Asian elephants gang up in a bid to survive an increasingly human world

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, Research Adolescent elephants in south India are adapting to human-dominated landscapes, probably to learn from older bulls how not to get killed by people.These unusual associations, which can last for several years, were not recorded 20 years ago.Researchers say it’s important to use this information to mitigate human-elephant conflict, including by not removing old bulls that don’t raid crops, which can pass down this behavior to young elephants. Matriarch grandmas, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews: elephants, much like us, have complex social lives. But Asian elephants in southern India could be changing their social lives just to adapt to human-use landscapes that are fast replacing their natural habitats.Young male elephants, which are typically solitary, are now forming unusually large, and more long-term, all-male herds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports last week. This adaptation could be an effort to learn the ropes from older, more knowledgeable males on how to avoid getting killed in these areas that pose unnaturally high risks to elephants.To elephants, human-dominated areas near forests, such as agricultural fields that often replace natural forests and connect one fragmented forest with another, are much like supermarkets: there is always abundant food to choose from. And if you’re a hungry, fast-growing, young male elephant, there’s nothing like feasting on cultivated crops (cereals like paddy and millets are far higher in nutrients such as protein, calcium and sodium than forest fare such as wild grasses) to boost growth and health, both of which are important requisites to attain mates.Social interaction between younger and older male elephants. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Big risks, big gainsBut the risks an elephant has to run if it ventures into human-dominated areas are many: stress and physical injuries caused when people chase elephants away from crops, capture of “problem elephants,” as well as deaths due to retaliation, electrocution, train accidents and poaching. But though the risks are high, so are the gains. A study in northern Karnataka state, for instance, found that crop-based diets are so rich that they even lower the stress levels of crop-foraging elephants.Wildlife biologist Nishant Srinivasaiah would often spot such elephant herds moving across human-use areas, including farmland, near his long-term study site in Karnataka’s Bannerghatta National Park. His interest in elephant behavior even got him analyzing YouTube videos of human-elephant interactions from the region. That’s when he noticed something unusual: some of the elephant groups were comprised only or mostly of males.“Why were male elephants moving across human-use areas?” Srinivasaiah wondered. “Where were they going? But there were other individual males who stayed largely within the forest.“This got me interested in digging deeper into the individual idiosyncrasies and decision-making in male elephants in the landscape in general and their sociality,” he said.To find out if environmental factors such as habitat contiguity and human presence influenced the sociality of male Asian elephants (whether an individual preferred to be alone or in a group), Srinivasaiah and his colleagues first identified an approximately 10,000-square-kilometre (3,900-square-mile) landscape that included protected areas (Bannerghatta National Park, Cauvery and Cauvery North wildlife sanctuaries), reserve forests, human settlements and agricultural land across southern Karnataka and northern Tamil Nadu.Field surveys and information from forest guards helped the team short-list areas that both people and elephants used, to install camera traps. Of the 20,124 photographs of elephants they obtained between February 2016 and December 2017 from these camera traps, the team identified individual elephants from 1,430 photos and categorized them into three groups: mixed-sex groups (containing male and female elephants), all-male groups, and solitary males. The team then categorized each of the 248 male elephants they identified from these groups into age classes. Age correlates with sexual maturity, so the team could also classify every male as either a juvenile (less than 10 years old and sexually immature), adolescent or sexually mature but socially immature (10 to 20 years), or mature (both sexually and socially mature, more than 20 years of age).Recent long-term associationsAs expected, the photographs revealed that juvenile males were spotted mostly in mixed-sex groups; male elephants continue to stay in the herd they are born into until they hit adolescence. The results also revealed that in forest habitats, male elephants tended to become increasingly solitary with age. Male bulls were, therefore, mostly solitary. But adolescents were either solitary or in all-male groups, in equal proportions. These males were most likely to be part of all-male groups and grouped with other males in large herds of up to 12 elephants, almost exclusively in croplands also containing isolated forest patches — a sign that these recent all-male groups could be there in response to environmental factors.These all-male groups also stuck together for an unusually long time. While it’s common for some males to team up with others for a single season or a few weeks, these new all-male groups lasted for “a few years,” according to the authors. Interestingly, studies conducted in the same region more than two decades earlier don’t mention such large and stable all-male groups at all, the authors add.These male elephants forming long-term associations is more than just co-occurrence or grouping by chance, says Srinivasaiah. One possibility is “social buffering,” where the social support system derived from being part of a group can help “buffer” or reduce stress. While social buffering is a known phenomenon among elephants, there could be another reason these adolescent male elephants are grouping together, Srinivasaiah said.“These elephants need to learn to utilize the novel landscape efficiently and to avoid getting killed,” he said. “Hence, associating with older, more knowledgeable and experienced males is a strategy used by some of the younger males to survive and persist in high-risk landscapes. Otherwise, they would have had to do the same through trial and error, which could be costly.”The establishment of these all-male groups in response to anthropogenic factors, thereby modifying their own sociality, is an important finding that suggests not just how adaptable elephants are, but also how human influence is changing the natural life around us, Srinivasaiah said.Anthropocene woesWidespread habitat loss is one of the hallmarks of the Anthropocene, the geological age defined by pervasive human influence on the natural world. If elephant home ranges within forests continue to be taken over for non-forest activities, the animals will have to adapt to the change or perish, Srinivasaiah said.“Elephants are survivors, hence most often they will choose alternative ways to persist; and feeding from crop fields even if it’s risky cannot be discounted,” he said.Elephants are arguably one of the most adaptive of mammalian species, and their social behavior may vary depending on environmental conditions, says Prithiviraj Fernando, trustee of the Centre for Conservation and Research in Sri Lanka, who studies Asian elephants in the island nation and was not involved in the recent study in India.“For example in Sri Lanka, large all-male groups are observed primarily in areas with high resource availability,” he said.This study is one of the first to focus on male Asian elephant sociality and how it varies in relation to habitat conditions, he wrote in an email to Mongabay. “Conducting studies similar in other parts of the range would help determine whether the patterns observed by Srinivasaiah and his colleagues are unique to their study area or characteristic of Asian elephants everywhere,” Fernando said.A solitary adolescent male elephant caught on camera trap at night within forested habitat. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Mitigating conflictAccording to the authors of the study, it’s “imperative that future attention is focused on the management and conservation of [these] young dispersing males” to mitigate the potential for increased human-elephant conflicts in agricultural landscapes.“Young dispersing males are very impressionable and if associated with non-crop foraging older bulls, will not learn crop-foraging behavior or can even unlearn it,” Srinivasaiah said. Mitigation measures such as capturing key individuals within a bull group may therefore backfire, he said, as these older and experienced bulls are essential in a male elephant society to help guide the younger bulls and also discipline them when moving across villages, thus keeping conflict to a minimum.“The key to living with elephants may lie in understanding their social complexity and harnessing this new found knowledge to learn how to modify our own lifestyle practices to make them more compatible with the elephants’ use of an area, and be more flexible in our own approaches and behavior towards elephants,” Srinivasaiah said.Citations:Srinivasaiah, N., Kumar, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Sukumar, R., & Sinha, A. (2019). All-male groups in Asian elephants: A novel, adaptive social strategy in increasingly anthropogenic landscapes of southern India. Scientific Reports, 9(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45130-1Sukumar, R. (1990). Ecology of the Asian elephant in southern India. II. Feeding habits and crop raiding patterns. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 6(1), 33-53. doi:10.1017/s0266467400004004Pokharel, S. S., Singh, B., Seshagiri, P. B., & Sukumar, R. (2018). Lower levels of glucocorticoids in crop‐raiders: Diet quality as a potential ‘pacifier’ against stress in free‐ranging Asian elephants in a human‐production habitat. Animal Conservation, 22(2), 177-188. doi:10.1111/acv.12450Banner image of an all-male elephant group moving toward a banana plantation on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India, courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.center_img Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 16, 2019

