As Amazon deforestation rises, sensational headlines play into Bolsonaro’s agenda (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all over Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Forests, Green, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery Deforestation appears to be on the rise in the Brazilian Amazon, but sensational headlines are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.For example, administration officials are actively calling into question Brazilian space agency INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.” Pereira’s claim is completely unsubstantiated, but is nonetheless consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring.It is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In recent weeks, some media outlets have run eye-popping headlines on rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: “Deforestation of Brazilian Amazon surges to record high” read a June 4th headline in The Guardian; “Monthly deforestation up 88.4% compared with a year ago” stated a summary bullet-point The Guardian added to the top of a story syndicated from Reuters on July 3rd; and “Brazilian deforestation spiked 88 percent under Bolsonaro“, said a July 4th piece in The Hill. These sensational headlines, which aren’t an accurate interpretation of the numbers, are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.While deforestation does indeed appear to be climbing in the Brazilian Amazon, the data from the two leading sources that track deforestation in the region — Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and Brazilian NGO Imazon — do not put it anywhere near all-time records, as implied by the headline The Guardian, or nearly twice the rate of last year, as claimed in the other two stories. The mistake these headlines make is they fail to account for the high variability of deforestation during the rainy season and early dry season in the Amazon, when cloud cover can reduce the accuracy of short-term, alert-based satellite monitoring systems. An article Mongabay published in 2015 explains:Month-to-month deforestation is highly variable leading to frequent misreporting in the media. Both MODIS and Landsat [satellite sensors] cannot penetrate cloud cover, so during the rainy season — from roughly November to April — estimates are notoriously unreliable when compared to the same month a year earlier. Furthermore, most forest clearing in the Amazon occurs when it is dry. So if the dry season is early, deforestation may increase earlier than normal. For these reasons, the most accurate deforestation comparisons are made year-on-year. For Brazil, the deforestation “year” ends July 31: the peak of the dry season when the largest extent of forest is typically visible via satellite.Nonetheless, short-term MODIS data isn’t useless — it can provide insights on trends, especially over longer periods of time. Generally, comparing 12 consecutive months of MODIS data will provide a pretty good indication of deforestation relative to other years.So when a headline makes a claim that deforestation is “up 88%” over the prior year based on one month of data, it’s providing only part of the picture. An analysis should at least look at multiple months’ worth of data, especially when the time period in question is outside the peak deforestation season from June-September. For example, the accumulated deforestation according to INPE and Imazon’s alert systems for the 12 months ended May 31, 2019 is 4,633 square kilometers and 4,916 square kilometers respectively, representing an increase of 1 percent and 43 percent over the prior year. The trend was actually looking worse at the beginning of 2019, when the moving average was over 5,000 square kilometers according to each system. This doesn’t mean of course that deforestation won’t continue its upward trajectory. Why this mattersMisconstruing the numbers is a problem because it plays into the narrative the Bolsonaro administration is using to undercut the credibility of journalists, civil society groups, and scientists that track and report on deforestation. For example, administration officials are actively calling into question INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.”“If you add up the percentages that have already been announced to date of deforestation in the Amazon, the Amazon would already be a desert,” he said.Pereira’s sentiments were echoed by Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina, who said in an interview with Globo’s CBN newspaper last week that “there are many distortions of information” regarding deforestation in Brazil. She added that Brazil needs to have “a single” and “correct” source of data.While neither the general’s remarks nor the minister’s statements indicate much depth of knowledge on Brazil’s own deforestation-tracking technologies or how deforestation is measured, they are consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring. Critics fear that effort could divert resources away from INPE’s system and foster uncertainty about the results it produces.More broadly, the comments square with the administration’s ongoing attack on science, scientific institutions, and environmental protection, including cutting funding for scientific research programs, education, and environmental law enforcement as well as policy moves like shifting the indigenous affairs bureau FUNAI under the control of the agriculture ministry.For these reasons, it is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now in the Amazon is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.Header image: Google Earth image showing deforestation around Arara in the state of Pará.last_img read more

Asian elephants gang up in a bid to survive an increasingly human world

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, Research Adolescent elephants in south India are adapting to human-dominated landscapes, probably to learn from older bulls how not to get killed by people.These unusual associations, which can last for several years, were not recorded 20 years ago.Researchers say it’s important to use this information to mitigate human-elephant conflict, including by not removing old bulls that don’t raid crops, which can pass down this behavior to young elephants. Matriarch grandmas, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews: elephants, much like us, have complex social lives. But Asian elephants in southern India could be changing their social lives just to adapt to human-use landscapes that are fast replacing their natural habitats.Young male elephants, which are typically solitary, are now forming unusually large, and more long-term, all-male herds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports last week. This adaptation could be an effort to learn the ropes from older, more knowledgeable males on how to avoid getting killed in these areas that pose unnaturally high risks to elephants.To elephants, human-dominated areas near forests, such as agricultural fields that often replace natural forests and connect one fragmented forest with another, are much like supermarkets: there is always abundant food to choose from. And if you’re a hungry, fast-growing, young male elephant, there’s nothing like feasting on cultivated crops (cereals like paddy and millets are far higher in nutrients such as protein, calcium and sodium than forest fare such as wild grasses) to boost growth and health, both of which are important requisites to attain mates.Social interaction between younger and older male elephants. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Big risks, big gainsBut the risks an elephant has to run if it ventures into human-dominated areas are many: stress and physical injuries caused when people chase elephants away from crops, capture of “problem elephants,” as well as deaths due to retaliation, electrocution, train accidents and poaching. But though the risks are high, so are the gains. A study in northern Karnataka state, for instance, found that crop-based diets are so rich that they even lower the stress levels of crop-foraging elephants.Wildlife biologist Nishant Srinivasaiah would often spot such elephant herds moving across human-use areas, including farmland, near his long-term study site in Karnataka’s Bannerghatta National Park. His interest in elephant behavior even got him analyzing YouTube videos of human-elephant interactions from the region. That’s when he noticed something unusual: some of the elephant groups were comprised only or mostly of males.“Why were male elephants moving across human-use areas?” Srinivasaiah wondered. “Where were they going? But there were other individual males who stayed largely within the forest.