dispersal. They are also a major predator of nocturnal insects.The threats to bats differ from area to area and include habitat loss, direct killing, disease, and wind turbines. A major threat to bats is the white-nose syndrome (WNS), which scientists estimate has killed several millions of bats from five species across North America, where it first emerged in 2006.A bat in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park with white-nose syndrome (WNS). Photo by: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.However, no strategies to combat the disease have been introduced, in part because bats’ habits of feeding at night and hiding during the day make them a challenge to study.Some bats also need to hibernate in caves to survive harsh winters. According to the study, this strategy for survival is at risk due to WNS.The WNS fungus (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) infects the hibernating bats’ skin, causing physiological imbalances which, the study says, “influence hibernation behaviors to the degree that sick bats arouse (metabolically warm up their bodies) from hibernation too frequently and deplete stored body fat needed for survival.”The research team collected 740 days’ worth of TI video, focusing on little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) and Indiana bats (M. sodalis) in Virginia and Indiana, USA, to detect increases in arousals during winter months among infected bats. The researchers chose these locations based on previous data that showed infection prevalence among the hibernating bats.Body temperatures of hibernating bats drop to just above surrounding air and rock temperatures. Bats that arouse from hibernation will be warmer and thus show up differently in a thermal image than those that are still hibernating.A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome hibernates in a Virginia cave during late spring of 2016. Patches of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome can be seen growing out of the skin (white areas) near the nose and across the folded wing skin of this bat. Photo by Paul Cryan, USGS.The study found that bats with WNS do arouse more than other bats during hibernation, but, for the Indiana bats, their arousals unexpectedly synchronized with the other bats within the cave.“The numbers of this species of bat in this cave seemed to be declining less than expected, and therefore we wonder if this synchronous arousal is an adaptation that allows this species to use less energy over winter.”The researchers are not positive of their hypothesis because bat behaviors are still relatively unknown, but Hayman encourages other scientists to use thermal imaging for observing bats to determine if this behavior occurs elsewhere.Using TI for long-term observation of batsTo compile the 17,760 hours of video over entire winters, the team used durable video cameras that are often used for surveilling properties or car lots and could be used in the caves for long period of time. The researchers streamed the video imagery to portable computers that the researchers could control via units set up at the cave entrances.The following video is of a sped-up time-lapse TI video of the hibernating Indiana bats in Indiana, USA. Bright areas show the warming and active bats:“The greater issue was actually being able to connect them to laptops in caves that enabled us to save all the video for such long periods,” Hayman said. “This required custom-made weather-proof cases to be built. Together, this enabled cameras and computers to be left in the caves for months.”The team applied technology widely used in other fields and available online for a few hundred dollars. As the TI video technology advances, Hayman said that he expects the prices to decrease. The team used video editing software that is free or already widely used, and the MATLAB® computer codes are free.Hayman believes other researchers can easily access the technology used in this study.“The difference is that we used cheaper, easily available videos [cameras] and developed software to be able to monitor the bats for complete winters,” Hayman said. “This means that we could analyze data from within the cave recorded over many winters without disturbing the bats.”The research team was unable to identify individual bats, which limits what the data can infer. They are, however, currently analyzing data from near-infrared video that was simultaneously collected with the TI video to better understand what the bats were doing while active.Additionally, they suggest future research in studying how bats use the cave’s local microclimates over the winter and how using them strategically can help the bats’ adapt to WNS.A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome on its nose and wings hibernates in Greeley Mine, VT. Photo by: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.“If the bat species that have been most affected by white nose syndrome can survive over winter by using microclimates that are less suitable for the fungus to grow, I think there might be more hope for these species than if they are so adapted to those microclimates that the fungus also grows well in,” Hayman said.Monitoring the behavior of bats and other animals over long time periods is crucial to determining how they interact with each other and their environment and helping scientists understand the transmission of zoonotic disease.Banner image is of a group of a group of bats with white-nose syndrome hibernating on a cave ceiling. Photo credit: Government of Alberta, Creative Commons.CitationsBelant, J.L and Seamans, T.W. (2000). Comparison of 3 Devices to Observe White-Tailed Deer at Night. Wildlife Society Bulletin. 