Kiribati confronts climate upheaval by preparing for ‘migration with dignity’

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Human Migration, Impact Of Climate Change, Interns, Islands, Overpopulation, Research Article published by Maria Salazar Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Climate change impacts and overpopulation are pushing Kiribati citizens to plan for a potential future migration en-masse.Still, many I-Kiribati fear losing cultural identity in the projected exodus of their people to higher land.To make the transition easier, some Kiribati citizens are receiving vocational training to qualify them for employment abroad. High tide keeps getting higher on the islands of the Republic of Kiribati – 33 coral atolls in the Pacific Ocean that rest only a few feet above sea level. In Kiribati culture, Nareau the Creator scattered stones to the north and south to create this mosaic of coral and rock. But, today, the effects of climate change are closing in and there’s no higher land to move to. Even as the atolls shrink, Kiribati’s population grows. The country is experiencing baki-aba: “land hunger.” In 2014, Kiribati president, Anote Tong purchased 20 square kilometers on Vanua Levu, a Fiji island making this the first international land purchase intended for climate refugees.For Kiribati, adapting to climate change might mean relocating entirely.Pacific islanders’ identities are very much tied to their ancestral land, the physical islands on which they live. Migration may mean a national and cultural loss, especially when most traditions are preserved orally.“They worry about the new country and if the people of that country will accept them,” Anterea Claire Anterea, co-founder of Kiri-CAN (Kiribati Climate Action Network International) and well-known climate activist in the country, said.Pacific island nations are some of the most vulnerable spots on Earth from climate change. According to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, small islands emit less than one percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, but they disproportionately suffer the effects of rising tides, drought, and extreme storms.Today, small island states are often allocating their scarce resources away from economic development towards more immediate climate adaptation measures.For example, sandbags line the shores of Kiribati and causeways are raised to the stop waves from breaking over the Kiribati’s only road. Kiribati also faces more frequent droughts that ruin crops and destroy farmer’s livelihoods. As sea levels rise, citizens worry about saltwater contamination of their freshwater lens – a rain-filled bubble of freshwater that rests below Kiribati’s soil, but still above the ocean water. Exacerbating climate issues, overcrowding in Kirbati’s largest cities has led to poor sanitation and public health problems.Kiribati is made up of 33 atolls, formed from a volcano that sunk into the sea and left behind a ring of coral. South Tarawa, pictured above, is the most populated island, home to about half the population, with more people per square foot than Tokyo, Japan. Photo: Wikimedia commons.Anote Tong, former president of Kiribati, advocates for “migrating with dignity.” This policy was designed to give citizens the tools to relocate legally, finding work in other nations like Australia and New Zealand. Tong prefers this slow and methodical transition to the alternative – moving tens of thousands of citizens at once in response to a catastrophic flood or drought.A planned migration means that I-Kiribati (Kiribati citizens) can move on their own accord, instead of becoming climate refugees – victims of climate change left stateless with questionable legal rights and potentially perceived as burdens on any host country. Colloquially, the term “climate refugee” is used to describe any person leaving their home due to the effects of climate change, i.e. drought, flooding, or extreme weather.Trans-nationally, the term “climate refugee” has no legal clout. That means climate refugees might not have human rights when they migrate to a new nation. In order to be a refugee – by current, global legal standards – a person must be facing political persecution.In 2012, Ioane Teitiota, a Kiribati native, applied for asylum in New Zealand on the grounds that he was unable to grow food or find potable water in Kiribati. The courts eventually rejected the case and Teitiota and his family were deported. Teitiota could not prove persecution.The court conceded that Teitiota met a “sociological” definition of a refugee, but not a legal one. Teitiota has appealed to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.“First and foremost – let it be known we do not want to [migrate] and become refugees!” Linda Uan said. Uan is a household name in Kiribati, known for co-founding the broadcasting and media production company Nei Tabera Ni Kai Video Unit (NTNK) which shares over 400 stories on climate change and social justice.“To an I-Kiribati mind – it is important to be self-reliant and we’ve been raised that way,” added Uan.“Migration to a new country will not be possible without the means to support oneself.”World Water Day outreach with communities of South Tarawa, who are rapidly losing their freshwater reserves due to salt water intrusion in their freshwater lens. Photo: Claire Anterea.Gaining employable skills will make I-Kiribati (Kiribati citizens) useful contributors to any host country.“If we train our people and they become skilled, then they would migrate with dignity and on merit, they would not be people running away from something,” Tong told Vice News. “They would be migrating, relocating as people with skills as members of communities they go into, even leaders, I hope.”A 2014 Poverty Assessment says that about 2,000 young persons enter the labor force each year in Kiribati. Many seek jobs in other countries. The total unemployment rate in 2010 was 31 percent. In 2011, the government began a program at the Kiribati Institute of Technology for Technical and Vocational Education and Training to “upskill” young persons through carpentry, plumbing, nursing, accounting, and other marketable trades. Over half of young employees are out of work and many are migrating to South Tarawa, Kiribati’s capital, where life is perceived as ‘easier’ than on the outer islands. Others are seafarers or seek seasonal employment as fruit-pickers in Australia or New Zealand.South Tarawa is now home to over half the Kiribati’s 113,000 people and exemplifies how climate change exacerbates poverty in a negative feedback loop. Water security for this overcrowded city is a major concern. I-Kiribati worry that the next drought and salinization will exhaust their supply in the freshwater lens.With limited space and resources, the latest survey, a Household Income and Expenditure Survey in 2006, estimates that almost 22 percent of I-Kiribati live in poverty.And yet, I-Kiribati have no word for “poverty.”“We live simply and happily by what we have,” said Anterea.Kiribati is only one example of how Pacific Island Countries (PICs) disproportionately suffer the consequences of climate change. According to a 2015 World Bank analysis, climate events like rising sea levels and severe weather events cost Pacific Island nations an average of US $284 million every year, making it nearly impossible for them to rise out of poverty.At the International Climate Talks in Paris in December, 2015, Tong brought Kiribati’s climate conundrum to center stage when he stressed that just a 1.5 degree Celsius temperature increase would be catastrophic for Kiribati and other small island developing states (SIDS) – the current Paris Climate Accord has set a goal to keep warming under 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels. Tong and other leaders also called for compensation from developed nations to help fund climate adaptation measures, but in the end, the Paris Climate Agreement did not contain any basis for liability or compensation.Claire Anterea, climate activist with Kiri-CAN with current president of Kiribati, Taneti Mamau, planting mangrove trees to improve shoreline health and climate resiliency. Photo: Claire Anterea.