Living above a century-old coal fire, Jharia residents pay the price for India’s mining ambitions

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Jharia coalfields, in India’s Jharkhand state, contain high-grade coal and have been continuously mined since 1894.The first underground fire was recorded in 1916. By the 1970s, around 17.32 square kilometers (6.68 square miles) were affected by fires. Mine executives say that has now been reduced to around 2.18 square kilometers.More than 100,000 families are affected by the fires and need to be relocated.Doctors say the average life expectancy of people living in the coalfields is reduced by 10 years, due to air and water pollution. DHANBAD, India — In the heart of India’s coal capital of Dhanbad lies one of the country’s oldest mines: the Jharia coalfields, endowed with India’s sole reserves of prime coking coal, a high-grade coal used for making steel.This economic boon has become the bane of this densely populated coal belt: For more than a century, underground mine fires have been raging.“There is fire just below the soil surface in our village, said Mohammad Manir, a resident Baesbarah, a small settlement in the Sijua Area of Jharia coalfields. “It often gets very hot and the ground crackles — suddenly tearing apart here and there, fuming out pungent smelling, white noxious gasses or even leaping tongues of flames. The walls of our houses have cracked and are crumbling apart.”Flanked by overburden dumps and boulders, dotted by barren trees, Baesbarah is home to about 100 families. Abandoned homes, strewn with debris are a common sight in the village. Even a portion of the local mosque recently subsided.A portion of the Baesbarah mosque subsided recently. The structure has been partitioned, apparently to keep the devotees safe as they squeeze within the “protected limit” to pray. Photo by Moushumi Basu.The 280-square-kilometer (110-square-mile) coalfields have been mined since 1894 — first by British companies, then by a succession of Gujarati, Rajasthani and Bengali firms. In 1972, as part of a countrywide nationalization of coking coal mines, production at the Jharia coalfields was taken over by Bharat Coking Coal Limited (BCCL), a subsidiary unit of government-owned Coal India Limited (CIL).The company inherited a legacy of more than 70 mine fires, covering an area of 17.32 square kilometers (6.68 square miles).The first of these fires was detected in 1916, in the Bhowrah area of the coalfield. In the early days of the mine, coal was extracted using a primitive method that left behind pillars of coal to support shallow mining tunnels, explained Arun Kumar Charanpahari, former general manager (mining) at CIL. Eventually, some of these pillars collapsed, creating subsidence and surface cracks that allowed atmospheric oxygen to enter the mine and react with exposed lumps of coal. With insufficient ventilation in these tunnels, heat gradually built up, igniting and spreading coal seam fires.Spurred on by soaring profits, a succession of owners and operators have nonetheless continued to extract coal. At present, 44 mines are operating in the area, producing 35.86 million tonnes of coal in the last financial year.A child works as an illegal coal picker in Jharia coal mine. Illegal coal pickers from Bokahapadi village successfully negotiate a daylight raid and hurry home to safely burn the hard coal for sale. Photo by Peter Caton/Greenpeace.Fighting the fireVarious attempts have been made to contain the fire while still carrying out coal production. Mine officials have attempted to isolate the fires by trenching, digging out burning coal or smothering flames with sand, soil or inert gasses. By 1996, the surface area affected by fires was reduced to 8.9 square kilometers (3.43 square miles). At present, the fire-affected area has been reduced to 2.18 square kilometers (0.84 square miles), according to Debal Gangopadhyay, director (technical) of BCCL.However, such figures and statements mean little for the residents of affected villages like Baesbarah. “The area near our village has a known history of mine fires,” said Mohammad Naushad. “BCCL carried out mining operations here in the 1970 and ’80s, but work had to be stopped because of the fire. However, the company then ensured our safety by digging deep trenches to separate our village from the fire.”Between 2008 and 2009, BCCL outsourced coal production to a private company and the mines were reopened, the villagers said. This stoked the already existing fire. Then,  the fiery rubble extracted from the mine was dumped in the trench cutting across the village. “Mining operations have been discontinued (about 3-4 years ago) but our existence in the village has been imperiled,” said Naushad.Now, villagers like Manir and Naushad — who have lived there for decades and claim to hold legal title deeds to the land — have no choice but to relocate.Fires are clearly visible in parts of the Jharia coalfields. The area has been affected by fires for more than 100 years, but mining in the area has never ceased. Photo by Moushumi Basu.A state-government-run agency was set up in 2004 to manage the resettlement of non-BCCL personnel living in affected areas: the Jharia Rehabilitation and Development Authority (JRDA). The JRDA is partly funded through a levy of 10 rupees per tonne of coal sold by BCCL, which is set aside for the rehabilitation of fire affected victims. This generates about 3 billion rupees (about $45 million) per annum, part of which is paid to the JRDA. During the last three years 5 billion rupees (around $75 million) has been transferred to the agency, Gangopadhyay said.Despite this pool of funding, the JRDA has faced numerous problems in organizing resettlement, particularly when it comes to procuring land to build houses on. In Baesbarah,  traditional land owners have protested because the houses being constructed by the JDRA for resettlement do not suit them. Most of the villagers live in extended family homes with multiple rooms; for JRDA, finding land to build even the prescribed norm of a two-room house per family is a challenging task.Adding to the JRDA’s difficulties, the number of fire-affected families has almost doubled since the 2008 master plan was created. “From the given target of 54,159 of non-BCCL employees as per the 2008 master plan, the figures today have exceeded [100,000] families,” said Vijay Kumar Gupta, officer-in-charge of JRDA. He said 2,103 families have so far been allotted homes in Belgharia — the upcoming relocation site — 1,566 of whom have already moved.  