28(1), 154-158Blackwell, B.F., Seamans, T.W., and Washburn, B.E. (2006). Use of Infrared Technology in Wildlife Surveys. The USA’s Dept of Agriculture, APHIS Wildlife Services.Focardi, S., DeMarinis, A. M., Rizzotto, M., and Pucci, A. (2001). Comparative evaluation of thermal infrared imaging and spotlighting to survey wildlife. Wildl. soc. bull. 29(1): 133-139.Frick, W.F., Puechmaille, S.J., and Willis, C.K.R. (2015). White-Nose Syndrome in Bats. Bats in the Athropocene: Conservation of Bats in a Changing World. 245-262.Hayman, D.T.S., Cryan, P.M., Fricker, P.D., and Dannemiller, N.G. (2017). Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats. Methods Ecol Evol., 00, 1–9.Hristov, N.I., Betke, M., and Kunz, T.H. (2008). Applications of thermal infrared imaging for research in aeroecology. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 48(1), 50–59. A group of browns bats hanging from the cave ceiling are imaged by a digital camera. Photo credit: National Park Service. Article published by dbettermannlast_img read more

Temer uses controversial deforestation data in speech to UN

first_imgDeforestation, Energy, Environment, Environmental Policy, Forest Loss, Forests, Government, Green Energy, Hydropower, Protests, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, United Nations, Wind Power In his speech to the 72nd General Assembly of the United Nations in New York on Monday, Brazil’s president Michel Temer referred to preliminary data showing reduced deforestation that critics say may not be accurate.Critics also refute other aspects of his speech, including his touting of Brazil’s renewable energy movement. Hydropower is the country’s largest source of renewable energy, which scientists say can have a huge carbon footprint.A protest comprised of representatives from more than 150 organizations gathered in Brasilia on Tuesday in reaction to Temer’s speech. Representatives of more than 150 civil society organizations gathered in Brasilia on Tuesday (19 September) to protest over the speech made by Brazilian president Michel Temer on Monday (18 September) at the opening of 72nd General Assembly of the United Nations in New York.In his speech, Temer said: “Deforestation is a question that worries us, especially in Amazonia. We have concentrated attention and resources on this question and I now bring you the good news that the first available figures [for this year] indicate a fall of over 20 percent in deforestation in [Amazonia].”Temer’s speech appears to have been intended to re-assure the international community, which has strongly criticized the environmental and indigenous policies of his administration over the past few months.“We have returned to the good path and we will continue along this path,” Temer told the Assembly.Brazilian president Michel Temer speaks before the UN General Assembly on Monday, September 18. Photo courtesy of the United Nations.BrazilIn June, Norway gave a stern warning to Temer on his visit to Oslo that Brazil could lose millions of dollars from the Amazon Fund if Brazil’s deforestation continued to rise. In August, the outcry after Temer signed a presidential decree to abolish a gigantic national reserve in the Amazon was so great that Temer had to issue a second decree, clarifying the first. Eventually, a federal judge annulled both decrees.In his address, Temer also stressed Brazil’s contribution to combatting global warming. “My country – and it is with great satisfaction that I say this – is in the vanguard of the global movement towards a low carbon economy. Clean and renewable energy represents more than 40 percent of our energy grid – three times the world average.”However, many environmentalists and political activists reacted to Temer’s speech with criticism. During Tuesday’s demonstration in Brasilia, organizations issued a press release in which they said that the socio-environmental advances made by Brazil in recent decades had been “summarily dismantled” by the Temer government.The release then carried a long list of “retrogressive” initiatives by the Temer government, including “the abolition of protected areas or a reduction in their size, a paralysis in the demarcation of the land belonging to indigenous communities, quilombolas [communities set up by people formerly held in slavery] and agrarian reform, a weakening in environmental legislation, sale of land to foreigners, an amnesty for environmental crimes and debts of agribusiness, the legalization of land theft.”Temer’s claim that deforestation is falling in Amazonia is based on data recently published by the non-governmental research institute, Imazon. These figures showed a 21 percent reduction in deforestation between August 2016 and July 2017, compared with the previous year.Normally, the government disregards figures published by Imazon, relying on official data issued by INPE (the National Institute of Space Research) but INPE has not yet published figures for this year. Last year INPE’s data showed a 29 percent increase in deforestation, compared with the previous year, with the destruction of 7,989 square kilometers (3,084 square miles) of forest between August 2015 and July 2016.This marked a sharp increase over the low deforestation rates seen four and five years earlier, though well below the 26,832 square kilometers (10,360 square miles) INPE data indicate were cleared in 2004.Imazon, itself, is