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments.Mongabay does not vet the news sources below, nor does the inclusion of a story on this list imply an endorsement of its content. Tropical forestsA free-trade deal between the United States and Brazil could be disastrous for the Amazon and forest communities, one commentator argues (The Hill).The continent of Africa emitted more carbon dioxide than the United States in 2016 (Carbon Brief).Ancient earthworks in the Amazon clue scientists into how societies used and protected the rainforest (Ensia).Brazil’s lawmakers are considering a law allowing hunters to go after jaguars and other iconic rainforest wildlife (The Independent).The Amazon is approaching a tipping point, according to one climate scientist (The New Yorker).Komodo dragons in Indonesia could become victims of their own popularity (The New York Times).Investors could be pivotal in stopping deforestation for soy in Brazil (Ethical Corp).A film tells the story of one man’s restoration of a small piece of rainforest in Ecuador (Yale E360).Other newsSome coal miners in the U.S. are looking for alternatives to coal mining (The Guardian).Microplastics are turning up in Arctic snow (The Atlantic) …… And the tiny pieces of trash are also leading to increases in air pollution (Los Angeles Times).Average temperatures in parts of the U.S. have already breached the 2-degree-Celsius (3.6-degree-Fahrenheit) mark (The Washington Post).New research shows that populations of river giants like catfish and stingrays are down by 97 percent in the past 50 years (The Guardian).Young climate change activist Greta Thunberg is sailing across the Atlantic Ocean for the upcoming U.N. climate talks (The New York Times).The baleen plates of dead whales are helping scientists learn more about threatened species (CBC).Fishing and shipping threaten whales as much as renewed hunting by countries such as Japan (Scientific American).The Trump administration in the U.S. has removed some of the protections of the Endangered Species Act (The Washington Post, The New York Times, EnviroNews Nigeria, Vox).July 2019 was hotter than any other month in recorded history, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported (The New York Times).Banner image of a jaguar by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update last_img read more

Chilean band Newen Afrobeat sings of a future it hopes to see

first_imgActivism, Archive, Arts, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Interviews Article published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Santiago, Chile-based band Newen Afrobeat’s songs are infused with themes to do with ecology, indigenous and women’s rights, and cultural understanding.Heavily influenced by Afrobeat, the musical style made famous by Nigeria’s Fela Kuti, Newen is fronted by a powerful trio of women singer/songwriters.Mongabay interviewed percussionist and Newen co-founder Tomas Pavez from his home in Santiago. The music of the Chilean band Newen Afrobeat is a vibrant mix of musical cultures, an energetic take on the Afrobeat musical style made famous by Nigerian star Fela Kuti with a Chilean sensibility that’s supported by a large horn section and an array of percussionists.The group has collaborated with members of Kuti’s extended family and toured around the Americas, with a recent highlight being a “stunning” set at this summer’s Montreal International Jazz Festival, as noted in a wide ranging interview with award-winning National Public Radio show Afropop Worldwide.Their three albums released to date celebrate the environment, indigenous rights, women’s empowerment, and multiculturalism with incredible energy, soaring vocals, and tight musical direction, which piqued the interest of Mongabay, so we reached out to percussionist Tomás Pavez to learn more.Pavez was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1987. A self-taught musician, he plays clave (jam blocks, wood blocks, and cowbell), Kpalongo-style Nigerian drums, and shekere. A co-founder of the band with Chilean composer/singer Nicolas Urbina in 2009, he has seen the band develop into the inspired unit we see today.The band enjoys shooting videos in nature and is known for costumery that’s both symbolic and whimsical, both in videos and on stage. Still image from video for Newen Afrobeat’s song Cantaros. Screenshot from Cantaros music video by Alejandro Espinoza and Marcela Toledo.Mongabay: You combine influences like Fela Kuti and Afrobeat with your Chilean sound and style, why is that cultural celebration important?Tomás Pavez: It is so important because of the times we are currently living in, where everything merges. We have to carefully embrace culture as a whole rather than creating separation. Things happening in Chile are not in reality apart from what essentially goes on in the rest of the world.Indigenous peoples and their struggle for rights are referenced in songs like Chaltumay, whose video was made at a historic conflict zone between the Mapuche people and the Chilean government. Why?Yes indeed, it is an ongoing struggle since colonial times. Back then it was about Spaniards conquering the land, nowadays it’s about territorial and cultural respect, so traditions aren’t lost because of private interests overtaking beautiful landscapes, as featured in the Chaltumay video.Chileufú eternal river land of poets / this land breathes ancestral wisdom / by force of hand and rifle / they snatch these territories / According to supposed favorable agreements / For whom? we asked / And why? / When did ambition devour the root?How has the Chilean State treated the Mapuche?They don’t recognize limits, and sacred lands where families have lived through centuries are taken away to make way for hydroelectric dams or logging companies.Why does Newen Afrobeat talk about ecology in its music?We see nature as a getaway from the fast city life, we really need it as a connection to our roots and as a reminder that we have to be awake to make changes for a better quality of life.Why did you personally become interested in the environment?When I was little I always liked to go hiking with my father, and as I grew up I got to appreciate nature more by learning how to grow food, learning about plants and their needs as living beings.The song Cántaros is a celebration of feminine energy and water as a life-giving element. Why was the video recorded by the dry Copiapó River?There is an environmental issue with the Copiapó River. The mining business is a big thing throughout Chile, mostly in the north, but it needs too much water. So this river is starting to dry up.We are pitchers that sing / we are crock pitchers that dazzle / mammalian fireflies, biological nature / Little ivory light that dances with the moon / magic goldfish of fresh and pure water / fertile garden rose / seed that gives life / Blood delirious with passion / trace of rebellionOther themes in your music are equality, migration, and women’s empowerment. Are your fans supportive of these issues?Yes they are, it’s the reality around the world. Everyone has a right to live without feeling discriminated against, and women have always fought for better and equal conditions. Sharing knowledge of this is [about] revolution.Do activists use your music to raise awareness?Some do give recognition to certain song lyrics, and most people like very much our first album’s opening audio track, where José ‘Pepe’ Mujica, the former president of Uruguay, talks about having a futurist outlook on our actual human conditions.What are other important themes of your music?Taking a good look at us as human race, recognizing what the past has taught us, so we do not keep doing the same things over and over.See more videos at Newen Afrobeat’s Youtube channel and hear more music at their Bandcamp page. Tomás Pavez, percussionist with Newen Afrobeat. Image courtesy of Leonardo Benavente.Banner image: the band during shooting of the Chaltumay video, image by Alejandro Espinoza and Marcela Toledo.last_img read more

