Western Chimpanzee numbers declined by more than 80 percent over the past quarter century

first_imgAgriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bushmeat, Chimpanzees, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Fragmentation, Great Apes, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Industrial Agriculture, Logging, Mining, Pet Trade, Poaching, Primates, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Research published in the American Journal of Primatology earlier this month finds that the overall Western Chimpanzee population declined by six percent annually between 1990 and 2014, a total decline of 80.2 percent.The main threats to the Western Chimpanzee are almost all man-made. Habitat loss and fragmentation driven by slash-and-burn agriculture, industrial agriculture (including deforestation for oil palm plantations as well as eucalyptus, rubber, and sugar cane developments), and extractive industries like logging, mining, and oil top the list.In response to the finding that the Western Chimpanzee population has dropped so precipitously in less than three decades, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) elevated the subspecies’ status to Critically Endangered on its Red List of Threatened Species. Research published in the American Journal of Primatology earlier this month finds that the overall Western Chimpanzee population has declined by more than 80 percent over the past quarter century.In order to arrive at an estimate of the chimp’s population numbers, an international team of scientists led by Hjalmar Kühl of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany used transect count data from 20 different sites that encompassed the nesting grounds for some 25,000 of the estimated 35,000 Western Chimpanzees remaining in the wild. The team writes that they “detected a significant negative trend” at 12 of the 20 sites.“The estimated change in the subspecies abundance, as approximated by nest encounter rate, yielded a 6% annual decline and a total decline of 80.2% over the study period from 1990 to 2014,” the researchers write. “This also resulted in a reduced geographic range of 20% (657,600 vs. 524,100 km2).”Western Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) are one of four commonly recognized subspecies of the great ape, the others being the Nigeria-Cameroon Chimpanzee (P. t. ellioti), the Central Chimpanzee (P. t. troglodytes), and the Eastern Chimpanzee (P. t. schweinfurthii). Each population faces different threats, thus a regional approach to the conservation of each subspecies is considered crucial.The main threats to the Western Chimpanzee are almost all man-made. Habitat loss and fragmentation driven by slash-and-burn agriculture, industrial agriculture (including deforestation for oil palm plantations as well as eucalyptus, rubber, and sugar cane developments), and extractive industries like logging, mining, and oil top the list.Poaching for bushmeat and the pet trade are also taking a toll on the chimps, while human-wildlife conflict is an issue even in or near protected areas. Women living near a national park in Guinea-Bissau, for instance, consider the chimpanzees themselves unfit for consumption, and blame the animals for malnutrition in their villages because of the damage they do to crops.Even infectious disease outbreaks that decimate the chimp’s numbers may be more frequent thanks to human activities. Homo sapiens and P. t. verus are, of course, closely related species, and as increasing human populations expand into Western Chimpanzee territory, they bring with them higher risks of disease transmission because the animals are coming into more frequent contact with humans and human waste.In response to the finding that the Western Chimpanzee population has dropped so precipitously in less than three decades, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) elevated the subspecies’ status to Critically Endangered on its Red List of Threatened Species.According to the IUCN, “Chimpanzees are completely protected by national and international laws in all countries of their range, and it is, therefore, illegal to kill, capture or trade in live Chimpanzees or their body parts.” But enforcement of these laws is generally weak, the IUCN adds.Some Western Chimpanzees are known to occur in national parks, but the majority — greater than 70 percent, the IUCN estimates — occur outside protected areas. That could mean that, in addition to the often intractable threats they’re already facing, the chimps could be facing even larger threats in the near future.The IUCN reports that there is significant overlap between Western Chimpanzee terrain and areas suitable for oil palm development in Western Africa, which is “likely to exacerbate population declines in coming years.” That’s especially true in Liberia, where 94.3 percent of areas of Western Chimp occurrence overlap with areas that might be targeted for oil palm plantations, and Sierra Leone, where there is 84.2 percent overlap. Those two countries, together with Guinea, are considered strongholds for the subspecies, which is already believed to be extinct in the wild in Benin, Burkina-Faso, and Togo. The chimp’s numbers are “in the low hundreds” in Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, and Senegal, the IUCN notes, while “Côte d’Ivoire has seen a catastrophic decline of about 90% of its Chimpanzee population.”The authors of the American Journal of Primatology study write that the IUCN plans to start updating a 2003 conservation action plan for Western Chimpanzees this year, with the intent of providing “a consensus blueprint for what is needed to save this subspecies.”The authors also included “a plea for greater commitment to conservation in West Africa across sectors” in their paper: “Needed especially is more robust engagement by national governments, integration of conservation priorities into the private sector and development planning across the region and sustained financial support from donors,” they wrote.Western Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus). Photo by Christoph Würbel, licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.CITATIONHumle, T., Boesch, C., Campbell, G., Junker, J., Koops, K., Kuehl, H. & Sop, T. (2016). Pan troglodytes ssp. verus (errata version published in 2016). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: e.T15935A102327574. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-2.RLTS.T15935A17989872.en. Downloaded on 31 July 2017.Kühl, H. S., Sop, T., Williamson, E. A., Mundry, R., Brugière, D., Campbell, G., … & Jones, S. (2017). The Critically Endangered western chimpanzee declines by 80%. American Journal of Primatology. doi:10.1002/ajp.22681Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Two studies provide dueling looks at where trees should go