unhappy with the way its figures were used by President Temer. “The data that Imazon publishes monthly can indicate a tendency and so it is possible that deforestation falls,” forest engineer Paulo Barreto, linked to Imazon, told BBC Brasil. “But we can’t say ‘by over 20%’ because we don’t have the precise figures that such a statement requires.”Barreto was also critical of the way Temer attributed the putative decline in deforestation to government policies. “Various policies contribute to deforestation, from public policies to the economy and the market,” he said. “There is a historic relation between the price of cattle and deforestation rates. An increase in price increases deforestation, and vice-versa. And [Brazil’s] economic crisis has been generating a fall in price.”Critics gather in Brasilia to protest Temer’s speech. Photo courtesy of Movimento Revista.Imazon’s latest bullet also contained a warning, not mentioned by Temer: over the last year 20 percent of all deforestation in Amazonia occurred in protected areas – forests, national parks, and biological reserves – created to form barriers to deforestation. According to Imazon, many people invading these areas are getting their cue from Brasilia, where moves are under way in Congress to have their illegal occupations legalized.Temer is not the first Brazilian president to express pride in the share of renewables in Brazil’s energy grid. Figures published earlier this year showed that 43 percent of the country’s energy came from renewable sources in 2016. Of this, the lion’s share came from hydropower, which provided 82 percent, followed by biomass (9 percent) and wind (5 percent).However, even here Temer’s statement is not uncontroversial.Some scientists, like Philip Fearnside, have long questioned the idea that Brazil’s tropical dams are “clean” emissions-free energy sources. Early this year a broader study, looking at 267 reservoirs across six continents, calculated that they contributed 1.3 percent of human-made greenhouse gas emissions. For many, this raises the question as to whether hydropower should still be seen as a “green” power.Temer is in New York at the head of a large delegation, including six ministers and the presidents of large state bodies, like the oil company Petrobras, the National Economic and Social Development Bank (BNDES) and the Central Bank. One of the main events took place on Wednesday morning at a seminar organized by the Financial Times when the government spoke about its planned economic reforms and announced a package of privatizations.No mention was made of the ongoing investigations into corruption, with yet another accusation of corruption made this week against the president by the Office of the Attorney-General, or of the results of a recent poll that suggest that the president’s popularity has fallen to just 3.4 percent of the electorate.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Amazon community on Tapajós River invaded by wildcat miners

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Flooding, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img The Brazilian community of Montanha-Mangabal made up of beiradeiros —riverside peasant farmers and traditional fishermen — has been invaded and threatened by angry wildcat miners.The beiradeiros community spread for miles along the Tapajós River in Pará, worked for decades to establish its legal land rights, achieved in 2013 when Brazil’s National Colonization and Agrarian Reform Institute (INCRA) turned the land into a 550 square kilometer Agro-Extractive Settlement (PAE).However, the federal government failed to meet its obligation to demarcate the land. As a measure of last resort, Montanha-Mangabal and Munduruku indigenous allies began marking the land’s boundaries in September using GPS and signs.This self-demarcation process apparently led to the miners’ invasion, as they illegitimately claim some of the community’s land. The beiradeiros, Munduruku, and other indigenous groups see the invasion as part of a bigger threat by Brazilian ruralists and the government to develop the Amazon. A hundred beiradeiro families — peasants and traditional fishermen — live in Montanha-Mangabal, an Amazon community spread thinly along 40+ miles of the Tapajós River. Their legitimate land claims are being threatened by wildcat miners and by a proposed, government-supported dam. Photo by Mauricio TorresMONTANHA-MANGABAL, Brazil: On 28 September, a group of wildcat miners, known in Brazil as garimpeiros, invaded a small community of riverside peasant farmers and traditional fishermen, known as beiradeiros, living beside the Tapajós River in Pará state in the Amazon.“The miners are extremely angry, they’re armed and threatening everyone,” one local resident told Mongabay.The beiradeiros say that a large group of garimpeiros arrived in the area, disobeying a legal order “not to enter any area occupied by the traditional population of Montanha-Mangabal.” The miners threatened violence against the local inhabitants, and, according to a witness, “took everything we had, including the ammunition for our firearms.”The garimpeiros left after making their threats, but the beiradeiros now feel vulnerable and isolated. Their houses are scattered along the river, and it takes an average 20 minutes to row from one to another. The community only has two or three radios, along about 70 kilometers (43 miles) of river.On the day of the invasion, the beiradeiros appealed to the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), an independent