As Amazon deforestation rises, sensational headlines play into Bolsonaro’s agenda (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all over Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Forests, Green, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery Deforestation appears to be on the rise in the Brazilian Amazon, but sensational headlines are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.For example, administration officials are actively calling into question Brazilian space agency INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.” Pereira’s claim is completely unsubstantiated, but is nonetheless consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring.It is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In recent weeks, some media outlets have run eye-popping headlines on rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: “Deforestation of Brazilian Amazon surges to record high” read a June 4th headline in The Guardian; “Monthly deforestation up 88.4% compared with a year ago” stated a summary bullet-point The Guardian added to the top of a story syndicated from Reuters on July 3rd; and “Brazilian deforestation spiked 88 percent under Bolsonaro“, said a July 4th piece in The Hill. These sensational headlines, which aren’t an accurate interpretation of the numbers, are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.While deforestation does indeed appear to be climbing in the Brazilian Amazon, the data from the two leading sources that track deforestation in the region — Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and Brazilian NGO Imazon — do not put it anywhere near all-time records, as implied by the headline The Guardian, or nearly twice the rate of last year, as claimed in the other two stories. The mistake these headlines make is they fail to account for the high variability of deforestation during the rainy season and early dry season in the Amazon, when cloud cover can reduce the accuracy of short-term, alert-based satellite monitoring systems. An article Mongabay published in 2015 explains:Month-to-month deforestation is highly variable leading to frequent misreporting in the media. Both MODIS and Landsat [satellite sensors] cannot penetrate cloud cover, so during the rainy season — from roughly November to April — estimates are notoriously unreliable when compared to the same month a year earlier. Furthermore, most forest clearing in the Amazon occurs when it is dry. So if the dry season is early, deforestation may increase earlier than normal. For these reasons, the most accurate deforestation comparisons are made year-on-year. For Brazil, the deforestation “year” ends July 31: the peak of the dry season when the largest extent of forest is typically visible via satellite.Nonetheless, short-term MODIS data isn’t useless — it can provide insights on trends, especially over longer periods of time. Generally, comparing 12 consecutive months of MODIS data will provide a pretty good indication of deforestation relative to other years.So when a headline makes a claim that deforestation is “up 88%” over the prior year based on one month of data, it’s providing only part of the picture. An analysis should at least look at multiple months’ worth of data, especially when the time period in question is outside the peak deforestation season from June-September. For example, the accumulated deforestation according to INPE and Imazon’s alert systems for the 12 months ended May 31, 2019 is 4,633 square kilometers and 4,916 square kilometers respectively, representing an increase of 1 percent and 43 percent over the prior year. The trend was actually looking worse at the beginning of 2019, when the moving average was over 5,000 square kilometers according to each system. This doesn’t mean of course that deforestation won’t continue its upward trajectory. Why this mattersMisconstruing the numbers is a problem because it plays into the narrative the Bolsonaro administration is using to undercut the credibility of journalists, civil society groups, and scientists that track and report on deforestation. For example, administration officials are actively calling into question INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.”“If you add up the percentages that have already been announced to date of deforestation in the Amazon, the Amazon would already be a desert,” he said.Pereira’s sentiments were echoed by Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina, who said in an interview with Globo’s CBN newspaper last week that “there are many distortions of information” regarding deforestation in Brazil. She added that Brazil needs to have “a single” and “correct” source of data.While neither the general’s remarks nor the minister’s statements indicate much depth of knowledge on Brazil’s own deforestation-tracking technologies or how deforestation is measured, they are consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring. Critics fear that effort could divert resources away from INPE’s system and foster uncertainty about the results it produces.More broadly, the comments square with the administration’s ongoing attack on science, scientific institutions, and environmental protection, including cutting funding for scientific research programs, education, and environmental law enforcement as well as policy moves like shifting the indigenous affairs bureau FUNAI under the control of the agriculture ministry.For these reasons, it is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now in the Amazon is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.Header image: Google Earth image showing deforestation around Arara in the state of Pará.last_img read more

Indonesian officials foil attempt to smuggle hornbill casques to Hong Kong

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Extinction, Global Trade, Hunting, Law, Law Enforcement, Organized Crime, Over-hunting, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Indonesian authorities have arrested a woman for allegedly attempting to smuggle 72 helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) casques to Hong Kong.The distinctive-looking bird is critically endangered, its precipitous decline driven by poaching for its casque — a solid, ivory-like protuberance on its head that’s highly prized in East Asia for use as ornamental carvings.Tackling the hornbill trade will be on the agenda at next month’s CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva. JAKARTA — Authorities in Indonesia have seized 72 highly prized hornbill casques and arrested a woman for allegedly attempting to smuggle them out of the country.The seizure occurred at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport outside Jakarta on July 17, with the ivory-like casques wrapped in tinfoil and hidden in biscuit cans. The woman, identified only as a 48-year-old, had placed the cans in her carry-on bag for a flight to Hong Kong, according to a statement from the environment ministry.“She claims she’s just a courier,” Sustyo Iriono, an enforcement official at the ministry, told Mongabay in a text message. He added that the woman had been charged under the 1990 Conservation Law, for which she could face up to five years in prison and up to 100 million rupiah ($7,200) in fines if convicted.Indonesian authorities present the seized hornbill casques and the alleged smuggler, third from right, to the press in Jakarta. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.The 72 seized casques come from the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil), a large bird with a distinctive helmet-like protuberance on its head that can account for up to an eighth of its total weight. The species is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List, its precipitous decline driven by demand for these casques, also known as red ivory and highly prized in East Asia for ornamental carvings.The helmeted hornbill is a protected species under Indonesian law. Sustyo said his office had launched an investigation to track down other members of what authorities suspect is a much wider poaching and trafficking network.“We continue to beef up security and monitoring for all activities of protected wildlife trade at airports, seaports and bus terminals,” he added.Yokyok Hadiprakarsa, executive director of the Indonesian Hornbill Conservation Society (IHCS), welcomed news of the seizure but said the incident proved that poaching of helmeted hornbills was still a serious problem.