“Our culture is very strong in helping each other through our family [and] community. If the Developed States have that value in life…then you know that they are real people,” said Anterea. “We need them to start saving our country [by] cutting their emissions.”Kiribati is one of the least developed nations in the world with one of the lowest GDPs and per capita income. Foreign aid – mostly from Taiwan, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand – makes up about a quarter of the country’s GDP and goes towards infrastructure development and public health initiatives.Part of Australia’s aid program is dedicated to giving young I-Kiribati the skills they need to succeed in national or international labor markets. Australia’s Pacific seasonal workers program connects Pacific Islanders with jobs in Australia, typically in rural and remote areas.“Australia understands the potential challenge climate change presents to habitation in the Pacific. We are committed to working on these issues,” a spokesperson for Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade spokesperson wrote.To that end, AusAID funded the Kiribati-Australia Nurses Initiative (KANI), which began in 2004 and was canceled in 2014. This $20.8 million dollar investment gave sixty full scholarships for I-Kiribati students to attend school in Brisbane Australia to gain vocational training and employable skills to Australian qualifications. After completion of the program, students were able to stay and work. But most chose to go home afterwards.“Weekly, we’re sending off more people to work on fruit picking, the hospitality industry, seafarers, fishermen etc. Interestingly enough, they’re all very happy to return home after they completed their contracts,” Uan said, speaking of all Kiribati’s labor migrants. “They talked about greener pastures abroad – very good soil, fertile, lots of room for more houses, quality goods, but that was there – not home. Home is good where our loved ones are, where we belong!”Anterea has visited many outer islands to ask them if they would ever migrate because of climate change. Most don’t want to leave their country. She says that both young and old generations worry about losing their traditions.“Our culture is that oral culture that [is] shared from generation to generation. And therefore our local knowledge is passed on from generation to generation by word of mouth. The challenge for preserving [it] will be not easy,” she says.Overcoming cultural and social differences have made it difficult for KANI students to adapt to life in Australia. Many reported homesickness. Students spent three months or more with Australian host families in order to adapt to Australian culture and practice speaking English. However, this assimilation strategy mostly made students feel isolated from one another. I-Kiribati live in bustling households with extended family. To move to an Australian home where they received their own quiet bedroom often exacerbated loneliness.To counter culture shock, a group called the Queensland Kiribati Community Youth took shape In Brisbane. KANI students and a small community of I-Kiribati who married Australians organize cultural events. This community celebrates Kiribati holidays together, performs traditional songs and dances at special events, campaigns for climate justice for I-Kiribati, and alleviates one another’s homesickness by maintaining a comfortable cultural backdrop.Maintaining these cultural practices helps KANI students cling to their identities. Three different waves of students have swept through the program, 87 overall. Some students are still finishing up their schooling. However, the pilot program was discontinued in 2014 due to low completion rates.Sixty-eight students are expected to graduate in total – 64 as registered nurses, 3 as social workers and 1 with a Bachelor’s in Human Services. Sixteen students did not complete schooling to become registered nurses and five students quit before receiving any qualification at all.Researcher Lara K. O’Brien interviewed KANI students for her published review of the initiative. All participants said climate change motivated their decision to join KANI.“Everyone back on the islands is aware of the fact that sea level is rising and that climate is changing, but I don’t know why they don’t have that sort of urge, you know, to panic or to start looking for something to do before the future,” one student told O’Brien. “They just, they’re relaxing and they tell you, ‘Oh, we’d rather die here.’”AusAid is expected to spend $30.9 million to Kiribati in Official Development Assistance in 2017-2018 and they are a major contributor to Kiribati’s Official Developmental Aid. Providing holding tanks for fresh water alleviates concerns over freshwater availability and protects public health. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.Critics say that KANI was not a cost-effective program since it cost on average $237,318 for one student to receive their Bachelor of Nursing. Others tout its successes as a way to send remittances to families on the homeland and prepare I-Kiribati youth for what’s seen as an inevitable migration.Despite the criticisms and its cancellation, KANI is still cited as a model for planned labor migration – the kind that may make for a smoother transition for I-Kiribati.“I believe that the KANI program is effective…because we witness that we have young people from our country that [are] working in Australia and allow them to stay as permanent resident[s]. We also see that they send good money back to help their family and that them young family settle and send their children to good schools in Australia,” said Anterea.The KANI initiative arises from a recent history of Australia-Kiribati cooperation. In 2009, the two countries signed the Kiribati-Australia Partnership for Development, agreeing to work in tandem to raise the standard of living for I-Kiribati by improving basic education and work skills.Australia plans to give $30.9 million to Kiribati in Official Development Assistance in 2017-2018 to increase quality of education, build a healthier population, and implement economic reforms. Other priorities include infrastructure improvements such as road, water, and sanitation projects.KANI was not the first instance of labor migration in Kiribati. In the 1820s, several residents of Gilbert Island (a Kiribati island) were forced into slavery for plantations and agricultural labor in Australia, Fiji, Tahiti, and even as far away as Peru. Some 1,400 Gilbertese were sent to the Solomon Islands. This time, though, I-Kirbatis are determined that the decision to leave Kiribati will be just that – a decision.CITATIONS:O’Brien, L. K. (2013, October 25). MIGRATING WITH DIGNITY”: A STUDY OF THE KIRIBATI-AUSTRALIA NURSING INITIATIVE (KANI). https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/12947/OBrien_ku_0099M_13103_DATA_1.pdf?sequence=1Shaw, L., Edwards, M., & Rimon, A. (2014, February). KANI Independent Review AidWorks Initiative Number: ING466 REVIEW REPORT. Retrieved from https://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/kiribati-australia-nursing-initiative-independent-report.pdflast_img read more