“This got me interested in digging deeper into the individual idiosyncrasies and decision-making in male elephants in the landscape in general and their sociality,” he said.To find out if environmental factors such as habitat contiguity and human presence influenced the sociality of male Asian elephants (whether an individual preferred to be alone or in a group), Srinivasaiah and his colleagues first identified an approximately 10,000-square-kilometre (3,900-square-mile) landscape that included protected areas (Bannerghatta National Park, Cauvery and Cauvery North wildlife sanctuaries), reserve forests, human settlements and agricultural land across southern Karnataka and northern Tamil Nadu.Field surveys and information from forest guards helped the team short-list areas that both people and elephants used, to install camera traps. Of the 20,124 photographs of elephants they obtained between February 2016 and December 2017 from these camera traps, the team identified individual elephants from 1,430 photos and categorized them into three groups: mixed-sex groups (containing male and female elephants), all-male groups, and solitary males. The team then categorized each of the 248 male elephants they identified from these groups into age classes. Age correlates with sexual maturity, so the team could also classify every male as either a juvenile (less than 10 years old and sexually immature), adolescent or sexually mature but socially immature (10 to 20 years), or mature (both sexually and socially mature, more than 20 years of age).Recent long-term associationsAs expected, the photographs revealed that juvenile males were spotted mostly in mixed-sex groups; male elephants continue to stay in the herd they are born into until they hit adolescence. The results also revealed that in forest habitats, male elephants tended to become increasingly solitary with age. Male bulls were, therefore, mostly solitary. But adolescents were either solitary or in all-male groups, in equal proportions. These males were most likely to be part of all-male groups and grouped with other males in large herds of up to 12 elephants, almost exclusively in croplands also containing isolated forest patches — a sign that these recent all-male groups could be there in response to environmental factors.These all-male groups also stuck together for an unusually long time. While it’s common for some males to team up with others for a single season or a few weeks, these new all-male groups lasted for “a few years,” according to the authors. Interestingly, studies conducted in the same region more than two decades earlier don’t mention such large and stable all-male groups at all, the authors add.These male elephants forming long-term associations is more than just co-occurrence or grouping by chance, says Srinivasaiah. One possibility is “social buffering,” where the social support system derived from being part of a group can help “buffer” or reduce stress. While social buffering is a known phenomenon among elephants, there could be another reason these adolescent male elephants are grouping together, Srinivasaiah said.“These elephants need to learn to utilize the novel landscape efficiently and to avoid getting killed,” he said. “Hence, associating with older, more knowledgeable and experienced males is a strategy used by some of the younger males to survive and persist in high-risk landscapes. Otherwise, they would have had to do the same through trial and error, which could be costly.”The establishment of these all-male groups in response to anthropogenic factors, thereby modifying their own sociality, is an important finding that suggests not just how adaptable elephants are, but also how human influence is changing the natural life around us, Srinivasaiah said.Anthropocene woesWidespread habitat loss is one of the hallmarks of the Anthropocene, the geological age defined by pervasive human influence on the natural world. If elephant home ranges within forests continue to be taken over for non-forest activities, the animals will have to adapt to the change or perish, Srinivasaiah said.“Elephants are survivors, hence most often they will choose alternative ways to persist; and feeding from crop fields even if it’s risky cannot be discounted,” he said.Elephants are arguably one of the most adaptive of mammalian species, and their social behavior may vary depending on environmental conditions, says Prithiviraj Fernando, trustee of the Centre for Conservation and Research in Sri Lanka, who studies Asian elephants in the island nation and was not involved in the recent study in India.“For example in Sri Lanka, large all-male groups are observed primarily in areas with high resource availability,” he said.This study is one of the first to focus on male Asian elephant sociality and how it varies in relation to habitat conditions, he wrote in an email to Mongabay. “Conducting studies similar in other parts of the range would help determine whether the patterns observed by Srinivasaiah and his colleagues are unique to their study area or characteristic of Asian elephants everywhere,” Fernando said.A solitary adolescent male elephant caught on camera trap at night within forested habitat. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Mitigating conflictAccording to the authors of the study, it’s “imperative that future attention is focused on the management and conservation of [these] young dispersing males” to mitigate the potential for increased human-elephant conflicts in agricultural landscapes.“Young dispersing males are very impressionable and if associated with non-crop foraging older bulls, will not learn crop-foraging behavior or can even unlearn it,” Srinivasaiah said. Mitigation measures such as capturing key individuals within a bull group may therefore backfire, he said, as these older and experienced bulls are essential in a male elephant society to help guide the younger bulls and also discipline them when moving across villages, thus keeping conflict to a minimum.“The key to living with elephants may lie in understanding their social complexity and harnessing this new found knowledge to learn how to modify our own lifestyle practices to make them more compatible with the elephants’ use of an area, and be more flexible in our own approaches and behavior towards elephants,” Srinivasaiah said.Citations:Srinivasaiah, N., Kumar, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Sukumar, R., & Sinha, A. (2019). All-male groups in Asian elephants: A novel, adaptive social strategy in increasingly anthropogenic landscapes of southern India. Scientific Reports, 9(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45130-1Sukumar, R. (1990). Ecology of the Asian elephant in southern India. II. Feeding habits and crop raiding patterns. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 6(1), 33-53. doi:10.1017/s0266467400004004Pokharel, S. S., Singh, B., Seshagiri, P. B., & Sukumar, R. (2018). Lower levels of glucocorticoids in crop‐raiders: Diet quality as a potential ‘pacifier’ against stress in free‐ranging Asian elephants in a human‐production habitat. Animal Conservation, 22(2), 177-188. doi:10.1111/acv.12450Banner image of an all-male elephant group moving toward a banana plantation on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India, courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.center_img Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

Colombian investors push Pacific port project, threatening biodiversity hotspot

first_imgCoastal Ecosystems, Conflict, Economics, Environmental Politics, Infrastructure, International Trade, Mangroves Colombian President Iván Duque has pushed the construction of Tribugá Port in the Pacific department of Chocó as an economic priority for the country’s coffee-growing heartland, to increase exports to international markets.But the plan to build the port has provoked a fierce outcry from environmental and human rights activists, as well as local tourism operators, pushing 70 organizations to sign a declaration against its construction.Endangered species such as hammerhead sharks, nesting sea turtles and humpback whales visit the area on an annual basis to mate, raise their young, and migrate through. Emboldened by a right-wing president and congressional approval, a Colombian public-private partnership is working through a licensing process to build a deepwater “megaport” on the country’s northern Pacific coast.Arquimedes S.A., the shareholder group behind the project, aims to build the country’s second major port on the Pacific coast to accommodate supertankers, an industrial park and a free-trade zone near the Darién Gap, an undeveloped, roadless region encompassing one of the world’s 24 biodiversity hotspots, breeding grounds for humpback whales, and collective Afro-Colombian and indigenous territories.Since assuming office in 2018, President Iván Duque has pushed the construction of Tribugá Port in the Chocó department as an economic priority for the country’s central coffee-growing region, to increase exports to international markets. Duque’s 2018-2022 National Development Plan, approved by Congress, gave the green light for the construction of the deepwater port and connecting transportation infrastructure between the inland town of Las Ánimas and the coastal municipality of Nuquí, the site of the planned port.“The Tribugá Port is one of my obsessions when it comes to infrastructure matters,” Duque said at a town hall meeting in Chocó’s capital, Quibdó, two months after his August 2018 inauguration. “I believe that we must continue advancing, the port is viable as long as the Ánimas-Nuquí transportation corridor is improved … These two projects are decisive for the entire Coffee Region.”Construction of the megaport, estimated to cost more than $300 million, will not be paid for with public funds but rather through private investments permitted by government concession for “up to 40 years,” according to statements by the minister of transportation, Ángela María Orozco. The roadways, on the other hand, are scheduled for construction with public resources as part of a wider government initiative to connect the department of Arauca, on the border with Venezuela, to the northern Pacific coast.Aerial view of the Gulf of Tribugá. Image courtesy of MarVivaThe port project, however, still needs to be granted a permit by the National Authority of Environmental Licenses (ANLA) and a concession agreement by the National Infrastructure Agency (ANI); both regulatory agencies fall under the government’s executive branch.The Arquimedes shareholder group emerged in 2006 during the government of right-wing former president Álvaro Uribe. The group represents governors’ offices and chambers of commerce in Chocó and the departments that make up the coffee region, as well as private construction companies. The coffee region, known as Eje Cafetero, straddles the departments of Caldas, Quindío, and Risaralda, and is the country’s fourth-largest industrial and commercial center as well as a center of power for Uribe’s right-wing political party, Centro Democrático.Iván Marulanda, a senator from the opposition Green Alliance, representing the coffee-growing department of Risaralda, told Mongabay that discussions about Tribugá Port first arose decades ago, but regional political players are pressing Duque to realize the project.