By the end of 2017, he said he hopes at least 10,000 two-roomed new homes will be ready for occupation.In other areas, relocation is going less smoothly. Gupta admitted the agency is facing problems with land acquisition. In Lipania, a non-coal-bearing site selected for relocation, they are locked in controversies and disputes with the land owners, he said.Efforts by the coal company to relocate the families of its workers are also underway. According to official data from BCCL’s Gangopadhyay, 6,500 families of its employees have already been shifted to safer areas as of 2016. By 2021, the company aims to relocate 15,000 families.Photographed in 2008, Bhagwat Saw, then 69, in the emergency section at Life Line Hospital. Bhagwat worked as a coal loader for over 40 years and was discovered to be suffering from pneumoconiosis before having hernia surgery. Photo by Peter Caton/Greenpeace (2008).Health impacts“Large goaves (hollows) have appeared in our village, belching out fire and smoke,” said Rajkishore Singh, a resident of the Dobari Khaad Village in the Bastacola Area. “The latest of these occurred about a fortnight ago, just 14 feet, 15 feet away from our homes. Two cows of my neighbor also perished in one of these incidents.” The mine management offered to fill up the goaves, but villagers resisted, fearing that this would make their land even more vulnerable to subsidence.In addition to the hazards of fire, people in villages like Dobari Khaad, which is adjacent to an open cast mine, face a host of health problems. “Mining operations raise huge dust, coal particles and stones — there is coal powder in the food we eat, all over our clothes, in our eyes and throats,” said resident Ajay Kumar.On average, the life expectancy of people living near the Jharia coalfields is reduced by at least ten years, said Om Prakash Agarwal, founder of Life Line Hospital in Jharia.The biggest culprit is airborne particulate matter (PM), which is largely associated with mining, storing and transporting coal, explained Biswajit Paul, an associate professor at the Centre of Mining Environment of Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad — the oldest institute of its kind in the country.A worker carries coal in Jharia coal mine. Miners work in teams to initially lift the coal on to their heads. Photo by Peter Caton/Greenpeace.According to Paul, high levels of both PM10 and the finer and even more dangerous PM2.5 are fairly high in the coal belt. The average concentration of PM10 has been found to exceed India’s air quality standards by three to four times, he said. PM2.5 levels are also elevated, exceeding national standards by as much as 66 percent, a problem made worse by automobile emissions and the transport of uncovered coal.Oxides of sulfur, nitrogen and carbon released by coal fires further pollute the ambient air.Together, these pollutants result in chronic respiratory diseases like bronchitis and asthma. Their incidences are at least 35 – 40 percent higher in the coal-belt than in other parts of the country, said Agarwal. Patients frequently arrive at his hospital with symptoms of pneumoconiosis — a disease caused by the accumulation of fine dust particles (of the order of PM2.5) in the lungs. Coal miners in particular may develop anthracosis, also known as Black Lung Disease, resulting from deposits of minute coal dust in the lungs. Such ailments, Agarwal added, can even lead to lung cancer.Diseases like Hepatitis and other gastrointestinal problems also occur due to water pollution caused by the discharge of mine water and other waste in local waterways.Early morning at Aina Village as a woman walks to collect coal illegally at the Rajapur Mining Project in Jharia coal mine. Photo by Peter Caton/Greenpeace.Even as troubles continue to mount regarding the safety and welfare of coal belt denizens, environmentalists have not given up hope. Simple solutions could help reduce the health impacts of the mine, said the Indian School of Mines’ Paul. “One effective way is to capture the dust at its generation point, to minimize its propagation in the ambient air,” he said. Paul also advocates for the compulsory use of dust extractors for trapping dust. At present, he said, most extractors are lying defunct, due to lack of maintenance.New technologies like mist sprays for prolonged and effective dust control should also be adopted, Paul said. Even simple preventative measures make a big difference: sprinkling water on coal-laden trucks traveling short distances, or covering long-haul coal trucks with tarpaulins, can help reduce the spread of coal dust.According to BCCL Technical Director Gangopadhyay, such measures are already being put in place. A “Rapid Loading System” of closed-circuit silos is being built at one of the company’s railway sidings, and two more have been proposed.  This will not only speed up the loading process but also stop dust from going to the surrounding air, he said. The company is also procuring fifteen mist sprinklers to reduce particulate concentration.Efforts are also on to process the abundantly available but polluted mine water. Pradeep Kumar Singh, director of the Central Institute of Mining & Fuel Research (CIMFR) and Kalendra Bahadur Singh, chief scientist at Natural Resources & Environmental Management have developed a pilot project to convert waste mine water for drinking. It comprises a reverse osmosis filtration plant that can purify 4,000 liters of mine wastewater per hour. It was handed over to BCCL in November 2014 and installed in its office at Putki Balihari area.  Since then, with a capacity of 40,000 liters per day, it is providing drinking water for 4,050 people, said the scientists from CIMFR. The project is expected to be replicated in other subsidiaries of CIL.Soil that has been degraded by mining operations is also being taken care of by the coal company. BCCL has set an example by growing three-tier forest cover on its bare overburden dumps. “We have covered about 204 hectares since 2011 and hope to cover 40 hectares in 2017-18,” said Gangopadhyay. In association with the local Forest Department, the company is also working on a target of establishing 100,000 tree plantations along the roads of the coal belt between 2016-2021.“We are not just extracting coal from the face of earth, but also greening the black rock and trying to reduce carbon footprints for our future generations,” he said. Meanwhile, the present residents of the Jharia coalfields, who are currently bearing the brunt of the mine fire, hope to see benefits like better health and livelihood options in their own lifetimes.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Coal, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Social Responsibility, Energy, Environment, Featured, Fires, Fossil Fuels, Mining, Pollution center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Singapore convicts rosewood trader in historic CITES seizure