Companies sourcing beef, leather from China exposed to Brazil deforestation risk, researchers say

first_imgArticle published by daniel An analysis of trade data reveals retailers and manufacturers using cattle products sourced from Brazil may be buying beef and leather linked to deforestation.The research by NGO Global Canopy linked Brazilian and Chinese companies to major brands including Adidas, Nike, DFS, Ikea, BMW, Daimler, General Motors and Volkswagen.Of the 15 importers in Europe and the United States included in the data, only three purchased products from Chinese companies that had made deforestation commitments. Major retailers and manufacturers of cattle products who source materials from Brazil may be using beef and leather linked to deforestation, an analysis of trade data by NGO Global Canopy suggests.Global Canopy looked at the deforestation policies of 43 companies involved in the beef and leather trade from Brazil via China. It found that popular sports brands such as Adidas and Nike, car makers BMW, General Motors and Volkswagen, and furniture retailers including DFS were unable to guarantee their leather was deforestation-free.Of the 15 importers they identified, just three purchased products from Chinese manufacturers that had made a deforestation commitment. The Chinese companies also sourced materials from Brazilian companies without commitments in place.Where deforestation pledges had been made by Brazilian suppliers, their policies only applied to the Amazon region and excluded other important and at-risk regions, such as the Cerrado, according to the research.“It’s difficult to know why some of these companies do not have policies – they may not be aware of the risks, or they may not see them as a priority,” André Vasconcelos, a Global Canopy researcher who co-authored the analysis, told Mongabay in an email.Previous research by Global Canopy found that companies exposed to deforestation risks from other commodities, such as palm oil, were more likely to be aware of their exposure and have deforestation policies than those dealing in cattle products.“Leather supply chains are complex and retail companies may not know where the leather has been sourced from. Our research shows that leather produced in Brazil is often exported to China where it is manufactured into products, such as car seats or shoes and then are re-exported to other countries,” Vasconcelos said. “Some companies may not be even aware that they could be purchasing products that are linked to deforestation. Other companies are clearly aware as they have policies for some areas – but not for all sourcing areas.”In the car industry, Vasconcelos says a focus on emissions over raw materials such as leather may explain the apparent oversight. Yet in the shoe industry he says the origins of the products’ core material should be “of crucial importance.” Similarly, for the companies supplying beef in China, consumer concerns about food safety “seem to dominate concerns over sustainability.”Commodities from illegally deforested areas of Brazil reach markets globally via complex supply chains that can obscure the source of goods. Scientists and conservationists have long argued for a halt to Amazon logging, not least because the carbon storage facility it provides acts as a vital bulwark against climate change.Experts are concerned that President Jair Bolsonaro’s plans to open indigenous lands to agribusiness and mining companies and the weakening of environmental regulations and agencies will further fuel deforestation. Bolsonaro has dismissed allegations he has encouraged illegal deforestation, the setting of wildfires and land grabbing.Brands in the SpotlightInternational brands sourcing leather from Brazil say they are increasingly offering alternative products where possible and that they are aware of their responsibility to monitor and improve sustainability standards within their supply chains.Daimler AG, the maker of Mercedes-Benz cars and one of the firms identified in the Global Canopy analysis as sourcing from Adient PLC and Lear Corporation, China-based manufacturers that also supply Ford, General Motors, BMW and Volkswagen, said suppliers are required to “to vigorously communicate and monitor” sustainability standards in their supply chains.Heike Rombach, a Daimler spokesman, said its customers could also go leather-free by opting for man-made alternatives composed of microfibers made from recycled polyester and polyurethane. According to Global Canopy, Lear Corporation does not have a deforestation policy. In turn, it also sources leather from Brazilian firm Vancouros Industria & Comercio De Couros Ltda, which also has no policy in place.Volkswagen Group said in a statement that it could not comment on specific suppliers, but that each supplier had to abide by its code of conduct and went through an assessment process that could include on-site checks. While the company admits it does not have “complete traceability for the whole leather supply chain”, it said suppliers are required to source “responsibly”.“The fact is that the sustainability situation in the leather supply chain is in some cases not satisfactory, and thus all the actors involved need to continue to be responsible for bringing about improvements,” Dr. Günther Scherelis, a Volkswagen spokesman, said in the statement. “We recognize this responsibility for ourselves and will increase our commitment and activities in the coming weeks and months.”He added that as well as working directly with contractors, the firm was piloting a leather traceability scheme using blockchain technology.In response to the Global Canopy research, BMW also said it placed stringent sustainability requirements on leather suppliers, though it noted that other materials, such as cobalt, copper and rubber, took priority. “For our leather suppliers we defined supplementary requirements that reinforce the importance of resource efficiency in the tanneries, working conditions in the sewing industry and animal welfare from field to tannery,” the carmaker said in a statement.BMW added that it conducted annual audits of leather suppliers and was developing tools to monitor the supply chain, as well as “asking for complete transparency for specific supply chains if a transgression is suspected”.Along with automotive and footwear firms, Global Canopy identified several furniture brands as potentially exposed to deforestation in their supply chains, such as Ikea, Macy’s, DFS and Ashley. According to the NGO’s data, several of the furniture brands buy leather products from Chinese firm HTL International Holdings, one of the country’s largest leather importers, which sources material from at least two Brazilian companies without a deforestation commitment.In a statement to Mongabay, DFS, the UK’s second-largest home furnishings company, said it worked with suppliers “to ensure materials meet credible certification standards” and had employed an independent third-party to implement a verification process for its leather supply chain.Global Canopy’s Vasconcelos said that publishing a deforestation policy can be an important first step towards deforestation-free supply chains as it shows companies are risk-aware. “But it is important to make clear that there is a difference between publishing a policy and implementing that policy,” he added. “We have seen in the past how some global companies that have deforestation policies continue to source cattle from areas embargoed due to illegal deforestation, for example. Companies need to make sure they have systems in place to implement their policies if they are going to make a difference on the ground.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Beef, Deforestation, Forests, Rainforests, Supply Chain, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Activists fighting for their lands swept up in Philippines crackdown

