Bearkats Finish Perfect to Claim 2019 Southland Bowling Championship

first_imgDALLAS, Texas – No. 2 Sam Houston State capped a seamless run through the 2019 Southland Bowling League Championship with a win over No. 1 Vanderbilt in the championship match Sunday afternoon. The Bearkats went 4-0 over the course of the tournament and were forced to a third round of play in two of their matches, once to No. 3 Arkansas State and once to top-seeded Vanderbilt.In addition to her Newcomer of the Year award, SHSU freshman Bea Hernandez was named the sixth player on the All-Tournament team and the tournament’s Most Valuable Bowler. The Bearkats needed three rounds to put the Commodores away and finally did so in game seven of the Baker Best-of-Seven Series.Sam Houston State, the Southland Bowling League’s automatic qualifier, will now advance to the NCAA Women’s Bowling Championship at RollHouse Wickliffe in Wickliffe, Ohio.How about six straight strikes to win a championship? Trailing in the seventh game of the best-of-7 match against Vanderbilt, @BearkatsBOWL knocked’em all down six times in a row to win the @SouthlandBowl title #StandTall pic.twitter.com/wlhKtfvEY9— BearkatSportsNetwork (@BearkatVid) March 24, 2019 Since the inaugural Southland Bowling Championship in 2015, the Bearkats are the third-team in league history to claim the title.The selection show announcing the field for the 2019 NCAA Women’s Bowling Championship will be streamed Wednesday, March 27 at 4 p.m. on NCAA.com.The NCAA Women’s Bowling selection committee will select a field of 12 programs – eight automatic qualifying teams and four at large teams. Teams will be ranked, based on available selection criteria, with the top four being placed in the championship bracket. The remaining eight teams will play in opening round matches to determine the final four teams that will compete in the championship match. Elimination Bracket – Fourth Round No. 1 Vanderbilt vs. No. 4 Stephen F. AustinVanderbilt earned a two-round victory over Stephen F. Austin in Sunday’s opening match, finishing the Ladyjacks with a 1,035-910 win in the Baker round. The Commodores were led in the Traditional set by Maria Bulanova who tallied a match-high 235. Vanderbilt averaged 208 in the traditional format as Jordan Newham (219) and Samantha Gainor (212) joined Bulanova to score above 200 in the opening game.center_img Sarah Gill attempted a surge early on, tallying a 221 in the traditional game to lead her Ladyjack squad to a score of 1,006 in the round. Unfortunately for SFA, Vanderbilt exploded to a 1,040 in the traditional matchup to set the pace for the contest.Hardware up for grabs on Championship Sunday. Three teams remain…@BearkatsBOWL, @VandyBowling, @SFA_Bowling. #SBL pic.twitter.com/Z18rIxIoU5— Southland Bowling (@SouthlandBowl) March 24, 2019 Championship MatchNo. 1 Vanderbilt vs. No. 2 Sam Houston StateThe title match went down to the wire between the Bearkats and the Commodores as Sam Houston State defeated Vanderbilt in game seven of the Baker Best-of-Seven showdown. SHSU climbed their way back from a 1-0 deficit following a 921-907 decision in favor of the Commodores in the traditional format match. Elise Chambers led Sam Houston State in the round with a 204-pin performance.Sam Houston State leveled the match at 1-1 following the Baker set to force the Best-of-Seven matchup. The Bearkats jumped out early in the third game with consecutive wins in the opening two rounds. Vanderbilt evened things up with wins in rounds three and four, but Sam Houston State climbed back in front with a round-five victory. The Commodores then leveled the series, topping SHSU 207-172 in round six. Sam Houston State bounced back to tie a bow on their first championship with a narrow 230-225 victory in game seven.All-Tournament TeamBea Hernandez, Sam Houston State (Most Valuable Bowler)Madysen Keller, Sam Houston StateMaria Bulanova, VanderbiltSamantha Gainor, VanderbiltSarah Gill, Stephen F. AustinDenishya Waller, Arkansas Statelast_img read more