first_imgA study published today in Science finds the planet contains a U.S.-sized area of unforested land environmentally capable of growing trees without displacing farmland or cities.The authors write that if this area were completely reforested, those new trees could, in theory, soak up two thirds of humanity’s carbon emissions to date.Meanwhile, another published earlier this week in Science Advances and which analyzed the tropics only, arrived at a slightly smaller area estimate. It points “restoration hotspots” based on the environmental and economic likelihood of restoration success, including Brazil and several African countries.However, the authors of the Science study warn we may not have much time to act as many places become hotter and drier in response to global warming, making it harder for trees to survive. They found that almost a quarter of places that could currently grow forests will become climatically unsuitable under business-as-usual global warming scenarios, with the vast majority of these losses in the tropics. Two papers published this week in major journals claim to do the same thing: show where forests should be restored. But they used starkly different approaches that lead to sharply varying conclusions.One study, published in Science, found that the globe contains a U.S.-sized area of unforested land capable of growing trees, and those trees could, in theory, soak up two thirds of humanity’s carbon emissions to date. The other, published in Science Advances, analyzed the tropics only and arrived at a slightly smaller area estimate, but also suggested “restoration hotspots” where bringing back forests is most affordable and likely to succeed.The need to restore forest, both to protect biodiversity and to stabilize the climate, is urgent, experts say. Some 80 percent of the world’s land species need forests to live. Trees also fight climate change by taking up carbon dioxide—the main gas responsible for warming—from the air and turning it into wood and roots.But especially in the tropics, forests are falling far faster than they are growing; a Belgium-sized swath of tropical forests disappeared in 2018 alone. Deforestation accounts for around 10 percent of humans’ carbon emissions, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last fall said forest restoration is critical to limiting global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius, the level many scientists consider potentially catastrophic.A candidate area for restoration in Extrema, Brazil. Photo courtesy of Robin Chazdon.Recognizing this, countries around the world have committed to bringing back vast tracts of previously cleared forests. Many have signed on to agreements such as the Bonn Challenge, launched in 2011 to restore 150 million hectares of forest by 2020; leaders recently upped their goal to 350 million hectares—an area larger than India—to be restored by 2030.Yet most countries don’t know where new forests will provide the most bang for the buck in terms of carbon or biodiversity, or even how much land they have available for restoration. “We talk a lot about restoration,” says Fred Stolle, a remote-sensing expert at U.S.-based World Resources Institute (WRI), “but how are we going to do that?”To provide that information, a team led by ecologist Thomas Crowther of ETH Zurich in Switzerland analyzed the amount of tree cover in satellite images of protected forest areas around the world. “The approach we use—you can’t argue, it’s so simple,” Crowther says.The researchers then combined the forest data with global maps of environmental factors such as temperature, rainfall and soil type to build a computer model that predicts where trees could grow and how much carbon they could store. They used their model to create a global map of tree restoration potential that pinpoints areas as small as one square kilometer.They reported in Science that trees could grow on 900 million currently unforested hectares—roughly the size of the United States—without displacing farmland or cities. They also found some countries have committed to more restoration than is actually possible, whereas others plan to restore far less than they could.Growing trees could sop up 205 billion tons of carbon—just over two-thirds of all the carbon dioxide humans have emitted in the industrial era, the researchers calculated.“Our study shows clearly that forest restoration is the best climate change solution available today,” Crowther says.The figure dwarfs previous attempts to quantify forests’ potential to fight climate change. In 2017, an analysis published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that forests and other natural ecosystems could provide about a third of the mitigation needed to avert disastrous climate change over the next few decades.That analysis attempted to determine where forest restoration and other actions would be economically feasible; Crowther’s team just looked at what is physically possible. The 2017 study also used broad biome definitions to estimate forest growth potential, rather than spatially explicit field data, leading to a lower estimate of potential forest area, Crowther says.“This is definitely the only dataset to get a really high-resolution estimate of how much tree cover can be added,” Crowther says.“This is a big step forward,” says Stolle. “I believe these numbers are very much better” than previous estimates of reforestation potential, such as one that WRI produced. But he thinks Crowther’s team need not have excluded farmland completely from their analysis. In much of Africa and Southeast Asia, trees grow amid pasture and crops, and there is substantial potential to expand agroforestry in Latin America as well. “It’s just a few trees per hectare, but it’s such a big area that carbon-wise it’s still interesting,” Stolle says.