first_imgActivism, Agriculture, Endangered Environmentalists, Environmental Activism, Human Rights, Land Conflict, Land Reform, Land Rights, Law, Terrorism, Wetlands Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A security crackdown in the Philippines targeting an armed communist insurgency has swept up environmental and land defenders in a raid on Oct. 31.International humanitarian and church groups have also been included in the military’s list of “legal front groups” of the outlawed New People’s Army and tied to terror financing.Security forces rounded up a total of 63 activists: 57 on the island of Negros and six in Manila. They include leaders of peasant groups, farmers, and anti-reclamation activists.At least six of the arrested critical groups are environmental and land defenders advocating for land campaigns on Negros and against the ongoing Manila Bay reclamation. MANILA — Environment and land rights leaders were among the activists rounded up in a new wave of arrests in the Philippines as part of the government’s extensive counter-insurgency campaign to flush out sympathizers of the outlawed New People’s Army (NPA) while international humanitarian groups, alongside local church groups, were accused of being “legal communist fronts” and aiding terrorism.A total of 57 activists were arrested on Oct. 31 in Negros, an island 850 kilometers (530 miles) from Manila, while another six were arrested in Manila on Nov. 5. Among the arrested are farmers and peasant group leaders fighting for their land rights in Negros Island and activists opposing the ongoing Manila Bay reclamation project. They were arrested in security crackdowns on major left-leaning organizations, with search warrants issued by a court in Metro Manila on Oct. 30.Environmental groups have denounced the arrests, which they say involved “planting evidence” in the form of explosives and guns in the homes of activists. Kalikasan PNE, an environmental NGO, says the tactic is similar to President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs, known locally as Tokhang, which has left nearly 6,000 people dead since 2016.“We condemn this recent surge of Tokhang-style raids and arrests against land and environmental defenders and other activists by the police and military forces,” Clemente Bautista, international network coordinator of Kalikasan PNE, said in a statement. He added that the strategy “fits a national and global trend of criminalization of land rights and environmental activism not only in the Philippines but globally,” echoing the findings of the recent “Enemies of the State?” report by the environmental watchdog Global Witness.“[M]any governments are manipulating their legal systems and intimidating defenders with aggressive criminal and civil cases, often to further the interests of big business,” the report says. “This often goes hand-in-hand with incendiary rhetoric that brands defenders as ‘terrorists’ or criminals in other guises, making attacks on them more likely and seemingly legitimate.”International humanitarian organizations and church groups have also been branded by the Philippine military as “legal fronts” for the NPA, according to a list shown to lawmakers in a briefing on Nov. 6. The military identified 18 organizations — including Oxfam Philippines; the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP), a fellowship of Protestant and non-Catholic churches; and the Farmers Development Center (Fardec), a nonprofit — as “front organizations of local communist terrorist groups (CTG).”In another list, Oxfam International and Oxfam UK were labeled as “foreign funding agencies wittingly or unwittingly providing funds to CTG front organizations.”The Philippines’ national defense department allegedly showed this list of communist terrorist groups in a briefing on Nov. 6, which includes development organization Oxfam Philippines. Image sourced from Rappler“Oxfam categorically denies these accusations,” the organization said in a statement, adding that the new development is a “troubling situation” that places “communities and partners we work with at risk.”“In a country where poverty remains, and poor communities are continually struck by disasters, we strongly believe that organizations like ours should be encouraged, rather than hindered, from undertaking our programs,” Oxfam Philippines said.The Department of National Defense and the military have since clarified that the list is “unverified” and that the organizations listed are “not red-tagged” — that is, not affiliated with the banned Communist Party and its armed wing, the NPA. Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said the list was based on “documents captured from all operations in the country,” news outlet Rappler reported.In April, the country’s police warned students about getting involved in potential communist groups outside schools, and the rhetoric heightened in August when the government accused some NGOs and state schools of being hotbeds of subversion. This is the first time, however, that international development organizations and church groups have landed on such a list.Groups were on high alert as early as September after reports of possible raids circulated among them. Kalikasan PNE filed complaints with the Commission on Human Rights (CHR), and the group and its partners, Global Witness and the World Resources Institute (WRI), have also engaged in a series of public forums and dialogues with representatives of the U.S. State Department and U.S. Congress on Oct. 26 over the incidents.Sixty-four local lawmakers, three belonging to the affected party-list groups, have also demanded an end to the government’s crackdown on activists, party-list groups Bayan Muna, Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU), and Gabriela Women’s Party. Both Bayan Muna and Gabriela are left-leaning organizations that currently hold congressional seats in the Philippines’ party-list system, in which underrepresented or single-issue parties receive a quota of congressional seats.In Negros: Land rights leaders, party-list members arrestedThe wave of arrests, however, is not new in Negros, where President Duterte dispatched seven military units and an additional 300 police personnel in August to quell a state of “lawlessness” that saw a spate of killings with 15 people gunned down in July alone.Fifty-seven people were arrested as suspected members of the communist insurgency, while the military raided the offices of groups including the National Federation of Sugar Workers (NFSW). Among those arrested were Danny Tabura of the KMU’s Negros chapter and John Milton Lozande, an NFSW representative who conducts land cultivation campaigns in Negros. These campaigns, locally called bungkalan, are a source of tension as they involve farmers taking over contested farmlands that are covered by the agrarian reform law but have yet to be titled and distributed. Lozande was eventually released alongside 48 other activists, leaving eight others who are still detained.After learning that there might be a potential raid in their office in Quezon City, local NGO Kalikasan PNE hung a banner in their office. Image courtesy of Kalikasan PNENine sugarcane farmers and environmental defenders, including four women and two children, were killed in one such dispute in Sagay, a city in Negros, on Oct. 20, 2018. They were among the 30 environmental and land defenders killed in the Philippines that year, according to Global Witness, which named the country the most dangerous in the world for defenders. Since the Sagay massacre, the island has seen two waves of counter-insurgency campaigns, which the government called Sauron I and Sauron II, that resulted in the arrests of peasant group leaders and the killings of local officials, farmers and social workers.Small farmers and indigenous peoples account for 81 percent of murdered land and environmental defenders under the Duterte administration, said Leon Dulce of Kalikasan PNE. “This shows that the unabated killings of farmers is the single biggest blow to the country’s environmental protection efforts,” he added. “Protecting the lives and rights of farmers will allow them to continue their innate role of protecting watersheds and agricultural lands.”In Manila: Anti-reclamation activists rounded upOf the six activists arrested in Manila, four were opponents of the ongoing Manila Bay reclamation project, which will cover 2,627 hectares (6,491 acres) of coastal and foreshore areas in the capital’s biggest body of water. Among them was Cora Agovida, a spokeswoman for Gabriela, the women’s party, and a campaigner against land reclamation in the capital’s bay. The three other anti-land reclamation activists arrested were Ram Carlo Bautista, Alma Moran and Reina Mae Nasino, all members of the Manila chapter of the Bayan Muna party.All four are part of Manila Baywatch, a watchdog coalition of environmental and human rights groups monitoring the Manila Bay inter-agency rehabilitation program that Duterte created on Feb. 19. The rehabilitation cost of the bay is estimated at 47 billion pesos ($924 million) and includes massive relocation projects for illegal settlers. The grassroots campaign seeks to “ensure that the rehab program addresses the threats of ecological destruction, flooding, and community displacement posed by reclamation projects.”“The Duterte administration is cracking down on Manila-based activists who exposed its sham Manila Bay rehab program for paving the way for reclamation development,” Dulce said. “The Manila Police District must be investigated and held accountable for their attacks are clearly meant to pave the way for reclamation and other infrastructure projects at all costs, including costing people’s rights and lives.”Manila Bay, home to the Port of Manila, one of Asia’s oldest harbors and the heart of the Philippines’ shipping, industrial and commercial activities, is the site of 19 reclamation projects that are under development. Six of these projects are in the “detailed engineering stage,” or close to being implemented, according to data from the Philippine Reclamation Authority (PRA).These reclamation projects include the 148-hectare Manila Solar City project and the contested Manila-Cavite Coastal Road and Reclamation Project (MCCRRP), which will encroach on Las Piñas-Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), a Ramsar site that’s a key stopping point for migratory birds.Banner image of the arrested activists in Manila who oppose the Manila Bay reclamation program. Image courtesy of Defend Negros MovementFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by leilanilast_img read more

