New bill aims to cut protection of 1M hectares of Brazilian rainforest

first_imgState legislators presented the proposal early last month to President Michel Temer’s Chief of Staff, which included changes to five protected areas in the southern state of Amazonas.When presenting the proposal, the legislators argued that the “protected” classification undermines the legal security of rural producers and economic investments that have already been made in the region.Conservation groups worry that, if approved, the bid would put more than a million hectares of rainforest at risk to deforestation.When surveying documents filed with Brazil’s National Department of Mineral Production, WWF reportedly uncovered a link between the proposed bill and applications for prospecting and mining in southern Amazonas. A proposal under review by the Brazilian government aims to shrink four protected areas in the Amazon and eliminate another area entirely, Greenpeace says. If approved, the bid would put more than a million hectares of rainforest at risk to deforestation.“Removing protection from these areas will lead to more deforestation,” Cristiane Mazzetti, a campaigner with Greenpeace Brazil, told Mongabay. “This moves us in the opposite direction of where we need to go now that deforestation rates are once again out of control.”Indeed, 2016 marked the highest rate of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon since 2008, contrasting the country’s much-heralded efforts to curtail forest loss just a few years back.State legislators presented the proposal early last month to President Michel Temer’s Chief of Staff, which included changes to five protected areas in the southern state of Amazonas. Among them is the complete removal of the Campos de Manicoré Environmental Conservation Area and a 40 percent reduction in the area of four other reserves: Acari National Park, Manicoré Biological Reserve, and Aripuanã and Urupadi National Forests. If ratified on the senate floor, the proposed bill would shrink protected Amazon forest by more than a million hectares – an area well over the size of Delaware.The bid comes less than a year after the five areas were officially gazetted by former president Dilma Rousseff under a program called “Terra Legal,” the non-profit Observatorio do Clima reports. By legalizing use of vacant public land, Terra Legal aims to reduce illegal occupation and land-grabbing – two common drivers of deforestation in Amazonas. Protected areas, also known as “conservation units,” are but one of many classifications under the program, which include urban expansion, settlements, and indigenous lands.An upwards look into the Brazilian rainforests’s canopy. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerBut there’s a flip-side to protection, Amazonas state legislators say. When presenting the proposal, the legislators argued that the “protected” classification undermines the legal security of rural producers and economic investments that have already been made in the region.“The conservation units are hampering the expansion of economic activities, Senator Omar Aziz said, according to a translated press release from the Ministry of the Environment. “And its creation created very serious legal insecurity throughout the southern state.”In a comment on Facebook, Deputy Átila Lins, an official who spearheaded the effort, added that populations are “on the verge of being withdrawn” from the protected areas and indicated that “large investments” have been made in the region. Those investments would be lost, he said.But exactly which “populations” and what “investments” are impacted aren’t clear from the legislators’ rhetoric – or from the 20-page proposal itself.In search of answers that might reveal the underlying motivations to reduce the protected areas, environmental groups did their own research – albeit unconventional.Greenpeace took to the skies. Aboard a small plane cruising over the five protected areas, Greenpeace looked for signs of human occupation and economic activities that might validate the legislators’ claims.“They said that investments were already made in those protected areas, producers would be impacted, and people would have to be removed, so we decided to fly over those areas to see if what the legislators was claiming was true,” Mazzetti said.They saw few signs of occupation. What they saw plenty of was forest – large, intact tracts of jungle, for which the state is famous.“What we saw was a few spots of human activity but the majority of the areas are still preserved,” Mazzetti said. “These lands are far from infrastructure.”Mazzetti argues instead that the proposal is about making these protected lands viable for economic expansion. And that argument is supported by new research by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).”That’s where research by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) comes in.By surveying documents filed with Brazil’s National Department of Mineral Production, WWF reportedly uncovered a link between the proposed bill and applications for prospecting and mining in southern Amazonas. In fact, most of the requests overlap precisely with the areas that may soon lose their protection status, WWF says.“We noticed that the majority of those exploitation requests are within the limits of the Conservation Units that the new bill wants to cut,” Mariana Ferreira, the science coordinator for WWF-Brazil, told the Thompson Reuters Foundation back in February.In Acari National Park alone, about 40 requests for prospecting or mining minerals have been filed – some of which have already been authorized, WWF writes.Tree cover loss data from the Brazilian government show the protected areas – shown here together – form a relatively undisturbed area surrounded by deforestation. Data from the University of Maryland indicate they are comprised mostly of intact forest landscapes, which are areas of original vegetation large and pristine enough to contain their native biodiversity levels.Global Forest Watch shows the protected areas also comprise many mining concessions.Environmental groups are concerned – 21 of them to be exact.“We understand that the maintenance of these protected areas as originally established is crucial for the conservation of regional biodiversity,” they wrote in a letter (translated here) to President Temer and several other senior officials, which 21 organizations signed, including The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, and Conservation International. “Removing the protection of one million hectares will contribute to the – already remarkable – deforestation in the Amazon.”The move could also “jeopardize” commitments under national and international accords, such as the 2015 Paris Agreement, which entered into effect last November, they said. Indeed, research suggests that protected areas may store large carbon stocks, and deforestation already accounts for 40 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in Brazil.The bid might put international financing at risk as well, Mazzetti says.“It will affect the country’s international credibility and the investments that international financiers are promising to make,” she said. “Donors might start questioning how effective the money is that they’ve invested in Brazil.”Germany, one of the Brazilian Amazon’s biggest donors, invested over $100 million in the Protected Areas of the Amazon Program – the very initiative that helped put these five areas in place. Norway has also dished up substantial sums of money.Brazil’s Ministry of the Environment declined multiple requests for comment. But earlier this week, the Minister of the Environment Sarney Filho announced that a committee – including researchers from the Ministry, businessmen, and politicians – would be reviewing the proposal and visiting the protected areas in question. At a meeting in Brasilia, Filho expressed that he’s open to dialogue, but noted that there are “conflicting points” between the proposal and the Ministry’s official data.“It is fundamental to resolve doubts about the existence of settlements within these areas and other types of economic activities,” the minister said in a translated statement. “We have no prejudice against proposals, but in this case it is necessary to clarify the doubts that have been raised.”The minister also highlighted that these five areas protect a region facing heightened pressure from deforestation. From 2015 to 2016, forest loss in Amazonas increased by 54 percent, according to the National Institute for Space Research of Brazil – much of which was concentrated in the region where these areas lie, called the “Arc of Deforestation.”Filho’s statements come just weeks after the Ministry announced that a priority of 2017 is to expand Brazil’s protected area network, which currently includes 327 federal areas. But if the proposal becomes a bill, it will likely pass on the senate floor, Mazzetti says – rolling that number back to 326.“It’s very likely that if it goes to congress it will be passed – these projects usually get approved,” she said. “We know that congress has lots of representatives of the business lobby, and for them it’s important to open new areas.”But before it becomes a bill, environmental groups have more leverage, she adds.“If we apply pressure [now], I believe we can stop it,” she said. “Our plan is to try to stop this from the very beginning.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Environment, Forest Destruction, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Indigenous Peoples, Law, Mining, National Parks, Primary Forests, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Audio: Impacts of gas drilling on wildlife in Peru and a Goldman Prize winner on mercury contamination