“It’s a very nice analysis, very creatively done,” agrees Christopher Field, an environmental scientist at Stanford University. However, he emphasizes that because trees take up carbon slowly over time, and not all areas that can grow trees will actually be restored, regrowing forests can absorb only a fraction of global carbon emissions. “We should be restoring forests where we can,” says Field, who earlier this year coauthored an article in Science, “Natural climate solutions are not enough.” “But it’s a mistake to think that they’re going to get us out of a need to decarbonize energy and industry.”The community nursery is in Biliran Island, Leyte, Philippines where a community-based watershed rehabilitation project is being piloted as part of the Philippines National Regreening Program. Photo courtesy of Robin Chazdon.Moreover, recent research has shown that forests’ climate impacts are more complicated than previously thought. Tree leaves can absorb more sunlight than the underlying land surface, and trees can emit climate-affecting chemicals into the atmosphere. So simply adding up stored carbon does not fully quantify how much trees can help slow climate change.Tropical forests, in most cases, do slow climate change because they put on carbon quickly and transpire a lot of water, which seeds clouds that reflect sunlight. (Complicating this somewhat, some tropical wetland trees have recently been found to emit a surprising amount of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas.)In northern boreal forests, however, trees grow more slowly and transpire less, and their dark leaves absorb sunlight that would otherwise be reflected back into space by snow and ice. So trees can actually increase global warming compared to bare ground, scientists have found. Crowther’s team found the largest tree restoration potential in three countries with a lot of boreal forest: Russian, the U.S. and Canada. Still, he believes boreal forest restoration is worthwhile, because trees can help keep carbon in the soil. “We can get a massive amount of carbon sequestration below ground in the boreal,” he says.However, Crowther and his colleagues do point out another reason forests may fight climate change less than hoped in the future: As the globe warms, many places will become drier and hotter, making it harder for trees to survive. When the researchers put their restoration opportunity map into a global climate model, they found that almost a quarter of places that could currently grow forests will become climatically unsuitable under business-as-usual global warming scenarios, with the vast majority of these losses in the tropics.“It’s extremely serious — of the land that’s available for restoration, we’re losing about 20% by 2050,” Crowther says. “It’s urgent. Now is the time to act.”Robin Chazdon, an ecologist at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia and the University of Connecticut in Storrs, calls Crowther’s team’s method an “advance” and “novel.”But she says that without considering social and economic factors such as how much could be earned from farming a piece of land and what surrounding land is used for, it’s impossible to tell whether restoration in a particular place is likely to succeed or fail. “We’d need to go a lot further to really translate [Crowther’s team’s results] into what will work on the ground,” she says.At the community nursery in Biliran Island, Leyte, Philippines, local people work with the government agency (Department of Environment and Natural Resources); an Australian-funded research project is providing technical expertise and support. Photo courtesy of Robin Chazdon.In a paper published yesterday in Science Advances, Chazdon and an international team of researchers attempted to do just that for the tropics. Using satellite and other datasets, they quantified biophysical variables such as how much carbon and biodiversity regrowing forests could accumulate. But they also assessed factors such as the opportunity cost of forest restoration versus planting crops in a given place, and the likelihood that planted trees won’t be cut or burned down.The team found that 863 million hectares of destroyed or degraded forests—around the size of Brazil—could accommodate regrowing forests. Of those, 101 million hectares, larger than the area of Spain plus Sweden combined, stood out as “restoration hotspots” where forests are both carbon- and species-dense, and are most likely to successfully regrow. While Brazil has the largest total restorable area of any tropical country, six African countries earned the highest “restoration opportunity scores”—a metric the authors invented to capture both the environmental and economic likelihood of restoration success.“There’s a huge opportunity that falls in this win-win category,” Chazdon says.Both Chazdon and Crowther emphasize that to fully realize carbon and biodiversity benefits, forest restorers should nurture diverse native forests, not just plant monocultures of commercially valuable species. But given current economic pressures, some of the areas the researchers have identified will likely be used for food or bioenergy plantations, warns Charlotte Wheeler, a forest researcher at the University of Edinburgh who recently coauthored a commentary in Nature on the topic. “There is little chance that all of the areas that could sustain natural forest will sustain natural forest,” Wheeler wrote in an email.Despite their differences, the two papers are similar in bringing to bear on restoration the same kinds of powerful global datasets that have long been used to study deforestation, Chazdon says.“These papers signal we’ve entered another era for that goal [of forest restoration] that is much more refined,” she says. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: A tree nursery at the Reserva Ecológica Guapiaçu in Rio de Janeiro State where conservationists are growing tree species native to the imperiled the Atlantic Forest. Photo courtesy of Robin Chazdon.Feedback: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Ecological Restoration, Environment, Forests, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Habitat, Landscape Restoration, Rainforests, Reforestation, Research, Restoration, Temperate Forests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