The Spirit of the Steppes: Saving Central Asia’s saiga

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Bushmeat, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Conservation, Diseases, Drought, Ecological Restoration, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Forgotten Species, Global Warming, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Over-hunting, Overconsumption, Overpopulation, Restoration, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking The Critically Endangered saiga (Saiga tatarica) once numbered in the millions. This large antelope was perhaps best known for making one of the last of the world’s remaining great mammal migrations — a trek sweeping twice per year across the steppes of Central Asia.Saiga populations declined more than 95 percent by 2004, according to the IUCN. Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan banned hunting in the 1990s, but the horns of male saiga are highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine, and illegal trafficking is a major threat; if not curtailed the trade could doom the species.In the 21st century, international NGOs and regional organizations such as the Saiga Conservation Alliance (SCA) and Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity of Kazakhstan (ACBK) formed partnerships with Central Asian nations to better conserve the species. And their work was paying off, until 2015.That’s when disease killed over 200,000 adult saiga of the Betpak Dala population in Central Kazakhstan. At the end of 2016, the Mongolian herd was hit hard by a new viral infection, with 4,000 saiga carcasses buried so far. But the saiga is reproductively resilient, and could be saved, if the species receives sufficient attention, say conservationists. The Critically Endangered saiga is targeted by traffickers for its horns and hunted for its meat. This steppe antelope also faces threats from disease, habitat degradation, and climate change which is causing seasonal water sources to dry up earlier, forcing the species to shift northward. Photo by Andrey Gilev, Karina Karenina, courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreThe beauty of the saiga belies first impressions. It may be hard to look beyond the big nose — a bulbous schnozz that looks like a chunk of an elephant’s trunk. And those spindly legs could make anyone wonder how this sturdy antelope can run so fast and far.Yet, this awkward looking beast is beautiful in its own right; perfectly designed for its life on the arid, windswept steppes of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Mongolia and the far reaches of southern Russia.In that harsh unforgiving climate, the saiga’s prodigious nose can filter out clouds of fine dry dust rising in summer, or it can warm sub-zero air to keep from freezing the lungs during winter. And those legs, built for speed and endurance, are the best defense in a landscape largely devoid of cover and requiring long annual treks for survival.Unfortunately for the Critically Endangered saiga, the species can’t outrun the rapidly and drastically changing Asian ecology or national economies now threatening its survival. Although the saiga’s prehistoric past is preserved in ancient cave paintings, conservationists worry that the future of this “spirit of the steppe” may be imperiled.Saving the saiga will also conserve the steppes. As the saiga graze and follow their seasonal routes, they help maintain healthy forage that supports other endangered wildlife such as the Sociable Lapwing (Vanellus gregarius), one of the most threatened birds on the Eurasian steppes, with breeding grounds in Kazakhstan. Good grazing also benefits the local communities that have herdstock. Photo by Valeri Maleev from the Russian, pre-caspian population. Courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreResilient traveler of the arid plainAside from its extraordinary looks, the saiga (Saiga tatarica) is known for making one of the last of the world’s remaining great mammal migrations. Each spring and autumn, the antelope scattered across the vast steppe, merge into one massive cinnamon-hued herd, surging across a landscape the species has inhabited since the ice age.Once counted in the millions, saiga populations declined more than 95 percent by 2004, prompting a Critically Endangered species listing by the IUCN. One of the biggest threats: the critically endangered antelope is targeted by poachers for its horns and hunted for its meat. The saiga is also challenged by extreme drought — increasingly common as climate change escalates — and by competition for grasslands from domestic grazing stock, along with land use shifts favoring fossil fuel production.Already in jeopardy, an unexpected blow to the saiga came in 2015 when a sudden sickness killed nearly two-thirds of the world’s population in a single month, with numbers plummeting to a mere 31,300 saiga in Kazakhstan and about 100,000 worldwide.The species was just beginning to recover — with its population topping 100,000 adult animals dispersed in four nations as of June 2016 — when, in December 2016, disease struck again. This time, a virus that typically infects domestic goats and sheep, called peste des petits ruminants, began taking saiga lives in Mongolian herds. Winter snows and remote habitat may currently conceal the full impact of this new epidemic, saidEnkhtuvshin Shiilegdamba, a wildlife veterinarian in Mongolia with the Wildlife Conservation Society, in a February 2017 New York Times article.“The saiga are built for catastrophe and bounce back,” notes E.J. Milner-Gulland, a zoologist the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, who has been fascinated by these large herbivores since she first travelled to Russia as a doctoral student.A 2-day old saiga. Photo by Kate Surzhok, courtesy of the Saiga Resource Centre.One way in which the steppe antelope has adapted to the extreme climate in which it lives is to evolve as one of the most fecund ungulates on the planet, says Milner-Gulland. Females can live and reproduce for about 12 years, giving birth by their first year, and routinely twinning from the second year onward.That reproductive evolutionary strategy doesn’t make existence on the steppe any less precarious for individual animals, though. When the saiga gather in huge herds, their sheer numbers can help deter predators ranging from golden eagles, to grey wolves and red foxes. But calving among so many big grazing animals, crammed together, has its own risks, which are compounded by highly erratic weather — with the herd buffeted by high winds one minute, then pelted by hailstones the next. All this can cause saiga stress levels to spike, says Milner-Gulland.So, life for the steppe antelope remains a harsh dance, in which great susceptibility to rapidly shifting conditions is balanced by the species’ high reproductive resilience. If not harmed by humans, saiga populations will naturally rise — and crash — then rebound.Conserving the herdsOne of the most at-risk saiga populations lives on the Ustyurt Plateau, a desert known for its extreme daily temperature shifts and scant rainfall, located between Central Asia’s Caspian and Aral Seas.This vast area covers roughly 200,000 square kilometers (about 77,000 square miles) and is shared by the countries of Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. Most saiga there migrate seasonally back and forth across national borders, spending summer in Kazakhstan, then heading south to Uzbekistan when winter snows cover forage in the north.Saiga distribution in Central Asia, excluding the Mongolian herds. Map courtesy of Steffen ZutherOnly about 2,000 animals remain in this trans-boundary herd today, down from 200,000 less then two decades ago. These huge declines occurred despite many years of conservation action by the governments of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, added to by an array of NGO partners.Uzbekistan has banned the hunting of saiga since 1991, and established the one-million hectare (3,861 square mile) Saigachy Reserve, in part, to protect Saiga breeding grounds. Kazakhstan banned hunting by 1998.But it wasn’t enough. The Ustyurt population kept decreasing, even as conservation for the other populations began to gain momentum, in particular for the Betpak-Dala herd.Enter the SCA and ADCIIn 2006, a coalition of Asian governments, along with NGOs such as the Saiga Conservation Alliance (SCA), signed the Convention on Migratory Species’ Memorandum of Understanding to protect saiga.The resilience of the species is rooted in their reproductive capability, says Milner-Gulland. Photo by Andrey Gilev, Karina Karenina, courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreBy 2010, all five saiga range states (Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Mongolia, and the Russian Federation) were taking steps to fulfill a conservation action plan. That same year, the Saiga Conservation Alliance became a formal non-profit organization, rather than a loose network of groups. SCA’s goal was to link up conservationists, researchers, NGOs and governments in all the range states, including Mongolia, and in saiga consumer states in China.“We try to bring everyone together,” says SCA chair Milner-Gulland, who first learned about saiga during her graduate studies on the illegal ivory and rhino horn trade. In Traditional Chinese Medicines saiga horn has long been used in similar ways to rhino horn, especially when the antelope were more plentiful.Since 2005, the Altyn Dala Conservation Initiative (ADCI) has worked to conserve the Betpak-Dala saiga population. The ADCI partnership includes the Kazakh Committee of Forestry and Wildlife, the Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity of Kazakhstan (ACBK), Fauna & Flora International, the Frankfurt Zoological Society, and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. While the ADCI didn’t single out the saiga for conservation, participants understood that anything that helped the antelope would also likely improve the steppe ecology for other plants and animals.2011 Whitley award winner Elena Bykova, with her students in Uzbekistan. Community outreach is an important part of saiga conservation. Photo by Alexander Esipov, courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreSeveral years later, the SCA joined other NGOs and local partners to launch a long-term project to better define the boundaries of the Saigachy Reserve, while also improving wildlife corridors for saiga travel between Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. Within eight years, in 2015, the Saigachy Reserve was re-designated, becoming the largest protected area in Uzbekistan, covering 7,000 square kilometers (2,700 square miles), and providing safer passage to calving and mating places.Another landscape-scale effort, the Ustyurt Landscape Conservation Initiative, was funded by USAID from 2009 to 2014. Projects conducted in partnership with ACBK and Fauna & Flora International include gaining a better understanding of the region’s biodiversity; establishing school eco-clubs for young people; and boosting wildlife law enforcement. Anti-trafficking efforts were ramped up with the addition of four “sniffer dogs” that worked the Kazakhstan border to help detect illegal saiga horn trafficking. In 2007, Saiga Day was established in Uzbekistan and then became an international festival, promoting conservation in communities across the saiga’s entire range.Sudden die-off, sudden setbackJust when it looked as though all these conservation efforts were starting to pay off, the die-off hit. It was May 2015 and the peak of calving season. In less than a month, the grasslands were dotted with more than 200,000 dead adult saiga. The Betpak-Dala herd of central Kazakhstan was almost wiped out. The count of the dead steppe antelope would eventually top more than 200,000 animals.E.J. Milner-Gulland, chair of the Saiga Conservation Alliance, holding a saiga calf. With a passion for all things Russian, her graduate studies on the illegal trade in rhino horn gave her an opportunity to work with saiga. In traditional Chinese medicine saiga horn is often used alongside rhino horn. Courtesy of the Saiga Resource Centre“It was a tragedy,” recalls Milner-Gulland. “It had just got to the point when colleagues doing the aerial surveys were saying: ‘This really looks like the way it was before all the poaching.’”It wasn’t the first big die-off the ungulates suffered, however. Mass mortality events were recorded in the same population in 1981 and 1988, and die-offs occurred in other herds too. Yet the saiga have always come back.Although bacteria caused the 2015 die-off, researchers are still sorting out why the antelopes were so susceptible. The infection, caused by Pasteurella, is considered to be opportunistic — something else must have first weakened the saigas’ immune systems in order to allow this run-of-the-mill bacteria to suddenly become a virulent killer.“With so few antelope left, we need to understand exactly what happened,” says ADCI international coordinator Steffen Zuther at ACBK. “We also need to focus on guaranteeing viable population sizes that could cope with [future] big catastrophes.”The concerns are slightly different — but no less dire — for the Mongolian herds, a unique subspecies (Saiga tatarica mongolica), that is succumbing to a virus spread from infected domestic sheep and goats. The outbreak of “goat plague” was previously recorded in areas where the saiga were later stricken, according to reports from the World Wildlife Fund in Mongolia. Although vaccines against the virus have been deployed for domestic herds, most recent reports say that 4,000 saiga carcasses have been buried so far. Worse, experts have found that other wild hoofstock are also infected, including ibex and Goitered gazelles.Saiga horn traffickingIf those viable populations are ever to be nurtured back into existence and permanently maintained, the very serious challenges presented by rampant poaching must be met.Male saiga possess ridged horns that fetch up to US $3,000 per kilogram and which are used in traditional Chinese medicine. It takes about three dead saiga to make a kilogram of the powdered horn.Poachers who kill males for their horns do the species a double disservice: they skew the population ratios so that there are too few males to attract a harem of females, and often the surviving males are younger animals who are sometimes not experienced enough, or mature enough, to breed effectively.Poaching is the biggest obstacle to saiga population recovery. The demand for saiga horn is worldwide, notes Elena Bykova, a mammalogist and the Saiga Conservation Alliance executive secretary. It’s not only the Chinese market that drives the demand, it’s also Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. Photo by Eva Klebelsberg/Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity of Kazakhstan, courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreThe Kazakh government supports ranger services, notes ACBK’s Zuther. But, as with poaching hotspots in Africa, the high prices available for saiga horn attract organized crime, which is difficult to fight.Also, the country is huge — close to three million square kilometers (1,052,085 square miles), roughly the size of Western Europe. Much saiga territory is rugged and nearly impossible to patrol, so the species cannot practically be protected across its entire range — or at least not at any reasonable price.Zuther also sees a bigger problem: “Saiga horn is never discussed at big international forums about wildlife crime,” he explains. “Everybody talks about rhinos and elephants. That’s important, but there’s something beyond that: saiga. They need to be part of the conversation.”Big oil, big problemsWhile poaching is rooted in poor economies, saiga also paradoxically suffer due to Kazakhstan’s oil boom. Already the biggest former Soviet oil producer after Russia, last summer the Kazakh government made a $36.8 billion dollar deal with investors to boost production at the country’s Tengiz field on the northeast edge of the Caspian Sea.Those plans have resulted in a building boom in gas pipelines, railroads and roads, all of which hinder herd movement. The saiga can run up to 80 kilometers per hour, but they cannot leap across pipeline construction or safely navigate the railways and roads of the new transportation infrastructure.Other human obstructions have impeded the saiga. In 2012, barbed wire went up along the Kazakh-Uzbek border, in part to help prevent drug smuggling, but the fence also blocked much of the saiga migration route. Animals stalled at the fence became easy targets for poachers. The efforts of conservation organizations has since resulted in the government beginning to modify fence sections so the saiga can get through.Fossil fuel production presents still another major long-term challenge for the saiga: climate change. “With higher temperatures, the quality of the grass is affected and the temporary watering holes dry up earlier in the season,” explains Elena Bykova, executive secretary of the Saiga Conservation Alliance and a leader for saiga protection in her native country of Uzbekistan. Slowly, the saiga herds are moving their calving grounds to the north.More than 60 percent of the world’s saiga population died in central Kazakhstan in May 2015, just after the peak of calving season. Mostly female and babies were lost. Although the antelope died from an overwhelming bacterial infection, researchers are still seeking the underlying cause. Photo by Sergei Khomenko, FAO. Courtesy of the Saiga Resource Centre.Climate change may even have triggered the 2015 die-off, suggests Bykova. Higher temperatures and humidity could have created optimal conditions for growth of the Pasteurella bacteria, overwhelming the saiga at a time when the herds were already stressed from calving. Another possibility: the world’s insidious global warming trend could have weakened the species’ vaunted reproductive resilience.Another unexpected threat has come due to the shrinking of the Aral Sea. This vast inland water body, located in the pre-Caspian lowlands of Eurasia, started fading away in the mid-20th century — mostly due to the siphoning off of Aral Sea freshwater feeder streams to irrigate Uzbekistan’s massive cotton crop.Over time, the inland sea receded, leaving behind a desert that degrades saiga habitat, explains Bykova. The sea’s loss has helped raise land and air temperatures, adding dust and air pollution. Also, fishermen who lived near the now vanished sea, are without livelihood, and so look to saiga poaching as a new means of income.“There needs to be a way that saiga can be helped to adapt to climate change,” says Milner-Gulland. “All they need is space, really. They can’t be boxed in. That’s what makes them such wonderful creatures.”The saiga are an important cultural icon and flagship species of the steppes. “Once you see them, you would love them and do everything possible to save the species,” says Steffen Zuther, international coordinator for the ADCI. He first encountered the steppe antelope when he moved to Kazakhstan 10 years ago. Photo by Pavel Sorokin, courtesy of the Saiga Resource CentreThe long viewIf there’s a silver lining to the die-offs, the tragic disease outbreaks may have shocked the world into recognizing the precarious condition of these awkward looking antelope of the steppes.“They are this amazing adaptive species that have survived [past] terrible climate catastrophes, so now it is the responsibility of the people who have impacted the saiga to help them,” says Bykova. She was a 2011 Whitley Award winner, honored for her rallying of diverse communities (women’s groups, schools, government officials, and even ex-hunters) to saiga conservation.Looking ahead, Bykova enumerates the next key steps for saiga conservation: she points to the importance of sharing scientific data as well as best conservation practices between nations, and of building stronger partnerships between NGOs, governments and the industries that impact saiga habitat.Above all, she says, the trafficking of saiga horn must be stopped.Can the saiga recover? The new viral epidemic may take a huge toll on the Mongolian population, which hovered around 10,000 animals before the outbreak. However, one year after the mass die-off of 2015, calving appears to be normal again, reports Milner-Gulland. “I don’t think we should give up on them,” she says. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