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Acoustic, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Animals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Biodiversity, Birds, Certification, Chemicals, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Stewardship Council, Health, Law Enforcement, Podcast, Public Health, Research, Water Pollution, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation On today’s episode: a look at the impacts of drilling for natural gas on birds and amphibians through bioacoustics, and a Goldman Prize winner discusses her ongoing campaign to rid mercury contamination from the environment.Our first guest on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast is Jessica Deichmann, a research scientist with the Center for Conservation and Sustainability at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Deichmann led a study that used acoustic monitoring, among other methods, to examine the impacts on wildlife of a gas drilling platform in the forests of southeastern Peru.Next, we talk with 2009 Goldman Environmental Prize winner Yuyun Ismawati, an environmental engineer from Indonesia who currently lives in the UK. As the founder of an NGO called BaliFokus and a steering committee member of IPEN, a non-profit based in Sweden that works to improve chemicals policies and practices around the world, Ismawati has made it her life’s mission to stop the use of mercury in activities like gold mining that cause the toxin to leach into the environment and thereby threaten human health and wildlife. On today’s episode, a look at the impacts of drilling for natural gas on birds and amphibians through bioacoustics, and a Goldman Prize winner discusses her ongoing campaign to rid mercury contamination from the environment.Our first guest on this episode of the Mongabay Newscast is Jessica Deichmann, a research scientist with the Center for Conservation and Sustainability at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Deichmann led a study that used acoustic monitoring, among other methods, to examine the impacts on wildlife of a gas drilling platform in the forests of southeastern Peru.In this Field Notes segment, Deichmann plays for us a variety of recordings to help illustrate her team’s findings and discusses the recommendations they developed for companies drilling in sensitive ecosystems. (Incidentally, Deichmann’s colleague, Marconi Campos Cerqueira, appeared on the Newscast back in June to play some recordings he’d made while using bioacoustic monitoring to examine bird ranges in the mountains of Puerto Rico.)Next, we talk with 2009 Goldman Environmental Prize winner Yuyun Ismawati, an environmental engineer from Indonesia who currently lives in the UK. As the founder of an NGO called BaliFokus and a steering committee member of IPEN, a non-profit based in Sweden that works to improve chemicals policies and practices around the world, Ismawati has made it her life’s mission to stop the use of mercury in activities like gold mining that cause the toxin to leach into the environment and thereby threaten human health and wildlife.Deforestation drops 16% in the Brazilian AmazonFSC mulls rule change to allow certification for recent deforestersBurning down the house: Myanmar’s destructive charcoal tradeLeading US plywood firm linked to alleged destruction, rights violations in Malaysia‘Decimated’: Germany’s birds disappear as insect abundance plummets 76%Helmeted hornbill, on verge of extinction, finds respite in new zone outside of known rangeMongabay is a nonprofit news provider and relies on the support of its readers and listeners, so if you value what you learn at the website and on this podcast, please visit impactfund.mongabay.org to help make what we do possible. You can even choose the kinds of reporting your donation supports — decide what issues or areas you’d like to support at impactfund.mongabay.org.You can read more about all of these top news items right here on Mongabay, and if you’d like to request email alerts when we publish new stories on specific topics that you care about most, from forests and oceans to indigenous people’s rights and more, visit alerts.mongabay.com and sign up!You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or RSS.The white-browed antbird (Myrmoborus leucophrys) is one of the species detected by Jessica Deichmann and colleagues in the forests of southeastern Peru. Photo Credit: J. Vitorino/SCBI.CITATIONDeichmann, J. L., Hernandez-Serna, A., Delgado, C., Amanda, J., Campos-Cerqueira, M., & Aide, T. M. (2017). Soundscape analysis and acoustic monitoring document impacts of natural gas exploration on biodiversity in a tropical forest. Ecological Indicators, 39-48. doi:10.1016/j.ecolind.2016.11.002Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

CITES 2019: What’s Conservation Got To Do With It? (commentary)