branch of the federal government, to take protection measures. So far, neither the MPF or any government branch has responded.The violence against the beiradeiros arose when the 100 families residing in Montanha-Mangabal — frustrated with the government’s failure to mark out the legal borders of their settlement, began self-demarcating their land, a process known as auto-demarcação. The miners see that process as a serious challenge to their illegitimate land claims.Community members work in the forest during the September self-demarcation. Photo by Fernanda MoreiraRightful owners of the riverbankThe community of Montanha-Mangabal was legally established in 2013, when residents won a long struggle to gain rights to their land. That year, Brazil’s National Colonization and Agrarian Reform Institute (INCRA) created a 550 square kilometer (212 square mile) Agro-Extractive Settlement (PAE) for the community.As a PAE, the beiradeiros — which is what people living along Amazon rivers call themselves — can go on occupying the land and using it the way their ancestors did in perpetuity. They cannot, however, sell the land.Pedro Martins, a lawyer with the Terra de Direitos NGO, which works closely with the beiradeiros, told Mongabay: “A few days ago the inhabitants of the PAE began their process of auto-demarcação, putting up signs marking out the limits of their land.”According to Martins, that action angered the invading miners because it clearly showed that the riverside land didn’t belong to them. That’s when the threats began “within this process in which communities are empowering themselves to defend their territories against illegal mining in the Tapajós region.”Martins sees the Montanha-Mangabal conflict in a broader context: “In the Amazon as a whole the mechanisms for advancing capital in the region always involve agrarian conflicts, struggles over the control of natural resources and violence,” he said, adding “Wildcat mining is only the advance guard of larger economic interests in the region. The miners are used to carry out criminal actions against local families.”Martins sees events in Montanha-Mangabal as being linked to the current political climate in Brazil: “Tension and violence in the Brazilian countryside, and especially in the Amazon, have increased with the extreme political instability in the country.” Critics of the Temer government hold that the administration’s pro-development policies have emboldened ruralists, agribusiness and mining interests eager to exploit the Amazon.Mangabal-Montanha residents celebrate the marking out of the borders of their lands. That effort has resulted in an attack from wildcat miners, to which the Brazilian government has yet to respond. Photo by Fernanda MoreiraContinuing struggle for Amazon landFor Montanha-Mangabal, becoming a PAE was the culmination of a 140-year-struggle for legal recognition. The community was settled in the second half of the 19th century when hundreds of poor farmers from impoverished northeast Brazil migrated to the Amazon to tap rubber. After the rubber boom went bust in the early 20th century, many were trapped without the money for the 2,000 kilometer (1,200 mile) trek home.Stranded, some single men abducted women from neighboring indigenous groups and settled down with them. One resident, Dona Raimunda Araujo, recalled family stories of how her grandfather “stole” her grandmother, a Munduruku Indian. But the women were not passive victims, she added; they brought centuries of indigenous survival knowledge to the rubber-tapper communities, without which the communities might have perished. This helps explain why beiradeiros communities — which cut only small areas for crops — have some of the best-conserved forest in the Amazon.Despite their isolation, the beiradeiros, many of whom are illiterate, acquired evidence of their long term settlement — reports by priests, letters from visitors, old travel tickets. Still, it took years of tenacious effort, wrestling with the Brazilian bureaucracy, for the small community to get its land rights recognized.When that finally happened, the PAE immediately ran counter to the plans of then President Dilma Rousseff, who was eager to open the Amazon to large scale economic activities. Rousseff was determined, despite warnings from environmentalists, to turn the biodiversity rich Tapajós basin into an industrialized export corridor, building a series of dams on the river to generate energy for mining.Location of Montanha-Mangabal and of proposed dams which would flood part of the community. If the Jatobá dam is built, the government is obliged to resettle the community to a new location, which residents must approve. Map by Mauricio TorresOne of these dams – Jatobá, still in the planning stages — would flood land given to Montanha-Mangabal. The creation of the PAE means that, if the dam goes ahead, the 100 families will now have to be resettled to a locale acceptable to them.Luiz Bacelar Guerreiro Junior, at the time the superintendent for the regional office of Brazil’s National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA) and the person who signed the portaria (order) creating the PAE, said: “I am very proud to be ending a struggle like this one, giving rights to those who deserve them.”Felipe Fritz Braga, a prosecutor in the Federal Public Ministry, independent government litigators, commented: “The recognition of Montanha-Mangabal by the Brazilian state is an unmistakeable act of true and effective agrarian reform. It is the first time the federal government