The military family that kept a pet orangutan in Indonesia

first_imgAnimals, Anti-poaching, Apes, Biodiversity, Environment, Environmental Crime, Featured, Great Apes, Mammals, Pet Trade, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Wildlife traffickers are chipping away at the dwindling populations of Sumatran and Bornean orangutans. Deforestation lends poachers an assist, rendering the primates homeless and easier to catch.Keeping an orangutan pet is illegal in Indonesia, but not once has a citizen been prosecuted for it. The owners tend to be influential figures — police officers, soldiers, politicians.Krismon was separated from his mother as an infant in the late 1990s. Only last year was he finally recovered from the military family he was living with.The ape will spend the rest of his life behind metal bars — unless a plan to construct an orangutan haven comes to fruition in North Sumatra. KABANJAHE, Indonesia — Zulbaidah used to take her family’s pet orangutan on road trips. He’d ride in the back with the kids.“He was like my own son,” the 55-year-old woman said at her home in this North Sumatran town. “Who wouldn’t love him?”Those were the good times, when the ape, Krismon, was small and cute. But as the years passed, and he grew more mammoth and strong-willed, the family began to use a cage to keep him under control. Eventually they threw away the key.By June 2016, when authorities confiscated Krismon, then aged around 20, he had been confined to the tiny enclosure for so long, his legs had wasted away to the point he could no longer stand.He is now relearning to climb and move at a rehabilitation center near Medan, the capital of North Sumatra province. But he lacks the skills to survive in the forest, and his caretakers doubt he can ever return to the wild.“We didn’t know he would get so big,” said Zulbaidah, who like many Indonesians goes by one name. “The man [who gave him to my husband] said he would stay small forever.”Krismon in his cage at the time of his confiscation by authorities. Panut Hadisiswoyo, left, founded the Orangutan Information Center, which participated in the operation. Photo courtesy of the OICKrismon is one of thousands of victims of the blackmarket trade in orangutans that has helped push these great apes to the brink of extinction. The babies are prized for their adorability as well as for the prestige an exotic pet can bestow on its owner.The trade is driven in large part by poachers who slaughter the mother to get to her young. It is abetted by the deforestation that flushes the apes from their arboreal homes. Indonesia has lost more rainforest than any other country since the turn of the century, when the plantation sector commenced a relentless expansion that made the archipelago nation the world’s top producer of palm oil, found in everything from ice cream to laundry detergent.Homeless and hungry, the displaced primates wander into violent confrontation with farmers who carry pellet guns to defend their crops. Orphaned apes can be sold into a vast network of traffickers that extends throughout Indonesia and beyond.The animals are found on Thailand’s tourist track, for instance, where they are dressed in silk shorts and made to spar like boxers. In 2014, at least 14 orangutans were repatriated to Indonesia after being confiscated from Thai zoos.In the late 1980s, more than 1,000 orangutans were illegally imported into Taiwan because a TV show featuring an orangutan character was stoking demand there, the WWF has reported.Orangutans held at a Thai government-run rescue center prior to repatriation to Indonesia. Photo by Claire Beastall for TRAFFICAbove the lawIt is in Indonesia where the trade is foremost. The law here provides a maximum penalty of five years imprisonment for anyone who transports, trades, keeps or kills a protected species such as the Sumatran or Bornean orangutan (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus). Both are listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN.But not once has a citizen been prosecuting for keeping an orangutan pet.It is not that seizures are uncommon. Since 2012, the Orangutan Information Center (OIC), a nonprofit, has assisted authorities in the confiscation of 114 orangutans, including 39 pets.At the root of the discrepancy, observers say, is that owners tend to be not poor villagers but influential figures, such as soldiers or politicians. They can afford to pay for an orangutan’s upkeep — and get away with having one in the house.“They know the law, but they ignore the law,” Panut Hadisiswoyo, the OIC’s founder, said at his office in Medan.Hadisiswoyo recalled how he and his colleagues tried to recover an ape from a high-ranking police officer in neighboring Aceh province, where most Sumatran orangutans live.“Don’t teach me about the law — the law is in my head,” the man told Hadisiswoyo’s team at his front door, before asking them to leave.This Sumatran orangutan was rescued by forest rangers after being kept as an illegal pet in the town of Kutacane, Aceh. Photo courtesy of the OICAnother time, they found a baby orangutan on display in a park in Aceh. It turned out to belong to the mayor of the city, who dutifully handed it over.The OIC also helped confiscate two orangutans from a former commander of Aceh’s now-defunct separatist movement, the GAM. The man claimed to have purchased the apes only because villagers were threatening to kill them. The police let him off the hook — only to discover he was preparing to ship five more by bus to a buyer in Medan. The animals were retrieved; the man remains at large.Hadisiswoyo sees traders and pet owners alike as criminals deserving of punishment.“The orangutans we rescue are the lucky ones — they get a second chance at life,” he said. “There are many more who cannot be rescued.”Krismon’s storyAnd then there is Zulbaidah. Her late husband ran a military base. The soldier received baby Krismon as a gift, she said, in 1998, while on duty near the Leuser Ecosystem, one of the country’s most biodiverse rainforests.It was a year in which Aceh was roiling with insurgency. The national currency had plunged amid the Asian financial crisis — known to Indonesians as Krisis Moneter.“We’ll name him Krismon, so we don’t forget,” Zulbadiah recalled her husband saying.Zulbaidah at her home in Kabanjahe, a two-hour drive from Medan. Photo by Philip Jacobson for MongabayThe children grew up with Krismon, enjoying TV shows and tickle fights in the living room. The young ape would laugh like the sound was stuck in his throat — hhk hhk hhk.The family brought him on trips to other towns, confident their military status precluded arrest for driving around with an endangered primate. Once they visited Zulbaidah’s relatives hundreds of miles away in West Sumatra province.As Krismon matured, his teeth grew longer and sharper; his body swelled in size. Sometimes he got angry and threw things. Zulbaidah let him ply the street outside — the neighbors liked to feed him cakes — but if he became unruly she stuck him in a cage. It was meant for chickens, with a doorway the size of a bird. She employed the device more frequently as time went on.The larger he grew, the more he seemed to be hurting himself squeezing in and out of that small opening.“Finally we didn’t have to lock him in anymore,” Zulbaidah said. “He was too big to get out.”From one cage to anotherThe adult Krismon was a rag doll of an ape by the time an anonymous tip sent the OIC to Zulbaidah’s house, his muscles atrophied from years of disuse and a diet of table scraps. His immense frame nevertheless inhabited the cage like a capsule hotel. They had to cut it open to get him out.When he arrived at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Progam’s (SOCP) rescue center outside Medan, “his entire body was shaking nonstop” from prediabetes, said Jennifer Draiss, who works at the facility. “He couldn’t even balance his hand to bring food to his mouth.”A tranquilized Krismon is removed from his cage in June 2016. Photo courtesy of the OICKrismon is taken from his cage in Kabanjanhe. Photo courtesy of the OICThe staff put Krismon in quarantine. Slowly, they weaned him off rice and bread and onto a normal orangutan diet. After four months he began to walk, albeit with a heavy slump.Soon he began to lumber up the metal bars of his new enclosure, where a hammock hangs from the rafters — but he’s still terrified of anything unstable.Draiss says he’ll never return to the wild. “He’s been with people for so long there’s no way,” she explained, watching Krismon munch on an okra at the SOCP’s facility. “They just don’t have the understanding of the forest they need to survive.”Ian Singleton, who runs the center, is more optimistic. “He just needs to get his legs back under him,” he ventured.An orphaned baby orangutan at the SOCP’s facility in North Sumatra, where Krismon now resides. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for MongabayThe center was never meant to house permanent residents. But that’s the fate awaiting a number of its apes — unless the SOCP succeeds in constructing the orangutan haven it is planning nearby.The idea is to build a cluster of islands in a reclaimed rice paddy for orangutans who cannot be released, and then to open it up to local and international visitors, where the animals’ stories could be used to educate the public about the follies of keeping an orangutan and why Indonesia’s rainforests must be conserved.Krismon wouldn’t have complete freedom at the haven. He’d still get his food from caretakers and sleep in a night house.“But he’d have outdoor space and not a cage,” Draiss said.Provided it can raise the funds, the SOCP will open the haven in three years.For now, Krismon’s victories are small and few. But they come. Draiss looked up at a horizontal pole toward the top of his enclosure. It was higher than the ape had ever climbed.“Just this morning, I caught him sitting on that pole in the sun,” she said. “I’d never seen him do that before.”Banner image: Krismon behind bars in Kabanjahe. Photo courtesy of the OIC Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Protests over geothermal development heat up in Central Java