Wildfires spread to planned site of new Indonesian capital

first_imgArticle published by mongabayauthor Fires raging across Indonesia have flared up in an area of Borneo where the government recently announced would be the site of the nation’s new capital.The location had been chosen in part because it was believed to be at low risk from fires and other disasters.Haze from the fires has affected local communities as well as a nearby orangutan rescue and rehabilitation center.Authorities have arrested two farmers for setting fires on their land, but activists say they were doing so in a controlled manner and with the permission of local officials. SAMARINDA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s wildfire emergency has spread to the part of eastern Borneo where President Joko Widodo wants to relocate the nation’s capital.On Aug. 26, President Widodo announced plans to move the capital to an area straddling the border between North Penajam Pasar and Kutai Kartanegara districts in East Kalimantan province. The decision was based in part on the area’s low risk of natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides and forest fires, as opposed to the current capital, Jakarta, which is sinking.This month, though, Indonesia faces its worst fire and haze crisis since the catastrophic fires of 2015, which razed 26,100 square kilometers (10,100 square miles) of land across the country — an area nearly the size of Hawaii. And the site of the new capital has not been free of the fires.Shahar Al Haqq, the head of damage control and security at the provincial forestry office, said fires had been burning in the area for the past few weeks. The fires, he said, were relatively small, compared with those in Jambi province on the island of Sumatra, where photos of skies turned an eerie blood-red color have gone viral as fires burn there.Fires in East Kalimantan are typically smaller than elsewhere on Borneo, he said. If the province experiences haze, he added, it’s usually from fires in West and Central Kalimantan provinces elsewhere on the island.“Even though the fires aren’t big, the firefighters are still facing difficulties because of the steep location [where the burning is happening],” Shahar said. “In almost all fire locations there are no groundwater sources.”Based on data from SiPongi, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry’s wildfire monitoring system, the area of land burned in East Kalimantan in 2019 is 67 square kilometers (26 square miles). That figure stands at 448 square kilometers (173 square miles) for Central Kalimantan and 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) for West Kalimantan.A map showing East Kalimantan province (light red) and two districts: North Penajam Paser and Kutai Kartanegara (deep red). Image courtesy of President Joko Widodo’s Twitter account.Fires in North Penajam Paser are concentrated in the Nenang, Mount Seteleng and Lawe-lawe areas, according to the district disaster mitigation office. In Kutai Kartanegara, they’re mainly in the Samboja and Bukit Soeharto areas.“All of our forces are focused on extinguishing these fires,” said Nur Kholis, the head of Samboja subdistrict. He is working with the military, the police and a special subdistrict-level task force on firefighting, as well as local volunteers.The area is home to Samboja Lestari, an orangutan rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction center run by the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation. The Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) is a critically endangered species. The center is also home to dozens of sun bears (Helarctos malayanus).“Since March 2019, we at BOSF have sounded the alert of forest and land fires,” said Jamartin Sihite, CEO of the BOSF. “At the moment, thin smoke which is thought to be the result of wildfires has hit Samboja Lestari in the last few days.”The center’s medical team has provided the 130 orangutans under its care with milk and multivitamins to protect their health as the haze spreads. They are also reducing the animals’ outdoor activities and spraying the cages with mist to keep them cool. “Without exception, every one of them is receiving intensive care,” Jamartin said.Fires in Samboja, East Kalimantan. Image by Yovanda for Mongabay.On Sept. 20, two residents of Paser district, not far from the planned site of the new capital, were arrested for allegedly setting forest fires.The arrest was criticized by AMAN, Indonesia’s main advocacy group for indigenous peoples’ rights, because the individuals were setting controlled fires to clear small fields in accordance with local custom. The two people had already obtained permission to set the fires from local authorities, said Margareta Setting Beraan, the head of AMAN’s branch in East Kalimantan.“During the dry season, Paser residents farm their land in accordance with local wisdom,” she said. “We condemn this arrest.”She added, “Don’t look for scapegoats [for the fire and haze crisis] by accusing indigenous people who are farming.”Banner: A Bornean orangutan in Kalimantan. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Crime, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Haze, Indigenous Peoples, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Southeast Asian Haze, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Coal power plants flourish in the Philippines despite ‘climate emergency’