recognizes the antiquity of the occupation of this land by these communities and treats them as people having fundamental rights, especially rights to the land.”Self-demarcation a tactic of last resortUnder the terms of the portaria, INCRA was obliged to mark out the borders of PAE. But so far it has done nothing. Increasingly concerned about the way their undemarcated land was being invaded by loggers, miners and land thieves, the community repeatedly appealed to INCRA to fulfil its obligation.Finally in September 2017, the beiradeiros decided to mark out their lands themselves, in the process known as “auto-demarcação” (self-demarcation).One of the beiradeiros, Ageu Pereira, told Mangabay: “This demarcation is happening because a lot of our land is being invaded. And the competent body, INCRA, hasn’t come to do the work. So we’ve decided, we’ll do it. We are already doing it”.Montanha-Mangabal resident and woodsman Francisco Firmino da Silva, known as Chico Caititu, helping the Munduruku with demarcation of their lands. Photo by Marcio Isensee e SáFrancisco Firmino da Silva, known as Chico Caititu, a woodsman, explained more fully: “We are demarcating the land ourselves so that they [the outsiders] will know where they can go and what land belongs to us. They are always saying to us: ‘I don’t know which is my land, which is yours.’ So as of today all those people who come from the road, all those people will know where they can — and where they can’t — go.”In fact, none of the invaders can lay legal claim to the land. The settlement lies within the area of Influence of the Transamazon Highway, built in the 1970s. At the time, a 100 kilometer (62 mile) strip was claimed by the federal government on either side of the highway. Though the beiradeiros are constantly threatened by loggers and miners waving documents that, they say, show them to be owners of plots, inside and outside the settlement, those claims aren’t valid. All the land is federal unless the government decides otherwise, as in the case of the Montanha-Mangabal PAE.Beiradeiro and indigenous allianceThe auto-demarcaçāo has lately become a tool for strengthening an emerging alliance between the beiradeiros and local indigenous communities. In the past, these communities fought each other for control of territory. Now they increasingly see themselves as allies, with each helping the other with demarcation.In 2013 Chico Caititu and other beiradeiros travelled to the Xingu River to join the Munduruku and other indigenous groups to protest construction of the Belo Monte dam, now in operation and damaging local communities and the environment.In 2014, when the Munduruku carried out their own auto-demarcação marking the boundaries of their Daje Kapap Eipi (Sawré Mubyu) indigenous territory, beiradeiros from Montanha-Mangabal helped. Now the indigenous communities are reciprocating.Two Munduruku Indians take a break during the hot work of self-demarcation of Montanha-Mangabal. Indigenous groups and traditional river communities are increasingly allies against ruralist and government plans to develop the Amazon. Photo by Fernanda Moreira“We and the beiradeiros both depend on this forest and this river,” said Juarez Saw Munduruku, the cacique (chief) of Sawre Muybu village. “We are threatened in the same way by government projects, miners and loggers. This is why we made an alliance. I am in debt to Montanha-Mangabal and I have come to pay that debt. And I have brought 23 male and female warriors with me.”Both the Munduruki cacique, Juarez Saw Munduruku, and the beiradeiro Chico Caititu are worried about the hydroelectric dams planned for the Tapajós River — which scientists say is an environmental “crisis in the making.” Of particular concern is the nearest one, the Jatobá dam, where studies for the dam’s licensing are due to be finished next year.If it goes ahead, the Jatobá dam will have a severe impact on both the Munduruku and the beiradeiros.Other Munduruku groups, not directly affected by Jatobá, also helped in the recent demarcation. Two leaders from the Satere Maue community undertook a five-day journey to visit and express their support for Montanha-Mangabal’s demarcation. They are involved in their own struggle, so far successful, to stop large São Luiz do Tapajós dam — shelved by IBAMA, the environmental agency, in 2016 after a major public campaign against it.It is too soon to gauge the reaction of other beiradeiro communities and indigenous communities to the violence happening in Montanha-Mangabal. But, if it continues, there is likely to be counter-offensive.Today the beiradeiros in Montanha-Mangabal increasingly feel part of a broader community which is resisting government and business incursions into the region, and standing against the rising wave of violence.Solimar dos Anjos, a beiradeiro playing an active role in the demarcation, said: “We need the river to fish. The river is our supermarket. The river is our life. The same goes for the forest…. But we can’t preserve all this alone. This partnership we have, this alliance we have made with the Munduruku, is an important conquest.”Correction: When this article was originally published, several photos were credited erroneously to Ailen Vega, but were actually shot by Fernanda Moreira. The errors have been corrected.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Parks and reserves ‘significant’ force for slowing climate change