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rebecca Kessler Late last month a high court in Singapore found Wong Wee Keong guilty of importing rosewood from Madagascar in 2014 in violation of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES).Environmental groups are heralding the ruling, which reversed the decision of a lower court and sidestepped conflicting claims about the legality of the shipment by Malagasy authorities.The outsized shipment to Singapore was larger than all of the other seizures of rosewood in the world, combined, over the past decade. In a major reversal late last month, a high court in Singapore found Wong Wee Keong and his company, Kong Hoo, guilty of illegally importing rosewood from Madagascar, after a lower court had found them not guilty. Authorities seized Kong Hoo’s rosewood shipment at a Singapore port in early 2014, saying it violated the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna. At nearly 30,000 logs, this was one of the largest wildlife seizures in the history of CITES.Environmental groups were relieved to learn that the guilty party would be held accountable. “It’s so hard to get convictions,” said Mark Roberts, senior counsel at the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit. “We’re really glad that the high court looked beyond the decision of the trial court,” he told Mongabay.The outsized shipment to Singapore was larger than all of the other seizures of rosewood in the world, combined, over the past decade — and the dark red hardwood is the world’s most trafficked form of wildlife. This shipment, now being held in a Singapore storage facility the size of two football fields, was valued at more than $50 million, according to court documents.The Singapore rosewood seizure in 2014 was the largest ever recorded.Demand for rosewood comes mostly from China, where its beautiful inner trunk is used in high-end furniture. In Madagascar, the logging results do not look as pretty. Every kind of Malagasy rosewood (Dalbergia spp.) that the International Union for Conservation of Nature has assessed — some 40 species, so far — the group lists as Threatened. In addition to depleting rosewood populations, excessive logging has severely disrupted local habitats: it dries out forests, allows for the growth of invasive species, and leads to the consumption of bush meat, among other problems.Madagascar has been quickly losing rosewood to traffickers since 2009, when a coup d’état created a regulatory vacuum that timber barons found easy to exploit. In 2010, Madagascar’s government issued a decree: no more rosewood exports. But trafficking continued, likely to the benefit of some government officials. In 2013, Madagascar formally agreed to a ban on the export of rosewood and ebony (Diospyros spp.) and an action plan that would increase forest protections. But the government did not follow through on its commitments, according to an EIA report from September.Illegal rosewood stockpiles in Antalaha, Madagascar, in 2007. Photo by Anonymous (CC BY-SA 3.0).Madagascar flip-flopsThe recent ruling in Singapore was applauded by Madagascar’s president, who credited his own government with providing the evidence needed to convict. However, Malagasy authorities sent mixed messages over the three-year course of the case, which made it difficult to prosecute Wong, a Singaporean, and Kong Hoo, a Singapore-based export company.Although no CITES documentation accompanied the shipment, the defense later produced documents from Madagascar that, it claimed, showed the export to be legal. In January 2015, following a trip to Singapore, Anthelme Ramparany, Madagascar’s Minister of Environment, Ecology, and Forests at the time, confirmed the authenticity of the documents, according to court records.Later, Prime Minister Jean Ravelonarivo tried to override Ramparany, clarifying that the rosewood shipment had indeed been illegal. However, in April 2016 Madagascar’s president forced him to resign. Ravelonarivo’s tough-on-trafficking approach to the Singapore case was among the main reasons he was removed from office, according to a Malagasy person close to the case, who asked not to be named as he was not authorized to speak publicly.For six months after Ravelonarivo’s departure, Malagasy officials declined to clarify the legal status of the shipment, which made prosecution difficult. The Singapore trial court judge who acquitted Wong and Kong Hoo explained in her ruling that the prosecution had “flipped-flopped” (sic).“Madagascar needs to do more than it was doing for most of last year,” Hanta Rabetaliana, who served as Secretary General of the Ministry of Environment, Ecology, and Forests until February of this year, told Mongabay.Madagascar’s government did begin working toward a conviction in October 2016, following an international CITES meeting in South Africa where the Singapore case was a priority. To apply pressure on Malagasy authorities, some parties at the CITES meeting pushed for a ban on export of all protected species from Madagascar. Currently, the only fully embargoed Malagasy species are rosewood and ebony.The threat of such a ban spurred Malagasy officials into action. “Governments really hate to be sanctioned,” said Roberts, the EIA counsel. “The more severe the sanction, the more embarrassing it is.”A full export ban would be CITES’s strongest punishment — no country in the world currently faces such an embargo, according to Roberts. When Madagascar was given a temporary reprieve, its representatives in South Africa expressed relief. In early 2017, Madagascar made good by sending documents to Singapore that showed that the 2014 rosewood shipment was illegal.While this pleased the environmental community and allowed Madagascar’s government to trumpet its own prosecutorial efforts after the fact, it was not the deciding factor in the case. In fact, the high court judge declined to accept the new evidence, according to her written legal decision: “There was no explanation why there has been an apparent shift in the Madagascan Government’s position on certain aspects of evidence … In the absence of such explanation, the reliability of the documents sought to be tendered is questionable.”In other words, if prior documents authenticated by Madagascar were of dubious authenticity, the court saw no reason to accept new documents from Madagascar as legitimate.Nonetheless, the judge found Wong guilty. Because the legal status of the export from Madagascar was unclear, the case hinged on whether the rosewood had been imported to Singapore, a signatory to CITES. The defense argued that the shipment was always “in transit” to Hong Kong a hub for the illegal timber trade that did not require import permits for rosewood at the time. The high court judge concluded that there were no immediate plans to bring the wood to Hong Kong, as Wong had not yet found a buyer.Stump of illegally cut rosewood tree in Marojejy National Park, Madagascar, in 2009. Photo by Anonymous (CC BY-SA 3.0).Awaiting sentencingThe high court’s decision to convict Wong and Kong Hoo is final unless there is a plea in the public interest, which is unlikely in this case, according to Roberts, the EIA counsel. Upcoming hearings will decide on jail time for Wong and fines for Kong Hoo; the prosecution will seek at least 18 months and the maximum fine of $500,000.Representatives of Kong Hoo did not respond to a request for comment for this story.The fate of the 30,000 logs will be decided in separate hearings. Although the state of Madagascar may be granted ownership, the logs are unlikely to return to the island nation, where they might well reenter the illegal timber trade. (In fact, some evidence suggests that some of the seized logs may previously have been in the Madagascar government’s possession as part of stockpiles of illegally harvested wood confiscated after the 2009 coup.)Those who pushed for a conviction hope that now the rosewood can be sold and the profits used for the benefit of Malagasy communities. “Singapore has done its job,” said Rabetaliana, the former environment ministry official. “Now it’s time for Madagascar to be more active in protecting its forests.”Diademed Sifaka (Propithecus diadema), a species threatened by the Madagascar rosewood trade. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Cites, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Forests, Governance, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Timber Laws, trafficking, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