“I’ve known this Arquimedes group for many years. This is an old pitch that appeared decades ago, maybe 30 or 40 years ago,” Marulanda said. “Even though things have changed and there is a greater level of environmental consciousness than there was before, they still haven’t let go of the idea.”Marulanda said the deepwater port project did not make economic sense for the coffee region because the existing port in the city of Buenaventura, about 200 kilometers (120 miles) to the south, could be dredged to accommodate larger ships without causing nearly the same level of environmental impact as building a new port and roads through rainforest in the northern Pacific.Arquimedes S.A. did not respond to request by email for comment on the proposed Tribugá Port.Collective communities and foreign capitalChocó department is largely inhabited by collective indigenous territories and Afro-Colombian communities, who, under the country’s 1991 Constitution, have been granted the right to autonomy in land management, political governance and cultural self-determination.The department was one of several held by guerrillas during Colombia’s decades-long civil war, and today suffers the country’s highest rates of poverty and infant mortality. The construction of the new port therefore presents an opportunity for progress, says Carlos Felipe Mejía, a Centro Democrático senator from the neighboring department of Caldas.According to Arquimedes president William Naranjo, the shareholder group has courted foreign investment, particularly from China and the United States. There was reported interest from Chinese port-building company China Harbour Engineering Company Ltd., and a U.S. investor, but no confirmed foreign investment in the project yet.Threat of environmental, social impactsThe plan to build Tribugá Port in the heart of Chocó has provoked a fierce outcry from environmental and human rights activists, as well as local tourism operators, pushing 70 organizations to sign a declaration against its construction. The activists and community leaders say the port would cause irreparable destruction to coastal mangroves, tropical rainforest and marine ecosystems that serve as breeding grounds for humpback whales and sea turtles.The Costa Rican environmental nonprofit MarViva works with the Afro-Colombian communities in the Gulf of Tribugá and other parts of Nuquí municipality to build sustainable local economies in protected mangrove areas. In December 2014, Chocó’s environmental agency, Codechocó, declared 2,408 hectares (5,950 acres) of mangrove forest in the gulf as a regionally protected area with sustainable use.Artisanal fishermen cast nets near mangrove forest in Nuquí municipality. Image courtesy of MarViva.But Codechocó’s director, Teófilo Cuesta Costa, has signaled support for the port project, as well as the construction of access roads. “I think the project is viable, even though it is located in a regional protected area,” he told local media Semana Sostenible.Daniela Durán, MarViva’s local governance coordinator, said 900 hectares (2,220 acres) of Nuquí’s largest mangrove forests would be destroyed if Tribugá Port is built. She said the mangrove forests are important because they act as “natural barriers that help control natural disasters, prevent soil erosion, improve water quality, and sequester carbon that causes global warming.”“There is also a key economic component to mangrove forests. They serve as sanctuaries where commercial marine species are able to reproduce,” Durán said.Within the Gulf of Tribugá, MarViva identified 15 artisanal fishing grounds that local families rely on for food security. In addition, Durán pointed to the piangueras, typically women who provide sustenance for their families by collecting clams grown in the mangroves.Waterside village in Nuquí municipality. Image courtesy of MarViva.Local media outlet RCN Radio reported Arquimedes president Naranjo as saying the company is engaged in environmental studies, with a report expected to be filed with the environmental agency, ANLA, between March and May of next year.Colombia’s inspector general has called on ANLA to exercise the precautionary principle when considering the environmental impacts posed by the port project, including taking account of the endangered species — hammerhead sharks, nesting sea turtles and humpback whales — that use the area to mate, raise their young, or migrate through.The proposed port would occupy private and municipal land belonging to parties promoting the Arquimedes project. But its impact would be felt in nearby collective Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities: connecting the port to Colombia’s road network would require repairs and construction on five sections of roads, the majority crossing their territories.At a public forum in Bogotá to debate the proposed port, Harry Samir Mosquera, president of the Afro-Colombian community council at Los Riscales, said Tribugá Port would violate the local community’s right to autonomy. With the country’s long-running armed conflict finally over, he said, his fears of multinationals and private companies flooding into the territory are becoming a reality.About the reporter: Taran Volckhausen is Colorado-based freelance journalist who regularly reports on environmental issues in Colombia. You can find him on Twitter at @tvolckhausen. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Willie Shubertcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Hornbill heroes: A conversation with a top Indonesian bird conservation NGO

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler With their ostentatious bills, raucous calls, and unusual behavioral traits, hornbills are arguably one of the most charismatic groups of birds in the tropics. No country is home to more species than Indonesia, which has 13.Hornbills in Indonesia are particularly under threat due to habitat destruction. Some species are also targeted by the wildlife trade, including, most notably, the helmeted hornbill, whose dense casque is made up of “hornbill ivory” that’s highly sought in China.Until very recently, the decline in hornbill populations in Indonesia has been relatively under-appreciated. But that changed in 2013 when Yokyok “Yoki” Hadiprakarsa, founder of Rangkong Indonesia, published a report estimating that the wildlife trade killed 500 helmeted hornbills a month in West Kalimantan alone.In June 2019, Mongabay interviewed Yoki Hadiprakarsa and Dian Hardiyanti from Rangkong Indonesia about their work to protect hornbills in Indonesia. With their ostentatious bills, often colorful plumage, raucous calls, and unusual behavioral traits, hornbills are arguably one of the most charismatic groups of birds in the tropics. While hornbills are found widely across tropical Africa and Asia-Pacific, no country is home to more species than Indonesia, which has 13. Within Indonesia, Sumatra leads the way with 9 species, followed by Kalimantan.Hornbills in Indonesia are particularly under threat due to habitat destruction. Vast areas of rainforest have been cleared for plantations and agriculture, while many of the forests that remain have been impacted by logging, which often focuses on trees hornbills depend upon for food and shelter. Some species are also targeted by the wildlife trade, including most notably, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil), whose dense casque (a showy protrusion atop the animal’s bill) is made up of “hornbill ivory” that’s highly sought in China.Rhinoceros hornbill in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.The loss of hornbills is having real and significant impacts on Asian forests, since hornbills are critically important seed dispersers. When they are extirpated from a forest, that ecosystem’s ecological function is degraded.Until very recently, the decline in hornbill populations in Indonesia was relatively under-appreciated. But that changed in 2013 when Yokyok “Yoki” Hadiprakarsa, founder of the Indonesian Hornbill Conservation Society, better known in Indonesian as Rangkong Indonesia, published a report estimating that the wildlife trade killed 500 helmeted hornbills a month in West Kalimantan alone. That finding shocked NGOs and the Indonesian government into action.Today, Rankong Indonesia is recognized as one of the leading organizations working on hornbill conservation in Indonesia. In a recent visit to Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan, Mongabay had an opportunity to travel with Dian Hardiyanti of Rangkong Indonesia to one of the group’s projects with the Dayak Iban community of Sungai Utik. After the visit, Mongabay also spoke with Rangkong Indonesia founder Yoki Hadiprakarsa. Below is an interview with the two hornbill conservationists.Dian Hardiyanti. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia.AN INTERVIEW WITH DIAN HARDIYANTI and YOKYOK HADIPRAKARSAMongabay: What is your background and how did you come to work with hornbills?Dian: My educational background is Bachelor of Science at Pakuan University, Bogor. My passion for conservation led me to do research on the illegal turtle trade for my final thesis. After finishing my studies, I met Yoki and he invited me to join a very ambitious hornbill research project: a hornbills’ population assessment in a district located in Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. I thought it would be a valuable opportunity to improve my understanding and expand my knowledge as a researcher and conservationist.Sunda wrinkled hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanWreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahYoki: I have a passion for nature, that is why I took a wildlife biologist as my life path. In 1999, I received a research scholarship from Wildlife Conservation Society – Indonesia Program (WCS-IP) to spent a whole year to finishing my undergraduate research on hornbills in Way Canguk Research Station in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Sumatra. In the same year, I also initiated long-term hornbill monitoring there, which led me to be hired by WCS-IP as a junior wildlife biologist. After graduating in 2000 I had a great opportunity to present my first hornbill research in the 3rd International Hornbill Conference (IHC) in Thailand. This became a milestone because the experience exposed and introduced me the international hornbill community.In the early years of my professional career, I spent most of the time in the research station monitoring hornbill population and breeding. In 2004 I had a special opportunity to conduct province-wide hornbill survey in Southern Sumatra. Later, this research was used for my graduate work at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia in the United States.For the 4th International Hornbill Conference in South Africa, I was appointed as co-chairman for the Asian Hornbill Network. As for now, I’m a member of the Steering Committee of the IUCN-SSC Hornbill Specialist Group and Research Coordinator for Helmeted Hornbill Working Group. At the national level, I was recently appointed as Chairman of the National Partnership for Indonesia Hornbill Conservation.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia / Nanang Sujana.Rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: What do you do? What does a day look like?Dian: I’m a research officer at Rangkong Indonesia. I focus on hornbill research in Kapuas Hulu District. Every month, we visit villages and forests to do interviews with local people. We ask villagers about their perspective on hornbills, like do they have local wisdom about hornbills, have they ever hunted a hornbill in the past, do they have customary laws to protect hornbills, do they use hornbill body parts for traditional ceremonies, and how they get hornbills from the wild. In general, the Dayak tribe has a strong relationship with hornbills, because hornbills were being used for customary needs and figures prominently in their mythology as a symbol of courage.On each visit we also spend 10 days in the forest to conduct a hornbill population survey, which cover eight hornbill species. We mark where we find hornbills and hornbill nests. We analyze whether the quality of habitat for hornbills, including the prevalence of trees important for their diets.In general, hornbills are very important for traditional Dayak culture.Helmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki HadiprakarsaHelmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki HadiprakarsaYoki: During my undergraduate research, I found hornbill conservation in Indonesia is lacking in many aspects, despite the fact that we have the richest hornbill assemblage with 13 species and the largest habitat for hornbills in Asia. For example, in a literature search I found only 40 scientific publications over four decades related to Indonesian hornbills. Most of this research was conducted by foreigners and there were no integrative conservation actions for Indonesian hornbills. It was a bitter finding that encouraged me to persistently work with the hornbills.Since then, I have taken every opportunity to work with hornbills, whether I had support or not. In 2009 I launched the Indonesian Hornbill Information Center website (Rumah Informasi Rangkong Indonesia – RIRI, in Bahasa). The idea was simple: provide any information on hornbills, both popular and scientific. I was also collecting information on hornbill sightings and scientific publications on hornbills. For this, I didn’t get any support, since it is difficult to get financial support for non-celebrity species like hornbills. Later, I also started using all mainstream social media along with the website.After returned from the U.S., I spent most of my professional career working with numerous development agencies on projects related to biodiversity and conservation. I also worked independently on sustainability-related issues on various concessions from mining to palm oil. During this period, I witnessed the beginning of the helmeted hornbill crisis and, with the generous support from Chester Zoo Conservation Fund, decided to conduct the first investigation on the issue. Those findings about the extent of the crisis shocked the world.Since then, I decided to establish Indonesia Hornbill Conservation Society/Rangkong Indonesia as part of a research unit in the Rekam Nusantara Foundation, which we established with Ridzki and four other colleagues. Afterward, I tried to advocate at the national and global level to persuade people to take action on the Helmeted hornbill crisis. Luckily this worked and policies have been put into place at both the international and national levels. These changes have impacted both directly and indirectly sources of threat: hunting and illegal trade.How? Well, today most famous big international conservation NGOs have prioritized the helmeted hornbill. The Indonesian government has launched a national conservation action plan for the next 10 years (2018 – 2028). This action plan is paramount for the government to allocate more budget and direct its partners to implement the plan. For assurance, the government established a National Partnership for Indonesian Hornbill Conservation, not just for helmeted hornbill.From a global perspective, the Global Conservation Action Plan is also in place and range state countries, as well as NGOs, have also prioritized hornbill conservation.I’m quite happy with these outcomes, which builds momentum on top of our earlier work. With Rangkong Indonesia and Rekam Nusantara Foundation, we are going always work on the frontline for Indonesia hornbill conservation.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia / Nanang Sujana.Sunda wrinkled hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanMongabay: Can you give more more specifics on your initiatives?Yoki: The helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) is the most hunted hornbills for its unique solid casque. In 2013, we found at least 6,000 birds were being killed by opportunistic or organized poacher groups across West Kalimantan alone. Many of the hunters live in the area where the Helmeted hornbill occurs and killed the birds for their daily survival. This is a bitter fact that we are facing.However, there are many success stories of beneficial relationships between people and birds through birdwatching tourism that gives people income while ensuring that the birds thrive. We strongly believe these communities have a great potential to be a conservation frontline for guarding hornbills. This idea is possible if there is an economic relationship between birds and communities without killing the birds.Three years ago, we initiated a hornbill guardian project in collaboration with Nature Conservation Foundation, India funded by the Whitley-Segré Conservation Fund. This project has laid the foundation for a hornbill guardian program with the Sungai Utik people and beyond. Such initiative will be the first in Indonesia.Oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: What have been some of the key findings of your work?Dian: We found helmeted hornbills are getting harder to find, even in the remote forest areas, which might be a full two days travel by boat. It’s surely the result of hunting and habitat loss. The best potential habitat for hornbills is still primary forest, but we find the best hornbill population in hutan desa (community forest). My hypothesis is that traditional people protect the forest. For example, when they go out hunting, they are also monitoring the forest.In the cultural context, hornbill is used in many traditional rituals, such as welcome dances for guests among the Iban and Punan tribes as well as wedding and birth ceremonies in Dayak Pangin and Dayak Punan.Dayak Punan and Iban communities have customary laws built around a mythology that hornbills are their heroes or gods. For example, there is a belief that if you hear a rhinoceros hornbill calling during tribal conflict, you follow the call because it will lead you to a safe place.Dayak culture is very closely tied to hornbills. Therefore if they let go