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Animals, Avoided Deforestation, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecology, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Communities, Logging, National Parks, Parks, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Protecting tropical forests between 2000 and 2012 amounted to a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to a 29 percent cut in deforestation rates.The authors used statistical models to estimate the amount of CO2 that would have been released if currently protected areas in South America, Asia and Africa had instead been cleared.The researchers argue that their findings bolster the conservation case for safeguarding tropical forests. Setting forests aside in the tropics is helping to stanch the upward creep of global temperatures, according to new research, in addition to the benefits that parks and other protected areas provide for the wildlife and indigenous groups who depend on them.“Tropical protected areas are often valued for their role in safeguarding biodiversity,” said ecologist Dan Bebber of the University of Exeter in a statement. “Our study highlights the added benefit of maintaining forest cover for reducing carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere, [which is] helping slow the rate of climate change.”Scientists know that protected areas lower deforestation rates, especially in the tropics. A 2014 study of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon found that unprotected areas that were accessible by road or river had been deforested by almost 44 percent, compared to about 11 percent in protected areas. But until now, the precise impact these forests have on keeping carbon out of the atmosphere hasn’t been clear.Land cleared of its forest in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.Bebber and fellow ecologist Nathalie Butt of the University of Queensland in Australia decided to look at what would have happened to carbon levels if forests in parks and reserves in South America, Asia and Africa had been cut. In total, these areas cover about 20 percent of all tropical forests. Using statistical models, the researchers then estimated how much carbon such deforestation would have released.They found that safeguarding those areas between 2000 and 2012 translated into the same reduction in carbon emissions as if deforestation rates had been cut by nearly 30 percent over the same time period. Their findings were published online in the journal Scientific Advances on Oct. 25.Forest clearing by humans accounts for about 10 percent of the total amount of carbon emitted globally. But tropical forests also tie up 68 percent of the world’s forest-held carbon in the trees’ roots, trunks and canopies.The team found that preserves in South America socked away the most carbon during that time period, at 368.8 million metric tons (406.5 million tons). Asian protected areas accounted for another 25 million metric tons (28 million tons), and those in Africa added 12.7 million metric tons (14 million tons).Deforested land in Brazil. Photo by Dan Bebber / University of Exeter.In all, the world’s tropical protected areas saved nearly 407 million metric tons (449 million tons) of carbon each year. That’s about three times the amount of carbon that the U.K. emits every year.In their view, the authors argue that these results bolster support for keeping forests standing.“Carbon storage, along with socioeconomic and biodiversity benefits, provides further support for the need to maintain the world’s protected area network,” they write.CITATIONSBarber, C. P., Cochrane, M. A., Souza, C. M., & Laurance, W. F. (2014). Roads, deforestation, and the mitigating effect of protected areas in the Amazon. Biological Conservation, 177, 203-209.Bebber, D. P., & Butt, N. (2017). Tropical protected areas reduced deforestation carbon emissions by one third from 2000–2012. Scientific Reports, 7 (1), 14005.Banner image of deforestation for oil palm in Indonesia by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonlast_img read more

Storytelling empowers indigenous people to conserve their environments

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Nicoletta Lanese is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories by UCSC students can be found here. Conservation, Environment, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, Traditional Knowledge, Traditional People, UCSC Indigenous storytelling is a powerful tool for preserving biocultural diversity, conservation scientists propose.Conservationists should rise above the field’s historic malpractice by listening to stories and truly collaborating with indigenous people.To successfully collaborate, conservationists must regard indigenous knowledge as valid, act in accordance with standing traditions and maintain a humble willingness to learn. The moon rides high over the Bolivian Amazon as the Tsimané people crowd around the fire to tell stories. A conservation scientist sits among them, leans in to catch every word, and realizes how much he stands to learn from their rich indigenous knowledge.Indigenous storytelling is a powerful tool for preserving biocultural diversity, says Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, an environmental researcher at the University of Helsinki in Finland. Having heard stories in Bolivia, Costa Rica, Kenya and Madagascar, he has now proposed that storytelling could transform how conservationists work with native peoples. His article appeared in a recent issue of Conservation Letters.Fernández-Llamazares wrote the article with renowned conservation scientist Mar Cabeza, also at the University of Helsinki. In her years of fieldwork, Cabeza has collected stories to share with her daughter. In them, she saw the potential to involve indigenous people in protecting their own environments.