first_imgCoal has long been the primary power source in the Philippines, and large-scale power plants act as a safety crutch in the country’s quest for energy security.But the advent of cost-efficient renewable energy technologies is challenging coal’s dominance as the go-to energy source.President Rodrigo Duterte has voiced support for renewables but has yet to release an executive mandate that could propel the energy department to change its coal-dependent roadmap.Any meaningful shift to renewables would require drastic changes in priorities and perspective, according to an energy think tank. MANILA — In 1996, when a community in the Philippine municipality of Pagbilao agreed to house a coal power plant a few hours’ drive from Manila, the residents had high hopes. The fishing town saw in the dominating edifice full-time jobs and food on the table, says Warren Puno of the Catholic diocese of Lucena, the provincial capital.What they didn’t expect, however, was for additional coal plants to follow suit.After Pagbilao, another power station mushroomed in the nearby municipality of Mauban in 2000; the two plants have a combined generating capacity of 1,594 megawatts, earning the region the title of the “coal corridor” of the Philippines as it’s the only province to house two major coal plants. They also make the region the biggest power producer for the grid that serves the central island group of Luzon.President Rodrigo Duterte inaugurated a third plant (the 21st nationwide) on Oct. 16, the 500 MW San Buenaventura Power facility in Mauban, citing the venture as a prime example of “clean coal technology” and a significant addition to the country’s green energy roadmap.Environmental groups, however, are not convinced. “Coal is not clean, not cheap, and not sustainable,” Khevin Yu of Greenpeace Philippines said at a press conference on Oct. 21. “It is unfortunate that another coal plant has been inaugurated in the country, by no less than the president who seems to have been misled or misinformed by the coal industry and its ridiculous myth of ‘clean coal.’”While Duterte continues to voice support for renewables in his public speeches, his energy department has gone the other way: more coal-fired power plants have been approved for construction since Duterte assumed office in 2016, driving environmental groups to question the government’s commitment to reducing emissions from coal and its transition to renewables as mere lip service.Bucking the global coal declineSince the signing of the landmark Paris climate agreement in 2015, coal projects have declined across the world. But it’s a different story in the Philippines and in Southeast Asia. Threatened by looming energy insecurity and with industries dependent on fossil fuels, coal remains the prime power generation source for electrification in the Philippines.It’s the only country in Asia that gained a 1-gigawatt increase in power sourced from coal this year, which now accounts for 43 percent of the national energy mix. Given new investments, coal’s share of the pie will reach 50 percent in 2030. The energy sector is the biggest generator of the country’s carbon emissions and is at the forefront of its 70 percent emissions reduction pledge in the Paris Agreement, followed by the transport, waste, forestry and industrial sectors.Duterte, however, has always had misgivings about the Paris Agreement. “I did not sign it … my predecessor signed it,” he said after taking office in 2016. “It will hamper the country’s industrialization agenda,” he added. He threatened to pull out of the agreement but ratified it begrudgingly a year later, when a majority of his cabinet secretaries voted for it.Three years on, Duterte’s energy policies remain ambivalent, with the Department of Energy signalling a “conditional concurrence” to the deal, reflected in Secretary Alfonso Cusi’s “technology-neutral” bureaucracy. While the department signed renewable energy contracts in 2016, it also pushed for large-scale coal investments with seven committed projects that will provide 3,971 MW nationwide, spearheaded by San Buenaventura’s switch-on in October. “Coal still serves a purpose for our baseload,” Cusi said during his department’s budget deliberations, adding that a coal moratorium could “hurt” the energy sector.“There remains considerable uncertainty around how these commitments will be achieved … given that continued economic development is contingent on significant increases in power generation capacity,” according to a 2019 report from the Asian Development Bank.Further, the country’s power roadmap for 2016 to 2040 cements coal’s role in energy security. Both low-carbon and business-as-usual scenarios show anticipated annual supply growth rate from coal, with a 5.5 percent annual increase under business-as-usual and 4.9 under low-emissions scenarios.“Investing in coal is investing in the climate crisis that is already impacting the lives and livelihoods of millions of Filipinos and costing the Filipino taxpayers billions every year,” Yu said, adding the government should “stop investing in coal, enact a moratorium on all planned coal projects, and enable an immediate energy transition towards clean and cheap renewable energy.”‘The time is ripe for renewables’Electricity prices in the Philippines remain among the highest in Southeast Asia, driven by high dependence on fossil fuel imports, high financing costs and uncompetitive market structures that have stifled innovation, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), an international think tank.“There is an unprecedented opportunity to redesign the market to attract lower prices and more investment,” an IEEFA report says. “The government should guard against abuse of market power and anti-competitive agreements such as price fixing without a bidding system.”But while renewable’s biggest opposition is its upfront high costs, especially for solar, the advent of new and cheaper technologies when matched with existing but underutilized financing schemes can tip the scales in favor of renewables, according to Gerry Arances of the local think tank Center for Energy, Ecology, and Development.“Solar’s share in the energy mix is still a low 6 percent,” Arances told Mongabay. “But in the past, it never breached the 1 percent mark. But now it jumped in two years — that goes to show that there is a huge, untapped market … and it is growing. The technology, policies, and mechanisms are there to fully transition to renewables. We simply need to fully implement it.”In the coal corridor, resistance against the fossil fuel ballooned after the energy department approved the construction of three new coal-fired power plants: Tangkawayan (1,000 MW), Atimonan (1,200 MW), and Ibabang (600 MW), in Pagbilao municipality.“The community started asking: ‘Why are they building here again?’” Puno says. “We are being turned into a trash can. We think coal is dirty and we are becoming a repository for all that dirt.”Theirs is not a lone sentiment. Around the Philippines, resistance against coal power is gaining ground in at least 12 provinces, with the most vocal opposition in Palawan, where the government approved a 15 MW plant that, according to local environmental groups, threatens the province’s biodiversity and overlooks cheaper renewable power generation options.“The energy department is in a better position to begin the transition because the renewables technology is there,” Arances says. “Prices won’t plummet if the industry is not ripe for renewables. It’s about time that the Department of Energy puts its act together and shepherd the transition.”Banner image of the coal-fired Quezon Power Plant in Mauban, Quezon. The 511-megawatt power plant was commissioned in 2000 and is owned and operated by Quezon Power Limited Co. Image by Lawrence Ruiz (Epi Fabonan III) via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change Policy, Coal, Energy, Renewable Energy Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by leilanilast_img read more