first_imgThe people of Karangtengah Village in Central Java learned in January one of their key sources of freshwater had been contaminated by debris from the development of a planned $1 billion geothermal energy plant at a nearby volcano.Indonesia, which is estimated to have the largest geothermal capacity in the world, is eager to tap into the renewable energy source.The government says work will continue despite mounting demands from locals to stop the project over claims it has contaminated rivers, cleared forests and damaged the local tourism industry. PURWOKERTO, Indonesia — This January, the people of Karangtengah Village in Central Java were surprised to find that the river running past their homes had turned murky. Not only do the villagers rely on the Prukut River for freshwater, it also tumbles down in the scenic Cipendok Waterfall, the centerpiece of a local tourism industry.Before long, the villagers identified the source of the muck polluting the waterway: mud and debris from a once-forested plot of land that had been cleared to make way for a planned geothermal power plant in Baturraden, a tourist resort on the southern slopes of Mount Slamet.A view of Mount Slamet in Purwokerto, Central Java. Photo by L. Darmawan/Mongabay-IndonesiaIndonesia’s geothermal dreamIndonesia is hungry for electricity to help power its economy and raise living standards across the archipelago. The country’s electricity demand is projected to increase by an average of 9 percent per year to reach 328.3 terawatt hours (TWh) in 2020, double 2012 levels.As the government struggles to keep pace with demand, few options look more attractive than geothermal — a 24-hour-a-day, 365-days-a-year source of very low carbon energy that is available in abundance throughout the volcanic islands that form the Indonesian archipelago. The country is estimated to have geothermal capacity of more than 28,000 megawatts, the largest in the world.So far, this potential is largely untapped. Indonesia currently has installed capacity of 1,403 megawatts from geothermal fields in Java, Sumatra and Sulawesi. The government aims to expand that to 7,200 megawatts by 2025, making geothermal energy a key part of its plan to derive 23 percent of its electricity from renewable energy.The Baturadden power plant, the development responsible for muddying the Prukut River, demonstrates that while these projects can bring tremendous benefits, they are not entirely without social and environmental costs.The plant, which is being developed by independent power producer PT Sejahtera Alam Energy (SAE), is expected to generate 220 megawatts of electricity from three turbines. Power from the plant will be transmitted to five districts in Central Java: Banyumas, Purbalingga, Tegal, Brebes and Pemalang.The heat to drive these turbines comes from Mount Slamet, an active stratovolcano standing 3,428 meters (11,247 feet) high and spanning 420 kilometers (260 miles) at its base. It last erupted in 2009, but in September 2014 the volcano spewed lava and ash as high as 3,000 feet above its peak, prompting authorities to put the mountain on level-3 alert status, with level 4 being the highest.“The [Baturraden geothermal] project will create multiplier effects to the economy, especially prosperity to the people surrounding the [districts] and Central Java. We are promoting a cleaner environment by reducing the country’s CO2 emission for more than 205,000 ton per year,” the firm says.In 2010, the company obtained a 35-year concession from Indonesia’s Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources to develop a 24,660-hectare (95.21 square miles) plot of land in Baturraden.So far, some $30-$35 million has been disbursed for the project which is currently in the exploration phase for its first well. Overall, it is estimated to cost $1 billion.The plant is targeted to be fully operational in 2022, according to PT SAE, a company whose ownership has previously been linked to a major political scandal.Herman Afif Kusumo, who has been listed as President Commissioner of both PT SAE and PT Trinergy Mandiri International (which also owns a stake in PT SAE’s parent company PT Trinergy) was named in a notorious corruption case involving former energy minister Jero Wacik. Kusomo and other company officials were not charged with any wrongdoing, but the Jakarta anti-corruption court proved that Wacik in 2012 improperly accepted a 349 million rupiah birthday party from Kusomo, part of a list of financial improprieties for which Wacik was sentenced to four years in prison for graft. The people of Karangtengah Village in Central Java put up signs saying ‘Where can I get help?’ in protest against the Baturraden geothermal plant development which has polluted the Prukut River, one of their source of freshwater. Photo by L. Darmawan/Mongabay-Indonesia The water of Cipendok Waterfall on Mount Slamet in Central Java was contaminated this January by mud and debris from a once-forested plot of land that had been cleared to make way for the ongoing Baturraden geothermal power plant project. Photo by L. Darmawan/Mongabay-Indonesia. Article published by Basten Gokkon 123 read more