“The demand is still there and the offering price remains attractive: low cost, high profit,” he told Mongabay in an email. Yokyok added that poaching and illegal trade in wildlife appeared to be increasingly secretive and better organized.China and Hong Kong are top destinations for hornbill casques, Yokyok said. In January 2013, airport authorities detained four Chinese nationals for attempting to smuggle 248 casques out of the country to Hong Kong. They were also found to be carrying pangolin scales, another highly trafficked commodity. Later that same month, authorities in the Indonesian Bornean province of West Kalimantan arrested a Chinese man for attempting to smuggle 24 hornbill casques. He later told investigators that he typically sent the casques to Hong Kong and Taiwan.Two of the hornbill casques that were destined for Hong Kong before their seizure on July 17. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.A 2013 investigation supported by the Chester Zoo Conservation Award found that 6,000 helmeted hornbills were killed for their casques in a single year in West Kalimantan.According to the wildlife trade watchdog TRAFFIC, 2,170 hornbill heads or casques were seized from the illegal trade in Indonesia and China between March 2012 and August 2014.“What’s interesting is that the trade of helmeted hornbill has led to the hunting and illegal trade of other hornbill birds,” Yokyok said.Pushing these birds toward extinction could also have severe repercussions for their forest habitats, he said. Helmeted hornbills feed mostly on fruit, and their long flying range means they’re hugely important in the dispersal of fruit trees throughout their habitat — “the forest’s true farmers,” Yokyok called them.He called on investigators to carry out DNA tests on the newly seized casques to determine where they came from, and also to assess the population status of helmeted hornbills in Borneo and Sumatra.He added that tackling the trade in helmeted hornbill parts would be on the agenda at next month’s summit of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Geneva.“The threats from hunting and trade are still real,” Yokyok said. “Conservation actions at grassroots levels become important as it starts from there.”The helmeted hornbill is one of Southeast Asia’s most distinctive birds, with a large ivory-like casque that’s used by males for jousting. Dubbed “red ivory,” the scarlet-tinged casques are highly valued in East Asia for use as ornamental carvings. Image by Yokyok Hadiprakarsa/IHCS.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

New roads in Papua New Guinea may cause ‘quantum leap’ in forest loss

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Animals, Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Community Development, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Economics, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Global Warming, Green, Hunting, Illegal Logging, Infrastructure, Logging, Over-hunting, Poaching, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Roads, Saving Rainforests, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Papua New Guinea intends to nearly double its existing network of roads between now and 2022.A new study raises concerns about the impacts of building these roads through tropical forest environments on local communities, sensitive habitats and vulnerable species.The authors of the paper, published July 24 in the journal PLOS ONE, suggest that the country would reap more benefits and avoid future debt by investing in existing roads, many of which are largely unusable because of flagging maintenance. Papua New Guinea hopes to nearly double the length of its road network by 2022, posing grave threats to more than 50 parks and biodiversity-rich areas, according to a new analysis.The country, occupying the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and a smattering of islands in the South Pacific, is home to a vast bank of tropical rainforest that covers some 328,000 square kilometers (127,000 square miles) — an area about half the size of Texas. These forests seethe with species found nowhere else on Earth, such as the hedgehog-like eastern long-beaked echidna (Zaglossus bartoni) and several species of tree kangaroos — along with massive amounts of carbon locked in the lush vegetation and soil.But Papua New Guinea’s plans to add more than 6,000 kilometers (3,700 miles) of roads in the next few years, as part of broader efforts to lift the country out of poverty, could seriously endanger that natural wealth, a team of scientists cautions in a new paper published July 24 in the journal PLOS ONE.Road construction in a mountainous area of New Guinea. Image by William Laurance.“That’s fair enough. They need roads. They need economic development,” Mohammed Alamgir, the paper’s lead author, said at the International Congress for Conservation Biology in Kuala Lumpur ahead of the paper’s publication.But, “The new roads will create many deforestation hotspots for rainforests and carbon-rich peatlands, sharply increasing greenhouse-gas emissions,” Alamgir, an environmental scientist at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, said in a statement.Research has shown that roads open up previously remote areas to logging, agriculture and hunting, leading to dwindling carbon stocks and pushing vulnerable species closer to extinction.To understand the impacts of Papua New Guinea’s push for road construction, Alamgir and his colleagues compared the government’s development plans with satellite maps showing areas of intact and degraded forest in the country. They also plotted out the locations of parks and reserves, peatlands, and potential or current mining sites, along with the steepness of the slopes throughout the still mostly forested highlands.Much of Papua New Guinea contains steep, wet areas where roads are exceptionally expensive to build and maintain. Image by William Laurance.The team found that Papua New Guinea stands to lose 3,080 square kilometers (1,190 square miles) of the large blocks called core forests because they’re more than 600 meters (1,970 feet) from the forest edge. The roads will also carve out another 3,740 square kilometers (1440 square miles) of “connectivity forests,” which form critical corridors that allow the movement of species faced with threats such as impacts from climate change.More than 300 kilometers (186 miles) of the planned roads will also traverse around 680 square kilometers (263 square miles) of peatlands, around half of which stretch 4 or more meters (13 feet) down — in other words, they’re the most carbon-rich of Papua New Guinea’s swampy carbon sponge.The project “will lead to a quantum leap in forest loss and loss of connectivity, and substantial areas of peatland forest,” tropical ecologist and co-author William Laurance, also of James Cook University, told Mongabay.That’s concerning, Alamgir said, because so many of Papua New Guinea’s 8 million people depend on forests in some way. As with many such infrastructure projects, he said, the roads are unlikely to benefit the majority of the population.New Guinea is home to a great diversity of unique wildlife, including cassowaries. Image by John Manger.“A few politicians and land developers are getting very rich, but the rest of the country suffers — with traditional communities potentially losing their forests, fisheries, and clean water,” Alamgir said in the statement.Indeed, he said, the team’s work shows that several of the roads will go to areas nearly devoid of people. Instead, proposed mining concessions lie along some stretches, hinting at the value of these conduits to companies involved in extracting resources like gold and copper from the country’s interior.One specific stretch, known as the Epo-Kikori “missing link,” slices through dense-canopy forest. It alone would, by the team’s calculations, lead to the loss of nearly half of the core forest associated with the project. It also cuts across one of the last blocks of relatively undisturbed lowland rainforest known as Kamula Doso. The researchers argue that leveraging the high levels of carbon that this rainforest contains through a scheme such as REDD+ — short for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation — could benefit local communities while keeping the forest standing.Road in steep terrain in New Guinea, which is highly prone to landslides. Image by William Laurance.Additionally, many of the roads will be built in Papua New Guinea’s highlands, where steep slopes and copious annual rainfall will drive up the amount of investment required for construction and upkeep. Alamgir and his colleagues suggest that investment might be more prudently directed toward repairing and upgrading rather than expanding the existing road network.As things stand, many of the roads that already exist in Papua New Guinea aren’t currently well maintained, raising serious questions about the value of expanding the network so aggressively.“Two-thirds of PNG’s existing roads are nearly unusable,” Laurance said. “Why spend a fortune building new roads that you can’t maintain? If history is a guide, they’ll be big money-losers and will create years of social and environmental crises.”Banner image of a Goodfellow’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi) at Melbourne Zoo in Australia by Richard Ashurst via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Citation: Alamgir, M., Sloan, S., Campbell, M. J., Engert, J., Kiele, R., Porolak, G., … Laurance, W. F. (2019). Infrastructure expansion challenges sustainable development in Papua New Guinea. PLOS ONE, 14(7), e0219408. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0219408FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