Why gender matters in conservation

first_imgArticle published by Rebecca Kessler Biodiversity, Community Development, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Innovation In Conservation, Interviews Over recent decades, conservation organizations have started listening to local communities for insight into how best to protect dwindling ecosystems. But only recently have some of them begun tuning in the voices of women, specifically.By adopting a “gendered approach” to conservation, some organizations believe they can improve both environmental and social outcomes.Kame Westerman, the Gender and Conservation Advisor at the NGO Conservation International, helps her group adopt the gendered approach in its projects. Over recent decades, conservation organizations have started to tap into the wealth of knowledge and experience held by communities living near conservation targets. Listening to the voices of local people has given these NGOs new insight into how best to protect dwindling ecosystems. However, only more recently have some groups noticed they were hearing only half of the voices.Kame Westerman of the NGO Conservation International. Photo courtesy of Kame Westerman.Women traditionally take a quieter role than men in community discussions in the global south, and their voices had remained unheard. Yet they have a lot to offer to the conservation conversation. Women have distinct roles, knowledge, experiences, and ideas from those of men, and some conservationists began to believe that their exclusion was hampering the success of some initiatives.By adopting a so-called “gendered approach” to conservation, some organizations believe they are improving both environmental and social outcomes. Tactics include ensuring that women are involved in community discussions and management decisions and creating “women’s projects” that aim to empower women socially through initiatives that also help the environment.But addressing gender in conservation is a delicate task. Practitioners must consider challenges such as women’s existing workload, men’s perceptions of the approach, and traditional gender roles and expectations.A leading proponent of this new approach is Kame Westerman. Currently the Gender and Conservation Advisor at the Arlington, Virginia-based NGO Conservation International (CI), Westerman encourages the gendered approach in all of CI’s projects. Mongabay interviewed Westerman by email about the complexities of considering gender in conservation, and the future of the approach.AN INTERVIEW WITH KAME WESTERMANWhat inspired you to start considering gender in conservation? I’ve spent a number of years living and working on environmental conservation initiatives in rural communities, mostly in Madagascar — first in forest-dependent communities near the Makira forest [in the country’s northeast] and then in the southwest focused on marine management. In that context, it was apparent that men and women interact with their environment and natural resources differently. They use different resources, they have different priorities for conservation or resource management, and they have different knowledge about the status of environmental resources.At the same time, though, it also became apparent that when it came to natural resource management and conservation initiatives women were largely absent. For example, with a few exceptions the community-based forest management teams near the Makira forest and the fishery management association in the southwest that I worked with were largely dominated by men.This became a problem when management decisions were made that impacted women’s lives and livelihoods, without necessarily taking into consideration their needs and interests. I saw this play out in octopus fishery management, where decisions about where and when the fishery should be closed [were] not a fully inclusive process. The result was that women octopus fishers were unable to equitably benefit from that management practice.Why should organizations consider gender in conservation? There are two main arguments, or reasons, for considering gender in conservation:The moral imperative. The conservation movement largely aims to protect nature for the wellbeing of people. Ensuring that the users of natural resources — whether it’s men or women (or boys and girls) — have the right, opportunity, and ability to participate in decision-making and projects affecting those resources is a moral imperative. The ability to participate in decisions that will affect your life and livelihood is a fundamental human right.For conservation effectiveness. It is fairly well understood within conservation that good stakeholder engagement and community buy-in is critical to effective conservation initiatives. We can think of gender in the same way: understanding who the users are (men, women, boys, girls) and involving them in consultations [and] decision-making and building on their ecological knowledge help contribute to positive conservation outcomes.Without [that], a project is susceptible to increased unsustainable harvest or management. Just imagine: if a conservation initiative cuts off access to the forest where you collect food for your family (because you were not consulted), you’re likely going to continue entering that forest and collecting what you did before…effectively undermining the intended conservation outcome.Both men and women fish on Tonle Sap Lake in Cambodia. Photo by Kristin Harrison and Jeremy Ginsberg.What projects stand out to you as particularly innovative or interesting?In Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake, CI works with Community Fisheries Committees (CFCs) and women’s savings groups. Until recently, there was little overlap of the two groups. The CFCs were largely dominated by men (despite the fact that women were involved in the fishery) while the savings groups were all women. Recognizing the need to bring more women’s voices into fisheries management, CI helped the two groups create a system where a portion of the interest from the savings groups would go to the CFC management budget. These contributions now link the two groups, providing an avenue for women to join CFC meetings, allow men to learn about the activities of the savings groups, and conduct joint activities.When I worked in southwest Madagascar on local marine conservation, we noticed that primarily men were making decisions about octopus fishery management, which was usually the domain of women. Data showed that this was having a negative impact on women’s catches. We talked with men and women about this phenomenon and they proposed several ideas for how women could be more involved in decision-making and management.At a national policy level, the work that the IUCN’s Global Gender Office is doing on national Climate Change Gender Action Plans is quite innovative and transformative. In over 20 countries now, they have supported governments to begin fulfilling gender and climate change commitments by bringing together stakeholders and developing specific actions for ensuring gender-responsive climate policy and initiatives.Some groups create “women’s projects” that aim to empower women through skill building or financial projects intended to achieve environmental outcomes. What do you think about these kinds of projects?[At CI] we’ve focused, for the most part, on improving how our core conservation projects and programs are designed and implemented; this usually entails looking at the full spectrum of men’s and women’s access, benefit, and ability to participate. Separate women-focused projects certainly have their time and place and there are examples where they have been successful in increasing women’s leadership, access to money and information, and standing within [their] community. But unless those projects are placed within a broader approach to gender equity, they can further perpetuate inequalities.What kind of evidence is there that this approach actually works for either women or the environment? Craig Leisher (et al.) recently mapped all of the published literature linking gender to forest and fisheries management. While there is a dearth of published literature looking at this issue (quite a problem in its own right!), the researchers did highlight a number of studies demonstrating an increase in conservation outcomes (mostly forest cover) when decision-making bodies are of mixed gender.What would you say to conservation supporters who are worried that addressing gender might waste time? Simply that they are wasting time and money by moving forward with a project without fully understanding and responding to underlying social elements, and it could very well come back to haunt them. Getting the social components of conservation right from the very beginning is critical to long-term success, getting local buy-in, and contributing to human wellbeing.A woman and man collect firewood in South Africa. Gendered tasks, such as collecting firewood, can differ around the world. Photo by Alex Marsh.What are the pitfalls of considering gender in conservation? Anything that involves people gets complicated quickly. The same is certainly true for the practice of gender integration — while we can make some generalizations, they can be misleading and tricky. I’ll highlight three issues that come up a lot, although there are certainly others:A frequent challenge … is the belief that gender is too “culturally sensitive,” especially in remote or indigenous communities. I think this sentiment ultimately comes from not fully understanding what is meant by gender, or women’s empowerment, in the context of our conservation work. Gender is often perceived as a western concept, and not something that is okay to talk about with communities, especially indigenous communities. But the fact is, recognizing that men and women interact with their environment differently and using that to inform conservation projects, programs, and policies is good for conservation objectives, good for community wellbeing, and good for men and women.Gender is often regarded as a “women’s issue,” and it is a struggle to get men to even engage. However, gender in the conservation context requires delving into how both women AND men interact with their resources, and each other, and how that impacts knowledge, use, and priorities for conservation.Funding and institutional prioritization: doing more extensive community consultations, holding separate meetings, or providing transportation to meetings does cost more money. Unless a donor requires it, gender is often one of the first items to be cut from a budget (and even then it can be a struggle).In trying to empower women in conservation projects, how do practitioners avoid imposing different cultural values where they are not welcome? The majority of CI staff around the world comes from the countries and communities where we work. That means that they understand the cultural norms and nuances associated with gender in that context, and can more easily navigate what is appropriate and what is not… There needs to be a dialogue with women and men within the community to develop processes and opportunities for engagement that they feel comfortable with.A vanilla farmer in Madagascar. In many parts of the world women tend to focus on subsistence harvesting and agriculture while men tend to engage in more lucrative activities, such as vanilla farming. Photo by Curan Bonham / Conservation International.How long has gender been a part of conservation initiatives? The development community is leaps and bounds ahead of where conservation is. The fact that we’re still questioning it as a necessity (and that I have to defend it) shows how far behind we are. There have been advocates for gender in conservation for a couple decades, but it’s only been relatively recently that we’ve seen much traction.This is, for better or for worse, largely driven by donors who are asking for more and more rigorous gender components. This is particularly noticeable in public funding such as the Global Environment Facility, the Green Climate Fund, USAID, AusAid, and most European governments. We also see much stronger language in international agreements (such as the Paris Agreement which calls for the empowerment of women and girls when addressing climate change), and within efforts of the three Rio Conventions — the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, and the UN Convention to Combat Desertification.How long until it becomes common to include a gender dimension in conservation projects?Until or unless conservation practice really internalizes people as a central element of effective conservation, I’m honestly not sure that gender considerations will become truly embedded.Why do you think conservation practice hasn’t internalized people as a central element of effective conservation? I think part of the problem (at least from the gender perspective) is that conservationists are often not taught about it in school. I have both a conservation bio undergrad and graduate degree, and to the best of my memory the gendered dimensions of conservation [were] never discussed. If we don’t teach it as a fundamental element in effective conservation at that level, then why would we expect conservation practitioners to have those skills?Editor’s note: this interview has been edited for length and clarity. Roz Evans is a science journalist based in Exeter, England. Follow her on Twitter at @rozevans89.CitationsLeisher C. et al. (2016). Does the gender composition of forest and fishery management groups affect resource governance and conservation outcomes? A systematic map. Environmental Evidence, 5:6.Indigenous Awajún women in Shampuyacu, Peru. Conservation International has worked with these women to designate a forest of their own where they can cultivate traditional plants. Photo by Freddy Guillen.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