first_imgAnimals, Cites, Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Green, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img From August 17-28, the global community convenes in Geneva for the meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).Species whose very future on this planet will be debated include the African elephant, Southern white rhino, giraffe, tiger, jaguar, cheetah, and mako shark.Susan Lieberman, Vice President for International Policy at WCS, argues governments must not let their decisions be swayed by the pressures of those more interested in trade than conservation.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. From August 17-28, the global community convenes in Geneva for the meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The meeting was originally planned to take place last May in Sri Lanka, but due to the horrific terrorist bombings, the meeting was moved to Geneva, the headquarters of the CITES Secretariat.This is the 18th meeting of the CITES CoP in the history of the Convention, which entered into force in 1975. There are now 183 governments as “Parties” (members) to the convention, comprising the only intergovernmental forum that addresses the threat of international trade to wild species of plants and animals—both legal and illegal trade.I have had the privilege of attending all of the last 11 CoPs, as both a government and non-governmental representative. Governments attending will make decisions on whether to regulate international trade in certain species to prevent them from becoming threatened by trade, or to prohibit trade altogether for threatened or endangered species.Jaguar. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Species whose very future on this planet will be debated include the African elephant, Southern white rhino, giraffe, tiger, jaguar, cheetah, and mako shark. Several lesser known species will also be considered—among them the saiga antelope, helmeted hornbill, glass frogs, Indian star tortoise, and so many others.Many of these species are subject to significant poaching and trafficking—either for use of their body parts or for the pet trade. This illegal trade threatens species while undermining the rule of law, facilitating corruption, and harming the livelihoods and sustainable development of local communities.It is easy to imagine that in light of the well-documented biodiversity crisis—from threats such as climate change, habitat loss, trade, and the depletion of wildlife that are over-hunted and over-fished—species across the globe would receive the necessary protection. But that is not always the case. Too often, commercial interests work to block increased protection or regulation of species.There is one key conservation issue at play. If a species is found in multiple countries, and is declining or endangered in some and more secure in others, sound conservation practice and the precautionary principle dictate that international measures should focus on the populations needing the most help. Two examples highlight this point.Mongolia and the U.S. have proposed conferring upon the saiga antelope (a critically endangered species found in the open steppes of Central Asia) the highest level of protection. Formerly widespread and numbering well over 1 million individuals as recently as the 1970s, the species repeatedly experienced drastic declines in the late 20th century, reaching an all-time low of about 50,000 animals in the early 2000s.There has been some rebounding of populations, but the species is still threatened by poaching and illegal trade; the males’ horn is used in traditional medicine in China and Southeast Asia. In addition, disease outbreaks recently killed at least 200,000 saiga in the course of only three weeks.Wild male saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) visiting a waterhole at the Stepnoi Sanctuary, Astrakhan Oblast, Russia. Photo credit: Andrey Giljov [CC BY-SA 4.0]The saiga must go to CITES Appendix I (which prohibits international commercial trade in threatened species) at the Geneva meeting. However, some governments and trade interests have focused more on the less-endangered populations in Kazakhstan and elsewhere than the critically endangered Mongolian saiga population. If the species is to persist in healthy herds, governments should ensure that all saiga receive the highest level of protection.Another example is the giraffe, found in 19 countries in Africa. Giraffe populations are declining due to habitat loss, illegal killing and illegal trade, and climate change. Six African countries with giraffes have proposed CITES list the giraffe on Appendix II—which allows trade as long as it is sustainable and legal. Since there is evidence of some commercial and illegal trade, it is prudent to accept this proposal to ensure the giraffe trade is sustainable and does not further threaten the species.Yet several interests are pushing to block this protection for giraffes, claiming that the species is in good shape in southern Africa. It is correct that giraffes are much better off in South Africa, Botswana, and their neighbors, than elsewhere in Africa, but prudent conservation says that the species must be looked at in its entirety. We cannot let giraffes disappear in Central, East, and West Africa because it might be inconvenient for others to require permits and regulation.There are 57 species proposals and more than 100 other issues to be discussed in Geneva. When governments join a treaty such as CITES, they have agreed to act for the global good, and not only act or decide based on their own national or trade interests. Governments must not let their decisions be swayed by the pressures of those more interested in trade than conservation. I look forward to strong, precautionary, conservation decisions in Geneva—for the well-known giraffe, the strange saiga antelope, and so many other species in need of global collaboration and action.Glass frog in Costa Rica. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Susan Lieberman is Vice President for International Policy at WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).last_img read more