‘Much deeper than we expected’: Huge peatland offers up more surprises

first_imgcarbon, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Climate Change Negotiations, Deforestation, Featured, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Warming, Habitat, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Daviscenter_img Scientists recently discovered the world’s biggest tropical peatland in the Congo Basin rainforest of Central Africa. The peatland straddles the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of the Congo.Roughly the size of England, the massive peatland is estimated to contain more than 30 billion metric tons of carbon — equivalent to three years of global fossil fuel emissions.When the scientists went back to investigate the peatland further, they discovered the peat along its edges is deeper than they thought. This means it may contain more peat — and, thus, more carbon — than they originally thought.The scientists are racing to learn more about the peatland as loggers move to fell and drain the forests above it to make way for roads and developments like palm oil plantations. Meanwhile, local communities are hoping for greater protection of the region as government officials try to drum up more support for conservation initiatives at this week’s UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany. Lokolama barely registers on atlases and maps. The small Pygmy village, home to a few hundred people, lies deep in the Congo Basin rainforest 48 kilometers (30 miles) south of the equator. It has a dilapidated church that doubles as a primary school, a single television set, a few rice and vegetable fields, and a dirt track that is impassable when it rains.But last week the remote community in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was put on the world map when international scientists, government officials and forest campaigners from three continents camped for two nights on its edge in order to conduct research and confirm the presence of one of the world’s most important carbon sinks.Fieldwork in the swamps of the Cuvette Centrale region in the neighboring Republic of Congo (ROC), and four years of analysis of satellite imagery by Leeds University scientists Simon Lewis and Gretta Dargie revealed that Lokolama sits on the edge of what is now believed to be the world’s biggest tropical peatland. Their study mapping the extent of the peatland was published in the journal Nature earlier this year.The recently discovered peatland is believed to be the largest tropical peatland in the world. Image courtesy of Dargie et al., 2017.View from the village of Lokolama at sunset. A team from Greenpeace Africa are working with local partners to conduct scientific research in the village of Lokolama, 45 kilometers from Mbandaka. The team aims to identify the presence of the tropical peatland in the region, and to measure its depth. Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.The newly discovered peat deposits lie below the vast swamp that begins just a few hundred meters from Lokolama and stretch nearly 322 kilometers (200 miles) north and both sides of the Congo River. Covering an area of around 155,000 square kilometers (59,800 square miles), the peatland is around the size of England. Lewis and Dargie estimate it may store 30.6 billion metric tons of carbon, equivalent to around three years of global carbon emissions.Their discovery has been welcomed by scientists, environmentalists, governments and local communities. They say that the peatland’s huge store of carbon increases the urgency to protect its overlying rainforest, and could also give two of the poorest countries in the world access to global climate funds.Deeper than expectedPeat forms in the tropics over thousands of years because plant matter like leaves and roots cannot decompose in permanently waterlogged ground. It is a carbon storage powerhouse, sequestering up to 20 times more carbon than other types of rainforest soil.Despite its vast size, the peatland shared between the DRC and ROC was barely known to science even five years ago. Now, scientists are racing to learn more about it as loggers move to fell and drain the forests above it to make way for roads and developments like palm oil plantations.“We know that this vast new ecosystem exists; now we’d like to know how it works,” said Lewis, who with Dargie and Congolese botanist Corneille Ewango went to Lokolama to take samples from the forest floor to gauge the depth of the peat.Congo Basin Experts from the UK and DRC take samples from the peatland. Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.After collecting samples, the team measured their lengths to determine the peatland’s depth. Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.After two days of probing, the three scientists announced that the peat was 3.7 meters (12 feet) deep at the peatland’s edge — nearly as deep as its center in the ROC. This could mean there is much more peat than was thought, but more field research is needed to know for certain.“It is much deeper than we expected so close to the swamp edge,” Lewis said. “It confirms the satellite maps and models and shows the need to do more research in DRC. We now need to spend more time on the ground to get more data.”The scientists are hoping to learn more than just how deep the peat is. Even basic information about the formation and nature of the peatland is lacking, and they say its carbon storage capacity needs to be investigated more thoroughly.“There are so many questions still to answer,” Dargie said. “We don’t know how the hydrology of the swamps works or where the water comes from. We suspect it comes from rainfall but don’t know the depth of the peat deposits, or how much methane and CO2 they hold.  We think, but we don’t know, that these deposits [in the DRC] are more carbon rich, but less deep than those north of the river [in the ROC].”Lewis, a professor of global change science, wants to raise around $5 million to research the peatlands more fully. He says time is of the essence.“This is a precious moment because the peatlands are practically intact. They are so vulnerable to logging, roads, large-scale agriculture,” he said.Lewis said he and his team would like to involve paleoecologists and climatologists in the next round of research, as well as DRC universities and local PhD students.“Peat is a record of what has happened and they could build a mathematical model of how it has developed over 10,000 years and then predict its future with different climates and temperatures.”More peatland, more protection?The discovery has also excited the DRC government. Under constant pressure from environmental groups like Greenpeace and the Rainforest Foundation in Britain to better protect the second-largest rainforest in the world, after the Amazon, the revelation that some of its remotest lands are vital to the global effort to avoid climate change is a source of national pride and gives the country added leverage in ongoing climate change negotiations.A proposal to protect a much smaller area of Peruvian Amazon peatland has already attracted attention from the UN’s Green Climate Fund. However, a DRC government official told Mongabay that a transboundary application by the DRC and ROC to protect and sustainably develop their more extensive peatlands could attract much more money from conservation groups, governments and the UN.As a measure of the peatland’s importance to the DRC, President Joseph Kabila last week sent Joseph Katenga, his forests adviser, to Lokolama with Greenpeace campaigners and the scientists. Within days, Environment Minister Amy Ambatobe proposed setting up an official unit to oversee future management of the peatland.“The management of the peatland will become very important. It will determine how [it] will be managed and who would be involved,” Ambatobe said. “This work is to be done with technical partners and donors, civil society and local community.”Joseph Katenga, forest adviser to the Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development, accompanied scientists to Lokolama. Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.Meanwhile, in the Republic of Congo, the government has said it plans to extend the area of protected swamp by expanding the Lac Tele Community Reserve by up to 50,000 square kilometers (19,300 square miles).But protection alone is not enough, Ambatobe warns. He said it must be balanced with responsible development that will help ensure local communities aren’t adversely affected.“When we talk about protecting forest, we should not only talk about climate change; but also about protecting the forest for the benefit of communities [who] live in the forest,” Ambatobe said.The structure of the management unit has already been established, according to Ambatobe, and it will be presented at the 2017 UN Climate Change Conference (COP23) taking place this week in Bonn, Germany. But he and Katenga stress that funding is still needed to make it functional.“This is very important to us. But it all comes down to money,” Katenga said. “We need partners. Its existence can change everything.”Illegal logging and other threatsAll central African countries have laws protecting their forests and peatlands. However, logging companies working in remote locations commonly bribe authorities and fell forests at will. Greenpeace, which identified several illegal logging operations in 2016, doubts whether the DRC government has the resources or ability to protect its peatland.“There is a huge lack of transparency and accountability,” says Raoul Iyaba, Greenpeace Africa coordinator. “I would say that all the concessions that include peat lands are illegal.”The DRC government, backed by the French Development Agency (AFD), is currently seeking to lift a 15-year moratorium on new logging concessions and increase the pace of commercial logging.This, say Greenpeace and other environmental groups, directly threatens the just-discovered peatland. According to the Rainforest Foundation U.K. (RFUK), most of the DRC’s logging concessions are illegal and many overlap the peat swamp forest. The organization warns that if the moratorium were lifted, it would open more than 10,000 square kilometers (3,860 square miles) of forest to logging. And if this area is logged, the RFUK estimates it could release around 2.8 billion metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere.Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.Greenpeace says around half of the DRC’s currently allocated logging concessions are in breach of the law and is calling for them to be shut down and returned to the state.“Legally, forestry concessions contracts are automatically terminated if, within four years of its signature, the concession does not have a management plan approved,” said Matt Daggett, Greenpeace International forest campaigner. “This has been extended by one year, but in March 2017, 29 out of 57 had exceeded their deadline.”But not all see logging as incompatible with conservation of the DRC’s forests. The Norwegian government maintains legal commercial logging can go hand in hand with protection of the peatlands, and that banning logging would not be enough to stop it.“It would be ideal if the banning of commercial logging was sufficient to save DRC’s forests,” the Norwegian government said in a recent statement. “However, according to the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), an estimated 90% of all logging occurs illegally in the informal sector outside of the logging concessions.“How can DRC, a poor nation abundant with natural resources, meet its growing demand for timber, food and charcoal in a sustainable manner, short of importing expensive wood from Europe? A solution must be comprehensive and include efforts against illegal logging while simultaneously promoting sustainable forestry.”Norway is committing $200 million in funding to the Central African Forest Initiative (CAFI), which seeks to protect the region’s rainforest and is backed by the governments of the EU, U.K., Brazil and other countries. However, the CAFI has come under fire by conservation organizations like the RFUK and Greenpeace, which say it is promoting the establishment of more logging concessions on DRC peatland.“We urge [the DRC] government not to issue logging concessions which have peatland areas inside,” said Greenpeace’s Daggett. “If they are destroyed as a result of land use change or drainage, the carbon would be released as billions of [metric tons] of CO2 into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change.”Residents of Lokolama welcome the international expedition team on their arrival.  Photo by Kevin McElvaney/Greenpeace.For Lokolama and other communities living close to the peatland, the discovery of a colossal carbon sink on their doorstep offers some hope of much-needed development and recognition of their land rights.“We protect the forest and depend on the swamp for fish and fuel,” said Lokolama community spokesperson Valentin Egobo. “We had no idea that the peat deposits were there, but as indigenous people, peatlands are part of our heritage and their discovery for the world to see represents a great hope for future generations.“We hope our government will support us in our role as guardians of this ancient forest and provide us with the needed support to safeguard peatlands for our children and for the world.”Correction (09/10/17): This article previously stated the estimated carbon contained in the peatland to be equivalent to two years of global carbon emissions, when scientists estimate it to be equivalent to three years.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