The tiger population in Nepal’s Parsa National Park is recovering rapidly

first_imgAccording to Babu Ram Lamichhane, a wildlife research officer with Nepalese non-profit National Trust for Nature Conservation and lead author of a study published this month in the journal Oryx, Nepal’s Parsa National Park (known as Parsa Wildlife Reserve until June of this year) was an area where tigers no longer roamed despite having the potential to harbor the species.That appears to be changing, however: Lamichhane led a team of researchers who documented a threefold increase in Parsa’s tiger population in just three years.Parsa’s tiger population recovery is due mainly to conservation measures undertaken since 2009, including village relocations, enhanced security (such as additional guard posts), the formation of community-based anti-poaching units, and other community engagement efforts. Tigers once roamed widely throughout Asia, from Turkey to the east coast of Russia and down to Vietnam. But a variety of threats, including human-wildlife conflict, the over-hunting of tiger prey species by humans, and especially poaching for the illegal trade of tiger skins, bones, and meat, has left vast areas of otherwise suitable tiger habitat unoccupied today.According to Babu Ram Lamichhane, a wildlife research officer with Nepalese non-profit National Trust for Nature Conservation and lead author of a study published this month in the journal Oryx, Nepal’s Parsa National Park (known as Parsa Wildlife Reserve until June of this year) was one of those areas where tigers no longer roamed despite the terrain having the potential to harbor the species.That appears to be changing, however: Lamichhane led a team of researchers who documented a threefold increase in Parsa’s tiger population in just three years.Parsa attracted “very little attention from conservation organizations before 2009,” Lamichhane told Mongabay. “It was believed to be the sink of the neighboring tiger source population of Chitwan National Park. We wanted to highlight the potential of Parsa for tiger recovery.”After 2009, conservation measures aimed at rehabilitating the park’s tiger population were undertaken, including village relocations, enhanced security (such as additional guard posts), the formation of community-based anti-poaching units, and other community engagement efforts. Not only did Lamichhane and team want to document the effectiveness of these measures, they also wanted to determine whether or not tigers are using Parsa merely as a refuge or as their territory, meaning they intend to stay a while and breed.Camera trap photo of a tiger in Parsa National Park. Photo Credit: DNPWC/NTNC/ZSL Nepal/Panthera.Tigers (Panthera tigris) are listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which reports that the total number of tigers in the world has decreased by more than 50 percent since the late 90’s, with breeding tiger populations now known to occur in just eight countries: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand, and Russia.Research released last month determined that the tiger’s global range, like that of many other large carnivores, has been greatly reduced compared to its historical territory. In the tiger’s case, its total range has shrunk by as much as 95 percent.According to the authors of the Oryx study, the remaining tiger habitat “is not occupied at optimum density because of poaching of tigers, hunting of their prey species and conflict with local communities.”Parsa National Park is a key landscape for the species’ recovery. Nepal’s tigers are found only in five protected areas and surrounding forests in what’s known as the Terai Arc Landscape, which lies in the south of the country and straddles the border with India. Parsa National Park, the easternmost protected area of the Terai Arc Landscape, shares a 35-kilometer-long border with Chitwan National Park and is less than two kilometers from the eastern edge of Valmiki Tiger Reserve.Camera trap photo of a tiger in Parsa National Park. Photo Credit: DNPWC/NTNC/ZSL Nepal/Panthera.Lamichhane and his co-authors note in the study that the Chitwan–Parsa–Valmiki forest complex of the Terai Arc Landscape is of “global importance” for the recovery of tigers. Yet as recently as 2013, the tiger density in Parsa was just 0.78 tigers per 100 square kilometers, compared to Chitwan’s 3.84 tigers per 100 square kilometers. “Prey density had also been low in Parsa (5.5 prey individuals per km2) compared to Chitwan (62.6 per km2) as a result of widespread hunting and habitat degradation through livestock grazing,” the researchers write in the study, “leading to Parsa being considered the sink to Chitwan’s source.”In 2010, Nepal made a commitment to double the size of its tiger population by 2022, and Parsa was targeted with conservation interventions in order to meet that goal. Lamichhane and team deployed camera traps in 2013, 2014, and 2016 in order to study the tiger population in the park. The researchers identified individual tigers based on their stripe patterns and employed a capture-recapture analysis to estimate Parsa’s tiger population density increased from 0.78 to 1.38 individuals per 100 square kilometers between 2013 and 2016.Just five tigers were detected in Parsa by the 2013 camera trap survey. One year earlier, a tiger had been killed in retaliation for its attacks on livestock and people in a village that was still in the core of the park. That village has since been relocated, and the tiger population appears to be recovering quickly, with a total of 17 tigers detected in Parsa by camera traps in 2016.The researchers determined that immigration of tigers from Chitwan has driven the rapid tiger recovery in Parsa, and that the tigers are not simply using Parsa as a refuge. “We documented that 40% of the tigers photographed in camera trap were dispersed from Chitwan,” Lamichhane said. “Tigers are not using Parsa only as dispersal refuge but they are also establishing their territory and breeding.”While tigers had been known to disperse from Chitwin to Parsa in the past, he added, they could not persist long in Parsa “due to high anthropocentric pressure.” But with villages in the park evacuated, increased security measures, and local communities engaged in conservation efforts, tigers have started recolonizing the national park.Lamichhane suggested that, despite the study’s focus on Nepal and Parsa National Park, the team’s findings might be more broadly applicable. “Tigers are conservation-dependent species and they respond to the conservation efforts immediately,” he said. “Our study illustrated that rapid tiger recovery can occur given the appropriate conditions of controlled poaching, inviolate space, and connectivity to a source population.”Camera trap photo of a tiger in Parsa National Park. Photo Credit: DNPWC/NTNC/ZSL Nepal/Panthera.CITATIONSGoodrich, J., Lynam, A., Miquelle, D., Wibisono, H., Kawanishi, K., Pattanavibool, A., Htun, S., Tempa, T., Karki, J., Jhala, Y. & Karanth, U. 2015. Panthera tigris. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T15955A50659951. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-2.RLTS.T15955A50659951.en. Downloaded on 15 August 2017.Lamichhane, B. R., Pokheral, C. P., Poudel, S., Adhikari, D., Giri, S. R., Bhattarai, S., … & Dhakal, M. (2017). Rapid recovery of tigers Panthera tigris in Parsa Wildlife Reserve, Nepal. Oryx, 1-9. doi:10.1017/S0030605317000886Wolf, C., & Ripple, W. J. (2017). Range contractions of the world9s large carnivores. Royal Society Open Science, 4(7), 170052. doi:10.1098/rsos.170052Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001 Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, National Parks, Protected Areas, Saving Species From Extinction, Tigers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