Tropical forests’ lost decade: the 2010s

first_imgThe 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019 however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. The decade closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests.According to the U.N., in 2015 global forest cover fell below four billion hectares of forest for the first time in human history. The 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. Widely available satellite imagery via platforms like Google Earth brought new levels of accountability which, for the first time, meant the world couldn’t use ignorance as an excuse for not addressing the destruction of tropical forests. Deforestation in Earth’s largest rainforest — the Brazilian Amazon — was in the midst of a historic plunge, while governments around the world were pledging billions of dollars in new money toward a mechanism to compensate tropical countries for protecting their forests. Several countries closed out the decade with important new conservation initiatives, while activists, empowered with a new set of tools, pushed the private sector to begin adopting a new type of sustainability commitment: the zero deforestation policy for commodity production and sourcing. Some of the largest consumer-facing companies adopted these forest-friendly policies with near-term implementation targets. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019, however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. On the climate front, a decade of science has mostly confirmed what we already knew 10 years ago: Tropical forests are deeply threatened by the current pace of climate change. Combined with ongoing deforestation, degradation, and fragmentation, the outlook for some of the planet’s largest forests, from the Amazon to Indonesia, is increasingly bleak. The 2010s were also marked by mixed progress for tropical forest conservation. Advances in remote sensing were undercut by backsliding on corporate and government commitments to protect forests. Gains in new protected areas were partially offset by a trend toward protected area downgrading, downsizing and degazettement (PADDD) in countries from Brazil to Indonesia. Efforts to recognize the value of healthy and productive natural forests were confronted with the challenging realities of implementation, public indifference and the punishing economics of rising demand for food, fiber and fuel in the context of unaccounted costs of environmental externalities. Political leaders in several important tropical forest countries turned a blind eye to — or in some cases even actively encouraged — threats against environmental defenders and the free press, contributing to hundreds of murders and assassinations of activists, indigenous leaders and journalists. The 2010s closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests. According to the U.N., in 2015, global forest cover fell below four billion hectares (10 billion acres) for the first time in modern human history.last_img read more

Upset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)

first_imgSatellites reveal the true story of the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires, and how to avoid a repeat in 2020.The common media narrative, and resulting public perception, is that large uncontrolled fires were raging through the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, causing vast destruction and deforestation. Subsequent analysis of extensive satellite imagery archives, however, has quietly revealed the opposite scenario: many of the fires were actually burning the remains of areas that were recently deforested.That is, the recent deforestation surge fueled the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires. The fires were in fact a lagging indicator of recent deforestation. Such information provides a much more focused target for the world’s outcry and related policy actions than just focusing on the fires alone.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The recent fires in Australia bring flashbacks of last August in the Brazilian Amazon, when news of massive blazes also captured the world’s attention (and for many, provoked intense concern and rage). Although the Amazon fires are currently out of the headlines, now is actually a critical time to understand what happened in order to avoid a repeat of the crisis in 2020.A key piece to the drama is that several months after the fires, Brazil was in the news again with the release of new data showing escalating deforestation in the Amazon. Critically, however, few have made the key connection between the fire and deforestation stories.The common media narrative, and resulting public perception, is that large uncontrolled fires were raging through the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, causing vast destruction and deforestation. Subsequent analysis of extensive satellite imagery archives, however, has quietly revealed the opposite scenario: many of the fires were actually burning the remains of areas that were recently deforested.Specifically, extensive analysis of a large archive of high-resolution satellite images spanning the last three years (obtained from Planet, the company with the largest active fleet of Earth-imaging satellites) unequivocally showed that fires burned over 1.1 million acres that were recently deforested since 2017. Moreover, two-thirds of this burned area was very recently deforested in just the five months preceding August 2019.Base Map. Brazilian Amazon 2019. Click for larger size. Data: UMD/GLAD, NASA (MODIS), DETER, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA. Credit: MAAP.This surprising and novel result flips the script on the common “raging fires” narrative and instead shows a deeper link between the fire and deforestation stories. That is, the recent deforestation surge fueled the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires. The fires were in fact a lagging indicator of recent deforestation.Mongabay covered the story last September and November, but unfortunately this critical finding has not gone mainstream. This is unfortunate because of the significant policy implications: local, national, and international focus needs to be on minimizing new deforestation in order to prevent fires, in addition to continuing to strengthen fire prevention efforts across the Amazon.Recent news reports indicate that the leading deforestation driver in the Brazilian Amazon area affected by the fires is cattle ranching. Indeed, one of the most shocking things about the widespread nature of the fires is how the greatest rainforest on Earth has been transformed to a massive agricultural complex.Such information provides a much more focused target for the world’s outcry and related policy actions than just focusing on the fires alone.As we start the new year, let’s take this opportunity to learn from what the satellites have revealed about last year. Most importantly, let’s focus on how to minimize deforestation now to avoid a repeat of an Amazon fire crisis in August 2020.A common scenario of the August 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires: burning recently deforested areas. Data: Planet. Credit: MAAP.Dr. Matt Finer is Senior Research Specialist and Director of the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) at Amazon Conservation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Cattle Ranching, Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Fires, Megafires, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Researcher Perspective Series, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, wildfires last_img read more