The curious case of the phantom hippo teeth

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Animals, China wildlife trade, Cites, Hippos, Ivory Trade, Mammals, UCSC, Wildlife, Wildlife consumption, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Hippo ivory is an affordable alternative to elephant ivory, whose international trade is prohibited by many countries.The reported export and import numbers of legal wildlife trade in the CITES database are dramatically mismatched for some species, including the numbers for hippo teeth.An updated population estimate for hippos could indicate how much illegal poaching for their ivory is threatening them. Think of the illegal wildlife trade, and elephant tusks and rhino horns come to mind. But another of the world’s largest land mammals is slipping under the radar: the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) may be at greater risk than previously believed, according to a new analysis of the international trade in hippo teeth.Hippo ivory, from their large canines and incisors, is an affordable alternative to elephant ivory (international trade in elephant ivory is increasingly restricted). Its legal trade quotas are agreed upon by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). But when researchers looked into CITES trade records for an investigation recently published in the African Journal of Ecology, the numbers looked suspicious.Lead author Alexandra Andersson, a conservation biologist at the University of Hong Kong, examined the export and import numbers for animals in the legal trade markets, and noticed the numbers didn’t match up — sometimes dramatically so.Hippo teeth, primarily used for ornamental purposes, are available for sale in a Hong Kong shop. Credit: Alexandra Andersson / University of Hong Kong“I just thought that was a bit strange,” Andersson told Mongabay. “So I decided to select one case study to dive deeper into this issue and find out why this happens, and how it’s so prevalent in the CITES trade database.”She chose to investigate the hippo ivory trade, a straightforward case compared to other wildlife trades. Hong Kong imports more than 90 percent of global hippo teeth, largely from just Tanzania and Uganda.When Andersson and coauthor Luke Gibson compared the trade volumes reported between Hong Kong and Uganda from 1995 through 2013, they found more than 14,000 kilograms (31,000 pounds) of hippo teeth were missing. Uganda reported exports totaling 79,000 kilograms (174,000 pounds), but Hong Kong reported receiving just 65,000 kilograms (143,000 pounds).“This article is one of the first ones I’ve actually seen that takes CITES records numbers and says, ‘Look, there’s something really wrong here,’” said Pieter Kat, an evolutionary biologist and geneticist at LionAid in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the study.Hippo ivory is an affordable alternative to elephant ivory. Credit: Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.The authors examined common bookkeeping errors as possible reasons for the mismatched data, but they struggled to identify the exact cause.Their difficulty didn’t surprise independent conservation biologist Allie Russo, who was not involved in this study. Russo has looked at the CITES database for multiple species, including parrots. She found there are too many shortcomings to make sense of the inconsistencies.This disparity brings into question how effective the regulations are, said Kat. He believes CITES is badly in need of reform.“If you are dealing with endangered species in trade, one of the first things you have to do is be really careful about accurately counting up the total number of specimens that you have in trade,” Kat said in an interview. “There shouldn’t be these discrepancies in the records.”For hippos, the authors estimated the missing teeth represent at least 2,700 individual animals. That’s about 2 percent of the African census of 125,000 to 148,000 hippos, according to a population estimate from 2008. But hippos have been losing habitat, are poached for meat and ivory, and have conflicts with humans, so the survey needs updating, Kat said.The current hippo population in Africa may be dramatically less than the 2008 estimated number of 125,000 to 148,000.Credit: Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Hippos are an easy species to count, he noted. From the air, their large purplish-gray bodies stand out along waterways. A new population estimate could change their IUCN and CITES conservation status.The authors recommend supporting African authorities in their efforts to protect the species. Although the trade in hippo teeth was banned in Uganda in 2014, the country has far fewer than the recommended number of rangers per given area of protected land. That makes it easier for poachers to smuggle ivory to neighboring countries.Such illegal ivory is a potential cause of the data mismatch, the researchers believe.“It’s so easy to fake permits and then ship illegal shipments under the disguise of being legal,” Russo said. “It could be happening right under our noses. If we don’t tighten up the data reporting mechanisms, it’s just going to continue.”Hippos have large curved canine teeth and a pair of huge incisors in the lower jaw. Credit: Peripitus via Creative Commons (CC- BY-SA-3.0)Citation:Andersson, A., & Gibson, L. (2017). Missing teeth: Discordances in the trade of hippo ivory between Africa and Hong Kong. African Journal of Ecology. doi: 10.1111/aje.12441Laura G. Shields (@LauraGShields) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Mine tailings dam failures major cause of environmental disasters: report