World is fast losing its cool: Polar regions in deep trouble, say scientists

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer As representatives of the world’s nations gather in Madrid at COP 25 this week to discuss global warming policy, a comprehensive new report shows how climate change is disproportionately affecting the Arctic and Antarctic — the Arctic especially is warming tremendously faster than the rest of the world.If the planet sees a rise in average temperatures of 2 degrees Celsius, the polar regions will be the hardest hit ecosystems on earth, according to researchers, bringing drastic changes to the region. By the time the lower latitudes hit that mark, it’s projected the Arctic will see temperature increases of 4 degrees Celsius.In fact, polar regions are already seeing quickening sea ice melt, permafrost thaws, record wildfires, ice shelves calving, and impacts on cold-adapted species — ranging from Arctic polar bears to Antarctic penguins. What starts in cold areas doesn’t stay there: sea level rise and temperate extreme weather are both linked to polar events.The only way out of the trends escalating toward a climate catastrophe at the poles, say scientists, is for nations to begin aggressively reducing greenhouse gas emissions now and embracing sustainable green energy technologies and policies. It remains to be seen whether the negotiators at COP 25 will embrace such solutions. A herd of caribou in Arctic Siberia. Image by Jeff Kerby / National Geographic Society.As delegates from 197 member states convene in Madrid, Spain, this week for the twenty-fifth annual United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 25) the world’s polar scientists are sounding the alarm in a new report over the rapidly changing Arctic and Antarctic regions.In the last decade alone, the Arctic warmed 0.75 degrees Celsius (1.35 degrees Fahrenheit). In contrast, it took 137 years for the entire Earth to warm nearly that same amount, 0.8 degrees Celsius (1.44 degrees Fahrenheit).Subsequently, the region has undergone a significant transformation as sea ice melts, permafrost thaws, and wildfires burn. Cold-adapted species, like polar bears and walruses, now face an uncertain and perilous future. In the decades to come, their home habitat may be virtually unrecognizable.“It’s too late to prevent dangerous climate change impacts because we’re already seeing them, and the amplified impacts in the Arctic drive that home,” Michael Mann, a renowned climate scientist, told Mongabay. But he says it is still possible to avoid catastrophic warming of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). “It will require a dramatic decrease in global carbon emissions of more than 7 percent per year for the next decade, and a primary goal of COP 25 must be to achieve those reductions.”In a comprehensive Science Advances report published this week, an international team of researchers, including Mann, documented the far-ranging effects of warming in both polar regions, on land and at sea. “Many of the changes over the past decade are so dramatic they make you wonder what the next decade of warming will bring,” said Eric Post, lead author of the paper and a University of California Davis professor of climate change ecology.The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) in 2008. The GIS appears highly sensitive to warming beyond 1 to 4 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels. Its loss would contribute substantially to global sea level rise. In the decade since this photo was taken, the Arctic has already warmed by 0.75 degrees Celsius. Image by Eric Post / UC Davis.In addition, researchers examined the potential consequences for the polar regions as the planet moves ever closer to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming above the 1981-2005 baseline mean. By the time the lower latitudes hit that mark, it’s projected that the far more rapidly warming Arctic will have seen annual temperature increases of 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit), rocketing up to 7 degrees Celsius (12.6 degrees Fahrenheit) increases in the boreal winter.Though temperatures have been more stable at the South Pole, Antarctica is at the dawn of a new climate change-influenced era. It’s projected that the frozen continent will reach 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming in the austral winter (summer in the Northern Hemisphere), far outpacing warming in the tropics and temperate zones.“Under a business-as-usual scenario, the Earth as a whole may reach that [2 degrees Celsius] milestone in about 40 years,” said Post. “But the Arctic is already there during some months of the year, and it could reach 2 degrees Celsius warming on an annual mean basis as soon as 25 years before the rest of the planet.”Indeed, many of the changes once forecast for far in the future for the Arctic are occurring well ahead of schedule. Ice experts once believed that the Arctic Ocean wouldn’t experience ice-free summers until between 2030 and 2050, with some older predictions pushing that out as far as 2070. But that date has already been revised downward to a “more likely” 2030, linked strongly to whether or not greenhouse gas emissions are curtailed and how quickly. New carbon cuts are largely dependent on what happens diplomatically in Madrid, where many analysts are pessimistic over major policy breakthroughs.Sea ice in the Arctic is declining in every month of the year, with the largest losses seen in late summer, though other seasons are seeing loss speed up. In Antarctica, sea ice extent increased slightly between 1978 and 2015, but now that tide may be turning. In the austral autumns of 2017 and 2018, sea ice extent reached record or near-record lows.UC Davis climate ecologist Eric Post samples vegetation abundance and diversity at his long-term field site in Greenland. Image by Emma Behr / Penn State.The changes in the polar regions aren’t contained at the ends of the Earth; they’re already affecting the lower latitudes. As glaciers and on-land ice sheets melt and calve into the ocean, global sea level will rise. West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier is a particularly noteworthy melt candidate, as the glacier is now losing twice as much ice to the ocean as it was in the 1990s. It’s expected that due to the rapid calving of Thwaites, we could see an additional 1.2 meters (3.9 feet) of sea level rise within two centuries.Since 2001, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s projected sea level rise contributions from ice sheets have repeatedly been boosted higher due to accelerated polar warming. Current overall sea level rise has occurred at a mean rate of 1.8 millimeters per year for the past century, but more recently at rates estimated near 2.8 to 3.1 millimeters per year (1993-2003).“Loss of the summer sea ice and thinning of winter sea ice will generate tipping points in weather and in ecosystems,” said James Overland, an Arctic oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “We need to do everything now to avoid this case.”Researchers think that declining Arctic sea ice is increasingly fueling extreme weather in the United States, Europe and elsewhere across the temperate zone. The California drought which ran from 2011 to 2017, for example, has its origins, in part according to researchers, in the changing Arctic.“The key messages here are that the polar regions of the planet, and the Arctic in particular, provide a laboratory for studying the sorts of environmental impacts of warming we will see in lower latitudes, the U.S. and Europe if we fail to act on climate,” said Mann.Given that the polar regions are home to a number of cold-adapted, endemic species, such sudden and rapid change threatens their long-term survival. The well televised plight of polar bears has presented that species as a clear loser to climate change. As ice habitat disappears, the bears must expend more energy traveling between less stable sea ice or open water in search of food, and face nutritional stress during summer fasting. The pinnipeds (seals and other semiaquatic mammals) which the bears feed on, too, could disappear. Pacific walruses, for example, are hauling out on spits of land by the thousands in the absence of ice, which often results in trampling deaths should the animals startle. Moreover, earlier spring sea ice break-up is stressing and killing off harp and ringed seal pups.On land, much increased rain-on-snow events lock up green vegetation in ice, preventing caribou and reindeer from foraging during harsh winters. Ice-encrusted polar rangelands have led to the mass starvation of ungulates, most recently in Svalbard. In Russia’s Yamal Peninsula, 61,000 reindeer died between 2013 and 2014 due to one such episode, the new study notes.An Arctic fox in Greenland. Climate change-driven regional population collapses of lemmings, one of the Arctic fox’s favorite foods, could result in the decline of this Arctic predator.  Image by Eric Post / UC Davis.To avoid total ecological catastrophe at the poles, the report’s authors say that the negative impacts of climate change will need to be reduced through “strengthened international cooperation and collaborative agreements.”The primary goal of COP 25 will be to determine rules under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement for creating carbon markets among nations, cities, and corporations as a way to incentivize emission-reduction strategies. Given the dire state of the planet, however, many analysts believe this focus is too narrow and that the climate crisis requires far more aggressive action. Nations especially need to step up by increasing and adhering to their Paris Climate Agreement goals.Instead, things are going in the reverse direction, with almost every nation falling well short of their original Paris greenhouse gas reduction pledges. Last month the Trump Administration began the year-long process to formally withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement, leaving the fate of the Arctic, Antarctic and ultimately the planet, in jeopardy.Even if carbon emissions were miraculously contained tomorrow, the polar regions would still continue to change. “There is a delay between temperature increases and the melting of major ice sheets,” said Overland. “Though the sea level rise rate is small for the next few decades, it kicks in strongly after 2040 and may continue to increase despite mitigation.”Speaking at the opening of COP 25 on Monday, UN General Secretary António Guterres said: “We stand at a critical juncture in our collective efforts to limit dangerous global heating. By the end of the coming decade we will be on one of two paths. One is the path of surrender, where we have sleepwalked past the point of no return, jeopardizing the health and safety of everyone on this planet.… The other option is the path of hope. A path of resolve, of sustainable solutions.… That is the only way to limit global temperature rise to the necessary 1.5 degrees by the end of this century.”Mann, despite all the bad news from North and South, says he’s “hopeful that we’ll act in time to avert the worst impacts of climate change, something our review makes clear is still possible.”Banner image: Muskox calves in Greenland. Young animals are especially vulnerable to climate change-driven extreme weather, such as rain-on-snow events which can cover polar rangelands with ice leading to mass starvation. Image by Eric Post, UC Davis.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Modeling, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Environment, Extinction, Extreme Weather, Featured, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Monitoring, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, satellite data, Sea Ice, Storms, Weather, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

