Education Ministry to work with Int’l Narcotics Board

first_img…to tackle drug use in schoolsThe Education Ministry will be working along with the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) to clamp down on the use of drugs among students in schools across Guyana.A team from INCB, comprising Stefano Berterame and Dr Raul Martin del Campo Sanchez, met with Chief Education Officer (CEO) Marcel Hutson and other senior officials of the Education Ministry on Thursday at the Brickdam boardroom.During the meeting, the two parties discussed how they can work together to eradicate and mitigate drug use in schools across the country. Further, the INCBCEO Marcel Hutson along with the INCB representatives and other officials from the Education Ministry posed for a photo after the meetingwanted to be apprised of where the Ministry was with regard to the Drug Production and Trafficking Legislation.According to the INCB officials, such feedback is necessary so that they can proffer advice and make recommendations to the Education Ministry where necessary.It was further revealed during the meeting that 39 teachers from 20 schools within Georgetown have been trained to integrate drug prevention training and strategies within the existing curricula for secondary schools.In 2017, the focus was mainly on conducting sensitisation sessions in schools that were vulnerable to drug use.Currently, the Education Ministry is working out the modalities to address referral protocols and preliminary screening for students and teachers who are suspected drug users. The Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) and the World Health Organisation are currently assisting the Ministry with this process.A study conducted in 2013 on the prevalence of drug use among secondary school students in Guyana has revealed an alarming trend showing that students as young as 12 years old are engaged in the use of both licit and illicit substances.The Secondary School Drug Prevalence Survey Project was done by the Organisation of American States (OAS) Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), in collaboration with the Government of Guyana. Some 1890 students from 28 schools participated in the study – 92.5 per cent from public schools and 7.5 per cent from private schools. These students were from Grades 8, 10, 11 and Sixth Form. Approximately 43.8 per cent of the participants were between the ages of 11 and 14.The report indicated that alcohol, cigarettes, inhalants and marijuana were the most commonly used drugs among the student population. It was noted that 19 per cent of the students have admitted using an illegal drug at least once in their lifetime, while 52 per cent said they have consumed alcohol. However, the findings showed that there was a higher prevalence of drug use among private school students.The following percentages of participants also admitted to using these other drugs once in their lifetime: 10.8 per cent of the participants admitted to having used inhalants/solvents; 16.8 per cent used tobacco; 6.6 per cent used marijuana: 3.2 per cent used tranquilisers; 1.6 per cent used ecstasy and 1.4 per cent used cocaine. Eighteen per cent of these students are from public school, while some 24.5 per cent are private school students.However, 7.6 per cent of the students said they have tried an illegal drug for the first time within the past year (dated from when the survey was done). More alarmingly, it was outlined that students as young as 10 years, eight months are using inhalants, while those 12 and above were using substances such as alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana.Most of the students said they usually get alcohol from shops, while marijuana and cocaine were acquired from friends and relatives. Moreover, marijuana was found to be the most accessible illegal drug, while cocaine was the least accessible.last_img read more

Is Your Merchant Charging the New Credit Card Surcharge Fee?

first_imgFrom the Mint team: Mint may be compensated if you click on the links to our issuer partners’ offers that appear in this article, including Chase. Our partners do not endorse, review or approve the content. Any links to Mint… Full Story,From the Mint team: Mint may be compensated if you click on the links to our issuer partners’ offers that appear in this article, including Chase. Our partners do not endorse, review or approve the content. Any links to Mint… Full Story,From the Mint team: Mint may be compensated if you click on the links to our issuer partners’ offers that appear in this article, including Chase. Our partners do not endorse, review or approve the content. Any links to Mint… Full Story,There’s a specific conversation I frequently have with people around my age. As they get closer to middle adulthood and look back on everything they’ve learned about money, they start to wonder – why didn’t they teach us this stuff… Full Story,Depending on what you look for in a card, one of these may be a perfect fit your do-it-yourself projects. Follow along to learn more about these top five credit cards for DIYers. Full Story,In many ways, our credit determines our power as consumers. The strength of our credit profile and score enable us to rent an apartment, take out a car loan, and sign up for a cell phone number. Can you imagine… Full Story,Travel credit cards are available with a wide array of rewards, redemption options, fees, and bonuses. Weeding through so many general and branded travel rewards cards can be tough, so we picked out some favorites for a wide range of travel styles – so you can find the best travel credit card for your wallet.Full Story,Traveling abroad carries with it all sorts of potential credit issues. Some are just mildly annoying, but some can leave you stranded in Amsterdam, relying on the help of a broke friend you haven’t seen since high school. To avoid those issues and everything in between, here are some tips for using credit abroad. Full Story,The top reward credit cards cater to an array of desires. Whether you want to get cash back or earn miles and points toward free travel, the cards below are all a great place to get started.Full Story,From the Mint team: Mint may be compensated by some of the links that appear in this article, including Chase. Our partners do not endorse, review or approve the content. Any links to Mint Partners were added after the creation… Full Storylast_img read more