“We were doing fieldwork in Kenya and listening to stories from the Daasanach and Maasai peoples,” said Fernández-Llamazares in an interview. “As we sat around the fire, we started thinking about ways storytelling could be brought to conservation contexts.”A Daasanach elder records traditional folklore about local wildlife as part of a participatory project with the University of Helsinki. Photo by Joan de la Malla.Stories give character to local wildlife, voices to trees and spiritual resonance to the sunrise. They connect indigenous people to their environment and guide their interactions with it. Historically, conservationists uprooted indigenous cultures under the banner of saving the environment. Believing they knew best, they discounted native knowledge and evicted people from their ancestral lands to make way for progress.Fernández-Llamazares and Cabeza propose that conservationists rise above this historic malpractice by listening to indigenous stories.“Indigenous people have long said they want to see more humility from conservation scientists and practitioners,” said Fernández-Llamazares. “The key is to consider every knowledge system as valid.”Stories tie people to their landscape, their heritage and one another. Storytelling sparks dialogue between generations and provides a time and place for ideas to be shared. In this way, stories preserve culture—and could help preserve the environment as well, wrote Fernández-Llamazares.In his paper, Fernández-Llamazares described projects that have turned this rhetoric into practice. They include an IUCN-funded radio series on lemur conservation in Madagascar and an exhibition of Tsimané traditional myths in Bolivia. The key to efforts like these is to “embrace indigenous people as legitimate collaborators, equal-to-equal,” he said.The Matawai Maroons in Suriname have partnered with the Amazon Conservation Team to preserve their oral history in video and audio recordings. Photo by Amazon Conservation Team.The Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) embodies this philosophy. ACT partners with South American indigenous communities to preserve rainforests and traditional culture.“In the Amazon, indigenous communities deeply value the forest and consider it an essential aspect of their territory, which is integrally tied to their own identity,” said ACT anthropologist Rudo Kemper. Their storytelling traditions are similarly vital and are at equal risk of being lost, he said.ACT recently started a project with the Matawai Maroons in Suriname to preserve their oral histories, training youth to record interviews with their elders. So far, the researchers have collected stories from more than 50 locations within Matawai ancestral lands. They are developing a digital map, available both online and offline, where the stories can be uploaded and “tied to space and territory,” Kemper told Mongabay.The Maasai people in Kenya pass down environmental knowledge through storytelling. Photo by Joan de la Malla.Fernández-Llamazares hopes projects like these will become a major trend in biocultural conservation. However, he delivers a word of caution: “We need to be very careful these projects are done according to indigenous standing traditions,” he said. “Otherwise, the knowledge system you’re trying to revitalize could actually be eroded.”An ideal conservation team keeps this wisdom in mind and engages indigenous people “full of genuine curiosity and joy, and an innate passion for stories and willingness to learn,” he said.“I’d also recommend a bit of humility.”Dr. Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares connects with multiple generations of Daasanach people in Kenya. Photo by Joan de la Malla.CITATION Fernández-Llamazares, A., & Cabeza, M. (2017). Rediscovering the Potential of Indigenous Storytelling for Conservation Practice. Conservation Letters. doi:10.1111/conl.12398 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Light pollution lures nighttime pollinators away from plants

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Ecology, Insects, Plants, Pollinators, Pollution, UCSC, Wildlife Over the last two decades, nighttime light emissions in North America and Europe have increased by more than 70 percent.This artificial light lures moths and other insect pollinators away from plants, a new study shows.This effect may also make daytime pollinators less efficient, posing a further threat to plants and global food security. Populations of bees, bats, butterflies and other pollinators have been declining for decades due to habitat loss, disease, pesticides and climate change. Now, scientists have documented yet another threat to pollinators: nighttime light pollution.In a recent study in Nature, ecologists showed that plants growing near streetlights were pollinated far less often at night and produced fewer fruits than their unilluminated counterparts. In turn, this may compromise the efficiency of daytime pollinators in the same fields, the authors conclude.