L’ex-patron de l’athlétisme mondial menacé d’un procès en France

first_imgUn pacte de corruption présuméeOuverte en novembre 2015 par le PNF, après un signalement de l’agence mondiale antidopage, cette enquête aux ramifications internationales a mis au jour un pacte de corruption présumée : en échange de l’indulgence des services antidopage de l’IAAF, Lamine Diack aurait obtenu des fonds russes pour des campagnes politiques au Sénégal. Le pacte aurait aussi permis de faciliter des négociations avec des sponsors et des diffuseurs russes, avant les Mondiaux d’athlétisme à Moscou en 2013.Lamine Diack est également soupçonné d’”abus de confiance” pour avoir permis, “du fait de ses fonctions”, à son fils “de s’approprier des recettes de l’IAAF provenant de sponsors”, selon le réquisitoire. Le ministère public vise aussi l’ancien conseiller de Lamine Diack, Habib Cissé, et l’ancien chef antidopage de l’IAAF, Gabriel Dollé, tous deux soupçonnés de “corruption passive”. Ce dernier a reconnu les faits et demandé une procédure de plaider-coupable.Le parquet demande enfin un procès contre Valentin Balakhnichev, ex-président de la Fédération russe d’athlétisme (ARAF) et ancien trésorier de l’IAAF, et Alexeï Melnikov, qui fut l’entraîneur en chef des courses de fond à l’ARAF. Tous deux sont réclamés par la justice française, le premier pour corruption passive et active, ainsi que blanchiment aggravé, et le second pour corruption passive.La justice française, compétente parce que des fonds ont pu être blanchis sur son territoire, avait été saisie par l’Agence mondiale antidopage (AMA) en 2015. L’année suivante, une enquête commandée par l’AMA a révélé un système de dopage institutionnel en Russie, allant au-delà de l’athlétisme.AFP Le parquet national financier (PNF) demande un procès en France contre l’ex-patron de l’athlétisme mondial (IAAF), le Sénégalais Lamine Diack, et son fils, Papa Massata Diack, soupçonnés d’être impliqués dans un système de corruption pour couvrir des cas de dopage d’athlètes russes, a-t-on appris lundi de sources concordantes.Si le juge d’instruction anticorruption Renaud Van Ruymbeke suit les réquisitions du parquet, Lamine Diack, ancien président influent de la fédération internationale d’athlétisme (1999-2015), âgé de 85 ans, devrait répondre notamment de “corruption active et passive” et “blanchiment en bande organisée”, lors d’un procès à Paris.Dans son réquisitoire signé jeudi, le PNF souhaite le voir jugé au tribunal correctionnel au côté de cinq autres personnes, dont son fils et ex-puissant conseiller marketing à l’IAAF, Papa Massata Diack. Depuis Dakar où il est installé, il n’a jamais répondu aux sollicitations de la justice française, qui a lancé un mandat d’arrêt contre lui. Il est soupçonné de “blanchiment en bande organisée”, “corruption active” et “complicité de corruption passive”. Partagerlast_img read more