‘The forest is our life’: Hope for change in Guyana’s forests (commentary)

first_imgCommentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Farming, Forestry, Forests, Gold Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Logging, Mining Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Forestry is big business in Guyana. The sector contributed 2.27 percent to Guyana’s GDP in 2016, with total forest products exports valued at $41.9 million. Approximately 20,000 people, mainly in the rural and hinterland areas, are employed in the sector.Guyana’s laws provide for indigenous villages to obtain titles for the land they occupy and, currently, indigenous peoples own 14 percent of the country’s land. However, the process of granting legal ownership has been cumbersome and villages have complained of mining and forest concessions being granted on land they have customarily used for farming, hunting, and other activities, all without them being informed.Guyana’s forests have sustained people for generations. For this commentary, Gaulbert Sutherland traveled deep into the country’s hinterland to hear of the pressures that locals face, and their hopes for change.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. First, an American company came knocking. Then an Indian firm. A Chinese corporation soon followed.“Ten years doing logging? The amount of machines they wanted to bring… I said no, don’t interfere with our jungle, that is our jungle, leave it there,” recalled Mark George of one encounter with a company that was seeking approval to log the forests surrounding Annai, an indigenous village in Guyana more than 400 kilometers (about 250 miles) from the capital, Georgetown.“The people supported me,” said George, who was then the toshao or village chief. Promises of $5,000 per year for the village and salaries for the village council were made, an appealing offer in an area where poverty is rife and jobs are scarce. But, conscious of how much the forests contributed to their livelihoods, the people resisted, George said.That resistance has come to the fore time and again over the past decade as companies sought to operate in the vast forests that surround Annai and its sister communities, with the indigenous villages often the last to know as various companies were granted concessions for logging.Forestry is big business in Guyana. Forests cover approximately 87 percent of the country’s land or about 18.48 million hectares (roughly 45.7 million acres), much of it designated as State Forests managed by the Guyana Forestry Commission (GFC). The sector contributed 2.27 percent to Guyana’s GDP in 2016, with total forest products exports valued at $41.9 million. Approximately 20,000 people, mainly in the rural and hinterland areas, are employed in the sector.Nonetheless, Guyana has one of the lowest deforestation rates in the world. In 2017, forest loss was recorded at 0.048 percent, the lowest since 2010, when the country began monitoring such changes under a REDD+ pact with Norway. Over the years, gold mining has been the main driver of deforestation, accounting for 74 percent of the deforestation recorded in 2017.Forced from their landFor indigenous communities, the destruction wrought by mining has been alarming, as has the granting of forest concessions close to indigenous lands. Guyana’s laws provide for indigenous villages to obtain titles for the land they occupy and, currently, indigenous peoples own 14 percent of the country’s land. However, the process of granting legal ownership has been cumbersome and villages have complained of mining and forest concessions being granted on land they have customarily used for farming, hunting, and other activities, all without them being informed. With farms as well as hunting and fishing grounds being impacted — and sometimes destroyed — in some cases, people have been forced from the land, as it does not fall within the titled area.Forests continue to sustain the lives of Guyana’s Indigenous Peoples — as they have for generations. Indigenous Peoples account for 10 percent of the population and in the rural areas, where most live, poverty rates range from 61 percent to 94 percent, according to UNICEF. Jobs are scarce, and according to the UNICEF report, “for most of the Indigenous Peoples, poverty is not only lack of monetary resources, but it involves access to land, culture, medicine, food, education and safety.”Forests as a way of lifeAnnai is perched at the edges of the Rupununi savannah, where forest-covered mountains, the peaks often adorned in fleeting wisps of clouds, mark the beginning of the jungle. Like other indigenous communities, the people here turn to the forest for the necessities of life.Forests are essentially their “supermarket,” according to Mike Williams, the secretary for the village council and member of the board of the North Rupununi District Development Board, made up of 20 indigenous villages that collectively work on development issues, including those related to the forest.“Each one of these villages depend on the forest for many things, for food, wildlife, fish, shelter, medicine, agriculture,” he said. Palm fronds form the roofs of many houses.At her home in Annai, while preparing to extract the toxins from cassava to make cassava bread, a staple of Indigenous Peoples’ diets, Zalita Moses points out that the matapee (a type of strainer used to squeeze out the “cassava water”), the sifter, and other implements used in the process all come from the forest, while the cassava is cultivated in jungle clearings because that is where the most fertile land is located.Abel Williams weaves a fan while his grandson Dylan Williams displays some of the products his grandfather produces using materials from the forest. Photo by Gaulbert Sutherland.“I feel more comfortable in the forest than at home in the village,” said Mark George, as he paused from clearing his farm of weeds. His and the surrounding farms are located on state land, which brings him some unease as a nearby non-indigenous community claims it, but they have agreed that the indigenous farmers can use the land. “This is our farming ground from very long [ago], our grandparents were here,” he said, disclosing that his sons and other relatives all farm in the area. Farming is their rotational livelihood and main source of income as they sell the excess produce.“The forest is important because that is how we live, we protect it, we conserve it, and we also collect food from the forest… collect materials for the house, for the craft, medicines,” said Veronica Farias, who, for the past 12 years, has led a group of women who produce various remedies for ailments.The group, called Medicine From Trees, utilizes plant materials, including crabwood seeds, harvested from the crabwood trees located deep in the forest where logging companies have previously expressed interest. Crabwood is a commercially valuable timber species but is not abundant in Guyana, and Farias is concerned at the implications should logging companies succeed in gaining access to the area.“If they touch that area where we depend on, and the crabwood trees, we would lose everything,” she said. “They will just extract the materials and where will we make ends meet for this project or for us?”Creating Space for Indigenous PeopleOn November 23, 2018, Guyana initialed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) with the European Union under the EU’s Forestry Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) program.The FLEGT program aims to reduce illegal logging by strengthening sustainable and legal forest management, improving governance, and promoting trade in legally produced timber. The initialing of the VPA followed six years of negotiations that saw the involvement of multiple stakeholders in Guyana.For Williams, who was involved in the process, the pact represents a new hope that the concerns of Indigenous Peoples will be treated with more seriousness. “The laws are there but it’s never really adhered to. But if we have to make the VPA work, all these things have to be abided with,” said Williams. He pointed out that if concessions are being allocated next to indigenous titled lands, the law says that the villages have to be informed, but this is not usually done. He said that changes have already been seen with extensive consultations and feedback and training.