first_imgBetween 2008-2017 it’s estimated that more than 340 people died, communities have been ravaged, property ruined, rivers contaminated, fisheries wrecked and drinking water polluted by mining tailings dam collapses. Estimates from the year 2000 put the total number of tailings dams globally at 3,500, though there are likely more that have not been counted.A new United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) report states that as mining production escalates globally to provide the minerals and metals required for a variety of industrial needs, including green technologies, it is urgent that nations and companies address tailings dam safety.The UNEP report recommends that mining companies strive for a “zero-failure objective” in regard to tailings dams, superseding economic goals. UNEP also recommends the establishment of a UN environmental stakeholder forum to support stronger international regulations for tailings dams, and the creation of a global database of mine sites and tailings storage facilities to track dam failures.One idea would be to eliminate types of tailings dams that are just too dangerous to be tolerated. For example, mining experts say there is no way to insure against the failure of “wet tailings disposal” dams, like the Samarco dam that failed in 2015 – Brazil’s worst environmental disaster ever. As a result, they recommend storing all future tailings waste via “dry stock disposal.” The Imperial Metals Mount Polley gold and copper mine tailings dam disaster in British Columbia, Canada, dumped 24 million cubic meters (more than 31 million cubic yards) of mine waste and sludge into neighboring Lake Polley and polluting the Hazeltine Creek watershed. Photo courtesy of the Multinationals ObservatoryIt’s estimated that more than 340 people have been killed since 2008 in mining tailings dam failures –preventable environmental disasters that also saw the ruination of communities and property, the contamination of rivers, destruction of fisheries, and pollution of drinking water supplies.Spurred by those calamities, the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) has issued a report stressing the need for increased tailings dam safety around the globe. Tailings dams store pools of toxic mining waste.UNEP notes that large quantities of minerals and metals will be required in the near future for a variety of industrial needs, including the development of green technologies that support the UN´s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The report offers two key recommendations and a number of policy actions to dramatically reduce tailings dam fatalities and accidents.The first recommendation: Mining companies should strive for a “zero-failure objective,” superseding economic goals. UNEP cites an expert panel convened in the wake of a major tailings dam failure in British Columbia, Canada, the Mount Polley gold and copper mine, which dumped 24 million cubic meters (more than 31 million cubic yards) of mine waste and sludge into neighboring Lake Polley. The panel concluded that “safety attributes should be evaluated separately from economic considerations, and cost should not be the determining factor.”The second key UNEP recommendation: Establish a UN environmental stakeholder forum to support stronger international regulations for tailings dams.Payal Sampat of Earthworks, a US-based NGO, notes: “Mine waste storage facilities are like ticking time bombs, putting communities and waterways in harm’s way in the event of catastrophic failure.”Aftermath of the Samarco tailings dam failure that sent a wall of toxic mud into the village of Bento Rodrigues, Brazil, killing 19 people and contaminating more than 500 miles of the Doce River. The UN report says that many such disasters are preventable if Mining companies strived for a “zero-failure objective,” superseding economic goals. Photo by Romerito Pontes licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licenseA record of disasterThe UNEP report was prompted by multiple serious accidents occurring around the world over the past decade. It points to China and Canada as the two countries with the worst recent safety record. Canada has had seven accidents since 2011, while China has had eight. Chile registered five separate tailings dam failures in 2010, according to the report, while the U.S. saw five tailings dam accidents over the past decade.Other countries have experienced disasters and grief. In Minas Gerais state, Brazil, on November 5, 2015, the Fundão dam collapsed releasing 50 million tons of toxic iron tailings into the Doce River – the nation’s worst environmental disaster ever. The dam held back waste from the Germano mine run by Samarco, a joint venture of BHP Biliton and Vale, two of the world´s largest mining firms. Nineteen people died when the slurry engulfed the town of Bento Rodrigues. Survivors fled for their lives to high ground and were left homeless. More than 500 miles of the river was contaminated, all the way to the Atlantic Ocean.Ugo LaPointe of Mining Watch Canada told DeSmog Canada that these major disasters represent just a portion of the problem: “This is just a glimpse of what we know. A lot of the data is missing. We need an international database of mining spills and mining failures. If you don’t collect that solid data, you are not in the best position to correct the problems.”Along with increased international regulation of tailings dams, UNEP’s Safety is No Accident report also calls for the establishment of a first-of-its-kind global database of mine sites and tailings storage facilities to facilitate the tracking of dam failures. Research cited from the year 2000, estimates that there are 3,500 tailings dams around the globe, though that figure is likely low considering that there are around 30,000 industrial mines planet-wide. No one knows how many tailings dams there may be, or their current condition.The UNEP report also calls for financial securities firms to give mining companies an economic incentive to prioritize safety. Suggestions include a global insurance pool, mandatory financial securities for the life of every mine, and a global financial assurance system for mine sites.La Tortolas tailings dam high in the Andes Mountains of Chile. The dam was built in a seismically active area, but is designed to resist earthquakes. Photo by Lodecop licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseViews within the industryCanada’s mining industry plays a significant and influential role internationally, with 30 Canadian mining companies operating in Brazil, for example. Further, Canadian mining firms were given advance notice earlier this year about the Brazilian government’s plans to open up a vast region in the Amazon to mineral extraction. Canada’s mining sector contributed $56 billion to Canada’s gross domestic product in 2015.The Mining Association of Canada told DeSmog Canada it would soon be releasing a revised Tailings Guide informed by mine reviews conducted by an independent task force it had assembled.A spokesperson for the U.S. National Mining Association (NMA) told Mongabay via email that the UNEP report’s recommendations don’t apply to the United States, “where mining is heavily regulated for any releases to the environment and where the only event of this type in recent years was caused not by miners but by a faulty EPA operation in an old legacy mine [Gold King] in Colorado.”However, a Bureau of Reclamation audit of that spill found that the circumstances “are not isolated or unique, and in fact are surprisingly prevalent” in the United States. The audit also reported that the release was the culmination of events over several decades including an “inadequately designed closure of the mine portal” and misinterpretation of the groundwater conditions when it was reopened in 2014/2015.Asked whether the NMA plays any role in monitoring U.S.-based companies’ international operations, the spokesperson said that the NMA doesn’t regulate mining operations.LaPointe emphasized that: “The problem is that the industry is not yet acknowledging publicly that there are too many financially risky, marginal mines that are being permitted.” He maintained that marginally profitable companies and mines are a major part of the problem because they cut corners on safety and don’t have the money to guarantee the safety of people and the environment.Dry bed of the tailings dam at the Brukunga Pyrite Mine east of Adelaide in the Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia. The mine was closed in 1972 and this photo comes from 1992. In 1974, a severe storm resulted in the retention ponds overflowing into nearby Dawesley Creek with water quality impacts occurring downstream. Tailings dams continue to be environmental hazards long after mine closures. Photo courtesy of CSIRO ScienceImage licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0“Reducing the number of dams that can fail”Suzanne Greene, a communications officer for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Metals and Minerals for the Environment group, told Mongabay that a “key element of dam safety is reducing the amount of waste produced by the mine. MIT has a number of technologies under development that will help achieve this, such as low or no-waste extraction and separation.” Greene also pointed to new technologies, such as sensors that can be embedded in dam walls, to monitor and detect cracks or bulges in these structures in real time.As importantly, some types of dams may need to be abandoned all together. Speaking with Mongabay by phone, Earthworks’ Alan Septoff explained that there are “financial assurances that are intended to do reclamation after a mine completes operations, and financial assurances for when something goes wrong.” But in the case of a disaster as extreme as Brazil’s Fundão disaster, Septoff cited research by Chambers and Bowker which concluded that “it’s essentially impossible for a company to get insurance for this severity.” And logically, if companies can’t get insurance for a particular type of operation because it is too risky, that type of operation will be eliminated, preventing future disasters, and promoting safer methods.As an example, Septoff points to Canada’s Mount Polley rupture and to the conclusions the review panel produced: “The independent review panel, which was peopled with mining engineers working for industry, said there was no way to insure against ‘wet tailings disposal’ like the kind that failed at Samarco [in Brazil] and that all future tailings storage need to be ‘dry stock.’”The Mount Polley report added: “The Panel firmly rejects any notion that business as usual can continue.” And also that “The Panel does not accept the concept of a ‘tolerable failure rate’ for tailings dams.” Rejecting the idea of slow incremental change within the industry, the panel concluded: “dam failures are reduced by reducing the number of dams that can fail.”For Septoff, this conclusion contrasts with most industry rhetoric: “Industry is trying to give the perception that this problem is going to go away, and so people should keep investing, but if the true cost of this type of disposal is made known, then the prospects for responsible investors investing in them will go considerably down.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A mining tailings dam in the Balkans. Estimates from the year 2000 put the total number of tailings dams globally at 3,500, though there are likely more that have not been counted. With mining operations fast expanding around the globe, more accidents are likely unless action is taken to safeguard tailings dams. Photo courtesy of WWF Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Social Responsibility, Dams, Degraded Lands, Drinking Water, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, forest degradation, Gold Mining, Green, Habitat Degradation, Infrastructure, Mining, Pollution, Public Health, Rainforest Mining, Water, Water Pollution Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

NCB Sporting Clays Open in spotlight at Woodleigh

first_imgConsidered one of the premium clay-shooting events here in Jamaica, today’s NCB Capital Markets Sporting Clays Open will feature an exciting and compact contest among Jamaica’s best. It will be staged at Woodleigh in Clarendon, which is adjacent to the Gun Range. Registration will open at 8 a.m., while Shotgun Start will be at 10.30 a.m. The entry fee is $1000, but ladies and juniors will enter free. Lunch will be provided. The competition involves Classes A to Hunters, Ladies, Juniors and Sub-juniors, who will be locked in their respective battles for titles, honours and bragging rights. “Each year, we all look forward to the NCB Capital Markets Sporting Clays Open with 16 interesting presentations,” said Khaleel Azan, Jamaica Skeet Club president. Azan said that a 60-80 feet articulated lift, sponsored by Zoukie, will provide shooters with international-type tower targets, while David Subaran will be providing scaffolding, enabling lower- tower type presentations. “Anyone that enjoys clay shooting should ensure that they are at this shoot,” stressed Azan. Many eyes will, no doubt, be on young Danzell Knight of Campion College, who is fresh off his first championship win and sub-junior Roman Tavares Finson of Hillel, who was runner-up in the junior inter-schools tournament recently. Meanwhile, David Subaran, who emerged top marksman at the recent Spectrum Systems Limited Sporting Clays to capture his first championship, will have to show his mettle against defending National Shotgun champion Christian Sasso, Bruce DuQuesnay, and Brett Thwaites. No doubtlast_img read more