Brazil’s new deforestation numbers confirm the “Bolsonaro Effect” despite denials (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Destruction, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Just released preliminary figures for “2019” Brazilian Amazon deforestation (covering the August 2018-July 2019 period) show a 29.5 percent increase over the previous year, with 9,762 square kilometers (3,769 square miles) cleared, more than double the rate when Brazil’s famous deforestation decline ended in 2012.Despite this deforestation surge, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro government claims the increase is not unusual and equivalent to high deforestation rates seen several times since 2012. However, critics point to the administration’s rhetoric and environmental deregulation as part of the “Bolsonaro Effect,” leading to rampant deforestation.The government’s assertion of innocence fails to note that the new data only covers through July. In August 2019 the deforestation rate was 222 percent above the 2018 value; in September it ran 96 percent higher. The full “Bolsonaro effect” on deforestation won’t be on view until the complete “2020” numbers are released next November.To date, the administration has done nothing to change its inflammatory rhetoric or its anti-environmental polices, so there is every reason to expect that Brazilian deforestation levels will continue to soar. This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. INPE data showing deforestation within an August 1-July 31 timeframe. 2019 thus reflects the 12 months ending July 31 and doesn’t include deforestation from August through October. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.On November 18th the Brazilian government released a preliminary figure for “2019” Amazon deforestation — the August 2018-July 2019 period — showing a 29.5 percent increase over the previous year. A total of 9,762 square kilometers (3,769 square miles) was cleared in this period, more than double the rate when Brazil’s famous deforestation decline ended in 2012.The announcement was made jointly by the Brazilian ministers of science and technology and of environment, with the latter claiming that the numbers indicate that the Jair Bolsonaro presidential administration that came into office in January 2019 has not resulted in an increase in clearing rates. His argument was that this year’s increase is just part of the upward trend that has held since the low point in 2012.Unfortunately, the 2019 deforestation surge can definitely be blamed on the Bolsonaro administration, despite the changes in deforestation rate since 2012 having approached the percentage increase seen this year twice (in 2013 and 2016).Although this year’s percentage increase is only slightly higher than those in the two years with similar percentages, it should be remembered that the PRODES data released on November 18, 2019 only cover the year through July 31st. However, the deforestation rate in the succeeding months has exploded to levels far above those for the same months in the previous year: in August 2019 the deforestation rate was 222 percent above the 2018 value, and the September value was 96 percent higher. As a result, this part of the “Bolsonaro effect” will only be reflected in the data from the PRODES program of the National Institute of Space Research (INPE) when the “2020” numbers are released a year from now.Deforestation for the August 1-October 31 period in 2019 is pacing well ahead of the historic norm for the period. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.Deforestation for the January 1-October 31 period in 2019 is pacing well ahead of the historic norm for the period. Bolsonaro took office in January 2019. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.The surge of deforestation and burning is the result both of the constant anti-environmental rhetoric and of concrete actions in dismantling the country’s environmental agencies and effectively halting fines for illegal clearing. The rhetoric and institutional setbacks have been documented in detail in a paper published in Environmental Conservation.The discourse of the president and his minister of environment repeatedly suggest that environmental laws can be violated with impunity. A clear message was sent that there will be no consequences for such violations when the ministers of environment and agriculture visited an illegal soy plantation in an indigenous area in Mato Grosso, where they posed for photographs with the machinery and praised the operation.People at the deforestation frontier do not follow the publication of decrees and laws in the government’s official gazette or read the details of legal changes reported in major newspapers. Instead, their information comes from social media that rapidly spreads the news of each inflamed tirade by the president and his ministers against the government’s environmental agencies and against environmentalists and environmental NGOs. It is the climate generated by this discourse that influences behavior. This year, many people caught red-handed violating environmental laws responded immediately that the president has “liberated” everything.Deforestation has risen since 2012 due to the continual increase in forces driving forest loss, such as new and improved roads giving access to the forest, more population and more investment. The indirect effect of soy expansion has undoubtedly played an important role, with soy planters purchasing many cattle ranches in Mato Grosso state, including ranches in the Cerrado savanna in addition to those in former Amazon forest. These ranchers use the money from the land sales to then buy much cheaper land in Amazon forest farther north, especially in the state of Pará, where they clear forest on a large scale to establish new ranches. Pará has been the biggest contributor to deforestation since 2006, when it surpassed Mato Grosso as the champion deforester.Accumulated deforestation from August 1, 2013 through July 31, 2019 for the Brazilian Amazon. Image by Mongabay using INPE data.Prospects for 2020 are grim. The PRODES data for the nominal year “2020” will include the deforestation that has already occurred from August 2019 onward, which now totals 3,929 square kilometers (1,517 square miles) based on the DETER monitoring system. (The official total to be produced by the PRODES system will be even higher, since the DETER system misses some of the clearing.)The rainy season has now begun, but when the dry season comes again in 2020 one can expect another surge in deforestation. Nothing has changed in the presidential administration’s discourse, and the dismantling of the country’s environmental institutions continues. Various planned roads, dams and other projects in Amazonia imply more deforestation.Banner image: The Amazon rainforest on fire in August 2019. Most Amazon fires are intentionally set, often to clear new lands for cattle and crops. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Conflict in the Chico Mendes Reserve threatens this pioneering Amazonian project