Industrial palm oil investors struggle to gain foothold in Africa

first_imgArticle published by terna gyuse Twenty-seven concessions intended for industrial oil palm plantations in West and Central Africa have either failed or been abandoned in the last decade.Of the 49 that remain, less than 20 percent of the allocated land has been developed.Malaysian palm oil giant Sime Darby recently announced its intention to withdraw from Liberia after years of conflict with communities and environmental groups. It was the “next new frontier” for palm oil. A “mutually beneficial relationship” that would be a win-win for struggling nations in Africa and multinational producers running out of land in Southeast Asia. “The time for that continent has come,” some palm oil executives declared. Others said the lucrative commodity was simply “coming home to Africa.” And for a while, everyone wanted in on the action.But a new report, by a collection of local and international groups working with affected communities, says that palm oil’s homecoming hasn’t gone as smoothly as its architects hoped. After years of fierce resistance by communities living inside areas demarcated for oil palm plantations, at least 27 new plantations have either failed or been abandoned. Of the 49 that remain in West and Central Africa, less than 20 percent of the 2.74 million hectares (6.77 million acres) of land allocated to them has been developed.“A lot of the bigger companies had no experience in Africa,” said Devlin Kuyek, one of the report’s authors. “It’s not the same environment they’re used to.”Oil palm kernels: evidence suggests the promised benefits of monoculture plantations are a mirage for most of the people affected by their development. Photo: Carsten Ten Brink/Flickr (CC-ND 2.0)Industrial oil palm cultivation has been a driver of the economies — and deforestation — of Malaysia and Indonesia for decades. But after years of expansion, the amount of suitable land available to producers in those countries has nearly run out. During the late 2000s and early 2010s, some African governments were quick to propose their forested regions as the solution. In what was dubbed the “great African land rush,” some of the world’s largest palm oil producers signed deals across the continent. Many of those deals were massive; in Liberia, for example, concession agreements held by just two companies covered nearly 600,000 hectares (1.5 million acres).Supporters promised they would bring in desperately needed revenue for host governments, along with local benefits in the form of jobs, health care and housing for workers, and other services. Critics decried the wave of investments as a “land grab” and pointed out that large-scale oil palm plantations threaten endangered species in the region, particularly primates.A decade later, GRAIN’s report says many of those deals subsequently collapsed or failed to materialize. Some of the land was leased to companies that lacked the capacity to develop plantations on their own, instead hoping to sell their concessions to bigger, more well-established producers down the line.But the key factor, the report says, is pushback by communities affected by the projects.Few of the companies that wanted to move into Africa had a plan for a fundamental problem: tens of thousands of people already lived on the land they’d leased. The land deals were often negotiated in near-secrecy and few local communities were consulted by their governments before their territory was offered up to investors; when the bulldozers arrived, trouble followed.In Cameroon, villagers affected by a Wall Street-backed plantation, Herakles, organized demonstrations against its expansion plans; local activists supporting them were arrested by military police. Land clearing by Sime Darby and Golden Veroleum in Liberia prompted community-led complaints filed to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, an industry body. In 2015, a riot by people living inside the Golden Veroleum concession led to dozens of arrests, and paramilitary police beat villagers participating in a march against a different plantation nearby.Often initially warm to the idea that oil palm plantations will bring development and jobs, communities have turned to civil society groups for help as the reality of the plantations becomes apparent.James Otto is a project director at the Sustainable Development Institute in Liberia. He says that in order to acquire land, some investors made expansive promises to communities that generated discontent when they weren’t fulfilled. [Editor’s note: The author of this article was a staff member at SDI between 2012 and 2014.]“They created huge expectations that they couldn’t meet,” he said. “And that showed communities that it wasn’t sustainable, so they decided to insist that expansion stop until those promises were met.”Evidence suggests the promised benefits are a mirage for most of the people affected by oil palm expansion. An assessment of Golden Veroleum’s massive holdings in southeast Liberia found that most of the 14,000 people living in the concession area would lose access to farmland and forest they rely on for additional food, fuel and building supplies; this in exchange for jobs for only around 1,650 community members. Attempting to put a monetary value on the trade-off, the consultants calculated a net loss to the community of $7.3 million per year.Studies of long-term impacts of plantations in Indonesia bear this out. Researchers found that while many communities already strongly integrated into market economies did enjoy overall benefits with the expansion of corporate oil palm plantations, subsistence-based communities suffered declining health, nutrition, and living standards.Palm oil fruits on plantation belonging to local residents in the Pujehun district of Sierra Leone: across West Africa, villagers living within and around the oil palm concession areas have resisted being dispossessed of their land. Photo: Maja Hitij/FIANBelgium (CC-NC-ND 2.0)After a troubled start in Liberia, Sime Darby pulls outFaced with resistance on the ground, palm oil producers are also finding West and Central Africa to be other than the promised land.Sime Darby was one of the first major investors to roll the dice on Africa. A Malaysian company with a market capitalization of nearly $5 billion, in 2009 it signed a 63-year lease to develop a 220,000-hectare (544,000-acre) plantation in western Liberia. Almost immediately, the concession ran into trouble. Local activists accused the company of failing to secure consent from community members, undercompensating them for destroyed crops, and clearing areas used for religious rituals. Environmental groups pointed out that the company’s plans to expand into “high conservation value” forests would have devastating effects on biodiversity.In response, Sime Darby agreed to rework its procedures for acquiring and developing land. In 2014, wary of further damage to its international image, it agreed to abide by strict “no deforestation” standards. But executives warned that they were losing money, with one saying that the company “never realized land would be this painful to secure.”Last month, Sime Darby announced its plans to exit Liberia by the end of this year, saying it was actively looking to sell its concession to another company. According to GRAIN’s report, in the decade since Sime Darby signed its deal with the Liberian government, it managed to plant only 10,401 hectares (25,701 acres) of its 220,000-hectare concession.“They realized it wasn’t going to be profitable, and the output is a lot lower than they ever expected,” said Matthew Piotrowski of Chain Reaction Research, a publication that provides sustainability risk assessments for investors. “A lot of this land isn’t able to be developed, so they’d be continuing to operate at a loss.”Similar events have played out in other high-profile concessions in the region. After sustained resistance and campaigning by communities in Cameroon, U.S.-based Herakles Farms had the size of its concession reduced from 73,000 to 19,843 hectares (180,400 to 49,033 acres). The investors backing the project subsequently sold their stake, and reports indicate its new owners are struggling to develop an even smaller area.Kuyek says that some companies likely expected that the governments who offered them the deals would be more aggressive in helping them secure land from communities:“If they’re going from the Indonesia context, the expectation they probably had was the government and army would ensure they had access to the land.”With the unexpectedly high costs of acquiring land piling up, other companies are likely to follow Sime Darby’s lead. Some advocates fear they could be replaced by investors who are less concerned about their international image and more willing to flout social and environmental regulations. But Kuyek says that as the bigger players withdraw, smaller companies will struggle to raise the capital they need to develop the massive tracts of land.“A lot of them now understand how difficult it is to set up these large-scale plantations in Africa, and that’s a good thing,” he said.CORRECTION: This article originally stated the report was written by GRAIN; it is in fact a collaborative effort involvingADAPPE-Guinée, CDCH (Congo-Brazzaville), COPACO (DRC), Culture Radio (Sierra Leone), Joegbahn Land Protection Organization (Liberia), JVE Côte d’Ivoire, Muyissi Environnement (Gabon), NRWP (Liberia), RADD (Cameroon), REFEB (Côte d’Ivoire), RIAO-RDC (DRC), SEFE (Cameroon), SiLNoRF (Sierra Leone), Synaparcam (Cameroon), YETIHO (Côte d’Ivoire), YVE Ghana, Bread for All, WRM and GRAINCitationsGiovanni Strona, Simon D. Stringer, Ghislain Vieilledent, Zoltan Szantoi, John Garcia-Ulloa, and Serge A. Wich (2018)Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(35).  doi:10.1073/pnas.1804775115Banner image: Palm oil fruits on plantation belonging to local residents in the Pujehun district of Sierra Leone. Photo: Maja Hitij/FIANBelgium (CC-NC-ND 2.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Community Development, Economics, Economy, Environment, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Indigenous Peoples, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Migration, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Neymar, le PSG et le Barça : un vaste jeu de poker menteur ?