“Even though daytime pollinators are usually more numerous than nighttime pollinators, they were unable to make up the difference in lost pollination of plants kept under artificial lighting,” said Eva Knop, an ecologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland and the study’s lead author. “Some studies have shown that nighttime pollinators seem to be more effective at transferring pollen between plants than their [daytime] counterparts,” Knop told Mongabay.Scientists estimate that one-third of all cash crops depend upon animal-mediated pollination. Many plants receive most of their pollination after dark, especially in tropical and desert climates. These plants attract nocturnal pollinators by producing alluring fragrances and copious amounts of nectar.Nocturnal pollinators swarm around a street light in Virginia, USA. Photo courtesy of Serge MelkiUnfortunately, pollinators drawn to lights, such as moths, find artificial light more tantalizing than nectar. Such nighttime emissions have increased by more than 70 percent in North America and Europe over the last two decades, particularly in residential areas, according to published estimates.To determine if night lights affect nocturnal pollination, Knop and her team found 14 ecologically similar cabbage thistle (Cirsium oleraceum) meadows in the Alpine foothills of Switzerland and set up mobile street lights in seven of them. Using night-vision goggles, the researchers closely monitored the behavior of nocturnal pollinators in both the dark and illuminated meadows.Light exposure reduced the number of pollinator visits by 62 percent, the team found. And while nearly 300 species of insects visited plants overnight in the dark fields, 29 percent fewer species came to the lighted fields, the results showed.The team also measured how much fruit was produced by cabbage thistles under the two treatments. They found that illumination after hours caused a 13 percent reduction in cabbage thistle fruit production, which they attribute to decreased pollination.Mexico’s Lady of the Night orchid (Brassavola nodosa) is pollinated at night by moth species. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.The team’s analysis suggests that flower pollination during the daytime is more effective for plants visited by a greater number of nocturnal pollinators. As a result, lights at night may also drag down pollination by bees and other daylight visitors. How that connection might happen isn’t yet understood, Knop said.Pollination is a fundamental ecosystem service that provides food, shelter and habitat to hundreds of thousands of species, so these nighttime impacts concern ecologists. “The effect of widespread use of nighttime artificial lights worldwide could have ecological and evolutionary effects that ripple through food webs in ways that we cannot yet predict,” John N. Thompson, distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who was not involved in the study, said in an email.Indeed, the most severe impacts of light pollution on pollinators and other light-sensitive species have yet to be seen, Thompson and other ecologists worry.Researchers point to several steps that citizens can take to help insects and other pollinators in their neighborhoods: keep outdoor lighting off at night, plant more flowers that bloom at different times of year, and never use pesticides.Beetles pollinating a cabbage thistle plant in Phillipsburg, Germany. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia commonsCITATION                                              Knop, E., Zoller, L., Ryser, R., Gerpe, C., Hörler, M., & Fontaine, C. (2017). Artificial light at night as a new threat to pollination. Nature, 548(7666), 206-209.Annie Roth (AnnieRoth_AtSea) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here.Header image: Chrysops fly. Courtesy of PX Here.center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Victory against Aussies ‘gives extra boost’ for ICC World T20 – Bravo

first_imgMUMBAI, India (CMC): West Indies all-rounder Dwayne Bravo has said their warm-up victory over Australia has lifted the team’s confidence ahead of their opening group game of the T20 World Cup today. West Indies defeated Australia by three wickets on Sunday in a nail-biting game in Kolkata, with one ball to spare. The win came after the Windies had lost their first official warm-up match against hosts India. “It (the win) has done a lot to our confidence. We had a two-week camp in Dubai. We won all our games there in Dubai. We came here and lost our first warm-up game against India, and then to win last night definitely puts us in a good place,” said Bravo. “You know Australia is one of the better teams in world cricket, so to beat them always gives you that extra boost and confidence.” Bravo was part of the Darren Sammy side which defeated Sri Lanka to win the T20 World Cup in 2012. “The World Cup is always a great tournament to be in. I am very excited to be part of yet another World Cup. I was lucky enough to win one (World T20 in 2012). We lost in the semi-finals in the last one (World T20 in 2014),” Bravo recalled. “For us as West Indies team, we want to take one game at a time, and want to obviously qualify from our group and take it from there.” His presence, along with T20 specialist Andre Russell and big-hitting Chris Gayle, is expected to enhance the chances of West Indies, already considered a favourite next to host India. “I focus on my bowling a lot because most teams that I play for in T20 cricket rely on my bowling,” said Bravo, after launching a video, ‘Champion’, by Vega Entertainment and Venus Entertainment. “Yes, my batting is important, but they (the teams) rely on my bowling in tough times and in death overs. Variation is key for my success as a bowler.” West Indies play England at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai today.last_img read more