La finale de futsal arrêtée après des échauffourées

first_imgFUTSAL La première manche de la finale du championnat, dimanche à Differdange, entre le FCD03 et le RFCU, n’est pas allée à son terme. L’arbitre a stoppé la rencontre après de graves échauffourées.Un arbitre agressé, des joueurs qui s’écharpent, des supporters d’une bêtise dramatique. Que va-t-il advenir de cette finale qui devait être une fête?On joue la 17e minute de ce choc qui a vraiment fière allure lorsque tout bascule. Pourquoi en arriver là, alors que jusqu’à présent, tout se passait à merveille? Partager On avait droit en effet à un spectacle digne d’une finale entre deux belles formations qui pratiquent un jeu alléchant. Mais parfois le stress et la nervosité prennent le dessus et les émotions font survenir des choses qu’au moins un des deux clubs va regretter amèrement.Bref, la tension de cette finale était visiblement de trop pour un Differdangeois qui a craqué lorsqu’il a voulu récupérer un ballon sorti en touche à côté du banc du Racing. Il est sorti de ses gonds et a agressé physiquement un joueur du Racing qui a été touché au visage.Ce fut la goutte d’eau qui a fait déborder le vase. Il n’en a pas fallu plus pour que cela entraîne une grosse altercation. Tous les joueurs s’en sont mêlés et pratiquement personne n’a essayé de stopper cette triste affaire. On a même pu voir le portier differdangeois piquer un sprint pour… donner un coup à un adversaire.Les arbitres tentaient tant bien que mal de calmer les ardeurs des joueurs et lorsqu’on a cru que la tension baissait enfin, ce sont quelques supporters differdangeois qui sont entrés en scène pour échauffer les esprits. Des mots d’oiseaux fusaient de tous les côtés, ces supporters étant survoltés, impossible de les stopper.Cela allait décidément trop loin et plus personne n’arrivait à mettre un point final à cette situation, qui va encore s’aggraver lorsqu’un supporter jette avec violence un bâton en bois sur le terrain. Un des quatre arbitres sera touché sur le haut du corps ce qui lui vaudra un bel hématome.Deux patrouilles de police nécessaires pour sécuriser le périmètreIl n’en faut pas plus à Fabio Aguiar, arbitre du match, pour mettre un terme à la rencontre. Pendant quelques minutes, tous les joueurs ont cru que le match allait se poursuivre, mais la décision sera définitive, Fabio Araujo ne reviendra pas sur sa décision : «J’ai arrêté la rencontre pour la simple raison qu’il y a des objets dont des bâtons, bouteilles qui ont été jetés de la tribune. Il y a des joueurs et un arbitre qui ont été touchés. On n’avait plus les conditions pour poursuivre la rencontre.»Une décision sans appel donc. On a senti que les membres de la direction de Differdange étaient dépités. Ils ont encore essayé de parler aux arbitres, mais rien à faire.Et la décision était sans doute la bonne puisqu’on a même eu un peu peur que les débordements ne continuent à l’extérieur du hall omnisports. Mais le calme est finalement revenu, deux patrouilles de police étant arrivées pour sécuriser le périmètre. Elles n’ont d’ailleurs pas eu à intervenir.La question, qui reste sans réponse à cette heure, est de savoir ce que la fédération va décider concernant cette situation. Est-ce que la partie sera rejouée? Est-ce que Differdange va perdre ce match sur tapis vert, puisqu’il accueillait la rencontre et que ses fans ont été directement identifiés?En tout cas, le président de la section de Futsal de Differdange, Filipe Costa, ne croit pas à un tel scénario. «Si on doit perdre par forfait, cela arrivera, mais je ne crois pas que cela va se produire, car c’est un fait de match qui s’est déroulé en dehors du terrain. On n’a pas d’influence. Maintenant on attend la décision. Si on doit jouer le match avec un huis clos on le jouera.» Filipe Costa devra attendre pour avoir sa réponse. Mais ce qui est certain, c’est que Differdange n’a plus son destin en main.Regrettable pour ce joli sport qui d’année en année prend de l’ampleur et s’améliore au niveau de la qualité. Mais pas encore assez au niveau de l’état d’esprit, visiblement…Jessy Ferreiralast_img read more