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Amazon Rainforest, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Law Enforcement, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests Article published by Xavier Bartaburucenter_img Farmers and irregular occupants in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve in Acre are enjoying newfound political power and pressuring for the reduction of the first protected area of its kind in Brazil as it approaches its 30th anniversary in March.A bill in the Federal House of Representatives proposes that areas used for irregular cattle farming be removed from its perimeter, effectively legalizing the activity. Resident associations oppose the move.The reserve, or Resex, is a model of territorial occupation that aligns the work and income of traditional populations with keeping the forest intact. Environmentalists fear intervention will make room for changes in other areas.The conflict has revived the confrontation tactics from the era of the military dictatorship, when the rubber tappers emerged victorious but suffered the death of leaders like Chico Mendes, for whom the reserve is named. In 1990, the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve, or Resex, in the Brazilian state of Acre introduced a brand-new model of alliance between non-indigenous traditional peoples and environmental preservation. But as it approaches its 30th anniversary, this reserve is experiencing its worst nightmare — one that could endanger its very model of existence.The first alerts came in mid-2019, when satellites from the National Institute of Space Research (INPE) detected deforestation rates well above the usual in the area. The total for the year had already reached 74.5 square kilometers (28.7 square miles), three times more than the average in each of the past five years. (The latter figure was itself twice as high as registered  before 2013, when the annual deforestation rate didn’t exceed 10 km² (3.8 mi²).In November, there was yet another warning sign, this time from the office of the minister of the environment, Ricardo Salles. A meeting on Nov. 6, registered on the official calendar as “an appointment with the caucus from the state of Acre,” featured the participation of five environmental violators whose crimes were committed inside the Resex Chico Mendes. They were there to ask for protection against what they considered the “abuses” of monitors and to raise support for a proposed law to reduce the reserve’s physical borders, whose bill is already circulating in the Federal House of Representatives. According to the newspaper Folha de S. Paulo, the minister agreed to both demands.Burning to clear pastures in the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre. Image by Katie Maehler/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).The fight against deforestation and the advances of land raiders are nothing new in the Chico Mendes Extractive Reserve. The protected area itself was born as a consequence of the embates — literally “standoffs,” actions of peaceful resistance organized by rubber tappers in the 1970s to save the trees from destruction at the hands of loggers. Led by Chico Mendes and Wilson Pinheiro, forest residents would hug trees or hold hands forming human chains to block the tractors and chainsaws from advancing upon the vegetation.This was a counterpoint to the developmental model pushed by the military dictatorship governing Brazil, which, based on the false assertion that the Amazon was uninhabited and unproductive, stimulated the implementation of large-scale farming, mining and logging operations.Organized into unions, the rubber tappers defended their right to a traditional way of life; like the indigenous peoples, they also lived off the forest and wanted to ensure that it remained standing. “As an alternative to the occupation of the Amazonian territory, a new model, designated ‘Extractive Reserve,’ was constructed in which the lands belong to the Union, but for the fruition of those who inhabit and work in them,” as registered in the Resex Chico Mendes Management Plan.This achievement, however, cost the leaders their lives. Chico Mendes was murdered on the doorstep of his home on Dec. 22, 1988. Pinheiro was killed much earlier, in 1980, when the peaceful standoffs were not the only form of confrontation in the region.The first of its kind to be conceived in the country, the Resex Chico Mendes ended up, for one reason or another, delayed by the bureaucracy in Brasília, which had previously decreed the creation of the Resex Alto Juruá, also in Acre, in January of 1990, making it a true pioneer in Brazil. The document legalizing the reserve named in honor of the leader of the rubber tappers came three months later, on March 12. This year will mark its 30th anniversary.But the official letterhead from the president was never enough to guarantee possession of the land and peace for the rubber-tapping, nut-harvesting and riverine peoples that inhabit it. Being a protected area with byways throughout nearly its entire span, in addition to two interstate roads (BR-364 to the north and BR-317 to the south), there has always been high pressure from raiders. For instance, the reserve’s entrance is just a two-hour drive from the state capital, Rio Branco.Since the corruption-curtailed second term of President Dilma Rousseff (2015-2016), the tension has been growing incrementally, in inverse proportion to actions in support of the “extractivists” and the monitoring that protects against invaders, which have only decreased since then. The rise of the current president, Jair Bolsonaro, shifted the power relationship all at once in favor of the violators.“The Sustainable Amazônia plan [of development for the forest populations] was not continued in the necessary magnitude. The actions became weaker and weaker, and during Dilma’s second administration, they were totally desiccated,” says Marina Silva, a former participant in the rubber tapper union movement, born and raised in the kind of rubber-producing community that Chico Mendes defended.She says Dilma’s successor and Bolsonaro’s predecessor, Michel Temer, “never assumed any identity regarding the subject and now Bolsonaro has abandoned it completely. In his view, these populations cannot be stimulated. Either they need to be assimilated or eliminated,” says Silva, who served as minister of the environment under Dilma’s predecessor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.Today, extractivist leaders and government employees are afraid to express their opposition to these measures. In November, the dispute over the land of a rubber-producing community in Xapuri ended with the death of the regional president of the political party PSOL. Ângela Mendes, daughter of Chico Mendes, says the farmers are going around with armed guards in order to intimidate landholders.“We went to a public hearing recently and the representative for the Ministry of the Environment threatened the people who wanted to file complaints. Whenever it was a small landholder [talking], this person would remind us that everything was being recorded, that they could face legal repercussions for this,” Angela Mendes says.Memória de Chico Mendes em casa da reserva extrativista que leva seu nome. Foto: Memorial for Chico Mendes in a house inside the extractivist reserve that bears his name. Photo: Cattle raising in the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre. Image by Katie Maehler/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).A conflict resurrected This new moment in Brazilian politics has brought to parliament representatives whose discourses — and bills — embrace ideas that weaken environmental control and preservation. For instance, Márcio Bittar of the MDB party and first-term senator from Acre, registered in a request for a public hearing that “many Amazonian communities have been forced to a give up their cattle ranching activities in name of the idea of florestania and extractivism as a model of development.”Another new arrival to the Brazilian Congress, federal representative Mara Rocha (PSDB) proposed as a “more viable option for ending this conflict that has dragged on for years once and for all” a bill that would reduce the protected area by 190 km² (73 mi²) — the equivalent of 2% of the entire reserve. “Before Acre becomes the site of tragedy, with bloodshed … I would like to take the time to ask for the good sense of all the agencies involved” — [the Federal Public Ministry, the environmental agency (IBAMA), the Chico Mendes Institute (ICMBio), and the Army — “for the construction of a peaceful way out of this impasse,” she said in her speech during the short session on Oct. 31.In justifying the need for her bill, Rocha alleges that there are residents of the Resex Chico Mendes who “are unable to find livelihood in the region’s extractivist products and are blocked from continuing the activities in which they always labored, namely: cattle raising and agriculture.” Though in her text she insists that “the aim is only the removal from the Resex area those small rural properties that were already occupied before the creation” of the protected area, residents, environmental experts and court documents indicate the opposite is true.Road inside the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre. Image by Katie Maehler/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).At least some of the people that Rocha cites as examples of inhabitants of the reserve trying to survive and being threatened by monitors from the ICMBio (the federal environmental agency responsible for managing protected areas and named in honor of Chico Mendes) are, in fact, invaders.For example, in a preliminary decision regarding the accusation of four occupants of the reserve who had received notice to leave the area within 48 hours, federal judge Herley da Luz Brasil noted that they all had an “address in the city,” and that “none of the authors had been notified personally, but instead through intermediaries in the areas of the extractivist reserve, so that it is unknown if they effectively reside in the Resex.”All four participated in the meeting with Minister Salles; two have been cited with land embargoes registered in the IBAMA system: Maria de Fátima de Abreu Sarkis was given notice on three occasions, in 2006, 2008 and 2009. She has a stud farm in the reserve and is a cattle rancher. Gutierri Ferreira da Silva is accused in a court case of “crimes against the flora,” and has been embargoed by IBAMA since 2009.The current vice president of the Association of Residents and Producers of the Resex Chico Mendes in Brasileia and Epitaciolândia (also known as Amoprebe), Luiza Carlota da Silva Caldas, condemns the bill for solely benefiting the reserve’s invaders. “The areas under discussion in the bill are heavily populated, with a large amount of cattle ranches, but these people are there illegally. They aren’t traditional inhabitants of the reserves. The representatives haven’t done their homework: they heard 30 families who have a specific interest, when we have over 3,000 that oppose this reduction,” she says.“The majority, 90% of the reserve’s population, categorically rejects the reduction of the reserve. To agree with this is to disregard, belittle and kill our hero Chico Mendes for the second time,” says Raimundo Mendes de Barros, also known as Raimundão, Chico Mendes’s cousin and companion on the front line against the loggers.The text proposed by Representative Rocha also contains a second controversial point: to change the classification of Serra do Divisor National Park, today closed off from economic exploitation, to that of an environmental protection area, which would allow some extractive activity. “It’s the only region in the state that possesses rocks that can be extracted and utilized in commercial construction, able to foment the state’s economic development and lower the cost of public works that the people of the state so badly need,” Rocha says.Raimundo Mendes de Barros, also known as Raimundão, cousin of Chico Mendes and local leader, extracting latex from a rubber tree. Image by Katie Maehler/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).Divergences in the movementsJust as they did in the 1970s, the residents are now organizing in reaction to what they consider an affront to their rights and traditional way of life. An “Extractivist March” is being planned for early 2020 to block the passage of the bill. “I’m still waiting for the latest responses from the base nuclei after the meetings we had,” Caldas says.However, it will be necessary to find some commonality between the two distinct visions held by the traditional residents. While Raimundão’s camp, connected umbilically to the National Council of Extractivists and the movement of resistance led by Chico Mendes, supports maintaining the reserve in the exact parameters by which it was created, Amoprebe favors a revision of the plan for the utilization of the area that would reconcile extractivism with cattle ranching.Cattle ranching is not currently prohibited inside the preservation area, but it is limited to a small portion of land, with small herds meant for subsistence. Still, many traditional inhabitants do not respect this norm. During the last socio-environmental survey, the ICMBio found cattle on 97% of the “collocations” (as lots in the rubber forests are known), which don’t have a single standard size.It is estimated that the total cattle population easily exceeds 50,000 animals — and wherever there is pasture, the forest disappears, which accounts for the fact that there are some rubber plantations with deforestation rates as high as 50%. According to the current rules, only 10% of the reserve can be cut down for complementary activities.With only five officials to look after the reserve, spanning an area so vast that it takes up to three days to cross it by car, the ICMBio is not capable of proper oversight. Other legal instruments, such as the prohibition of the sale of animals originating from the deforested area, have not proved effective. In Resex Chico Mendes, it is very easy to raise a cow on properties located within the borders, but outside of the unit: shortly before it is to be slaughtered, the animal is removed from the reserve and given clean documentation of origin.The problem is so serious that in 2010 the Federal Public Ministry introduced a sweeping program of conduct adjustment to regulate the beef industry in the Amazon. But as of September 2019, Acre was the state with the highest volume of meat-processing plants not in compliance with the standards for verifying the origin of slaughtered livestock.Raising cattle became easy and it’s now consolidated as an economic alternative. “Brazil nuts are worth 25 reais [$6] a can, which is a good price, but not everyone is able to produce nuts. Rubber is a little bit better these days, 8 reais [$2] a kilo, but it pays in installments. So there are lots of people who can’t afford to live off of extractivism, and that’s why they raise pigs, chickens, cattle,” Caldas says.Despite the invasion of cattle, there are still areas of extractivism where families live according to the traditional uses of the forest. And there are other possible activities aside from the extraction of latex and Brazil nuts: oils, fruits and lianas are products that are starting to be seen as having value, and scientific and environmental tourism can also serve as sources of income for families.“But we need to give these activities the same financial, technological and political support, and technical assistance provided to cattle breeders and agriculture. People want the reserve to have the same results, the same liquidity as a predatory model that’s over 300 years old. The comparison is extremely unfair,” Marina Silva says.Deforestation inside the São Bernardo rubber forest, near the border of the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre. Image by Pedro Saldanha Werneck/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).Amoprebe, though opposed to the reduction of the extractive reserve’s area, understands that the use of the land needs to be loosened to legalize these cattle breeders. It wants deforesters registered in the ICMBio as traditional inhabitants to have their infractions forgiven, and, in exchange, to sign a written agreement to “no longer tinker with the forest,” Caldas says.The association goes even further: it calls for an assessment of the deforestation. It proposes that, if the 10% of the total area of the reserve to be designated for complementary activities has not been achieved so far, residents who have not yet engaged in deforestation get an extra incentive to promote the cutting down of trees.Raimundão rejects the idea: “Violators are always going to want to do whatever serves their self-interest, but the conscious residents are organized. We don’t need amnesty. What we need is punishment: either these people have to be removed from inside the reserve or they have to make a commitment to recuperate the forest that they cut down,” he says.For Ângela Mendes, the “strategy behind this movement is to establish precedents” for other regions of the Amazon. “The danger is this: it begins with the removal of one community [of sustainable projects], then another and then soon enough the idea of the reserve loses the meaning of its existence,” she says.Cattle breeding inside the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre. Image by Pedro Saldanha Werneck/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).Banner image of deforestation in the São Bernardo rubber forest, near the border of the Resex Chico Mendes in Acre, by Pedro Saldanha Werneck/Mídia NINJA (CC-BY-NC).This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Brazil team and published here on our Brazil site on Dec. 20, 2019.last_img read more