“I think they have done a good job. They’ve been the only entity that have been interacting and meeting the people,” he said of the GFC and the VPA negotiation process. “I think our concerns will be listened to more because of this process.”Laura George, of the Amerindian Peoples Association, an NGO that advocates for indigenous peoples’ rights, said that the process created spaces for their concerns to be heard. “To an extent, we can say that the VPA that was initialed… created a platform from which we can work to enhance forest governance and respecting rights, improving the system and reducing illegality,” she said. George added that as the process moves forward, they hope that resources can be made available to ensure the continued engagement and protection of indigenous peoples’ rights.In this way, observes Oda Almas of the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), the VPA could be a catalyst not just for enforcing existing laws, but for bringing Guyana’s national legislation into line with its international obligations on indigenous peoples’ rights.Research conducted by indigenous communities themselves, with assistance from APA, FPP, and the Rainforest Foundation US, has documented how village titles granted by the state overwhelmingly leave out large areas of the communities’ customary lands. In many cases logging concessions have been allocated in these areas — because the national legislation allows this.“The VPA could be very useful if it helps create a platform which leads to indigenous peoples’ rights to their customary lands being recognized and protected both in law and in practice, so that concessions and logging operations could not be carried out there on such lands without the free, prior and informed consent of the customary owners,” says Almas.The VPA process has propelled changes that otherwise would have taken longer.Kenny David, who heads Guyana’s FLEGT Secretariat, pointed out that Guyana’s overarching Forest Act was revised and codes of practice that govern forest operations were published. Laura Singh of Guyana’s Forest Products Development and Marketing Council observed that some requirements for those involved in the industry were not enforced previously but said that, influenced by the VPA process, this is now being done “because people need to ensure that they are legal in every sense, [including] the environmental, social and the economic component of it.”Attitudes among stakeholders have also changed. “Many times, when we went, people said, ‘Listen, this EU thing is not for us, we don’t wanna hear about it, we’ll sell our wood to whomever.’ But then you understand that if you don’t get it right… at the very start of that process, it’s gonna affect [the entire sector],” said David. Greater understanding, he said, has fostered an increased willingness to comply with regulations.In Guyana, illegal logging is not a major problem; improving governance and access to markets is seen as a bigger issue among stakeholders.“We said [that with] the VPA, for us, the motivation wasn’t to curb illegal logging because illegal logging was always quite small, but it was rather to improve our systems and give us access to markets which were the things we lacked,” said David.For stakeholders, the changes seen and promised have engendered hope of positive change for governance, markets, and rights.Mark George and his wife Norma George heading for their home from their farm. Photo by Gaulbert Sutherland.Gaulbert Sutherland is an award–winning Guyanese journalist specializing in human rights and the environment. This article is from a forthcoming report by the forests and rights NGO Fern, featuring reportage on various aspects of forest governance around the world by local journalists.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Sea Around Us: Global fisheries data and the goose that laid the golden egg (commentary)

first_imgHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?Having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals).Many of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. With the Sea Around Us data set, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The end of the 2010s will be remembered as the time when the world realized that we are in the midst of a global biodiversity crisis, as illustrated by the widespread collapse of insect populations.A similar realization occurred about two decades earlier, when it became obvious to anyone with a passing interest in the matter that fish populations were collapsing all over the world under the onslaught of out-of-control fisheries. The generality of this pattern had long been contested: fish population collapse had long been seen as isolated events, each with its own cause, usually attributed to environmental fluctuations.However, the 1980s had also seen a slowing down of the global catch increases, which, since the post-WWII period, had masked localized fisheries collapses. Later, this stagnation of global catches — occasionally if optimistically described as “stabilization” — turned into a continuous decline now known to have started following 1996, the year of peak catches.For global marine catches to decline in spite of the massive increase in the size and power of international fishing fleets implies that we are essentially everywhere past the amount of fishing that generates Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). Thus, the biomass (or abundance) of fish everywhere is well below that which can generate MSY.This is confirmed by multiple single species “stock assessments,” i.e., the estimation of time series of abundance of fish “stocks” based on their catch, ancillary information, and mathematical models representing the growth and decline of fish populations.Government subsidies and fisheries collapseHow did we get into a situation where fisheries are allowed to destroy the fish populations from which, given prudent management, high catches could be extracted on a sustainable basis?As in the case of the proverbial goose that laid the golden egg, this destruction was driven by short-term greed. But this alone is not a sufficient explanation. Another driver was (and still is) government subsidies. These subsidies are given to fisheries for two reasons:Because politicians can, on the short term, buy votes and/or social peace when subsidies are given to the fisheries sector (e.g., Spain, Japan, France, China); andBecause politicians and many high-ranking civil servants, many of whom are trained engineers or agronomists, appear to sincerely believe, all evidence to the contrary, that subsidies should enable fisheries to increase declining catches.The latter belief stems from a misunderstanding due to the fact that, in most economic sectors (e.g., manufacturing, agriculture), more “input” (investments, machinery, fertilizer, and other factors of production) lead to more “output.” This is not so in fisheries: Past a certain point (MSY, see above), more fishing boats reduce the catch from an exploited fish population.The solution to what seems like a riddle is that boats are not a factor of fish production — wild fish are produced by nature in functioning ecosystems. Boats are only the means by which the fish produced by nature are collected.Thus, having more boats in the water doesn’t produce more fish, and neither do subsidies, which enable fishing operations to break even as they overexploit the populations upon which they depend. It is as if we encouraged hunters to kill more geese and replaced their golden eggs with a subsidy (a.k.a. tax money diverted from the funding of our schools and hospitals). These and other problematic issues are covered in a book I recently published through Greystone Books, Vanishing Fish: Shifting Baselines and the Future of Global Fisheries.There is always some data to work withMany of the major trends in fisheries, notably the massive increase of their capacity and their geographic expansion, which for a long time compensated for the international, subsidy-driven competition for the fish that are left, can be seen only when fisheries are studied globally. However, decidedly global studies of fisheries were rare in most of the 20th century, and became common only in the 1990s.Before that, most fishery scientists were content to study and write about a single fishery for decades, detailing their ups and (mostly) downs in isolation from other fisheries. In the 1990s, contributions began to appear that demonstrated a massive impact of fisheries on their underlying ecosystem on a global basis, and these inquiries became a flood in the early 2000s.Many of these global analyses were based in part or completely on the database of “catches” (actually “landings”) supplied annually since 1950 