Giro : Bob Jungels revient sur son tour décevant

first_img«J’ai eu de grands problèmes avec ça, dès la première étape en montagne, lorsque je me suis aperçu que je ne pouvais pas suivre les meilleurs. Je me suis assis dans le bus et j’ai pleuré pendant dix minutes. Je n’avais perdu que deux minutes mais dès ce moment-là, j’ai ressenti que je n’étais pas en forme, physiquement et mentalement. En montagne, c’était vraiment dur pour moi, tous les jours, d’ailleurs, c’était dur. La météo n’a pas aidé non plus. Je ne sais pas pourquoi mais mentalement, je n’étais pas prêt pour disputer un grand tour comme le Giro. C’est un point que je dois régler à l’avenir.» «Je me sentais coupable vis-à-vis de mes coéquipiers dans ce Giro et je ne voulais pas abandonner pour eux, même si, physiquement et mentalement, j’ai souffert. J’ai donc tenu à rester jusqu’au bout.» Son chrono Son mental Partager «Je vais faire une pause, j’en ai besoin, et je vais partir en vacances avec ma copine, je veux prendre le temps de savourer, sans téléphone, j’ai vraiment besoin de cette pause. Je ne sais pas quand je veux reprendre le départ d’une course. En été, je veux participer à moins de courses ou, même, à aucune course, parce qu’à la fin de la saison, il y a beaucoup de belles courses, comme le Tour de Lombardie.» Sa préparation «J’ai déjà montré que je peux bien faire dans un grand tour, car je récupère bien en troisième semaine. C’est la première fois que ce n’est pas le cas. Mais ce n’est pas la pire des choses non plus. Il ne faut pas que je baisse la tête.» Il s’est ensuite longuement confessé sur ses doutes, ses interrogations. Sa frustration de ne pas pouvoir peser sur la course, malgré son rôle de leader pour le classement général. Il dira en avoir pleuré le soir de sa déconvenue sur le Montoso. Il confirme qu’il ne peut donner le meilleur de lui-même sur un grand tour très montagneux comme l’était ce Giro. Il ne tire pas pour autant un trait sur ces grands tours et le Giro, qui l’avait révélé. Bob Jungels confesse ensuite son désir d’observer une pause, pour mieux revenir en fin de saison, où beaucoup de courses lui conviennent, comme le Tour de Lombardie, où il aimerait s’illustrer. Morceaux choisis. Ses conclusions Son programmecenter_img Durant ce long chemin en roue libre, il aura eu le temps de faire et défaire les fils d’un Giro où sans doute, pour la première fois de sa carrière, il a dû digérer une forte déception. Un soleil de plomb fusillait les Arènes, terminal de la dernière étape, et lorsque Bob Jungels a fendu la foule pour rejoindre, sans s’attarder, le parking des bus, rejeté loin hors du centre-ville, loin de la foule bruyante et suffocante qui venait de l’accompagner dans ses derniers mètres, on a compris que le champion national en avait fini avec sa corvée quotidienne sur ce Giro. «J’ai peut-être sous-évalué l’énergie que coûtent les classiques flandriennes avant de préparer ce Giro. Je l’ai abordé en disputant moins de courses. Dans le passé, j’enchaînais un stage d’altitude, les classiques ardennaises puis le Tour de Romandie. Cela m’avait permis de terminer sixième et huitième du Giro (2016 et 2018). Là, je suis allé en Colombie (NDLR : il a remporté une étape sur le Tour de Colombie) et je me suis aligné sur les classiques flandriennes (NDLR : il a également couru Paris-Nice). J’ai donc moins disputé de courses que les années passées. Lors du Tour des Flandres (NDLR: cinq jours avant son stage d’altitude en Sierra Nevada), je me suis aperçu que je n’étais pas au top physiquement. J’ai respecté la théorie et j’ai fait des pauses.» Son avenir dans les grands tours «Je suis content car le Giro est désormais fini, le chrono s’est assez bien passé mais j’ai remarqué que je n’avais pas retrouvé toute mon énergie.» Denis Bastien, à Vérone Ses responsabilités de leader «Je vais essayer d’être plus relax, de me calmer, d’aborder les choses plus tranquillement. J’ai appris à connaître mon corps au fil des ans, et depuis l’an passé, je me connais bien. Mais là, ce n’était pas le cas. » Le Luxembourgeois n’a jamais pu s’exprimer à sa juste mesure dans cette édition 2019 du Giro. Dimanche, il a pris une honorable 17e place du chrono. Le champion national termine à la 33e position du classement général final.last_img read more

[Cyclisme] L’allemand Marcel Kittel met un terme à sa carrière

first_imgLe sprinteur allemand Marcel Kittel, vainqueur de quatorze étapes du Tour de France, a annoncé vendredi mettre un terme à sa carrière à 31 ans, ne voulant plus “se torturer sur un vélo”.“Les souffrances définissent le sport et le monde dans lequel tu vis. J’ai perdu toute la motivation de me torturer sur un vélo”, explique au Spiegel le natif d’Arnstadt (Thuringe). Kittel, en manque de résultats et à court de forme depuis quelques mois, avant annoncé en mai quitter la formation Katusha-Alpecin pour “faire une pause dans sa carrière”. Il avait alors déclaré se sentir “épuisé” et “pas capable” de s’”entraîner et faire des courses au plus haut niveau”.Cycliste allemand ayant remporté le plus d’étapes sur le Tour de France, Kittel s’était également imposé à quatre reprises sur le Giro et cumule 91 victoires depuis ses débuts professionnels. “J’avais trop de peu de ma place pour ma famille, mes amis. En plus de cela, il y avait cette fatigue permanente et la routine. J’ai réalisé de plus en plus que cela pesait sur ma qualité de vie”, continue-t-il. “En tant que coureur cycliste, tu es sur la route 200 jours par an. J’aimerais bien ne pas voir grandir mon fils via Skype”, a déclaré celui qui est devenu père en novembre dernier.Durant sa carrière, Kittel a notamment porté les couleurs des équipes Argos-Shimano, Etixx-Quick Step et Katusha-Alpecin.LQ/AFP Partagerlast_img read more