[LIGUE 1] Le FC Metz revient de l’enfer à la Meinau

first_imgBousculé par Strasbourg au cours d’une première période catastrophique, le FC Metz a montré un visage complètement différent après le repos pour obtenir un point courageux, dimanche à la Meinau (1-1), pour la première journée de Ligue 1. La saison est lancée!Le football est parfois curieux. Pas grand-monde n’aurait donné cher de la peau du FC Metz, dimanche à Strasbourg, après 45 minutes d’une incroyable pauvreté. Une mi-temps plus tard, les Grenats quittaient la Meinau avec un nul dans leurs bagages et une pointe de regrets suscitée par deux grosses occasions d’Ibrahima Niane dans les derniers instants de la partie (87e, 90e+3).Vincent Hognon et ses hommes peuvent tout de même s’estimer heureux : ils ont évité une défaite qui semblait inéluctable à la pause et, surtout, ils se sont rassurés sur leurs propres capacités après une seconde période plus conforme à ce que doit montrer un promu en Ligue 1. Diallo ouvre son compteurÀ côté de la plaque, Metz échappait au carton rouge sur un tacle bien maladroit de Thomas Delaine – qui blessait Youssouf Fofana (15e) – et au break alsacien, Dimitri Liénard étant signalé hors-jeu (36e). Rentré aux vestiaires avec un retard d’un seul but, il pouvait alors se remettre la tête à l’endroit. «On est reparti du bon pied», confirme Vincent Hognon.C’est peu de le dire : quelques secondes après la reprise, Habib Diallo était lancé à l’extrême limite du hors-jeu et ajustait froidement Matz Sels (47e). Après de longues secondes de vérification, l’assistance vidéo à l’arbitrage validait finalement cette égalisation et lançait véritablement la saison des Messins.«J’espère que cette deuxième mi-temps va leur servir à prendre conscience qu’ils peuvent poser des problèmes à pas mal d’équipes», remarque le technicien lorrain, qui ne manque pas de souligner la belle opposition proposée par les Strasbourgeois.«En Ligue 1, on aura des gros tests tous les week-ends», avait prévenu Renaud Cohade dans la semaine. Sa formation a été servie mais elle a répondu présent sur cette seconde période. Et rassuré les sceptiques.Oui, les Grenats peuvent exister dans ce championnat, s’ils convoquent les valeurs observées après la pause : réalisme, combativité, solidarité, à l’image de ce retour désespéré de Mamadou Fofana sur une belle pichenette de Liénard (51e). Pour le FC Metz, c’est un bon point de départ.Angelo Salemi (Le Républicain lorrain) Partagercenter_img «En première mi-temps, on était passif, sans doute en raison d’une certaine appréhension. On jouait trop bas, on a subi…», note l’entraîneur messin, qui avait choisi d’associer en charnière centrale Mamadou Fofana et Stoppila Sunzu, aux dépens de John Boye, rentré plus tard de la CAN. Ce binôme, mal aligné, était en partie responsable sur l’ouverture du score d’Adrien Thomasson (21e). Une sanction logique après une première alerte signée Kenny Lala (19e) et une entame plus que délicate.last_img read more

Tennis : victime d’une maladie auto-immune, l’Américaine Danielle Collins est forfait à Luxembourg

first_img Partager “Cela fait quelque temps que je ne me sens pas très bien : enfin connaître d’où viennent mes souffrances est une sorte de soulagement”, a indiqué la joueuse loridienne. “J’ai débuté un traitement contre cette maladie. Je suis engagée à 100 % et compte continuer à me battre sur et en dehors des courts. Je ne sais pas quand je serai soignée, mais je suis optimiste sur le fait que je reviendrai à la compétition.”J.C. Après le forfait d’une Eugenie Bouchard qui est, apparemment, touchée à la cheville, le Luxembourg Open (12 au 20 octobre) devra aussi se passer de la présence de la demi-finaliste du dernier Open d’Australie, l’Américaine Danielle Collins (WTA 33). Cette dernière a indiqué sur Instagram ce jeudi  avoir débuté un traitement contre la polyarthrite rhumatoïde, une maladie inflammatoire sévère qui touche les articulations.Danielle Collins, 33e joueuse mondiale,  avait été l’un des premiers noms révélés en vue du Luxembourg Open 2019 qui débute samedi. Mais la joueuse américaine de 25 ans, auteur jusque-là d’une très belle saison avec notamment une demi-finale en Australie en janvier,  ne viendra finalement pas à Kockelscheuer.last_img read more

[Rugby] « Même dans une défaite 123-0, on a quelque chose à apprendre… »

first_imgÀ mi-chemin de la saison, le Rugby Club de Luxembourg a pris l’eau à Francfort (123-0) en 1. Bundesliga Süd/West. « On a pris une belle raclée, on a payé la note », analyse Paolo Tarakdjan, le président des Ciel et Blanc à l’accent chantant, fraîchement naturalisé. « Mais on ne va pas baisser la tête pour autant », prévient-il.Non, vous ne rêvez pas ! Dans notre édition papier de ce lundi, nous vous indiquons en « der des sports » que le Rugby Club de Luxembourg a coulé… 123-0 à Francfort, samedi ! Appelez ça comme vous voulez… une leçon, une tôle ! Mais au lieu de bêtement se moquer, on a cherché à connaître les raisons de ce naufrage.« Le gros problème, c’est qu’on s’est rendu à Francfort, samedi, avec une équipe très affaiblie, décimée par les blessures. Des joueurs clés du Rugby Club de Luxembourg sont notamment revenus blessés du match gagné en Suède (13-0) par les Lions rouges (NDLR : l’équipe nationale du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg : Hugo Bertani, Joshua van Zeeland, Matthew Dennis-Soto…) », raconte Paolo Tarakdjan, le président des Ciel et Blanc (57 ans). Du coup, le club de la capitale a dû « bricoler ». «On a dû faire appel pour cette rencontre aux joueurs de la 2e équipe, notamment 2 joueurs de 2001 qui viennent des U18, explique Paolo Tarakdjan. Je les remercie encore d’avoir fait l’effort de venir, même si l’on sait que ce n’est jamais évident, car il y a un gros ‘‘gap’’ entre l’équipe première et la réserve. En face, Francfort, c’était du costaud, c’est l’une des meilleures équipes de la 1. Bundesliga Süd/West, elle est semi-pro. »Deux jeunes du RCL recrutés par le Stade français !Et le rugby, entre guillemets, ce n’est pas le foot, où il peut y avoir davantage d’aléas, de surprises, car c’est un sport à faible marque. Donc samedi, les essais ont malheureusement défilé. Le Rugby Club de Luxembourg perdait déjà 50-0 à la mi-temps. Et les vagues rouge et noire ont repris de plus belle en seconde période. Les Ciel et Blanc ont bu le calice jusqu’à la lie.« Au final, on a pris une belle raclée (123-0), on a payé la note, comme on dit dans le jargon, glisse Paolo Tarakdjan. Mais on ne va pas baisser la tête pour autant. Même dans une défaite 123-0, on a quelque chose à apprendre, des leçons à tirer. On doit rester positifs, regarder vers l’avant et vite se concentrer sur le match du 30 novembre prochain à Pforzheim, qui est un concurrent direct dans l’optique du maintien (NDLR : le RCL est actuellement 7e sur 8 avec 4 points). »Après ça, il y aura une trêve hivernale de 3 mois. « Le RCL est dans une année difficile, de transition. On a perdu 13 joueurs à l’intersaison. Certains ont pris leur retraite, d’autres sont partis à Metz ou retournés à Walferdange. Et deux de nos jeunes nés en 99, Tony Drennan et Liam Carroll, ont même été recrutés par le Stade français, ça prouve qu’on fait du bon boulot. Donc comptez sur nous pour nous battre et rebondir, car c’est le propre de ce merveilleux sport qu’est le ballon ovale ! »Ismaël Bouchafra-Hennequin     * Dans le même temps, Walferdange s’est incliné 13-19 face à la réserve de Francfort en 2. Bundesliga West. Partagerlast_img read more