first_img Partager “Les conditions que le Barça mettrait pour un retour de Ney sont pratiquement impossibles. On ne met pas un centime pour le n°10 et un accord avec un échange semble assez complexe. Sans compter qu’à son manque de professionnalisme en dehors du terrain, il faut ajouter que maintenant le fisc espagnol lui réclame près de 35 millions d’euros”, note mercredi dans un éditorial le directeur adjoint de Mundo Deportivo Josep M. Artells.“En gros, le Barça propose deux joueurs dont il a envie de se débarrasser, et une somme relativement faible. En acceptant une telle offre, le PSG aurait vraiment l’impression d’être pris pour un pigeon”, estime Virgile Caillet. De là à imaginer que le club blaugrana ferait exprès une proposition inacceptable pour le club parisien afin de forcer ce dernier à la refuser tout en disant avoir fait ce qu’il pouvait pour le retour de Neymar, il n’y a qu’un pas, ajoute-t-il. Pour le journal espagnol As, le Barça est simplement “en train de poser les bases pour la négociation”. Même si dans le fond, l’arrivée de Neymar ne ferait pas forcément ses affaires…“Quelle est sa véritable valeur ?”Du côté du PSG, qui espère réaliser une plus-value en revendant Neymar, le compte n’y est clairement pas. D’autant que l’arrivée de Coutinho, Rakitic ou Dembélé ne rentre pas forcément dans sa stratégie. “On n’a jamais entendu dire que le PSG était intéressé par ces joueurs”, souligne Loïc Ravenel. “Derrière toute cette affaire, la véritable question qui est posée c’est : quelle est la véritable valeur de Neymar aujourd’hui ?”, analyse-t-il. En effet, alors que le Brésilien était présenté il y a deux ans comme un Ballon d’Or en puissance, le rapport de force entre le PSG et son buteur s’est aujourd’hui clairement inversé.Blessures à répétition, performances plus aussi éblouissantes, image ternie par des accusations de viol, gifle à un spectateur-chambreur, insultes à arbitre : Neymar n’est clairement plus le crack qu’il était. Selon le CIES, la cote du Brésilien se trouve aujourd’hui autour des 120 millions d’euros, soit 100 millions de moins que la somme pour laquelle il a été acheté. “Le PSG va lui aussi devoir mettre de l’eau dans son vin. Il ne veut pas brader Neymar, mais en demander 300 millions aujourd’hui c’est clairement surcoté”, selon Loïc Ravenel.Mais en plaçant la barre aussi haut, le club parisien ne joue-t-il pas lui aussi un jeu de dupes ? A ce tarif-là, seuls quelques grands clubs sont susceptibles en théorie de se positionner : outre le Barça, on peut penser au Real Madrid ou à Manchester United. Mais ces dernières places fortes ont fait d’autres choix et le club blaugrana vient d’enrôler Antoine Griezmann pour 120 millions d’euros. Donc, dans les faits, les candidats pour accueillir “Ney” ne se bousculent pas. Et si l’enjeu de ce mercato n’était pas au fond pour le PSG de montrer au Brésilien qu’il a, pour le moment, tout intérêt à rester ?LQ/AFP Entre Neymar et le PSG, rien n’est plus comme avant, le Brésilien drague ouvertement le Barça, mais le club catalan semble encore hésiter : le feuilleton du mercato estival tient en haleine la planète foot, mais ne pourrait être qu’un vaste jeu de poker menteur, selon plusieurs experts.Dernier épisode en date : selon L’Équipe et plusieurs médias espagnols, Barcelone aurait proposé au Paris SG d’échanger Neymar contre Philippe Coutinho et Ousmane Dembélé ou Ivan Rakitic, ainsi que 40 millions d’euros. C’est peu pour un joueur acheté 222 millions d’euros il y a deux ans…“Le Barça fait un test pour voir comment le PSG réagit”, estime Loïc Ravenel, analyste de l’Observatoire du football (CIES). Un avis que partage Virgile Caillet, délégué général de l’Union sport et cycle : “On est dans une phase où Barcelone envoie des sortes de ballons d’essai, via la presse ou les agents, pour estimer le degré d’acceptabilité du PSG”. Pour cet expert du marketing sportif, “on est entré dans une phase de jeux d’influences entre les différentes parties (le père et agent de Neymar, le PSG, le Barça) qui s’apparente à une sorte de poker menteur”.last_img read more

[Cyclo-cross] Le Belge Loïc Hennaux s’impose à Rumelange

first_imgLe Namurois s’est imposé sur un nouveau circuit où les habituels leaders luxembourgeois n’ont pas été vernis.Pas une minute de répit avec cette pluie soutenue qui ravinait dans la forêt. Le nouveau parcours de Rumelange, «un circuit de VTT mais pas un tracé de cyclo-cross», pour beaucoup de concurrents, a été lavé à grande eau. C’était un baptême pluvieux, pas vraiment un baptême heureux.Et pour cause, seul Scott Thiltges, un peu plus épargné par la poisse que ses compatriotes, a semblé surnagé. L’ancien champion national vainqueur samedi dernier à Kayl, a échappé au déluge. Surtout à la poisse qui a collé aux basques de Tristan Parrotta et Vincent Dias dos Santos, d’abord relégué dans les profondeurs du peloton à la suite d’une crevaison survenue dans le premier tour pour l’actuel champion national, et pour le lauréat des deux premiers cross, à Brouch et Mersch. Même combat…Bref, sur ce nouveau parcours extrêmement physique et pas assez technique pour les puristes de la discipline (prévu au départ, l’Allemand Sascha Weber s’est finalement décommandé en dernière minute, le circuit ne lui convenant pas), le Namurois Loïc Hennaux a caracolé en tête.Un habitué des cross luxembourgeois Partager Ce dernier n’est certainement pas un inconnu au Luxembourg. C’est même un vieil habitué puisque l’an passé, il avait remporté les épreuves de Tétange, Preizerdaul et Warken.Hier, il n’a jamais semblé en difficulté, campant sur la pole position. Seul, le Français Victor Thomas l’aura longuement accompagné. Mais lui aussi va disparaître de la circulation sur crevaison. Pas Loïc Hennaux.«On avait beaucoup d’appréhensions sur ce circuit, très cassant pour le matériel. Des concurrents ont cassé dès le premier tour. Vincent (Dias dos Santos) a eu un problème de crevaison. Mes sensations étaient bonnes. J’ai terminé mes études samedi passé. J’ai défendu mon mémoire en comptabilité et j’ai trouvé un job également. Il y a beaucoup de choses qui font qu’après des mois de galère et un été difficile, je suis très serein», évaluait-il ainsi.Avec ce succès, il se retrouve fatalement en tête de la Skoda Cross Cup.Il vise la Skoda Cross CupIl va jouer le jeu. «Maintenant que je suis leader, je vais donner la priorité au Luxembourg. Mais on verra, je vais essayer d’être constant tout au long de la saison», explique le coureur wallon qui garde dans sa tête une épreuve référence.Il concluait ainsi : «Le cross du Kopenberg me réussit très bien. L’an passé, j’avais terminé deux places devant Mathieu Van Der Poel. C’est un bon baromètre pour moi…» Rien que ça!On le reverra donc dimanche prochain à Contern, dans un contexte international.Chez les dames, notons le succès de la jeune Marie Schreiber devant Elise Maes et Nina Berton.Denis BastienÉlite/espoirs : 1. Loïc Hennaux (Colnago) 56’13”; 2. Victor Thomas (Ganova CKT) à 32″ (1er espoir); 3. Scott Thiltges (LG Alzingen) 1’10”; 4. Jarne De Meyer (Stageco) 1’47” (2e espoirs); 5. Raphaël Kockelmann (CCI Differdange) 1’52” (3e espoirs); 6. Cédric Pries (VC Schengen) 2’02”; 7. Lucas Thilly (VTT Club Viessmann) 2’16”; 8. Aymeric Barthel (Thionville) 2’24”; 9. Lorenzo Marasco (VC Hettange-Grande) 2’54”; 10. Tristan Parrotta (UC Dippach) 3’06”; 11. Lex Reichling (VV Tooltime) 3’16”; 12. Jacques Gloesener (VV Tooltime) 3’22”; 13. Vincent Dias dos Santos (LC Tétange) mt; 14. Théo Jung (VTT Fun Club) 3’58”; 15. Eric Meyers (LC Tétange) 4’13”Dames : 1. Marie Schreiber (CT Atertdaul) 41’27”; 2. Elise Maes (SAF Cessange) à 1’05”; 3. Nina Berton (CT Atertdaul) 1’51”last_img read more