hornbills go extinct, they will lose their culture.Yoki: At a species level, my studies found that hunting is seriously impacting the helmeted hornbill population in the wild. In some areas, helmeted hornbills have been extirpated due to the deadly combination of hunting and habitat loss, e.g Kutai National Park. Sadly, our ongoing project found that hunting is still occurring, despite a drastic fall in the population and increased law enforcement. Why is this still happening? The demand still out there! Including some indication of demand for live birds!At a local level, I’ve found that communities have great potential to benefit from the presence of hornbills via bird ecotourism.Rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanMongabay: In general, is the public very much aware of the status of hornbills?Dian: The general public isn’t that familiar with hornbills. Due to educational materials we have in school, they are more likely to know species from other countries than native fauna. People are often surprised to learn that hornbills are endangered.Even in public spaces, the authorities often make mistakes or misunderstand between hornbill species. Our role is to educate them about hornbills and their status in the wild. We are doing campaigns and awareness-raising in several villages and visiting schools.Yoki: At the global level, knowledge on Indonesian hornbills is still surprisingly lacking. Even mainstream media still confuse hornbills with toucans and make other mistakes like using the wrong name for species, let alone understanding their protection status. However thanks to social media, public awareness on hornbills is growing.The global wildlife conservation paradigm must be changed to to support non-celebrity or less-known species which face serious threats.Indonesian hornbills are one of our greatest biodiversity treasures. Their ecological function of nurturing our vast tropical rainforest is irreplaceable. Indonesians should be proud that we have them in our lives, now and in the future to come.Oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: Do you have advice for anyone wanting to pursue a career in conservation in Indonesia?Dian: Very few people in Indonesia work in conservation. People often think it’s hard, low paid, and requires going to remote areas that are seemingly dangerous. But, if are passionate and work hard, you will cope with all the challenges and find opportunities. If you’re going into conservation research as a career, you need to be serious, patient, and curious. If you’re a life-long learner, a career in conservation can be very rewarding.Banner image: A fresh helmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki Hadiprakarsacenter_img Animals, Archive, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Illegal Trade, Indigenous Communities, Interviews, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 16, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsA free-trade deal between the United States and Brazil could be disastrous for the Amazon and forest communities, one commentator argues (The Hill).The continent of Africa emitted more carbon dioxide than the United States in 2016 (Carbon Brief).Ancient earthworks in the Amazon clue scientists into how societies used and protected the rainforest (Ensia).Brazil’s lawmakers are considering a law allowing hunters to go after jaguars and other iconic rainforest wildlife (The Independent).The Amazon is approaching a tipping point, according to one climate scientist (The New Yorker).Komodo dragons in Indonesia could become victims of their own popularity (The New York Times).Investors could be pivotal in stopping deforestation for soy in Brazil (Ethical Corp).A film tells the story of one man’s restoration of a small piece of rainforest in Ecuador (Yale E360).Other newsSome coal miners in the U.S. are looking for alternatives to coal mining (The Guardian).Microplastics are turning up in Arctic snow (The Atlantic) …… And the tiny pieces of trash are also leading to increases in air pollution (Los Angeles Times).Average temperatures in parts of the U.S. have already breached the 2-degree-Celsius (3.6-degree-Fahrenheit) mark (The Washington Post).New research shows that populations of river giants like catfish and stingrays are down by 97 percent in the past 50 years (The Guardian).Young climate change activist Greta Thunberg is sailing across the Atlantic Ocean for the upcoming U.N. climate talks (The New York Times).The baleen plates of dead whales are helping scientists learn more about threatened species (CBC).Fishing and shipping threaten whales as much as renewed hunting by countries such as Japan (Scientific American).The Trump administration in the U.S. has removed some of the protections of the Endangered Species Act (The Washington Post, The New York Times, EnviroNews Nigeria, Vox).July 2019 was hotter than any other month in recorded history, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported (The New York Times).Banner image of a jaguar by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

Sea Around Us: Global fisheries data and the goose that laid the golden egg (commentary)

first_imgHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?Having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals).Many of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. With the Sea Around Us data set, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The end of the 2010s will be remembered as the time when the world realized that we are in the midst of a global biodiversity crisis, as illustrated by the widespread collapse of insect populations.A similar realization occurred about two decades earlier, when it became obvious to anyone with a passing interest in the matter that fish populations were collapsing all over the world under the onslaught of out-of-control fisheries. The generality of this pattern had long been contested: fish population collapse had long been seen as isolated events, each with its own cause, usually attributed to environmental fluctuations.However, the 1980s had also seen a slowing down of the global catch increases, which, since the post-WWII period, had masked localized fisheries collapses. Later, this stagnation of global catches — occasionally if optimistically described as “stabilization” — turned into a continuous decline now known to have started following 1996, the year of peak catches.For global marine catches to decline in spite of the massive increase in the size and power of international fishing fleets implies that we are essentially everywhere past the amount of fishing that generates Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). Thus, the biomass (or abundance) of fish everywhere is well below that which can generate MSY.This is confirmed by multiple single species “stock assessments,” i.e., the estimation of time series of abundance of fish “stocks” based on their catch, ancillary information, and mathematical models representing the growth and decline of fish populations.Government subsidies and fisheries collapseHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?As in the case of the proverbial goose that laid the golden egg, this destruction was driven by short-term greed. But this alone is not a sufficient explanation. Another driver was (and still is) government subsidies. These subsidies are given to fisheries for two reasons:Because politicians can, on the short term, buy votes and/or social peace when subsidies are given to the fisheries sector (e.g., Spain, Japan, France, China); andBecause politicians and many high-ranking civil servants, many of whom are trained engineers or agronomists, appear to sincerely believe, all evidence to the contrary, that subsidies should enable fisheries to increase declining catches.The latter belief stems from a misunderstanding due to the fact that, in most economic sectors (e.g., manufacturing, agriculture), more “input” (investments, machinery, fertilizer, and other factors of production) lead to more “output.” This is not so in fisheries: Past a certain point (MSY, see above), more fishing boats reduce the catch from an exploited fish population.The solution to what seems like a riddle is that boats are not a factor of fish production — wild fish are produced by nature in functioning ecosystems. Boats are only the means by which the fish produced by nature are collected.Thus, having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals). These and other problematic issues are covered in a book I recently published through Greystone Books, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries.There is always some data to work withMany of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. However, decidedly global studies of fisheries were rare in most of the 20th century, and became common only in the 1990s.Before that, most fishery scientists were content to study and write about a single fishery for decades, detailing their ups and (mostly) downs in isolation from other fisheries. In the 1990s, contributions began to appear that demonstrated a massive impact of fisheries on their underlying ecosystem on a global basis, and these inquiries became a flood in the early 2000s.Many of these global analyses were based in part or completely on the database of “catches” (actually “landings”) supplied annually since 1950 to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, which then harmonized and disseminated them. This was, at the time, the only global database on fisheries statistics.Increased use of the