Audio: The sounds of tropical katydids and how they can benefit conservation

first_imgAnimals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Conservation, Environment, Insects, Interviews, Podcast, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Laurel Symes is assistant director of the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University in the United States. We’ve frequently featured bioacoustic recordings here on the Mongabay Newscast, and it’s not been uncommon for the researchers we spoke with to have used recording equipment designed at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, or to have received support and research assistance from staff at the Lab. So we thought it would be useful to get Symes to start off by telling us a bit about the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and what it does.Symes’ own research is currently focused on using machine learning to detect and identify tropical katydids via the sounds they produce. Katydids are grasshopper-like insects that are important to the rainforest food web, as they eat a lot of plants and are in turn eaten by a lot of other species, including birds, bats, monkeys, frogs, and more.Symes is here today to discuss how the study of katydids might benefit tropical forest conservation efforts more broadly, how machine learning is aiding her bioacoustic work, and to plays for us some of the katydid sounds that she’s captured.Here’s this episode’s top news:2019 was second-hottest year on record, 2010s hottest decadeIndigenous lands hold 36% or more of remaining intact forest landscapesUpdate to biodiversity treaty proposes protecting at least 30% of EarthOne six-week expedition discovered ten new songbird species and subspecies in IndonesiaPhylloptera dimidiata. Photo by Laurel Symes.Lamprophyllum micans. Photo by Hannah ter Hofstede.Katydids can be as small as your thumb or as big as your hand — and can weigh as much as a bird, as Symes tells us in this episode of the Mongabay Newscast. Photo by Laurel Symes.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Laurel Symes, a biologist who is using bioacoustics to study tropical katydids in Central America. She is also assistant director of the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University in the United States.Symes’ research is focused on using machine learning to detect and identify tropical katydids via the sounds they produce. Katydids are grasshopper-like insects that are important to the rainforest food web, as they eat alot of plants and are in turn eaten by alot of other species, including birds, bats, monkeys, frogs, and more.Symes is here today to discuss how the study of katydids might benefit tropical forest conservation efforts more broadly, how machine learning is aiding her bioacoustic work, and to plays for us some of the katydid sounds that she’s captured. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Laurel Symes, a biologist who is using bioacoustics to study tropical katydids in Central America.Listen here:last_img read more