to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, which then harmonized and disseminated them. This was, at the time, the only global database on fisheries statistics.Increased use of the FAO database, however, made its various shortcomings more visible than they had been previously. One example of this was the non-consideration of millions of tons of discarded fish. Another was the widespread omission in most countries’ contributions to the FAO database of the catches of artisanal subsistence and recreational fisheries, wrongly assumed to be negligible.Combined with the lack of geographical resolution (the FAO marine fisheries statistics are allocated to 19 giant FAO statistical areas, with, for example, the Eastern Indian Ocean reaching from Bangladesh to the Antarctic convergence), these shortcomings made it necessary to correct for the incomplete coverage of the FAO data and the coarseness of their spatial allocation. With these corrections, it would be possible to make reasonable assessments to the state of the world’s oceans.The task of implementing these corrections was undertaken by the Sea Around Us, a research project that I have led since mid-1999, which was funded for many years by the Pew Charitable Trusts (and currently by a variety of philanthropic foundations).Sea Around Us and its hundreds of collaborators throughout the world “reconstructed” the marine fisheries catch of all maritime countries of the world (including their overseas territories), an activity that took almost 15 years to complete.The initial reconstructions covered the years 1950 to 2010; this work was subsequently updated to 2014, and is currently being updated to 2016 (i.e., it remains about two years behind the FAO’s database, which produces its statistics with a lag time of about two years). On our side, the delay is due to having to verify the official landing data country by country and territory by territory, add the fish that were discarded, and allocate the complemented catch data to various fisheries sectors and gear. Also, we allocate the catch data to smaller spatial entities such as the Exclusive Economic Zone of the various countries and territories, Large Marine Ecosystems, or other geographic entities.The Sea Around Us dataset subdivides marine catch data by, for example, species, fishing gear, fishing country, and end use (direct human consumption, fish meal, etc.). This information is provided both as tonnage and in dollar terms, i.e., as weight times the dockside prices of the landed fish. These various dimensions are the reasons why this dataset is increasingly used by the scientific community and by civil society, as intended.Indeed, this wide use of the Sea Around Us dataset was the main point of emphasis at the celebration of its 20th anniversary at the University of British Columbia on June 20, 2019. With the Sea Around Us dataset, it becomes possible for fisheries scientists working in developing countries to perform stock assessments of their major exploited species, and thus for fisheries departments throughout the world to meet the requirements that politicians have with regard to fisheries.This will not solve all fisheries problems. However, being able to provide the advice that they can be expected to give, fisheries scientists will be empowered to do their work and politicians will not be able to claim that they have no basis for making decisions to reduce fishing effort in order to rebuild fish populations. The ball will be in their court, along with multiple golden-egg-laying geese waiting to be resuscitated.Featured Image: Trawlers by John, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Dr. Daniel Pauly, who is both French and Canadian, studied fisheries science in Germany and spent much of his career in the tropics, notably in Philippines. Since 1994, he is a Professor of Fisheries at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada, where he direct the Sea Around Us project. The Sea Around Us, initially funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts, and since 2014 by a variety of philanthropic foundations, is devoted to studying, documenting and mitigating the impact of fisheries on the world’s marine ecosystems. The concepts, methods and software Daniel Pauly developed are documented in over 1000 widely-cited publications, and have led to his receiving multiple scientific awards.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Big Data, Commentary, data, Editorials, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Overexploitation, Overfishing, Researcher Perspective Series Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How many fires are burning in the Amazon?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, wildfires center_img The fires raging in the Amazon are nearly double over last year, but remain moderate in the historical context.The 41,858 fires recorded in the Amazon as of Aug. 24 this year are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when deforestation rates were very much higher.However, this year’s numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires.The hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have focused worldwide attention on the soaring deforestation rates in the Amazon as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. While fires burning in the Amazon have garnered worldwide attention due to last week’s midday “blackout” in urban São Paulo, more than 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) from the Amazon, analysis of historical data suggests the fires are well within the historical range of the past 20 years.Mongabay’s analysis of data from Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) shows that the number of fire hotspots recorded this year in the Amazon biome total 41,858 through Aug. 24, an increase of 89 percent over the end of August 2018, with still a week to go in in the month. (If August keeps its current pace, Amazônia will tally nearly 50,000 fires by the end of the month.)Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.The 41,858 fires recorded so far this year in the Brazilian Amazon are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when fire hotspots regularly topped 60,000 through this point in the year. Over the past 20 years, 2005 — a year of severe El Niño-induced drought — holds the record of 94,780 fires through August. 2019 currently stands roughly 4 percent above the 20-year average and is on pace to end the month at around 50,000 fires, or 19 percent above average.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.The situation is similar in the Cerrado, a woody, savanna-like biome that lies east and south of the Amazon. Through Aug. 24, 23,322 fires had been recorded there, which is slightly less than the 20-year average for this point in the year.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.In terms of the extent of burning, INPE releases data on a monthly basis, so Mongabay could only look at numbers through the end of July, before the recent surge in fires. With 18,629 square kilometers (7,193 square miles) burned through July in Amazônia, 2019 was 62 percent higher than 2018, but below the 2016 figure.Area burned in the Brazilian Amazon through July each year since 2002. Data from INPE.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Trailing 12-month moving average of the area burned per biome in Brazil since 2002. Data from INPE.An important caveatThese numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires. This is a significant limitation because the area affected by sub-canopy fires that burn into intact and otherwise healthy forests can be quite substantial: a 2013 NASA study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B found that understory fires burn a larger extent of forest than the area deforested for agriculture and cattle pasture.And these fires do long-term damage to the rainforest, setting the stage for more destructive fires, forest die-off, and eventual deforestation. Long-running research initiated by scientist Daniel Nepstad when he worked at the Woods Hole Research Institute, found that forests that have previously been burned are twice as likely to be deforested as unburned forests.Nepstad, now the head of the Earth Innovation Institute, explained the context of the current situation in a blog post.“Satellites do NOT detect most fires that are burning beneath the canopy of standing forests. And it is these low fires, that rarely reach the knee, that do the most damage, burning slowly across the forest floor, killing giant trees with thin bark,” he writes. “Once these trees die, they fall to the ground, opening up huge gaps in the forest canopy that allow more sunlight to reach the forest floor, drying the fuel layer and making the forest more prone to further burning.”Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. According to Greenpeace’s research, 75 percent of the 23,006 hot spots the group recorded in the Amazon in the first 20 days of August occurred in areas were forest in 2017. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Nepstad notes that we don’t yet have a good understanding of the damage from the current burning season, but there is plenty to worry about based on preliminary evidence. For example, the fires are more persistent than in recent years, indicating that they are burning hotter, meaning they are burning more than pasture and dry scrub. And there’s lots of smoke.“We do not know with confidence how the area of fire compares with previous years, [but] it is important to bear in mind that the fire season has just begun, with most fires occurring from September to December,” he writes. “With forecasts of a long dry season, the number of fires could continue to be greater than usual.“We also know that it is a particularly smoky burning season. This is probably related to the large number of ‘deforestation fires’ — fires set to burn patches of forest that have been felled to make way for cattle pasture or crop fields. The smoke released from a fire that burns a hectare of felled forest releases far more smoke than a fire that burns a hectare of degraded pastureland. We do not know the area of standing forest that has burned. Forest fires, however, usually happen late in the dry season.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.While the current fires aren’t off the charts relative to the historical baseline, they are indeed concerning. But the silver lining to the crisis is that the hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have sparked worldwide attention to the soaring deforestation rates now occurring in the Amazon, as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. High-level political blowback from the EU, street protests, and pressure on Brazilian companies has forced Bolsonaro to backtrack on some of his most heated rhetoric from the past week and start to take action, including sending in the army to battle fires. Volunteer fire brigades formed by landowners, indigenous peoples and NGOs have already been battling the fires for weeks.Cumulative deforestation through July for each year from 2008 according to INPE’s DETER system. Note that the chart switches from DETER to DETER-B in August 2016.According to INPE, deforestation in 2019 in the Brazilian is trending 57 percent ahead of last year through the end of July, the fastest rate of deforestation since 2008. Deforestation appears to be continuing at a high rate through August, but the picture is less transparent than usual because INPE has stopped releasing data publicly since Bolsonaro fired Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the head of the agency, at the beginning of the month.last_img read more

Rare songbird recovers, moves off endangered species list

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The Kirtland’s warbler, a species that was close to extinction five decades ago, is now thriving and has been removed from the U.S. federal list of endangered species.Where there were fewer than 200 breeding pairs of the warbler in the 1970s and 1980s, today there are more than 2,300.However, the warbler’s continued survival is conservation-reliant, which means it will still depend heavily on continued conservation efforts.Conservationists say the bird’s comeback is testament that the Endangered Species Act works, and warn that current attempts by the Trump administration to roll back conservation policies could lead to other protected species going extinct. The recovery of a rare bird species that was close to extinction five decades ago is now being heralded as a conservation success story.The Kirtland’s warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii), also known as the jack pine warbler, a small songbird that nests only in young jack pine forests in northern Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, was never really considered to be an abundant species. During the first ever census of the bird in 1951, birders and researchers counted 432 singing males (a rough proxy of the number of breeding pairs). A decade later, the number rose to 502 singing males. The third census in 1971, however, revealed a population crash: researchers counted only 203 singing males, a number that saw subsequent slight dips and rises, but remained low throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Consequently, the warbler, known for its distinct yellow throat, chest and belly and blue-gray head and back, became one of the first species to be listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).But thanks to decades of conservation actions, the bird is now thriving, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) says. There are more than 2,300 singing males (or breeding pairs) of the warbler as per latest estimates, and due to its recovery, the species has been removed from the federal list of endangered species.“The delisting of the Kirtland’s Warbler is cause for celebration and proof that the Endangered Species Act works,” Shawn Graff, vice president of the American Bird Conservancy’s (ABC) Great Lakes program, said in a statement.Dan Eichinger, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, added that delisting marked the “latest chapter in a remarkable wildlife success story.”“The bird’s recovery provides dramatic testimony to what conservation organizations, governments and businesses can accomplish when they come together for the good of the resource,” he said in a statement.However, the warbler’s survival into the future is conservation-reliant, conservationists say, which means that it will still depend heavily on continued active management efforts.For example, the warbler needs large stands of young jack pine habitat to nest, and historically, wildfires helped create those vast tracts of habitat. But practices like fire suppression and timber harvesting in the early 1900s reduced the area the birds could breed in, according to the USFWS. To counter this, authorities developed a rigorous management plan that mimicked the natural processes within jack pine forests and increased the warbler’s breeding habitat. In addition, they had to work to control brown-headed cowbirds, birds that lay their eggs in warbler nests, forcing the warbler parents to raise larger cowbird chicks that easily outcompete the smaller warbler babies.“This bird flew off the endangered species list because the Endangered Species Act works,” Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement. “This success story highlights the danger of the Trump administration’s efforts to cripple laws protecting our wildlife and natural landscapes. Without the Endangered Species Act, the Kirtland’s warbler might have vanished forever. Many other species will disappear if we don’t stop Trump’s efforts to gut conservation policies.”A male Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest in Michigan, U.S. Image by Jeol Trick/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Malaysian attempt at Sumatran rhino IVF fails on low quality of sperm

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Extinction, Mammals, Megafauna, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img A recent effort to produce a Sumatran rhino embryo from egg and sperm samples taken from the last of the species in Malaysia has failed, officials said.The low quality of the sperm, extracted in 2015 and 2016 from an aging rhino that has since died, was cited as the main cause of the failure to fertilize the egg.Malaysian officials say they will continue to improve and attempt their in vitro fertilization attempts, and have called on Indonesia to send sperm samples from younger rhinos held in Sumatra.Indonesia has refused to send any samples, citing the need for a formal agreement, but conservationists say that captive-breeding of Sumatran rhinos is the only feasible solution to protect the species from extinction. JAKARTA — A recent effort by scientists to produce a Sumatran rhino embryo using egg and sperm samples taken from the last of the species in Malaysia has failed, according to officials.Those involved in the attempt had previously cautioned that there was a low chance of success, given the poor quality of the genetic samples they had to work with.The egg cell was extracted on Sept. 30 from Iman, the last known Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) in Malaysia. The scientists then injected the egg with sperm from Malaysia’s last male rhino, Tam, who died this past May. His semen had been collected in 2015 and 2016 and preserved in liquid nitrogen.But the in vitro fertilization attempt on Oct. 1 failed to produce an embryo after 72 hours of incubation, Augustine Tuuga, the director of the Sabah state wildlife department, said as reported by the New Straits Time.