Les Roud Léiwen méritaient mieux

first_imgLundi, à 23h35 (heure locale), la Lviv Arena a hurlé sa joie comme si l’Ukraine venait de gagner l’Euro. C’est dire le soulagement qu’elle a éprouvé à ce que cela se termine. Maxime Chanot et Laurent Jans se sont, eux, assis par terre, conscients d’être encore passés à côté de quelque chose d’immense. Comme à l’aller, en somme. Mais n’ayez crainte, messieurs : l’avenir est à vous ! En fonction de ce qu’elle répondra, le classement pourrait évoluer dans des proportions intéressantes et qui vont commencer à faire naître des rêves fous. Trop fous, vu l’âge de ces gamins, mais on s’en moque, puisqu’ils font tout pour que cela soit ainsi. Être capable de cela au début du mois de juin, alors que fut une époque où l’on voyait souvent des corps en souffrance, voire déjà en vacances, en dit tout aussi long sur ce qu’est devenu le Grand-Duché. Une équipe pleine de maturité Lundi, les Roud Léiwen ont joué à l’espagnole, n’hésitant presque jamais à relancer court de derrière. Bon, rien de neuf, puisqu’ils le font depuis quelques mois déjà, nous direz-vous ! Si, justement. Parce que c’est face à l’Ukraine, parce que cette dernière était prévenue et qu’elle s’était déjà fait trimballer en mars au stade Josy-Barthel, parce que les conditions étaient indescriptibles, parce que ces gamins assument de jouer et, surtout, en ont les moyens techniques, parce qu’à certains moments, les hommes d’Andreï Shevchenko ont carrément dû se contenter de regarder. La réaction d’un stade bouillonnant, à la 58e minute, est assez éloquente pour dire ce qu’ont encore réalisé les hommes de Luc Holtz : le public a passé vingt bonnes secondes à chanter le nom d’Andriy Pyatov, son gardien de but, auteur d’une parade phénoménale sur un coup franc de Vincent Thill le long de son poteau. Partager Ce n’est pourtant pas l’injustice qui restera de ce match mais bien la maturité de cette équipe contre ce que Luc Holtz avait qualifié d’adversaire de top niveau mondial. On veut bien lui accorder la pertinence de l’analyse, mais alors où est-ce que cela place le Luxembourg à l’échelle du continent ? Et que faut-il attendre, dès lors, des confrontations contre la Serbie ou le Portugal ? Il y a des défaites qui valent de l’or. Surtout quand elles sont une confirmation de ce qu’une sélection nous a donné à voir au match aller. En trois mois et deux confrontations contre l’Ukraine, il va falloir dissocier le contenu du résultat. Oui, il y a deux défaites au bout du compte mais aussi deux performances d’une sacrée qualité, même dans l’enfer de Lviv. De classe internationale, serait-on même tenté de dire. Messieurs, l’avenir est à vous ! A Lviv, Julien Mollereau Battu mais très bon face à l’Ukraine (1-0), le Luxembourg a encore aligné six joueurs qui n’ont pas 24 ans. Où cette génération en sera-t-elle dans deux ans ? Ce mardi matin, la FLF doit sourire en ouvrant les journaux et en constatant qu’elle est toujours deuxième de ce groupe B extraordinairement relevé. Elle doit se dire aussi qu’il y aurait une petite justice à récupérer l’intégralité des points perdus contre l’Ukraine à l’aller, le 18 juin, dans les bureaux de l’UEFA, où la cour d’appel aura à trancher pour savoir si Junior Moraes avait vraiment le droit d’être sur le terrain. Le reste de l’Europe aurait pu cerner encore un peu mieux le phénomène si le trio arbitral slovaque du match avait laissé l’avantage aux attaquants sur cette tête victorieuse de Christopher Martins à la 38e minute. Mais il faut croire que le statut de nain du football reste accroché à ses basques et le traitement légèrement inéquitable qui va avec, aussi. Luc Holtz s’en est déjà souvent plaint dans le passé. Lundi, il aurait encore eu matière à faire de sacrés reproches à cette désespérante habitude qu’ont les hommes en noir d’oublier que les équipes méritent d’être toutes traitées de la même façon.last_img read more

Sélection nationale : la rentrée, ce sera sans Joachim

first_imgLa sélection démarrera sa saison, début septembre, sans son meilleur buteur. Mais Maurice Deville revient aux affaires.Luc Holtz a sélectionné 24 joueurs en vue des échéances en Irlande du Nord (5 septembre, amical) et contre la Serbie (éliminatoires de l’Euro-2020, 10 septembre). Outre la sélection du jeune milieu de terrain de Cologne Mathias Olesen, que Luc Holtz souhaite “voir sur une semaine de stage”, peu de surprises.La non-sélection d’Enes Mahmutovic, qui se cherche encore dans son nouveau club de Maastricht et se retrouve confronté à une terrible concurrence derrière (huit pris désormais, maintenant que Carlson a atterri à Karlsruhe, que Malget est à Virton, que Hall et M. Martins ont déménagé à Lviv) est le seul vrai fait marquant de cette liste pour ce qui concerne le bloc défensif. Devant, le rappel de Maurice Deville, titulaire indiscutable au sein d’un Waldhof Mannheim qui va très bien en 3e Bundesliga, est logique. Tout autant malheureusement pour lui, que la non-sélection d’Aurélien Joachim, qui a dû interrompre son test à Den Bosch pour cause de nouvelle paternité, mais qui peine à se trouver un autre challenge. “Il n’a plus performé à haut niveau depuis six mois. Dans ces conditions, ce n’est pas possible”, assume Holtz.Julien MollereauLa liste complète des joueurs sélectionnés par Luc Holtz :Gardiens : Anthony Moris (Virton), Ralph Schon (Strassen), Tim Kips (F91).Défenseurs : Laurent Jans (SC Paderborn), Tim Hall (Karpaty Lviv), Dirk Carlson (Karlsruhe SC), Maxime Chanot (New York City), Kevin Malget (Virton), Vahid Selimovic (Apollon Limassol), Lars Gerson (IFK Norrköpping), Marvin Marins (Karpaty Lviv).Milieux de terrain : Vincent Thill (Orléans),  Leandro Barreiro (FSV Mayence), Danel Sinani (F91), Mathias Olesen (FC Köln), Olivier Thill (FC Oufa), Florian Bohnert (FSV Mayence), Chris Martins Perreira (YB), Chris Philipps (Legia Varsovie), Aldin Skenderovic (Progrès).Attaquants : Daniel Da Mota (RFCU), Dave Turpel (Virton), Gerson Rodrigues (Dynamo Kiev), Maurice Deville (Waldhof Mannheim). Partagerlast_img read more

Jeunesse-Pétange : et si Huysman jouait sa tête ?