[Escrime] Giannotte : «Si les planètes sont alignées ce jour-là…»

first_imgAvez-vous changé quelque chose au niveau de votre entraînement, justement ?Non. Comme on dit, “never change a winning team”. Je suis toujours à Reims, où je termine cette année mon master 2 pour être prof de sport. Je m’entraîne toute la semaine à Reims et le week-end, je viens m’entraîner avec Me Pizay au Luxembourg ou bien je pars en compétition. Et Me Pizay se rend une fois par semaine en Champagne pour me donner la leçon.Travaillez-vous également sur le plan mental ?Oui. Je travaille depuis quelques temps avec des psychologues du sport, une à Reims et un autre au Luxembourg, qui me suit depuis le Grand Prix de Cali (NDLR : où il a battu le n°1 mondial) et qui m’a été présenté via le LIHPS (Luxembourg Institute for High Performance in Sports).L’idée était de laisser le moins de place possible au hasard et, le jour J, d’être prêt sur tous les plans, technique, physique et psychologiquePas inutile quand on sait qu’on est dans une année olympique. Les JO, c’est le seul objectif ?C’est un peu trompeur. On peut se dire qu’on met toute sa concentration, toute son énergie sur le tournoi de qualification olympique. Mais si tu fais ça, tu n’es pas dans une bonne dynamique car tu ne fais pas tes compétitions d’avant à fond. Maintenant, si je me concentre complètement sur ma compétition de ce vendredi à Berne, ce n’est pas bon non plus, je risque d’être frustré si ça ne se passe pas bien. Du coup, on a décidé que désormais, il fallait bien sûr faire de son mieux lors de la compète mais surtout bien analyser la performance, qu’elle soit bonne ou mauvaise. L’idée était de laisser le moins de place possible au hasard et, le jour J, d’être prêt sur tous les plans, technique, physique et psychologique.Vous pouvez nous rappeler le chemin pour aller aux JO ? C’est vraiment très compliqué quand on vient d’une petite nation ?Oui. Ils prennent déjà les meilleures équipes. Ensuite, les deux meilleurs Européens du ranking mondial parmi les équipes non qualifiées. Et ensuite, il y a un tournoi de qualification à Madrid, à la mi-avril. Ce sera un niveau exceptionnel, certainement un des tournois les plus durs au monde, car il n’y aura personne qui ne mérite pas d’être là. Tout le monde aura une chance. Pour aller à Tokyo, il faut l’emporter. Je sais que j’ai tout ce qu’il faut. Si les planètes sont alignéees ce jour-là…Mais auparavant, il y a donc ce premier gros tournoi à Berne. Qu’attendez-vous de cette compétition ?C’est la première Coupe du monde de la saison et je sais que j’ai toujours besoin de temps pour prendre mes repères pour des épreuves de niveau mondial. Le premier objectif sera de sortir des poules. Ensuite, on verra au fur et à mesure. Maintenant, je sais qu’il y aura beaucoup de monde, que ce sera très relevé car tout le monde a encore ses chances pour aller aux JO.Vous avez réalisé une superbe saison. Est-ce que cela vous met en confiance ou vous rajoute de la pression ?Un peu des deux. L’année dernière, à la même époque, je revenais tout juste de blessure et mon but était de retrouver mon niveau. Maintenant, c’est différent, on met en place des choses. C’est vrai que la saison dernière a été très bonne. J’ai battu (Yannick) Borrel, ça m’a donné confiance pour les championnats d’Europe, où tout était presque parfait (NDLR : il termine 14e) puis aux championnats du monde où je fais des poules sans faute et je termine 40e. Tout cela te donne confiance car tu sais que tu l’as déjà fait.C’est toujours possible et facile de performer une fois. Le plus dur, c’est de le faire de manière constanteVous sentez que le regard de vos adversaires a changé ?Au fil des ans, il y a de plus en plus de gens qui viennent te voir, qui assistent à tes matches, des entraîneurs nationaux qui les analysent. Mentalement, il faut être prêt à tout ça. C’est toujours possible et facile de performer une fois. Le plus dur, c’est de le faire de manière constante. La saison dernière, j’ai enchaîné les bons résultats en faisant 32 à Cali, 14 aux Europe, 9 aux Universiades et 40 aux Monde. La dernière fois, Yannick Borel est venu de lui-même me saluer, quant à Park, le champion olympique (NDLR : qu’il avait battu aux Mondiaux en 2017), il le fait à chaque compétition. Mine de rien, ça fait quand même plaisir. Tu n’es plus le petit Luxembourgeois que personne ne connaît.Que pensez-vous que vos adversaires redoutent chez vous ?La faim. L’envie. Ils savent que je n’ai pas peur. Je respecte mes adversaires, mais je ne suis pas impressionné par leur palmarès.Entretien avec Romain Haas Coupe du monde, aujourd’hui à Berne. Flavio Giannotte entre dans le vif du sujet dans une saison qu’il espère aussi belle que la précédente. Avec le TQO de Madrid comme objectif principal.Très en vue la saison dernière pour son retour après une très grave blessure à la jambe, Flavio Giannotte a prouvé qu’il pouvait rivaliser avec les meilleurs. C’est toujours avec la même ambition que le jeune homme de 24 ans aborde cette nouvelle saison.Qu’avez-vous fait depuis les championnats du monde à la mi-juillet ?J’avais besoin de souffler. Je n’avais pas fait de vraie pause depuis deux ou trois ans, alors j’ai coupé un bon mois et demi. Je suis parti en Bulgarie deux semaines avec des potes, puis en Grèce avec ma copine. Ça m’a fait beaucoup de bien pour attaquer la reprise de l’entraînement. J’ai fait quelques stages, à Copenhague une semaine, beaucoup en Italie, j’ai participé à des petites compétitions histoire de me remettre en route. Partagercenter_img Déjà en Tableau de 64!Les planètes étaient visiblement alignées. En effet, Flavio Giannotte ne devra même pas passer par le tableau préliminaire. En effet, l’élève de Maurice Pizay a réalisé : «les meilleures poules depuis que je tire». Son bilan? 6 victoires – 0 défaite. Du coup, le voilà directement qualifié pour le Tableau de 64. Il va devoir patienter quelques heures avant de connaître son prochain adversaire.last_img read more

