Light pollution lures nighttime pollinators away from plants

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Ecology, Insects, Plants, Pollinators, Pollution, UCSC, Wildlife Over the last two decades, nighttime light emissions in North America and Europe have increased by more than 70 percent.This artificial light lures moths and other insect pollinators away from plants, a new study shows.This effect may also make daytime pollinators less efficient, posing a further threat to plants and global food security. Populations of bees, bats, butterflies and other pollinators have been declining for decades due to habitat loss, disease, pesticides and climate change. Now, scientists have documented yet another threat to pollinators: nighttime light pollution.In a recent study in Nature, ecologists showed that plants growing near streetlights were pollinated far less often at night and produced fewer fruits than their unilluminated counterparts. In turn, this may compromise the efficiency of daytime pollinators in the same fields, the authors conclude.“Even though daytime pollinators are usually more numerous than nighttime pollinators, they were unable to make up the difference in lost pollination of plants kept under artificial lighting,” said Eva Knop, an ecologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland and the study’s lead author. “Some studies have shown that nighttime pollinators seem to be more effective at transferring pollen between plants than their [daytime] counterparts,” Knop told Mongabay.Scientists estimate that one-third of all cash crops depend upon animal-mediated pollination. Many plants receive most of their pollination after dark, especially in tropical and desert climates. These plants attract nocturnal pollinators by producing alluring fragrances and copious amounts of nectar.Nocturnal pollinators swarm around a street light in Virginia, USA. Photo courtesy of Serge MelkiUnfortunately, pollinators drawn to lights, such as moths, find artificial light more tantalizing than nectar. Such nighttime emissions have increased by more than 70 percent in North America and Europe over the last two decades, particularly in residential areas, according to published estimates.To determine if night lights affect nocturnal pollination, Knop and her team found 14 ecologically similar cabbage thistle (Cirsium oleraceum) meadows in the Alpine foothills of Switzerland and set up mobile street lights in seven of them. Using night-vision goggles, the researchers closely monitored the behavior of nocturnal pollinators in both the dark and illuminated meadows.Light exposure reduced the number of pollinator visits by 62 percent, the team found. And while nearly 300 species of insects visited plants overnight in the dark fields, 29 percent fewer species came to the lighted fields, the results showed.The team also measured how much fruit was produced by cabbage thistles under the two treatments. They found that illumination after hours caused a 13 percent reduction in cabbage thistle fruit production, which they attribute to decreased pollination.Mexico’s Lady of the Night orchid (Brassavola nodosa) is pollinated at night by moth species. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.The team’s analysis suggests that flower pollination during the daytime is more effective for plants visited by a greater number of nocturnal pollinators. As a result, lights at night may also drag down pollination by bees and other daylight visitors. How that connection might happen isn’t yet understood, Knop said.Pollination is a fundamental ecosystem service that provides food, shelter and habitat to hundreds of thousands of species, so these nighttime impacts concern ecologists. “The effect of widespread use of nighttime artificial lights worldwide could have ecological and evolutionary effects that ripple through food webs in ways that we cannot yet predict,” John N. Thompson, distinguished professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who was not involved in the study, said in an email.Indeed, the most severe impacts of light pollution on pollinators and other light-sensitive species have yet to be seen, Thompson and other ecologists worry.Researchers point to several steps that citizens can take to help insects and other pollinators in their neighborhoods: keep outdoor lighting off at night, plant more flowers that bloom at different times of year, and never use pesticides.Beetles pollinating a cabbage thistle plant in Phillipsburg, Germany. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia commonsCITATION                                              Knop, E., Zoller, L., Ryser, R., Gerpe, C., Hörler, M., & Fontaine, C. (2017). Artificial light at night as a new threat to pollination. Nature, 548(7666), 206-209.Annie Roth (AnnieRoth_AtSea) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here.Header image: Chrysops fly. Courtesy of PX Here.center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Chilean band Newen Afrobeat sings of a future it hopes to see