Mondorf-Differdange : une porte qui fait scandale

first_img Partager «On prendra notre stock de portes avec»«Que voulez-vous, on va être obligé de payer mais tout ça est un scandale», lançait vendredi Fabrizio Bei, le président differdangeois.«On n’a pas l’impression d’avoir pu se défendre comme on le voudrait dans ce dossier. Et personne chez nous n’a cassé cette porte ! J’ai posé la question aux joueurs, au staff… Personne n’a rien fait. De toute façon, nous avons des joueurs civilisés, pas des voyous. Quand on se déplacera chez eux, lors de la reprise en 2020 fin février, on prendra notre stock de portes avec nous…»LQ Le 19 mai dernier, date de la dernière journée du championnat, Differdange n’était pas parvenu à se qualifier pour l’Europe sur la pelouse de Mondorf. Dans la foulée, une altercation se serait passée dans les couloirs du stade Grün, une porte ayant été cassée dans l’aventure.Le club mondorfois l’a signifié par courrier à la Fédération. Plainte qui n’a pas été contestée auprès de la FLF par le FCD03. Une facture (qui avoisine les 1 000 euros) a dès lors été envoyée aux Differdangeois, afin de rembourser ladite porte. Facture qui reste toujours aujourd’hui impayée.Ce qui a poussé la FLF a infliger au FCD03 des amendes pour dépassement de délai pour un montant total de 1 000 euros. Et jeudi le tribunal fédéral est passé à la vitesse supérieure, décidant de suspendre tout le club de Differdange lors du week-end du 10 novembre si celui-ci ne paie pas avant cette date. Aucune équipe differdangeoise ne pourrait alors jouer, des Bambinis à l’équipe A (qui se verrait donc éliminée de la Coupe sans jouer).last_img read more

Quand les stats du basket s’affolent à Dudelange…

first_img Partager Les livestats, c’est bien quand ça marche. Mais quand ce n’est pas le cas, ça devient beaucoup plus compliqué. C’est ce qui s’est malheureusement passé ce week-end sur le parquet du T71, lors de la 5e journée de N1.Si on se fie aux stats, les joueurs de Dudelange ont explosé tous les records. S’ils se sont, effectivement, largement imposés face à l’Arantia, les hommes de Ken Diederich ont en fait subi les affres d’un bug informatique.Depuis quelques années, les clubs de N1 sont tenus de s’occuper des statistiques des matches en live, sous peine d’amende. C’est ainsi que sur tous les parquets de l’élite, on retrouve des personnes derrière leur ordinateur qui suivent les moindres faits et gestes de chaque joueur. C’était donc logiquement le cas lors de la réception de l’Arantia par le T71. A priori, un match sans encombre pour les Dudelangeois, qui s’imposent 127-76. Mais à y regarder de plus près, on constate qu’il y a des choses qui ne vont pas : un premier quart remporté… 89-56 puis deux autres très défensifs conclus sur le score de 5-2 et 3-2. Une réussite à trois points insolente avec un superbe 27/31 soit… 87 % de réussite, de quoi faire pâlir Stephen Curry en NBA! Tom Schumacher? Trois secondes de présence, mais il trouve tout de même le temps de planter une banderille à trois points dont il a le secret…Un premier quart qui se termine sur 89-56, une ligne à trois points mirifique à 27/31 et «Schumi», 3 pts en 3″de présence sur le parquet. Clairement, il y avait quelque chose qui ne tournait pas au niveau des stats du T71. (capture écran)3 points en 3 secondes de présence !Bref, du grand n’importe quoi! «Schumi» la gâchette n’a pas joué trois secondes mais beaucoup plus et il n’a pas inscrit un mais bien trois missiles longue distance. À la pause, le score n’était pas de 94-58 mais de 65-39. En revanche, le dernier quart bouclé 30-16 en faveur des joueurs de Ken Diederich est conforme à la réalité.Mais qu’a-t-il bien pu se passer, samedi, au Grimler ? C’est tout simplement un problème informatique, comme l’explique Marcel Wagener, le président du T71 : «Il y a eu un problème avec le Digibou, la feuille de match électronique. Tout a très bien marché jusqu’au match des filles, mais le logiciel a eu besoin d’effectuer une mise à jour juste après le début du match des seniors messieurs.» Et contrairement à ce qui se passe pour Windows, par exemple, impossible de décaler cette update pour après la fin du match, par exemple : «Quand ça se met à clignoter, c’est trop tard. Il faut effectuer la mise à jour.»Du coup, les arbitres ont décidé de se servir du PC qui devait normalement servir aux statistiques et sur lequel le Digibou était également installé, laissant les jeunes dévolus aux statistiques dans une certaine panade : «Ils ont essayé de le faire à la main, mais ça va trop vite. Ce n’est pas possible», constate Marcel Wagener.Difficile d’en vouloir à qui que ce soitTom Michel, un des responsables du T71, confirme : «On aurait pu se dire qu’on allait faire la mise à jour et attendre, mais on ne sait jamais combien de temps ça va prendre. Du coup, les jeunes ont fait de leur mieux. Ils ont réussi à mettre à peu près le bon nombre de points. En revanche, pour les autres statistiques, c’est beaucoup plus aléatoire. C’est pour cette raison, notamment que pratiquement tout le monde a 100 % de réussite à 3 pts.»C’est ainsi qu’on se retrouve avec des stats totalement délirantes. Mais difficile d’en vouloir à qui que ce soit. Surtout que trouver des bénévoles est tout sauf une sinécure : «Désormais, il faut du monde pour les stats, pour la table de marque, pour filmer le match, pour nettoyer la salle. Heureusement qu’on a la chance d’avoir des cadettes et des cadets pour nous aider», se réjouit Marcel Wagener.Un nouveau joueur sans statsSi globalement, le système de stats en live de la FIBA est plutôt performant, parfois ça coince. C’était également le cas à Contern où on n’a carrément aucune stat à disposition.Marcel Wagener est d’autant plus peiné que cet incident a empêché son nouveau joueur d’avoir ses bonnes stats. En effet, Daniel Samuel, est arrivé il y a tout juste une semaine car le club ne voulait pas prendre le moindre risque : «Avec déjà Tom et Frank sur le flanc, on s’était dit qu’en cas de blessure d’un Américain, c’était adieu les play-offs. On a eu l’opportunité de prendre Daniel, qu’on avait déjà dans les radars il y a quelques mois. Il se trouve que Nick était malade vendredi et qu’on a joué avec Daniel. On verra comment ça se passe mais l’idée, c’est de le garder au moins jusqu’à Noël.»Romain Haaslast_img read more