[Cyclisme] Luc et Tom Wirtgen confirmés en Continental Pro

first_imgLa formation est composée de 20 coureurs, parmi lesquels Tom Wirtgen déjà présent l’an passé et qui est rejoint par son jeune frère Luc, issu quant à lui de l’équipe de développement de Wallonie-Bruxelles. Avec Jan Petelin, qui évoluera de son côté au sein de la formation italienne Vini-Zabu KTM, ils seront donc trois Luxembourgeois à rouler au deuxième échelon de la hiérarchie internationale.R.H.Wallonie-BruxellesLes coureurs de 2019 : Kevyn Ista (Bel, 35) Eliot Lietaer (Bel, 29), Kenny Molly (Bel, 22), Julien Mortier (Bel, 22), Aksel Nommela (Est, 25), Mathijs Paaschens (P-B, 23), Dimitri Peyskens (Bel, 28), Baptiste Planckaert (Bel, 31), Ludovic Robeet (Bel, 25), Franklin Six (Bel, 22), Lionel Taminiaux (Bel, 23), Tom Wirtgen (Lux, 23).Arrivées (8) : Jonas Castrique (Bel, 22, < WB Développement), Sean De Bie (Bel, 28, < Roompot-Charles), Laurens Huys (Bel, 21, < Lotto-Soudal U23), Arjen Livijns (Bel, 25, < Roompot-Charles), Joel Suter (Sui, 21, < Akros-Thömus), Boris Vallée (Bel, 26, < Wanty-Gobert), Jelle Vanendert (Bel, 34, < Lotto-Soudal), Luc Wirtgen (Lux, 21 < WB Développement). Comme c’était attendu, l’UCI a bien validé la licence de la formation Wallonie-Bruxelles, qui évoluera en 2020 sous le nom de Bingol-WB et au sein de laquelle on retrouvera les deux frères Tom et Luc Wirtgen.Ce n’était plus qu’une question de jours. Même si l’UCI avait laissé le dossier en suspens, il ne faisait aucun doute que Tom Wirtgen et ses coéquipiers auraient le droit d’évoluer la saison prochaine au niveau Continental Pro.La confirmation est venue ce jeudi pour le plus grand bonheur de son patron, Christophe Brandt : «Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer la poursuite du projet sportif de l’équipe cycliste Wallonie-Bruxelles pour une durée de trois ans à partir de 2020», a-t-il expliqué sur le site internet de l’équipe. Partagerlast_img read more