FAO database, however, made its various shortcomings more visible than they had been previously. One example of this was the non-consideration of millions of tons of discarded fish. Another was the widespread omission in most countries’ contributions to the FAO database of the catches of artisanal subsistence and recreational fisheries, wrongly assumed to be negligible.Combined with the lack of geographical resolution (the FAO marine fisheries statistics are allocated to 19 giant FAO statistical areas, with, for example, the Eastern Indian Ocean reaching from Bangladesh to the Antarctic convergence), these shortcomings made it necessary to correct for the incomplete coverage of the FAO data and the coarseness of their spatial allocation. With these corrections, it would be possible to make reasonable assessments to the state of the world’s oceans.The task of implementing these corrections was undertaken by the Sea Around Us, a research project that I have led since mid-1999, which was funded for many years by the Pew Charitable Trusts (and currently by a variety of philanthropic foundations).Sea Around Us and its hundreds of collaborators throughout the world “reconstructed” the marine fisheries catch of all maritime countries of the world (including their overseas territories), an activity that took almost 15 years to complete.The initial reconstructions covered the years 1950 to 2010; this work was subsequently updated to 2014, and is currently being updated to 2016 (i.e., it remains about two years behind the FAO’s database, which produces its statistics with a lag time of about two years). On our side, the delay is due to having to verify the official landing data country by country and territory by territory, add the fish that were discarded, and allocate the complemented catch data to various fisheries sectors and gear. Also, we allocate the catch data to smaller spatial entities such as the Exclusive Economic Zone of the various countries and territories, Large Marine Ecosystems, or other geographic entities.The Sea Around Us dataset subdivides marine catch data by, for example, species, fishing gear, fishing country, and end use (direct human consumption, fish meal, etc.). This information is provided both as tonnage and in dollar terms, i.e., as weight times the dockside prices of the landed fish. These various dimensions are the reasons why this dataset is increasingly used by the scientific community and by civil society, as intended.Indeed, this wide use of the Sea Around Us dataset was the main point of emphasis at the celebration of its 20th anniversary at the University of British Columbia on June 20, 2019. With the Sea Around Us dataset, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This will not solve all fisheries problems. However, being able to provide the advice that they can be expected to give, fisheries scientists will be empowered to do their work and politicians will not be able to claim that they have no basis for making decisions to reduce fishing effort in order to rebuild fish populations. The ball will be in their court, along with multiple golden-egg-laying geese waiting to be resuscitated.Featured Image: Trawlers by John, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Dr. Daniel Pauly, who is both French and Canadian, studied fisheries science in Germany and spent much of his career in the tropics, notably in Philippines. Since 1994, he is a Professor of Fisheries at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada, where he direct the Sea Around Us project. The Sea Around Us, initially funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts, and since 2014 by a variety of philanthropic foundations, is devoted to studying, documenting and mitigating the impact of fisheries on the world’s marine ecosystems. The concepts, methods and software Daniel Pauly developed are documented in over 1000 widely-cited publications, and have led to his receiving multiple scientific awards.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Big Data, Commentary, data, Editorials, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Overexploitation, Overfishing, Researcher Perspective Series Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Snow leopard population overestimated in Nepal? DNA study suggests it may be

first_imgResearchers conducted a large-scale survey of potential snow leopard habitat in Nepal to re-estimate the species’ population density using the non-invasive technique of collecting environmental DNA from scat samples combined with standard genetic analyses.This method enabled the researchers to sample a larger, more representative, area than many previous studies, often conducted in prime leopard habitats; they also found that they could obtain reliable DNA from scat samples.Previous studies on which conservation policies have been based may have over-estimated the big cat’s population. The researchers say similar studies are needed to more accurately estimate the population of snow leopards in Nepal and 11 other range countries. In September 2014, Nepali zoologist Madhu Chetri asked his professor Morten Odden a strange question during their fieldwork. “Are you tired?” he asked Odden as the duo from the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences trekked the Annapurna region of Nepal, collecting scats of the elusive snow leopard for a DNA study. “Prof Odden asked me why I’d asked him such as question,” said Chetri, who recently completed his PhD. “I told him that there’s a rock in front of us, if you look behind it, you’ll find snow leopard scat.”Snow leopard at ease in its high-mountain habitat. Image credit: Madhu Chetri.Snow leopards (Panthera unica) are shy cats ‘believed to be’ (a phrase used to describe almost anything related to the animal) living at extreme altitudes in the steep mountainous areas of 12 countries in central and South Asia. Until recently, less than 2 percent of the animal’s geographic distribution has been sampled systematically, primarily in small survey areas.“I worked in an area known as an important snow leopard habitat for over a decade, but I saw the animal with my own eyes only three times,” Chetri told Mongabay. He had a hunch that because only a tiny fraction of the species’ range, often areas considered to be prime leopard habitat, has been sampled so far, the population of these cats may have been overestimated.The global snow leopard population is estimated to be between 4,678 and 8,745 individuals with an average density of 0.9–1.8 leopards per 100 square kilometers (2.3–4.7 per 100 square miles). In the case of Nepal, snow leopard densities estimated in different parts of the country using sign (scats and scrape marks) and radio telemetry data show higher densities than the global average.A 1989 study in Langu Valley, Dolpa reported a density of 5–10 snow leopards per 100 square kilometers (13–26 per 100 square miles), following a 1997 study in Manang, Annapurna Conservation Area that reported 4.8–6.7 snow leopards per 100 square kilometers (12.4–17.3 per 100 square miles). “These studies conducted on small areas have formed the bedrock of all future estimates of snow leopards and policies to conserve them,” Chetri said.Chetri wanted to buck this trend. In 2013, he was awarded a scholarship to carry out his PhD research on snow leopards at the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences. His aim was to conduct a large-scale survey of a potential snow leopard habitat in Nepal and to re-estimate their densities using the DNA found in the animal’s scat. Due to constraints of time and resources, he chose the ‘central block’ (4,393 square kilometers, or 1,696 square miles) of the snow leopard habitat in Nepal so that other researchers could build on his work and do the same for the eastern and western blocks.Researcher in the field at Manang within Annapurna Conservation Area at 4,000 meters elevation preparing a genetic sample of snow leopard DNA from a scat. Scat samples are tough to find, so the research team collected all carnivore scat samples (nearly 600) that could potentially belong to snow leopards during 490 kilometers (305 miles) of transect surveys. 182 of the samples in this study came from snow leopards. The team had the samples processed at an established laboratory. Image by Madhu Chetri.“I decided to use the DNA method mainly because of weather conditions in high altitude areas,” said Chetri, lead author of a recent paper in the Journal Global Ecology and Conservation. “Camera traps are hard to install at higher altitudes, as the batteries don’t function well in the cold,” he added. “Similarly, getting camera traps for a large-scale survey is costly.”Leopard scats can provide robust environmental DNAHigh-altitude areas tend to be dry, and this means that snow leopard scats remain preserved for a longer period of time. Also, having worked in the area for over a decade, Chetri knew where to go look for snow leopard scats.The study area he and his colleagues chose was the Annapurna-Manaslu landscape, the northern part of which adjoins the vast Tibetan Plateau. Most of the area falls within these two conservation areas. The team defined the study area borders by delineating a minimum convex polygon around all scat sampling transects except in the northern section, where they used the Nepal-China boundary.However, as the habitat of snow leopards lies above the tree line at elevations ranging from 3,000 to 6000 meters (9,843 to 19,685 feet), the researchers removed from the initial polygon areas considered too far above or below this elevation range, resulting in a survey area of 4,393 square kilometers, or 1,696 square miles.Part of the study area. The Annapurna range from above the city of Pokhara, Nepal. Phewa lake (below) and the peaks of Machapucharé, Annapurna III, Annapurna IV, Annapurna II and Lamjung Himal (from left to right) on the horizon. Snow leopards generally range above treeline (3,000-6,000 meters elevation). Image by Jean-Marie Hullot, via Wikimedia Commons. CC-BY-SA 3.0.The team collected 573 scats from 490 kilometers, or 305 miles, of transects within twenty-six 5 × 5-kilometer (3.1 x 3.1-mile) sized sampling grid cells of the survey area with 5–10 kilometers (3–6 miles) between grid cells. This, according to Chetri, covered about 15 percent of the total study area.