Laurent Jans dans le onze type de Kicker

first_imgLe capitaine de la sélection luxembourgeoise, Laurent Jans, ne doit pas regretter d’avoir rejoint l’élite allemande en signant pour le SC Paderborn 07. Le voilà parmi les meilleurs joueurs de la 14e journée de Bundesliga.L’international luxembourgeois a contribué, dimanche, à une victoire à l’extérieur de son club au Werder Brême. Un succès réconfortant pour un SC Paderborn qui se traîne à l’avant-dernière place du classement de Bundesliga avec huit petits points.L’ancien joueur du FC Metz, en étant gratifié par le magazine Kicker de la très bonne note de 2,5 (1 étant le graal), côtoie pour cette grande première pour lui,  dans ce tableau prestigieux des pointures du Borussia Dortmund telles que Marco Reus ou Thorgal Hazard,  l’international anglais Jadon Sancho (dans le viseur du Real Madrid et de Chelsea) ou encore en défense l’international autrichien Martin Hinteregger.Dans le résumé du match figurant sur le site du SC Paderborn, c’est d’ailleurs un Laurent Jans déterminé qui a les honneurs de la photo. Partager LQ last_img read more

[BGL Ligue] Jänisch au Progrès cet été : c’est «pratiquement sûr»

first_imgNous vous révélions voici quelques jours que le défenseur international de Differdange Mathias Jänisch (29 ans), qui sera en fin de contrat en juin, était en contact avancé avec le voisin du Progrès Niederkorn en vue d’un passage au stade Jos-Haupert.Mercredi, Thomas Gilgemann, le directeur sportif niederkornois, glissait que son arrivée était «quasiment sûre pour cet été». C’est dire si les tractations avec le joueur semblent en bonne voie.La question semble donc désormais être : pourrait-il rejoindre le Progrès dès cet hiver? «Nous sommes évidemment intéressés mais pas à n’importe quel prix», continuait l’ancien défenseur. «On est en discussion avec le club de Differdange. Tout est clair et correct. Et on a d’ailleurs prévu de se revoir. Mais pour l’heure, on semble plus se diriger vers une arrivée l’été prochain que dès ce mois de janvier.»Si aucun accord n’est trouvé, le Progrès devrait alors se tourner durant le prochain mercato hivernal vers un autre défenseur polyvalent gaucher en attendant Jänisch en fin de saison. Quant au deuxième transfert que le règlement luxembourgeois autorise, «on se laisse janvier pour voir», concluait Gilgemann.Julien Carette Partagerlast_img read more

[Volley] Dascalu : “tu ne débutes jamais un match pour faire un nul”