“What we have gathered from the experts is that possibly Tam’s sperm was not of good quality,” Tuuga said. Tam’s age would have been around 60 years in human terms when his sperm was harvested.Given these circumstances, the rhino experts were not hopeful about the results. “Given that IVF in Sumatran rhino has been tried only about 6 times, we expect a high failure rate,” John Payne, the head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA), which was involved in the effort, told Mongabay in an email.“Iman’s egg cells are fine,” Payne said. “Tam’s sperm quality is likely to be the main problem. Imagine taking sperm from a 70 year old man with kidney disease — what do you expect? That is Tam.”Iman, the last female Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Image courtesy of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA).The fact that the team had to rely on “poor quality” sperm from a single aged rhino has highlighted the lack of progress on an agreement between Malaysia and Indonesia that would have allowed Iman’s eggs to be fertilized with healthy sperm from one of Indonesia’s rhinos. At the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia hosts three young males, including one who has already successfully fathered two calves.However, Indonesia insists that to send sperm samples from its rhinos in Way Kambas to Malaysia, both countries would need to sign a memorandum of understanding for an exchange of specimens of protected species, the transfer of which is regulated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).Tuuga said the IVF efforts would continue and be improved, while also urging Indonesia’s help in providing sperm from the Way Kambas rhinos.Christina Liew, the Sabah state minister of tourism, culture and environment, said representatives of both countries have had regular meetings, most recently in August, to discuss the possibility of obtaining sperm from the rhinos in Way Kambas.No more than 80 Sumatran rhinos, a critically endangered species, are believed to survive in the wild, often living in small populations too small and isolated to be reproductively viable. Seven rhinos are held at Way Kambas, one in a sanctuary in Indonesian Borneo, and one in Malaysia. Two calves were born at Way Kambas after being conceived naturally, while previous IVF attempts in Malaysia were unsuccessful.Indonesia’s environment ministry said in August that the two countries had earlier this year agreed on a new partnership that would see eggs shipped from Malaysia for IVF attempts in Indonesia. To date, however, the paperwork to finalize the deal has still not been completed.Iman, the last female Sumatran rhino in Malaysia. Image courtesy of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

World is fast losing its cool: Polar regions in deep trouble, say scientists

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer As representatives of the world’s nations gather in Madrid at COP 25 this week to discuss global warming policy, a comprehensive new report shows how climate change is disproportionately affecting the Arctic and Antarctic — the Arctic especially is warming tremendously faster than the rest of the world.If the planet sees a rise in average temperatures of 2 degrees Celsius, the polar regions will be the hardest hit ecosystems on earth, according to researchers, bringing drastic changes to the region. By the time the lower latitudes hit that mark, it’s projected the Arctic will see temperature increases of 4 degrees Celsius.In fact, polar regions are already seeing quickening sea ice melt, permafrost thaws, record wildfires, ice shelves calving, and impacts on cold-adapted species — ranging from Arctic polar bears to Antarctic penguins. What starts in cold areas doesn’t stay there: sea level rise and temperate extreme weather are both linked to polar events.The only way out of the trends escalating toward a climate catastrophe at the poles, say scientists, is for nations to begin aggressively reducing greenhouse gas emissions now and embracing sustainable green energy technologies and policies. It remains to be seen whether the negotiators at COP 25 will embrace such solutions. A herd of caribou in Arctic Siberia. Image by Jeff Kerby / National Geographic Society.As delegates from 197 member states convene in Madrid, Spain, this week for the twenty-fifth annual United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 25) the world’s polar scientists are sounding the alarm in a new report over the rapidly changing Arctic and Antarctic regions.In the last decade alone, the Arctic warmed 0.75 degrees Celsius (1.35 degrees Fahrenheit). In contrast, it took 137 years for the entire Earth to warm nearly that same amount, 0.8 degrees Celsius (1.44 degrees Fahrenheit).Subsequently, the region has undergone a significant transformation as sea ice melts, permafrost thaws, and wildfires burn. Cold-adapted species, like polar bears and walruses, now face an uncertain and perilous future. In the decades to come, their home habitat may be virtually unrecognizable.“It’s too late to prevent dangerous climate change impacts because we’re already seeing them, and the amplified impacts in the Arctic drive that home,” Michael Mann, a renowned climate scientist, told Mongabay. But he says it is still possible to avoid catastrophic warming of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). “It will require a dramatic decrease in global carbon emissions of more than 7 percent per year for the next decade, and a primary goal of COP 25 must be to achieve those reductions.”In a comprehensive Science Advances report published this week, an international team of researchers, including Mann, documented the far-ranging effects of warming in both polar regions, on land and at sea. “Many of the changes over the past decade are so dramatic they make you wonder what the next decade of warming will bring,” said Eric Post, lead author of the paper and a University of California Davis professor of climate change ecology.The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) in 2008. The GIS appears highly sensitive to warming beyond 1 to 4 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels. Its loss would contribute substantially to global sea level rise. In the decade since this photo was taken, the Arctic has already warmed by 0.75 degrees Celsius. Image by Eric Post / UC Davis.In addition, researchers examined the potential consequences for the polar regions as the planet moves ever closer to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming above the 1981-2005 baseline mean. By the time the lower latitudes hit that mark, it’s projected that the far more rapidly warming Arctic will have seen annual temperature increases of 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit), rocketing up to 7 degrees Celsius (12.6 degrees Fahrenheit) increases in the boreal winter.Though temperatures have been more stable at the South Pole, Antarctica is at the dawn of a new climate change-influenced era. It’s projected that the frozen continent will reach 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) of warming in the austral winter (summer in the Northern Hemisphere), far outpacing warming in the tropics and temperate zones.“Under a business-as-usual scenario, the Earth as a whole may reach that [2 degrees Celsius] milestone in about 40 years,” said Post. “But the Arctic is already there during some months of the year, and it could reach 2 degrees Celsius warming on an annual mean basis as soon as 25 years before the rest of the planet.”Indeed, many of the changes once forecast for far in the future for the Arctic are occurring well ahead of schedule. Ice experts once believed that the Arctic Ocean wouldn’t experience ice-free summers until between 2030 and 2050, with some older predictions pushing that out as far as 2070. But that date has already been revised downward to a “more likely” 2030, linked strongly to whether or not greenhouse gas emissions are curtailed and how quickly. New carbon cuts are largely dependent on what happens diplomatically in Madrid, where many analysts are pessimistic over major policy breakthroughs.Sea ice in the Arctic is declining in every month of the year, with the largest losses seen in late summer, though other seasons are seeing loss speed up. In Antarctica, sea ice extent increased slightly between 1978 and 2015, but now that tide may be turning. In the austral autumns of 2017 and 2018, sea ice extent reached record or near-record lows.UC Davis climate ecologist Eric Post samples vegetation abundance and diversity at his long-term field site in Greenland. Image by Emma Behr / Penn State.The changes in the polar regions aren’t contained at the ends of the Earth; they’re already affecting the lower latitudes. As glaciers and on-land ice sheets melt and calve into the ocean, global sea level will rise. West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier is a particularly noteworthy melt candidate, as the glacier is now losing twice as much ice to the ocean as it was in the 1990s. It’s expected that due to the rapid calving of Thwaites, we could see an additional 1.2 meters (3.9 feet) of sea level rise within two centuries.Since 2001, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s projected sea level rise contributions from ice sheets have repeatedly been boosted higher due to accelerated polar warming. Current overall sea level rise has occurred at a mean rate of 1.8 millimeters per year for the past century, but more recently at rates estimated near 2.8 to 3.1 millimeters per year (1993-2003).