“However, due to financial constraints, we used only 347 scat samples for our analysis,” he said. “We also collected scats on trails connecting the cells and along some trails that were beyond grid cell borders. We avoided placing grids on areas that were inaccessible due to high elevation or ruggedness.” They also avoided areas falling in and around large settlements and those with cultural restrictions.Big cats such as leopards and tigers use their scats to mark their territory, and the team did not want to alter the natural environment for their study. So they only took half of the scat as sample and left the other half where they found it.A typical snow leopard scat. This one must have eaten well. Snow leopards and other big cats mark territory with scat and urine, so the research team left at least half of each sample in place. Image by Madhu Chetri.A population overestimation?In September 2017, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)‘down-listed’ the snow leopard’s extinction risk categorization.“Thanks to new available data, the Snow Leopard has moved from the Endangered to Vulnerable category,” the IUCN reported before warning that “its population continues to decline and it still faces a high risk of extinction through habitat loss and degradation, declines in prey, competition with livestock, persecution, and poaching for illegal wildlife trade.” The change was prompted by new estimates that more than 4,000 wild snow leopards, and possibly more, existed across Asia, with as many as 2,000 possible in China.“The talk of this ‘down-listing’ had been going on for several years, and it was seen as inevitable,” said Chetri, who was further motivated by the development to finish his PhD research and determine whether surveying a large area would produce a more accurate population estimate than those based on surveys of known smaller areas of “prime habitat”.Processing the DNA in the 347 scat samples using six microsatellite markers specifically designed for snow leopard confirmed that 182 samples were from snow leopards. Eighty-one of these gave sufficiently reliable high-quality results to show they belonged to 34 distinct individuals.Chetri and his colleagues used maximum likelihood-based spatial capture-recapture analysis to develop models from the DNA analysis results to test the effects of various covariates on density and detection of scats on transects. They found that snow leopard density increased with elevation until a certain point, then began to decline. Detection of scat varied primarily with topography, and it was highest in dry river beds and ridge trails.The analysis showed that the average density estimate of snow leopards for the central block within Nepal was around 0.95 animals per 100 square kilometers (2.46 per 100 square miles), with predicted densities varying between 0.1 and 1.9 animals in different parts—this was much lower than the 5-10 individuals per 100 square kilometers (13 to 26 per 100 square miles) density suggested by previous studies.A curious and possibly suspicious female snow leopard approaches lead researcher Madhu Chetri and his camera. Their large home ranges are in inhospitable terrain, so snow leopards see few people. Image by Madhu Chetri.“Data from previous studies was extrapolated to say that that Nepal was home to around 300-400 individuals,” Chetri said. “But if my data from the central zone is to be extrapolated in a similar way, it would suggest that only 48 individuals roam the centre block, and only 140 animals live in the 12,815 square kilometers (4,948 square miles) of potential snow leopard habitat in Nepal.”“But we should not extrapolate in such a manner, as snow leopard densities are not same even within the centre block, let alone the whole distribution range in Nepal. That is why need similar studies for the two remaining blocks,” he added.He and his co-authors write that the results highlight the need for similar large-scale studies of the species in its 12 range countries. As range country governments prepare for PAWS (Population Assessment of the World’s Snow Leopards), which aims to produce a robust estimate of the threatened cat’s population status within the next four years, Chetri hopes that his findings will provide input for those involved in the count.Zoologist Hem Sagar Baral, who was part of the technical team that prepared the Nepal Snow Leopard Action Plan (2017-21) said Chetri’s study shines new light on the ecologically important species. “The study’s inputs will definitely help policy makers incorporate the new findings when they sit for a mid-term review of the action plan soon,” Baral added.Snow leopard passes a camera trap at Marjhong in Upper Mustang in 2014. Image by Madhu Chetri.After Chetri completed his PhD defense, it was Prof Oden’s turn to ask Chetri a strange question. “How did you know that day that there were two snow leopard scats lying next to the rock?” Chetri recollected quoting the professor.“I told him, ‘I worked in the field for a decade and this was the most crucial factor in the research,’” he said. “On the surface, this study looks like a year-long effort, but this was a result of a decade-long work I did on snow leopards.”CitationChetri, M., Odden, M., Sharma, K., Flagstad, Ø., &Wegge, P. (2019). Estimating snow leopard density using fecal DNA in a large landscape in north-central Nepal. Global Ecology and Conservation, 17, e00548.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Big Cats, Carnivores, DNA, Endangered Species, Genetics, Leopards, Monitoring, Mountains, Population, Protected Areas, Research, Snow Leopards, surveys, Technology, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Companies sourcing beef, leather from China exposed to Brazil deforestation risk, researchers say

first_imgArticle published by daniel An analysis of trade data reveals retailers and manufacturers using cattle products sourced from Brazil may be buying beef and leather linked to deforestation.The research by NGO Global Canopy linked Brazilian and Chinese companies to major brands including Adidas, Nike, DFS, Ikea, BMW, Daimler, General Motors and Volkswagen.Of the 15 importers in Europe and the United States included in the data, only three purchased products from Chinese companies that had made deforestation commitments. Major retailers and manufacturers of cattle products who source materials from Brazil may be using beef and leather linked to deforestation, an analysis of trade data by NGO Global Canopy suggests.Global Canopy looked at the deforestation policies of 43 companies involved in the beef and leather trade from Brazil via China. It found that popular sports brands such as Adidas and Nike, car makers BMW, General Motors and Volkswagen, and furniture retailers including DFS were unable to guarantee their leather was deforestation-free.Of the 15 importers they identified, just three purchased products from Chinese manufacturers that had made a deforestation commitment. The Chinese companies also sourced materials from Brazilian companies without commitments in place.Where deforestation pledges had been made by Brazilian suppliers, their policies only applied to the Amazon region and excluded other important and at-risk regions, such as the Cerrado, according to the research.“It’s difficult to know why some of these companies do not have policies – they may not be aware of the risks, or they may not see them as a priority,” André Vasconcelos, a Global Canopy researcher who co-authored the analysis, told Mongabay in an email.Previous research by Global Canopy found that companies exposed to deforestation risks from other commodities, such as palm oil, were more likely to be aware of their exposure and have deforestation policies than those dealing in cattle products.