Upset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)

first_imgSatellites reveal the true story of the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires, and how to avoid a repeat in 2020.The common media narrative, and resulting public perception, is that large uncontrolled fires were raging through the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, causing vast destruction and deforestation. Subsequent analysis of extensive satellite imagery archives, however, has quietly revealed the opposite scenario: many of the fires were actually burning the remains of areas that were recently deforested.That is, the recent deforestation surge fueled the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires. The fires were in fact a lagging indicator of recent deforestation. Such information provides a much more focused target for the world’s outcry and related policy actions than just focusing on the fires alone.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The recent fires in Australia bring flashbacks of last August in the Brazilian Amazon, when news of massive blazes also captured the world’s attention (and for many, provoked intense concern and rage). Although the Amazon fires are currently out of the headlines, now is actually a critical time to understand what happened in order to avoid a repeat of the crisis in 2020.A key piece to the drama is that several months after the fires, Brazil was in the news again with the release of new data showing escalating deforestation in the Amazon. Critically, however, few have made the key connection between the fire and deforestation stories.The common media narrative, and resulting public perception, is that large uncontrolled fires were raging through the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, causing vast destruction and deforestation. Subsequent analysis of extensive satellite imagery archives, however, has quietly revealed the opposite scenario: many of the fires were actually burning the remains of areas that were recently deforested.Specifically, extensive analysis of a large archive of high-resolution satellite images spanning the last three years (obtained from Planet, the company with the largest active fleet of Earth-imaging satellites) unequivocally showed that fires burned over 1.1 million acres that were recently deforested since 2017. Moreover, two-thirds of this burned area was very recently deforested in just the five months preceding August 2019.Base Map. Brazilian Amazon 2019. Click for larger size. Data: UMD/GLAD, NASA (MODIS), DETER, Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA. Credit: MAAP.This surprising and novel result flips the script on the common “raging fires” narrative and instead shows a deeper link between the fire and deforestation stories. That is, the recent deforestation surge fueled the 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires. The fires were in fact a lagging indicator of recent deforestation.Mongabay covered the story last September and November, but unfortunately this critical finding has not gone mainstream. This is unfortunate because of the significant policy implications: local, national, and international focus needs to be on minimizing new deforestation in order to prevent fires, in addition to continuing to strengthen fire prevention efforts across the Amazon.Recent news reports indicate that the leading deforestation driver in the Brazilian Amazon area affected by the fires is cattle ranching. Indeed, one of the most shocking things about the widespread nature of the fires is how the greatest rainforest on Earth has been transformed to a massive agricultural complex.Such information provides a much more focused target for the world’s outcry and related policy actions than just focusing on the fires alone.As we start the new year, let’s take this opportunity to learn from what the satellites have revealed about last year. Most importantly, let’s focus on how to minimize deforestation now to avoid a repeat of an Amazon fire crisis in August 2020.A common scenario of the August 2019 Brazilian Amazon fires: burning recently deforested areas. Data: Planet. Credit: MAAP.Dr. Matt Finer is Senior Research Specialist and Director of the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) at Amazon Conservation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Amazon, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Cattle Ranching, Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Forest Fires, Megafires, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Researcher Perspective Series, Saving Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, wildfires last_img read more

Giro : Bob Jungels revient sur son tour décevant

first_img«J’ai eu de grands problèmes avec ça, dès la première étape en montagne, lorsque je me suis aperçu que je ne pouvais pas suivre les meilleurs. Je me suis assis dans le bus et j’ai pleuré pendant dix minutes. Je n’avais perdu que deux minutes mais dès ce moment-là, j’ai ressenti que je n’étais pas en forme, physiquement et mentalement. En montagne, c’était vraiment dur pour moi, tous les jours, d’ailleurs, c’était dur. La météo n’a pas aidé non plus. Je ne sais pas pourquoi mais mentalement, je n’étais pas prêt pour disputer un grand tour comme le Giro. C’est un point que je dois régler à l’avenir.» «Je me sentais coupable vis-à-vis de mes coéquipiers dans ce Giro et je ne voulais pas abandonner pour eux, même si, physiquement et mentalement, j’ai souffert. J’ai donc tenu à rester jusqu’au bout.» Son chrono Son mental Partager «Je vais faire une pause, j’en ai besoin, et je vais partir en vacances avec ma copine, je veux prendre le temps de savourer, sans téléphone, j’ai vraiment besoin de cette pause. Je ne sais pas quand je veux reprendre le départ d’une course. En été, je veux participer à moins de courses ou, même, à aucune course, parce qu’à la fin de la saison, il y a beaucoup de belles courses, comme le Tour de Lombardie.» Sa préparation «J’ai déjà montré que je peux bien faire dans un grand tour, car je récupère bien en troisième semaine. C’est la première fois que ce n’est pas le cas. Mais ce n’est pas la pire des choses non plus. Il ne faut pas que je baisse la tête.» Il s’est ensuite longuement confessé sur ses doutes, ses interrogations. Sa frustration de ne pas pouvoir peser sur la course, malgré son rôle de leader pour le classement général. Il dira en avoir pleuré le soir de sa déconvenue sur le Montoso. Il confirme qu’il ne peut donner le meilleur de lui-même sur un grand tour très montagneux comme l’était ce Giro. Il ne tire pas pour autant un trait sur ces grands tours et le Giro, qui l’avait révélé. Bob Jungels confesse ensuite son désir d’observer une pause, pour mieux revenir en fin de saison, où beaucoup de courses lui conviennent, comme le Tour de Lombardie, où il aimerait s’illustrer. Morceaux choisis. Ses conclusions Son programmecenter_img Durant ce long chemin en roue libre, il aura eu le temps de faire et défaire les fils d’un Giro où sans doute, pour la première fois de sa carrière, il a dû digérer une forte déception. Un soleil de plomb fusillait les Arènes, terminal de la dernière étape, et lorsque Bob Jungels a fendu la foule pour rejoindre, sans s’attarder, le parking des bus, rejeté loin hors du centre-ville, loin de la foule bruyante et suffocante qui venait de l’accompagner dans ses derniers mètres, on a compris que le champion national en avait fini avec sa corvée quotidienne sur ce Giro. «J’ai peut-être sous-évalué l’énergie que coûtent les classiques flandriennes avant de préparer ce Giro. Je l’ai abordé en disputant moins de courses. Dans le passé, j’enchaînais un stage d’altitude, les classiques ardennaises puis le Tour de Romandie. Cela m’avait permis de terminer sixième et huitième du Giro (2016 et 2018). Là, je suis allé en Colombie (NDLR : il a remporté une étape sur le Tour de Colombie) et je me suis aligné sur les classiques flandriennes (NDLR : il a également couru Paris-Nice). J’ai donc moins disputé de courses que les années passées. Lors du Tour des Flandres (NDLR: cinq jours avant son stage d’altitude en Sierra Nevada), je me suis aperçu que je n’étais pas au top physiquement. J’ai respecté la théorie et j’ai fait des pauses.» Son avenir dans les grands tours «Je suis content car le Giro est désormais fini, le chrono s’est assez bien passé mais j’ai remarqué que je n’avais pas retrouvé toute mon énergie.» Denis Bastien, à Vérone Ses responsabilités de leader «Je vais essayer d’être plus relax, de me calmer, d’aborder les choses plus tranquillement. J’ai appris à connaître mon corps au fil des ans, et depuis l’an passé, je me connais bien. Mais là, ce n’était pas le cas. » Le Luxembourgeois n’a jamais pu s’exprimer à sa juste mesure dans cette édition 2019 du Giro. Dimanche, il a pris une honorable 17e place du chrono. Le champion national termine à la 33e position du classement général final.last_img read more