first_img Partager La Jeunesse accueille ce dimanche à 16 heures Pétange dans une position extrêmement bancale. Et qui pourrait bien coûter son poste à son entraîneur.Nicolas Huysman, qui a conduit la Vieille Dame au 2e tour de l’Europa League au mois d’août, serait directement sous la menace de son comité, qui regarde l’équipe s’enfoncer au classement.Quand les membres d’un club, quelle que soit leur place dans la hiérarchie, commencent à parler de la situation d’un technicien en se retranchant derrière le «off», ce n’est jamais très bon signe. Surtout quand tous s’accordent à dire que Nicolas Huysman a épuisé une large partie de son crédit, celui qu’il s’est construit au fil d’une campagne européenne très bien maîtrisée et d’un début de saison plutôt bien emmanché avec la mise sur orbite d’un duo d’attaquants alors extrêmement prometteur, la paire Makota-Boakye. Mais voilà, la Jeunesse, qui n’a gagné qu’un seul de ses sept derniers matches de championnat, est en train de se déliter sous le regard des suiveurs de la Division nationale. Les arguments de Nicolas Huysman sont audibles et (cela va de «l’année de transition» au problème «de très nombreux cadres blessés» en passant fatalement par le «manque de profondeur de banc») mais le classement est, lui, terrible. La Vieille Dame pourrait basculer, à un match de la fin de la phase aller, à la 9e place de DN. Il suffirait qu’elle perde (soit un quatrième match à la Frontière sans victoire) contre une équipe inarrêtable ces derniers temps, que le RFCU s’impose contre Etzella et que Mondorf terrasse Rodange. Trois hypothèses loin d’être irréalisables.L’hiver hors du top 7 ?La Jeunesse dans la deuxième partie de classement pendant la trêve hivernale ? Les dirigeants ne sont a priori pas prêts à l’envisager et encore moins à le tolérer et un ultimatum aurait été posé à Nicolas Huysman : la victoire ou la porte. Jean Cazzaro, touché par un deuil familial, vendredi, n’a pas souhaité s’épancher sur le sujet pour des raisons bien compréhensibles.Il n’en demeure pas moins que l’équipe joue gros pour elle-même et pour son staff, dimanche. Incapable de convertir trois grosses occasions de but à Strassen en semaine, elle a lâché des forces en pure perte et accueille un Titus qui rêve de s’installer sur la plus haute marche du podium pour les fêtes. Un Titus, aussi, qui se réjouit de trouver enfin une pelouse à la hauteur de ses envies de jeu, celle qu’il n’a plus à la maison depuis quelques semaines déjà. «Et puis, niveau pression, on en a moins qu’eux, se réjouit Carlos Fangueiro. On veut tout faire pour être champion d’automne. Au vu du classement, je dirais qu’on est favoris mais pas du point de vue de l’histoire. J’espère juste que leur match en semaine comptera, qu’on le sentira dans les jambes.» Nicolas Huysman, lui, préférerait qu’on en reparle plutôt dimanche prochain, contre Hostert. Cela voudra dire que ses garçons ont fait le boulot et lui auront donné un certain répit. Mais c’est un sacré duel qui se présente à eux et les responsabilités pèseront lourd.Julien MollereauJeunesse-Pétange, stade de la Frontière, dimanche 16 heureslast_img read more

[Cyclo-cross] Lex Reichling impérial à Mondorf

first_img Partager Pas vraiment surprisJamais sans doute depuis le début de cette saison, il n’était paru aussi facile, serein et mine de rien, très peu contesté. Mais il avait bien du mal à l’admettre, histoire sans doute de ménager ses rivaux. L’instituteur diekirchois se gardait bien de fanfaronner.D’ailleurs, il ne se dit pas surpris par sa lente métamorphose depuis le début de cette saison. «Ici, reprend Lex Reichling, le parcours, n’était pas vraiment dans mes cordes mais je suis parvenu néanmoins à m’imposer. C’est vrai que je n’ai pas eu à puiser dans mes réserves. Je pense aussi que je me montre bien plus sérieux cette saison que les précédentes. Je ne bois plus une goutte d’alcool, je m’entraîne beaucoup…»Évidemment, on pourra toujours regretter que le duel avec son rival et ami, Scott Thiltges, toujours leader de la Skoda Cross Cup,  ait tourné court. Mais impossible de refaire le film…Les classements :Élites et  espoirs : 1. Lex Reichling (VV Tooltime) en 55’01”; 2. Scott Thiltges (LG Alzingen) 57″; 3. Victor Thomas (Fra/Team Safir) 2’28”; 4. Raphaël Kockelmann (CCI Differdange) 2’31”; 5. Aymeric Barthel (Fra/Thionville VTT) 3’01”; 6. Vincent Dias dos Santos (LC Tétange) 3’03″…Dames : 1. Elise Maes (Torrelli Assure) en 39’32”; 2. Nina Berton (CT Atertdaul) 7’28”; 3. Maïté Barthels (LP Schifflange) 7’32” Le coureur de Préizerdaul a effectué une belle démonstration pour signer son quatrième succès de la saison, alors que Scott Thiltges ne s’est jamais remis de sa chute initiale.On était en droit d’attendre un duel homérique. Dans la lignée de ce feuilleton épicé que mènent depuis le début de la saison Lex Reichling et Scott Thiltges. Une semaine plus tôt, à Warken, ils ne s’étaient pas quittés d’une semelle et c’est le coureur du LG Alzingen qui avait eu le dernier mot à la fin d’une course très emballante.Cette fois, le suspense a duré… une centaine de mètres. «J’étais bien parti, mais je suis le premier à être tombé dans le premier virage. J’ai commis une faute», s’excusera presque l’ancien champion national. Livré à lui-même, Lex Reichling ne s’est pas démonté, visiblement assez pressé d’aller croquer dans son quatrième succès de la saison, égalisant d’ailleurs au passage avec… Scott Thiltges!La pluie s’était stoppée juste avant la course élite et la boue collait aux basques des uns et des autres. Le physique l’emportait assez largement sur la technique, les positions allaient donc se figer…Devant, Lex Reichling, droit comme un i, s’était lancé dans une sorte de chrono. Il était comme seul au monde, enfermé dans sa logique de ne rien céder. Rien ni personne ne pouvait le faire dévier de sa trajectoire.«Pendant la semaine, je me suis bien entraîné et je me sentais bien. Mais avant le départ, je pensais que le parcours ne me conviendrait pas avec tous les virages. Scott (Thiltges) ayant glissé dans le premier tour. J’ai pu faire le trou dans le premier tour, personne ne suivait donc j’ai pu faire mon rythme. Dans les passages un peu plus spéciaux, j’ai essayé de ne pas faire de faute, j’ai forcé un peu plus à chaque tour, l’écart s’est creusé. Dans le dernier tour, je me suis permis de ralentir un peu, histoire de me ménager un peu», commentait un Lex Reichling apaisé à l’arrivée.last_img read more