NBA : Zach Randolph prend sa retraite après 17 ans de carrière

first_img Partager — Zach Randolph (@MacBo50) December 28, 2019Drafté en 2001 en 19e position par les Trail Blazers de Portland, Zach Randolph a ensuite joué pour les Knicks de New York et les Clippers de Los Angeles, avant de rejoindre en 2009 les Grizzlies de Memphis, où il réussit la meilleure partie de sa carrière. Il est alors sélectionné deux fois au NBA All-Star (2010 et 2013) et joue les play-offs sept saisons d’affilée de 2011 à 2017, atteignant la finale de conférence en 2013 pour la première fois de l’histoire de la franchise.Également élu meilleure progression de l’année en 2003, Zach Randolph n’a plus foulé les parquets depuis le 19 mars 2018. Les Grizzlies ont annoncé en 2017 que son maillot serait retiré.LQ/AFP Le basketteur Zach Randolph, sélectionné deux fois au NBA All-Star dans sa carrière longue de 17 ans, a annoncé samedi qu’il prenait sa retraite.“J’ai tout donné à ce sport, et il m’a tant rendu”, a tweeté le joueur de 38 ans, qui termine sa carrière avec 18.578 points et 10 208 rebonds.One love. pic.twitter.com/aZmUTbD2eSlast_img read more

[Football] Karen Marin, une carrière brisée ?

first_imgL’opération en avril 2019 se déroule a priori sans encombre, mais n’a pas les résultats escomptés : l’internationale a toujours mal. C’est pour ça qu’elle repassera par le bloc opératoire le 14 janvier, à la clinique d’Eich, neuf mois plus tard. Elle aura droit cette fois à une ostéotomie, une sauvagerie dont on ne sait pas exactement quel sera le résultat : son tibia sera sectionné et on lui apposera une plaque pour redresser l’axe de l’os de 3 à 4 degrés et ainsi, espère-t-on, diminuer la pression sur son genou.Une blessure comme ça, selon mon chirurgien, ce n’est arrivé qu’à une autre personne au LuxembourgEst-ce que ce sera suffisant pour sauver l’avenir footballistique d’une gamine de 20 ans qui enfile les buts comme des perles depuis six ans déjà ? Elle-même n’en est pas convaincue. «Une blessure comme ça, apparemment, selon mon chirurgien, ce n’est arrivé qu’à une autre personne au Luxembourg. Un handballeur dont je ne connais pas le nom. Il a rejoué apparemment. Moi… Je dirais que les chances de retrouver mon niveau sont quand même très faibles.»«Ce serait une grande perte pour le football luxembourgeois», lui répond tout de go son entraîneur de toujours, Daniel Nunes, qui a, cette saison, pris du recul.Il n’a pas tort. Karen Marin, ce sont des accélérations fulgurantes, un froid réalisme, des statistiques affolantes, une capacité à faire des différences en solitaire qui se ressentaient jusqu’en sélection nationale. Auteure de 6 buts en 12 sélections (quatrième meilleure buteuse de l’histoire à cinq longueurs d’Amy Thompson), Marin semblait avoir tout ce qu’il fallait pour marcher dans les traces des pionnières de son sport qu’étaient Rosangela Settani, Jeannine Hansen, Nathalie Thill et contribuer à tirer toute une génération vers le haut… Mais pour elle, tout pourrait s’arrêter au stade des promesses relatives.C’est que la petite ailière n’a jamais fait du football plus qu’un hobby envahissant. «Ce n’était pas la plus technique, ni la plus sérieuse aux entraînements», sourit Nunes. Elle confirme : «Mon hygiène de vie n’est pas top. J’aime bien faire la fête.» Des comme ça, chez les gars, on en a vu une paire et cela ne les a pas empêchés de réaliser de belles choses. Avant Singapour, Marin avait été testée par Francfort et Sarrebruck, avait aussi des touches pour des stages à Metz et Marseille. Mais à chaque fois qu’elle est sortie du pays pour son compte personnel plutôt que pour défendre les couleurs nationales, elle est revenue avec cette conviction : «Des Karen Marin, il y en a plein à l’étranger.» Non, ce qui l’embête le plus, aujourd’hui, c’est d’une part de s’être «habituée à la douleur constante qui m’empêche de faire du sport. Du coup, je suis stressée» et d’autre part le fait que pour assouvir son rêve de devenir policière, il faudra bien qu’elle puisse en refaire un jour, du sport.J’ai complètement coupé avec le foot. Je ne peux plus y jouer alors… Je me suis détachée, éclipséeIl lui semble donc très loin, le ballon rond. En fin d’année dernière, contactée pour donner son avis sur les chances du F91 de sortir de son groupe d’Europa League, elle avait poliment décidé de botter en touche : «Non mais vous savez, j’ai complètement coupé avec le foot. Je ne peux plus y jouer alors…» Il ne s’agissait pas d’une coquetterie. Si elle a suivi de tout près ses coéquipières de Bettembourg les premiers mois de sa longue blessure, elle a progressivement rompu le lien. «Je me suis détachée, éclipsée», raconte-t-elle sobrement.Il faut dire que contre toute attente, Bettembourg (actuellement 2e du championnat de Ligue 1) a reconquis le titre sans elle la saison passée. Sans elle ni son pendant, Kimberley Dos Santos, tombée elle enceinte (mais revenue depuis son accouchement), cela ressemble à un petit miracle ou plutôt à une énorme somme de travail. Daniel Nunes rêve de revoir ses deux ailières rejouer ensemble sous les ordres de son successeur, Yves Block, parce qu’«avec Marin sur le terrain, les adversaires n’osaient jamais jouer trop haut de peur de se faire contrer». Karen ne le dit pas, mais elle l’espère aussi. Et le reste du football luxembourgeois aussi. Récemment, un coach est venu la sonder pour un transfert alors qu’elle ne peut même pas courir. C’est dire si cette fille leur manquerait si l’ostéotomie se passait mal…Julien Mollereau Partager Meilleure joueuse du pays en 2015 et 2017, blessée depuis novembre 2018, Karen Marin repasse sur le billard dans moins d’une semaine. Avec le risque d’avoir à dire adieu au football à 20 ans.Elle a été la toute première alors qu’elle n’avait que 15 ans. Karen Marin restera pour toujours la première «meilleure joueuse de la saison». C’était en 2015, au cours de l’édition numéro 1 de la Nuit du football et tout le pays découvrait son minois impertinent de jeune première. Elle finirait 2e en 2016, 1re de nouveau en 2017… mais se retrouve incapable de postuler en 2018 et 2019. Et pour cause, sa carrière a pris un curieux tournant en novembre 2018, au terme d’un tournoi disputé à Singapour que la FLF venait de remporter après une dernière victoire 0-4 contre l’hôte de la compétition… avec un triplé de la Bettembourgeoise.Le lendemain, au cœur des gratte-ciels de la cité-État asiatique, l’attaquante a mal au genou mais rien de bien inquiétant. Elle rentre au pays, honore de sa présence les deux derniers matches de l’année avec son club et file voir un médecin qui lui recommande une arthroscopie. «Le cartilage était en mille morceaux. Les chirurgiens ne comprenaient pas comment cela pouvait arriver à quelqu’un d’aussi jeune.»last_img read more