[Basket] David Stern avait révolutionné la NBA

first_img“Il a tellement fait l’histoire. Quand j’ai annoncé en 1991 que j’avais contracté le HIV, les gens pensaient qu’ils auraient le sida en me serrant la main. Quand David m’a permis de jouer le All-Star Game en 1992 puis de participer aux JO de Barcelone avec la Dream Team, on a pu changer le monde”, a-t-il ajouté. Un monde que Stern a voulu sans frontières pour la NBA, faisant tout pour la populariser avec ses meilleurs ambassadeurs, les joueurs, qui allaient devenir des stars planétaires. “Sans David, la NBA ne serait pas ce qu’elle est aujourd’hui” a déclaré le plus célèbre d’entre eux Michael Jordan. “David aimait profondément le basket et exigeait l’excellence de ceux qui l’entouraient, et je l’admirais pour ça. Sans lui, je ne serais pas arrivé là où je suis”, a ajouté “his Airness” dont les exploits et les sneakers ont fait plus pour la NBA que n’importe quelle autre star de la balle orange.Que ce sport appartienne à chacun“C’est une énorme perte pour le sport en général car il est celui qui a ‘marketté’ les Jordan, Magic, Bird, Isiah Thomas, Charles Barkley, Karl Malone, Shaquille O’Neal, Kobe Bryant… Il a su rapprocher ces superstars des fans”, a abondé Reggie Miller, l’ancien shooteur des Indiana Pacers. Et il les a rendus richissimes : leur salaire moyen est passé de 250 000 dollars en 1984 à 5 millions de dollars en 2014 (7 aujourd’hui). Des gains qui se sont appuyés sur des chiffres d’affaire sans cesse croissants, au cours d’un mandat où sept franchises ont été créées, pour faire passer la Ligue à 30 clubs, et où d’autres ont déménagé. “Je crois que c’est important de nous souvenir où se trouvait ce pays en matière de relations raciales. David Stern a fait en sorte que ce sport appartienne à chacun, pas juste à une minorité”, a rappelé l’ancien joueur de Detroit Isiah Thomas. “Votre vision pour faire en sorte que notre jeu devienne PLANETAIRE, vous seul pouviez la réaliser. C’est ce que vous avez fait. Faire de notre sport le plus grand sport du monde! C’était un honneur de vous connaître personnellement”, a réagi LeBron James sur Instagram.En menant la NBA à la conquête du monde, Stern a aussi ouvert la porte à de plus en plus de joueurs non-américains, de l’Allemand Dirk Nowitzki au Français Tony Parker, pionniers des vedettes étrangères actuelles que sont le Grec Giannis Antetokounmpo, MVP en titre, ou encore le prodige slovène Luka Doncic, parmi les 108 joueurs internationaux recensés cette saison au sein de la NBA. Pour en avoir fait une des ligues sportives les plus puissantes du monde, Stern a été intronisé au Hall of Fame en 2016. Il a reçu le titre de “commissaire émérite” après sa retraite. “Restez en paix M. David Stern, LE meilleur commissaire qu’on n’ait jamais eu”, a tweeté Shaquille O’Neal, résumant le sentiment général du microcosme de la NBA.AFP “Un grand homme, mari, père, ami, homme d’affaires et visionnaire”: par ces mots empreints d’émotion, la légende du basket Magic Johnson a résumé l’hommage unanime du monde de la NBA adressé à son ancien patron emblématique David Stern, mort mercredi à 77 ans.C’est l’instance, dont il était à la tête de 1984 à 2014, qui a annoncé mercredi la nouvelle redoutée. “Le commissaire émérite David Stern est décédé cet après-midi des suites de l’hémorragie cérébrale qu’il avait subie il y a trois semaines” dans un restaurant de New York, a écrit la NBA dans un communiqué. “Pendant 22 ans, j’étais aux premières loges pour voir David en action. C’était un mentor et un de mes plus chers amis”, a réagi son successeur à la tête de la Ligue nord-américaine, Adam Silver.Au cours de ses 30 années de règne, assuré d’une main de fer dans un gant de velours, ce fils d’épicier de New York et diplômé de droit a fait prospérer la NBA et l’a transformée en une marque mondiale. A l’époque, cette instance était en proie à de graves problèmes financiers et était loin d’avoir l’exposition médiatique de la NFL (football américain) ou de la MLB (baseball). “David a fait de la NBA une des ligues les plus populaires du monde avec ses idées révolutionnaires. Il a fait des finales NBA des matches regardés en direct à la télévision et non plus en différé”, a tweeté la légende des Lakers Magic Johnson, dont la rivalité avec les Celtics de Larry Bird fut ainsi grandement exposée. Partagerlast_img read more

[Handball] «Une bonne séance de team building»

first_imgL’absence de Chris (Auger), évidemment, c’est un gros coup dur!Dans celle-ci figurent de nouveaux venus tels que Scott Meyers ou Loïc Kaysen. Pourquoi les avoir appelés?À 18 ans, Scott est apparu quelques fois cette saison avec Berchem. Et j’avais pu l’observer avec la sélection U18, dont il garde les buts avec Charel Kirtz, lors d’un tournoi en Allemagne. Et ça m’intéresse de voir ce qu’il peut faire un échelon plus haut. Quant à Loïc, c’est un jeune arrière polyvalent prometteur et j’avais envie de le voir à l’œuvre. Il profite aussi de l’indisponibilité de certains joueurs.La présence, dans ce groupe, de Scott Meyers fait automatiquement penser à l’absence de Chris Auger, forfait pour les deux échéances de janvier en raison d’une hernie discale. Avez-vous déjà établi une hiérarchie au poste de gardien de but?L’absence de Chris, évidemment, c’est un gros coup dur! On connaît son importance. Il va falloir faire sans lui. Quant à la hiérarchie au poste de gardien, j’en ai une dans mon esprit mais peut-être qu’après ces deux matches en Italie et ceux des qualifications du Mondial-2021, celle-ci aura évolué en vue des deux matches contre l’Estonie.Quelle est-elle la tendance actuelle?Pour l’instant, Mika (Herrmann) a fait une bonne première partie de saison.Absent de ce voyage en Italie, Martin Muller sera-t-il opérationnel pour le 10 janvier lors du premier match des qualifications du Mondial face aux Îles Féroé?Martin est touché aux adducteurs. Il est encore trop tôt pour dire s’il pourra jouer.Recueilli par Charles Michel Le groupeGardiens : Jérôme Michels (Käerjeng), Mika Herrmann (Dudelange), Scott Meyers (Berchem). Joueurs de champ : Pierre Veidig (Käerjeng), Yann Hoffmann (Red Boys), Loïc Kaysen (Gummersbach), Alen Zekan (Red Boys), Daniel Scheid (Red Boys), Joé Faber (Red Boys), Peter Ostrihon (Red Boys), Ben Weyer (Berchem), Leon Biel (Berchem), Felix Werdel (Esch).Le programmeSamedi18 h : Italie – LuxembourgDimanche17 h : Luxembourg – Italie Le Luxembourg livre, ce week-end, une double confrontation amicale face à l’Italie à Camirano. Pour l’occasion, Nikola Malesevic s’appuie sur un groupe rajeuni.Comment abordez-vous ce tournoi en Italie?Nikola Malesevic : En fait, ça a changé, ce n’est plus un tournoi… Je viens d’apprendre que les Turcs, finalement, ont décidé de ne pas venir. Du coup, on va jouer deux matches contre l’Italie. Donc ce rendez-vous relève d’une certaine manière davantage d’une escapade, d’une bonne séance de team building.Pour cette escapade, beaucoup de joueurs appelés à disputer les qualifications du Mondial-2021 (10-12 janvier) et les barrages de l’Euro, face à l’Estonie (16 et 19 janvier), sont absents…Entre les vacances des uns et les obligations professionnelles des autres, ça permet de se rappeler que le handball luxembourgeois n’est pas professionnel. Après, concernant les blessures, ça fait partie du sport. Tenez, Jacques (Tironzelli) devait être du voyage mais a pris un coup à la cuisse avec son club de Lemgo. Tommaso (Cosanti), lui aussi devait être là, mais hier (jeudi) il avait 39 de fièvre. Je ne pouvais pas prendre le risque de l’emmener avec nous… Alors, oui c’est vrai, pour ce tournoi en Italie, on va présenter une équipe new-look.center_img Partagerlast_img read more