“Loss of the summer sea ice and thinning of winter sea ice will generate tipping points in weather and in ecosystems,” said James Overland, an Arctic oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “We need to do everything now to avoid this case.”Researchers think that declining Arctic sea ice is increasingly fueling extreme weather in the United States, Europe and elsewhere across the temperate zone. The California drought which ran from 2011 to 2017, for example, has its origins, in part according to researchers, in the changing Arctic.“The key messages here are that the polar regions of the planet, and the Arctic in particular, provide a laboratory for studying the sorts of environmental impacts of warming we will see in lower latitudes, the U.S. and Europe if we fail to act on climate,” said Mann.Given that the polar regions are home to a number of cold-adapted, endemic species, such sudden and rapid change threatens their long-term survival. The well televised plight of polar bears has presented that species as a clear loser to climate change. As ice habitat disappears, the bears must expend more energy traveling between less stable sea ice or open water in search of food, and face nutritional stress during summer fasting. The pinnipeds (seals and other semiaquatic mammals) which the bears feed on, too, could disappear. Pacific walruses, for example, are hauling out on spits of land by the thousands in the absence of ice, which often results in trampling deaths should the animals startle. Moreover, earlier spring sea ice break-up is stressing and killing off harp and ringed seal pups.On land, much increased rain-on-snow events lock up green vegetation in ice, preventing caribou and reindeer from foraging during harsh winters. Ice-encrusted polar rangelands have led to the mass starvation of ungulates, most recently in Svalbard. In Russia’s Yamal Peninsula, 61,000 reindeer died between 2013 and 2014 due to one such episode, the new study notes.An Arctic fox in Greenland. Climate change-driven regional population collapses of lemmings, one of the Arctic fox’s favorite foods, could result in the decline of this Arctic predator.  Image by Eric Post / UC Davis.To avoid total ecological catastrophe at the poles, the report’s authors say that the negative impacts of climate change will need to be reduced through “strengthened international cooperation and collaborative agreements.”The primary goal of COP 25 will be to determine rules under Article 6 of the Paris Agreement for creating carbon markets among nations, cities, and corporations as a way to incentivize emission-reduction strategies. Given the dire state of the planet, however, many analysts believe this focus is too narrow and that the climate crisis requires far more aggressive action. Nations especially need to step up by increasing and adhering to their Paris Climate Agreement goals.Instead, things are going in the reverse direction, with almost every nation falling well short of their original Paris greenhouse gas reduction pledges. Last month the Trump Administration began the year-long process to formally withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement, leaving the fate of the Arctic, Antarctic and ultimately the planet, in jeopardy.Even if carbon emissions were miraculously contained tomorrow, the polar regions would still continue to change. “There is a delay between temperature increases and the melting of major ice sheets,” said Overland. “Though the sea level rise rate is small for the next few decades, it kicks in strongly after 2040 and may continue to increase despite mitigation.”Speaking at the opening of COP 25 on Monday, UN General Secretary António Guterres said: “We stand at a critical juncture in our collective efforts to limit dangerous global heating. By the end of the coming decade we will be on one of two paths. One is the path of surrender, where we have sleepwalked past the point of no return, jeopardizing the health and safety of everyone on this planet.… The other option is the path of hope. A path of resolve, of sustainable solutions.… That is the only way to limit global temperature rise to the necessary 1.5 degrees by the end of this century.”Mann, despite all the bad news from North and South, says he’s “hopeful that we’ll act in time to avert the worst impacts of climate change, something our review makes clear is still possible.”Banner image: Muskox calves in Greenland. Young animals are especially vulnerable to climate change-driven extreme weather, such as rain-on-snow events which can cover polar rangelands with ice leading to mass starvation. Image by Eric Post, UC Davis.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Modeling, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Environment, Extinction, Extreme Weather, Featured, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Monitoring, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Research, satellite data, Sea Ice, Storms, Weather, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Tropical forests’ lost decade: the 2010s

first_imgThe 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019 however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. The decade closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests.According to the U.N., in 2015 global forest cover fell below four billion hectares of forest for the first time in human history. The 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. Widely available satellite imagery via platforms like Google Earth brought new levels of accountability which, for the first time, meant the world couldn’t use ignorance as an excuse for not addressing the destruction of tropical forests. Deforestation in Earth’s largest rainforest — the Brazilian Amazon — was in the midst of a historic plunge, while governments around the world were pledging billions of dollars in new money toward a mechanism to compensate tropical countries for protecting their forests. Several countries closed out the decade with important new conservation initiatives, while activists, empowered with a new set of tools, pushed the private sector to begin adopting a new type of sustainability commitment: the zero deforestation policy for commodity production and sourcing. Some of the largest consumer-facing companies adopted these forest-friendly policies with near-term implementation targets. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019, however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. On the climate front, a decade of science has mostly confirmed what we already knew 10 years ago: Tropical forests are deeply threatened by the current pace of climate change. Combined with ongoing deforestation, degradation, and fragmentation, the outlook for some of the planet’s largest forests, from the Amazon to Indonesia, is increasingly bleak. The 2010s were also marked by mixed progress for tropical forest conservation. Advances in remote sensing were undercut by backsliding on corporate and government commitments to protect forests. Gains in new protected areas were partially offset by a trend toward protected area downgrading, downsizing and degazettement (PADDD) in countries from Brazil to Indonesia. Efforts to recognize the value of healthy and productive natural forests were confronted with the challenging realities of implementation, public indifference and the punishing economics of rising demand for food, fiber and fuel in the context of unaccounted costs of environmental externalities. Political leaders in several important tropical forest countries turned a blind eye to — or in some cases even actively encouraged — threats against environmental defenders and the free press, contributing to hundreds of murders and assassinations of activists, indigenous leaders and journalists. The 2010s closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests. According to the U.N., in 2015, global forest cover fell below four billion hectares (10 billion acres) for the first time in modern human history.last_img read more