“Leather supply chains are complex and retail companies may not know where the leather has been sourced from. Our research shows that leather produced in Brazil is often exported to China where it is manufactured into products, such as car seats or shoes and then are re-exported to other countries,” Vasconcelos said. “Some companies may not be even aware that they could be purchasing products that are linked to deforestation. Other companies are clearly aware as they have policies for some areas – but not for all sourcing areas.”In the car industry, Vasconcelos says a focus on emissions over raw materials such as leather may explain the apparent oversight. Yet in the shoe industry he says the origins of the products’ core material should be “of crucial importance.” Similarly, for the companies supplying beef in China, consumer concerns about food safety “seem to dominate concerns over sustainability.”Commodities from illegally deforested areas of Brazil reach markets globally via complex supply chains that can obscure the source of goods. Scientists and conservationists have long argued for a halt to Amazon logging, not least because the carbon storage facility it provides acts as a vital bulwark against climate change.Experts are concerned that President Jair Bolsonaro’s plans to open indigenous lands to agribusiness and mining companies and the weakening of environmental regulations and agencies will further fuel deforestation. Bolsonaro has dismissed allegations he has encouraged illegal deforestation, the setting of wildfires and land grabbing.Brands in the SpotlightInternational brands sourcing leather from Brazil say they are increasingly offering alternative products where possible and that they are aware of their responsibility to monitor and improve sustainability standards within their supply chains.Daimler AG, the maker of Mercedes-Benz cars and one of the firms identified in the Global Canopy analysis as sourcing from Adient PLC and Lear Corporation, China-based manufacturers that also supply Ford, General Motors, BMW and Volkswagen, said suppliers are required to “to vigorously communicate and monitor” sustainability standards in their supply chains.Heike Rombach, a Daimler spokesman, said its customers could also go leather-free by opting for man-made alternatives composed of microfibers made from recycled polyester and polyurethane. According to Global Canopy, Lear Corporation does not have a deforestation policy. In turn, it also sources leather from Brazilian firm Vancouros Industria & Comercio De Couros Ltda, which also has no policy in place.Volkswagen Group said in a statement that it could not comment on specific suppliers, but that each supplier had to abide by its code of conduct and went through an assessment process that could include on-site checks. While the company admits it does not have “complete traceability for the whole leather supply chain”, it said suppliers are required to source “responsibly”.“The fact is that the sustainability situation in the leather supply chain is in some cases not satisfactory, and thus all the actors involved need to continue to be responsible for bringing about improvements,” Dr. Günther Scherelis, a Volkswagen spokesman, said in the statement. “We recognize this responsibility for ourselves and will increase our commitment and activities in the coming weeks and months.”He added that as well as working directly with contractors, the firm was piloting a leather traceability scheme using blockchain technology.In response to the Global Canopy research, BMW also said it placed stringent sustainability requirements on leather suppliers, though it noted that other materials, such as cobalt, copper and rubber, took priority. “For our leather suppliers we defined supplementary requirements that reinforce the importance of resource efficiency in the tanneries, working conditions in the sewing industry and animal welfare from field to tannery,” the carmaker said in a statement.BMW added that it conducted annual audits of leather suppliers and was developing tools to monitor the supply chain, as well as “asking for complete transparency for specific supply chains if a transgression is suspected”.Along with automotive and footwear firms, Global Canopy identified several furniture brands as potentially exposed to deforestation in their supply chains, such as Ikea, Macy’s, DFS and Ashley. According to the NGO’s data, several of the furniture brands buy leather products from Chinese firm HTL International Holdings, one of the country’s largest leather importers, which sources material from at least two Brazilian companies without a deforestation commitment.In a statement to Mongabay, DFS, the UK’s second-largest home furnishings company, said it worked with suppliers “to ensure materials meet credible certification standards” and had employed an independent third-party to implement a verification process for its leather supply chain.Global Canopy’s Vasconcelos said that publishing a deforestation policy can be an important first step towards deforestation-free supply chains as it shows companies are risk-aware. “But it is important to make clear that there is a difference between publishing a policy and implementing that policy,” he added. “We have seen in the past how some global companies that have deforestation policies continue to source cattle from areas embargoed due to illegal deforestation, for example. Companies need to make sure they have systems in place to implement their policies if they are going to make a difference on the ground.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Beef, Deforestation, Forests, Rainforests, Supply Chain, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Rare songbird recovers, moves off endangered species list

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The Kirtland’s warbler, a species that was close to extinction five decades ago, is now thriving and has been removed from the U.S. federal list of endangered species.Where there were fewer than 200 breeding pairs of the warbler in the 1970s and 1980s, today there are more than 2,300.However, the warbler’s continued survival is conservation-reliant, which means it will still depend heavily on continued conservation efforts.Conservationists say the bird’s comeback is testament that the Endangered Species Act works, and warn that current attempts by the Trump administration to roll back conservation policies could lead to other protected species going extinct. The recovery of a rare bird species that was close to extinction five decades ago is now being heralded as a conservation success story.The Kirtland’s warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii), also known as the jack pine warbler, a small songbird that nests only in young jack pine forests in northern Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, was never really considered to be an abundant species. During the first ever census of the bird in 1951, birders and researchers counted 432 singing males (a rough proxy of the number of breeding pairs). A decade later, the number rose to 502 singing males. The third census in 1971, however, revealed a population crash: researchers counted only 203 singing males, a number that saw subsequent slight dips and rises, but remained low throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Consequently, the warbler, known for its distinct yellow throat, chest and belly and blue-gray head and back, became one of the first species to be listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).But thanks to decades of conservation actions, the bird is now thriving, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) says. There are more than 2,300 singing males (or breeding pairs) of the warbler as per latest estimates, and due to its recovery, the species has been removed from the federal list of endangered species.“The delisting of the Kirtland’s Warbler is cause for celebration and proof that the Endangered Species Act works,” Shawn Graff, vice president of the American Bird Conservancy’s (ABC) Great Lakes program, said in a statement.Dan Eichinger, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, added that delisting marked the “latest chapter in a remarkable wildlife success story.”“The bird’s recovery provides dramatic testimony to what conservation organizations, governments and businesses can accomplish when they come together for the good of the resource,” he said in a statement.However, the warbler’s survival into the future is conservation-reliant, conservationists say, which means that it will still depend heavily on continued active management efforts.For example, the warbler needs large stands of young jack pine habitat to nest, and historically, wildfires helped create those vast tracts of habitat. But practices like fire suppression and timber harvesting in the early 1900s reduced the area the birds could breed in, according to the USFWS. To counter this, authorities developed a rigorous management plan that mimicked the natural processes within jack pine forests and increased the warbler’s breeding habitat. In addition, they had to work to control brown-headed cowbirds, birds that lay their eggs in warbler nests, forcing the warbler parents to raise larger cowbird chicks that easily outcompete the smaller warbler babies.“This bird flew off the endangered species list because the Endangered Species Act works,” Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement. “This success story highlights the danger of the Trump administration’s efforts to cripple laws protecting our wildlife and natural landscapes. Without the Endangered Species Act, the Kirtland’s warbler might have vanished forever. Many other species will disappear if we don’t stop Trump’s efforts to gut conservation policies.”A male Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest in Michigan, U.S. Image by Jeol Trick/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Watch: Matt Breida’s record-breaking, eye-popping TD gives 49ers quick lead

first_imgOn the 49ers’ first play from scrimmage, Breida took a … Speed kills, especially with Matt Breida’s swiftness, as the Cleveland Browns found out rather quickly on Monday night.The 49ers’ running back scored on a jaw-dropping 83-yard touchdown run less than two minutes into the game to give San Francisco a 7-0 lead on Monday Night Football.This is the fastest an NFL player has run in 2019, per ESPN. pic.twitter.com/fGXpR6FoW2— Bay Area Sports HQ (@BayAreaSportsHQ) October 8, 2019last_img read more