first_img Partager Justement, ce n’est pas une compétition officielle ?Je sais, c’est un tournoi amical, mais en volley-ball, tu ne débutes pas un match dans l’espoir de faire match nul, pour la simple et bonne raison que ça n’existe pas… Tu gagnes ou tu perds. Je pars donc toujours avec l’ambition de gagner. Bon, je sais, ce n’est pas si facile… Mais j’aimerais qu’on fasse bonne figure et que les gens du volley luxembourgeois soient contents de notre prestation. Après, malgré ce léger trac, je vous rassure, j’ai bien dormi (il rit).Un effectif doit être renouveléÀ l’occasion de cette Novotel Cup, la sélection a subi un sérieux rajeunissement…Deux éléments expliquent cette composition : d’un côté, régulièrement, un effectif doit être renouvelé. C’est-à-dire que le travail effectué avec les jeunes doit permettre à certains d’entre eux d’intégrer l’effectif. Ça permet d’anticiper l’arrêt éventuel de l’un ou l’autre joueur. Que ce soit en raison de l’âge, de l’envie ou d’une autre raison. Une sélection, ce n’est pas un club. En cas de départ, on ne peut pas recruter. Il faut donc prévoir. Ensuite, certains éléments n’étaient pas disponibles pour cette Novotel Cup et j’en ai donc profité pour appliquer mes idées.Vous dites en avoir profité. Vous n’avez donc pas subi ces indisponibilités ?Pas du tout !Le 5 septembre dernier, Le Quotidien faisait état du malaise existant entre la sélection et la fédération depuis le renvoi, notamment, en 2017 de Burkhard Disch, l’ancien DTN. Certains de ses cadres n’excluaient pas d’ailleurs de prendre leur retraite internationale…Déjà, je n’étais pas là à l’époque des faits. Je ne connais pas le passé et suis donc mal placé pour en parler. Et puis, dans toute sélection, il arrive ce genre de choses. Quant aux cadres, je ne sais pas ce que vous entendez par là…Des éléments importants tels que Tim Laevaert, Olivier De Castro, Gilles Braas, capitaine de cette sélection, sans oublier Kamil Rychlicki même si sa situation est particulière puisque évoluant au Lube Civitanova, vainqueur de la Ligue des champions 2019 et du récent Mondial des clubs…La seule chose que je peux dire, c’est qu’aucun “cadre”, pour utiliser le même terme que vous, n’a exprimé l’envie d’arrêter. Et je n’ai dit à aucun que je ne comptais pas sur lui.Ils ont tous montré leur intérêtVous vous êtes entretenu avec eux ?Oui, j’en ai vu certains, j’en ai eu d’autres au téléphone. Ce n’était pas forcément un entretien, c’était essentiellement pour faire connaissance. Leur présenter ma façon de voir les choses, leur donner des informations afin de leur permettre de prendre leur décision, en leur âme et conscience, à propos des deux prochaines années. Je leur ai dit qu’en tant que “cadres”, ils pouvaient être un exemple pour les jeunes.Quelle a été leur réaction ?Ils ont tous montré leur intérêt et m’ont dit qu’ils allaient réfléchir.Quelle est votre ambition sur ces deux saisons ?Bâtir un projet permettant à l’équipe nationale de grandir. D’obtenir des résultats. Ici, il n’est pas uniquement question de faire partie d’un groupe, mais de savoir pourquoi les joueurs font autant de sacrifices, car des sacrifices, ils en font…C’est votre première expérience en tant que sélectionneur…Oui et je ne me considère pas encore comme sélectionneur. Je le serai peut-être dans deux ans. Je l’espère.Dans les faits, vous l’êtes pourtant. C’est votre titre…Oui, mais je ne l’ai jamais été auparavant et on ne le devient pas du jour au lendemain. J’ai déjà été adjoint de la sélection roumaine, mais c’était encore différent. Pour l’instant, je ne peux pas encore me présenter comme sélectionneur.On ne se rend pas compte des contraintes liées au sport professionnelComment et, surtout, pourquoi êtes-vous venu au Luxembourg ?Quand ma collaboration avec Terville (NDLR : après neuf saisons) s’est achevée, pour des raisons familiales, on a décidé de ne plus partir je ne sais où pour un autre contrat professionnel. De l’extérieur, on ne se rend pas compte des contraintes liées au sport professionnel. J’ai 57 ans et, depuis mes 19 ans, je suis dans le volley. On a beaucoup déménagé. Si ce n’est pas évident pour soi, ça l’est encore moins pour la famille qui, à chaque fois, doit s’adapter. Cette fois, alors qu’on avait toujours été en location, grâce au CDI que j’avais au club de Terville, on avait acheté une maison, on était posé. Quelque part, c’était une forme d’aboutissement.Quelle reconversion aviez-vous envisagée ?J’ai un diplôme de prof de sport, mais je n’ai jamais professé… Et puis, j’ai vu que la fédération luxembourgeoise cherchait un sélectionneur, alors j’ai naturellement postulé. Et voilà, j’ai été choisi parmi d’autres candidats.Revenons à cette Novotel Cup. Que pouvez-vous nous dire de cette sélection au visage juvénile ?Cette équipe, c’est vrai, est jeune et ça me plaît beaucoup. Ce que je vois d’elle depuis une dizaine de jours me plaît beaucoup. Il y a beaucoup de motivation, d’application. Ils veulent réussir quelque chose. De ce que je vois, ce sont des gars honnêtes dans leur démarche. C’est dommage qu’ils ne puissent pas s’entraîner davantage, car leur niveau pourrait augmenter rapidement.Propos recueillis par Charles MichelLuxembourg-Écosse, 20h, à la Coque (Luxembourg).Programme complet des rencontres ici. [Novotel Cup] Nommé à la tête de l’équipe messieurs en juillet dernier, Pompiliu Dascalu vivra son premier tournoi, dès ce vendredi soir à la Coque, dans la peau d’un sélectionneur. L’occasion de faire le point avec le successeur de Dieter Scholl.Comment appréhendez-vous cette Novotel Cup, votre première compétition comme sélectionneur du Luxembourg ?Pompiliu Dascalu : Des compétitions, j’en ai déjà disputé pas mal par le passé, mais là, il s’agit encore d’autre chose. C’est plus qu’une simple compétition dans la mesure où je dirige une équipe nationale. Ça a une autre portée. Une autre importance.Avez-vous le trac ?En quelque sorte, oui… Bon, ce n’est pas le trac du jeune qui est appelé pour la première fois en sélection, mais il y a tout un contexte.last_img read more