From flaming to free-flowing: The full lesson of the recovery of the Cuyahoga River (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki As we approach the 50th anniversary of the fire on the Cuyahoga River, it’s heartening to see my hometown flip the script and the national media focus on the river’s remarkable recovery as a testament to how restored nature can spark urban revitalization.The river’s recovery from pollution is an important story. But as someone who works in international river conservation, I see the Cuyahoga as demonstrating a lesson that is even more remarkable, and equally needed, today: There is great value in protecting a river, not just protecting the quality of the water within it.The future could be much brighter for rivers and the people that depend on them. Due to the renewable revolution — the dramatically dropping costs for electricity from wind and solar — the world can indeed power its future with systems that are low-carbon, low-cost, and low-conflict with rivers and communities.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. I come from where the river burned.For much of my life, I’ve braced myself for the river jokes that often follow when I say that I’m from Cleveland.As we approach the 50th anniversary of the fire on the Cuyahoga River, it’s heartening to see my hometown flip the script and the national media focus on the river’s remarkable recovery as a testament to how restored nature can spark urban revitalization.The river’s recovery from pollution is an important story. But as someone who works in international river conservation, I see the Cuyahoga as demonstrating a lesson that is even more remarkable, and equally needed, today: There is great value in protecting a river, not just protecting the quality of the water within it.While the 50th anniversary of the river fire is gathering quite a bit of attention, last year, Ohio marked another 50th anniversary that captured much less fanfare. In 1968, the Ohio legislature passed the Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers Act, perhaps the first time in the world that a government legislated a formal system for protecting rivers for their diverse values as living systems — and not only as resources to drink from or navigate (the U.S. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act is often credited with this distinction, but the Ohio Act preceded it by eight months).In 1974, a portion of the upper Cuyahoga was protected under the Ohio Act, a down payment on its trajectory from an industrial channel back to a living river. Even 50 years later, few countries have passed comparable legislation. However, similar formal protections are urgently needed.Last month, the journal Nature published an article showing that just one-third of the world’s long rivers (those longer than 1,000 kilometers) remain free flowing. The rest have been fragmented and altered by infrastructure, mostly dams. Also in May, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and The Nature Conservancy released a report showing that future hydropower expansion, driven in part by the need to transition to low-carbon electricity, could fragment another nearly 200,000 kilometers of rivers — including most of the world’s remaining free-flowing rivers. (I was a co-author on the Nature paper and lead author of the report).Thus, in the quest to save the planet’s climate, we risk losing its free-flowing rivers.Beyond losing unique ecosystems, this development path would compromise river fisheries that provide food and livelihoods to hundreds of millions. Hydropower reservoirs would trap much of the sediment needed to maintain economically crucial river deltas, home to half a billion people and some of the planet’s most productive agriculture.But the future could be much brighter for rivers and the people that depend on them. Due to the renewable revolution — the dramatically dropping costs for electricity from wind and solar — the world can indeed power its future with systems that are low-carbon, low-cost, and low-conflict with rivers and communities. The cost of solar power has dropped by more than 70 percent in the past seven years and investment in solar is now surging ahead of all other forms of generation.While powering the world without damming remaining free-flowing rivers is technically possible and economically competitive, to be durable, that brighter pathway must also be legally secure. To paraphrase David Brower, founder of the Sierra Club, while the damming of a river is essentially permanent, saving a river from a dam is only temporary because plans can rise again, and the battle must be engaged anew.Thus, fulfilling the renewable revolution’s potential to deliver both abundant low-carbon power and free-flowing rivers requires formal protections.While few countries have adopted legislation comparable to the Wild and Scenic River Act, promising examples are emerging.Mexico now has a system of legally binding Water Reserves that stipulate how much of a river’s flow can be altered, an approach that, in 2018, was used to secure long-term protection from dams for one of the country’s most important free-flowing rivers, the Usumucinta.Last month, the government of Slovenia decided to halt preparation for construction of a hydropower dam on the free-flowing Mura River, a tributary to the Danube, and plans for other dams on the Mura have been put on hold. This decision was bolstered by Slovenia’s 2018 designation of a Mura Biosphere Reserve. Just this week, Austria is joining Slovenia and designating a Lower Mura Valley Biosphere Reserve on its portion of the river upstream from Slovenia.Further, a number of conservation organizations in Europe are calling on the European Commission to establish a system of legal protection for free-flowing rivers similar to that under the U.S. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.It’s an inspiring story that pollution control led to dramatic improvement for the Cuyahoga, but, thankfully, that story is shared by thousands of rivers. The formal protection of the Cuyahoga under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act sent an even bolder message: a river is more than just (hopefully clean) water, it is a dynamic, living system with a broad array of values.That formal protection raised expectations for what the Cuyahoga could be. River advocates have now removed four aging dams, with plans for two more dam removals, reviving tourism for riverside towns, including a kayak race on the rapids that re-emerged as the reservoirs drained.So, on this 50th anniversary of the river fire, let’s hear the Cuyahoga’s full message: a living river should not only be free of flames, it should be free-flowing too.The Mura River. Photo Credit: © Matevž Lenarčič.CITATIONS• Grill, G., Lehner, B., Thieme, M., Geenen, B., Tickner, D., Antonelli, F., … & Macedo, H. E. (2019). Mapping the world’s free-flowing rivers. Nature, 569(7755), 215. doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1111-9• Opperman, J., J. Hartmann, M. Lambrides, J.P. Carvallo, E. Chapin, S. Baruch-Mordo, B. Eyler, M. Goichot, J. Harou, J. Hepp, D. Kammen, J. Kiesecker, A. Newsock, R. Schmitt, M. Thieme, A. Wang, C. Weatherby and C. Weber. (2019). Connected and flowing: a renewable future for rivers, climate and people. WWF and The Nature Conservancy, Washington, DC.Jeff Opperman is WWF’s global lead scientist for freshwater, working across the WWF network and with external partners to direct research that can strengthen conservation strategies and to integrate science into freshwater programs and projects. He is the lead author of the book Floodplains: processes and management for ecosystem services, published in 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Clean Energy, Climate Change, Climate Change and Dams, Commentary, Dams, Editorials, Environment, Global Warming, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Renewable Energy, Research, Researcher Perspective Series, Rivers, Water Pollution center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

For Indonesia’s newest tarsier, a debut a quarter century in the making

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered, Endangered Species, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, New Species, Primates, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Scientists first spotted a previously unknown type of tarsier on the Togean Islands off Sulawesi, Indonesia, in 1993, and it’s taken 25 years of further studies to describe the diminutive primate species as new to science.Niemitz’s tarsier (Tarsius niemitzi) is named after Carsten Niemitz, one of the scientists on that initial visit to the Togean islands, whom the authors of the new paper call “the father of tarsier field biology.”There are now 12 known tarsier species found in Sulawesi and surrounding islands, but the paper’s authors say the region could be home to at least 16, with more research needed.They warn that loss of habitat makes it “quite plausible” that some tarsier species may go extinct before scientists have a chance to identify them. JAKARTA — In 1993, scientists Alexandra Nietsch and Carsten Niemitz reported finding tarsiers, a type of small primate, on an island chain off eastern Indonesia’s larger Sulawesi Island.Sulawesi’s biodiversity was little known then, and the notion that the tarsier from the Togean Islands might be a new species spurred a series of studies that looked at everything from the tarsier’s vocalizations to its DNA sequence.Finally, in a study published this year in the annual journal Primate Conservation, that initial discovery by Nietsch and Niemitz a quarter of a century ago has been officially confirmed as a new species: Niemitz’s tarsier (Tarsius niemitzi), named in honor of the man “universally regarded as the father of tarsier field biology,” the study says.A map of the Togean Islands, top, nestled of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Image by L. Shyamal via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).“The biodiversity of Sulawesi is much like the biodiversity of the Galapagos Islands, made famous by Darwin’s work,” Myron Shekelle, a professor of anthropology at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA, and the lead author of the paper describing the new species, told Mongabay in an email.“Numerous related species were each individually adapted to the specifics of a given island,” he added. “Why would any of us choose to walk away, while species remain undescribed and questions remain unanswered?”Shekelle was also the lead author of a 2017 report describing two new tarsier species from the northern peninsula of Sulawesi.Niemitz’s tarsier from the Togean Islands of Indonesia. Image courtesy of Shekelle et al., 2019.While newly described to science, T. niemitzi has long been known to locals by the names bunsing, tangkasi and podi. Its weight and tail length fall within the range of a number of other tarsier species, but the tarsier from the Togean Islands lacks a reduced tail tuft, which is atypical for tarsiers endemic to small islands, according to the study.Vocalization analysis based on recordings show that its duet is structurally simple, possibly the simplest of all known tarsier duets, the paper adds. “Togean tarsiers are unique among known tarsier acoustic forms in that they respond in playback experiments to all other tarsier duet calls by duetting themselves,” the authors write.They also looked into the conservation status of the Niemitz’s tarsier and suggested it be classified as endangered, largely due to its isolation on the Togean Islands, cut off from the Sulawesi main island by water that goes down to depths greater than 120 meters (400 feet).“The broader implication is that the Togean Islands possess a largely endemic biota of taxa that do not disperse easily across water barriers,” the paper says.These nocturnal creatures can easily leap 3 meters (10 feet) or more in a single bound, thanks to their super-elongated legs — the longest legs relative to arm length of any primate species. Tarsiers, which are found only on a handful of islands in Southeast Asia, use their extraordinary jumping ability to target prey with laser-like precision. They’re the only purely carnivorous primates on Earth, with a diet consisting largely of insects and lizards.To spot their next meal in the darkness of night, tarsiers have developed the largest eyes relative to body size of any known mammal, a crucial adaptation that grants them better night vision even in the absence of the reflective eyeball tissue that most nocturnal species have (think of the spooky glow of raccoon or cat eyes). Tarsiers’ eyes are so large, in fact, that the creatures can’t even swivel them in their sockets — a limitation they’ve adapted to by developing the ability to swivel their heads 180 degrees in either direction, like an owl.Skulls of three type specimens, from left: Jatna’s tarsier (Tarsius supriatnai), Gursky’s spectral tarsier (T. spectrumgurskyae) and Niemitz’s tarsier (T. niemitzi). Image by Myron Shekelle.The description of T. niemitzi brings to 12 the number of known tarsier species found in Sulawesi and surrounding islands. But Shekelle and his co-authors say Sulawesi could be home to at least 16 species of tarsiers, adding that further investigation of other species is needed.“The ability to answer many of the most interesting questions is slipping from our grasp, while at the same time it is quite plausible that some tarsier species may go extinct before we have even identified them,” Shekelle said.Funding for wildlife conservation efforts in general, and for tarsiers in particular, is inadequate to make them fully effective or stabilize the loss of the species’ habitat and the loss of biodiversity within their habitat, Shekelle said.“Nevertheless, while the conservation picture is gloomy, we are also aware that the tarsiers of Sulawesi serve as powerful conservation mascots for tourism, flagship species for awareness, and umbrella species to help protect all of the other Sulawesian biota, both known and unknown,” he said.Citation:Shekelle, M., Groves, C. P., Maryanto, I., Mittermeier, R. A., Salim, A., & Springer, M. S. (2019). A new tarsier species from the Togean Islands of Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, with references to Wallacea and conservation on Sulawesi. Primate Conservation, 33.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more