first_imgActivism, Archive, Arts, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Interviews Article published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Santiago, Chile-based band Newen Afrobeat’s songs are infused with themes to do with ecology, indigenous and women’s rights, and cultural understanding.Heavily influenced by Afrobeat, the musical style made famous by Nigeria’s Fela Kuti, Newen is fronted by a powerful trio of women singer/songwriters.Mongabay interviewed percussionist and Newen co-founder Tomas Pavez from his home in Santiago. The music of the Chilean band Newen Afrobeat is a vibrant mix of musical cultures, an energetic take on the Afrobeat musical style made famous by Nigerian star Fela Kuti with a Chilean sensibility that’s supported by a large horn section and an array of percussionists.The group has collaborated with members of Kuti’s extended family and toured around the Americas, with a recent highlight being a “stunning” set at this summer’s Montreal International Jazz Festival, as noted in a wide ranging interview with award-winning National Public Radio show Afropop Worldwide.Their three albums released to date celebrate the environment, indigenous rights, women’s empowerment, and multiculturalism with incredible energy, soaring vocals, and tight musical direction, which piqued the interest of Mongabay, so we reached out to percussionist Tomás Pavez to learn more.Pavez was born in Santiago, Chile, in 1987. A self-taught musician, he plays clave (jam blocks, wood blocks, and cowbell), Kpalongo-style Nigerian drums, and shekere. A co-founder of the band with Chilean composer/singer Nicolas Urbina in 2009, he has seen the band develop into the inspired unit we see today.The band enjoys shooting videos in nature and is known for costumery that’s both symbolic and whimsical, both in videos and on stage. Still image from video for Newen Afrobeat’s song Cantaros. Screenshot from Cantaros music video by Alejandro Espinoza and Marcela Toledo.Mongabay: You combine influences like Fela Kuti and Afrobeat with your Chilean sound and style, why is that cultural celebration important?Tomás Pavez: It is so important because of the times we are currently living in, where everything merges. We have to carefully embrace culture as a whole rather than creating separation. Things happening in Chile are not in reality apart from what essentially goes on in the rest of the world.Indigenous peoples and their struggle for rights are referenced in songs like Chaltumay, whose video was made at a historic conflict zone between the Mapuche people and the Chilean government. Why?Yes indeed, it is an ongoing struggle since colonial times. Back then it was about Spaniards conquering the land, nowadays it’s about territorial and cultural respect, so traditions aren’t lost because of private interests overtaking beautiful landscapes, as featured in the Chaltumay video.Chileufú eternal river land of poets / this land breathes ancestral wisdom / by force of hand and rifle / they snatch these territories / According to supposed favorable agreements / For whom? we asked / And why? / When did ambition devour the root?How has the Chilean State treated the Mapuche?They don’t recognize limits, and sacred lands where families have lived through centuries are taken away to make way for hydroelectric dams or logging companies.Why does Newen Afrobeat talk about ecology in its music?We see nature as a getaway from the fast city life, we really need it as a connection to our roots and as a reminder that we have to be awake to make changes for a better quality of life.Why did you personally become interested in the environment?When I was little I always liked to go hiking with my father, and as I grew up I got to appreciate nature more by learning how to grow food, learning about plants and their needs as living beings.The song Cántaros is a celebration of feminine energy and water as a life-giving element. Why was the video recorded by the dry Copiapó River?There is an environmental issue with the Copiapó River. The mining business is a big thing throughout Chile, mostly in the north, but it needs too much water. So this river is starting to dry up.We are pitchers that sing / we are crock pitchers that dazzle / mammalian fireflies, biological nature / Little ivory light that dances with the moon / magic goldfish of fresh and pure water / fertile garden rose / seed that gives life / Blood delirious with passion / trace of rebellionOther themes in your music are equality, migration, and women’s empowerment. Are your fans supportive of these issues?Yes they are, it’s the reality around the world. Everyone has a right to live without feeling discriminated against, and women have always fought for better and equal conditions. Sharing knowledge of this is [about] revolution.Do activists use your music to raise awareness?Some do give recognition to certain song lyrics, and most people like very much our first album’s opening audio track, where José ‘Pepe’ Mujica, the former president of Uruguay, talks about having a futurist outlook on our actual human conditions.What are other important themes of your music?Taking a good look at us as human race, recognizing what the past has taught us, so we do not keep doing the same things over and over.See more videos at Newen Afrobeat’s Youtube channel and hear more music at their Bandcamp page. Tomás Pavez, percussionist with Newen Afrobeat. Image courtesy of Leonardo Benavente.Banner image: the band during shooting of the Chaltumay video, image by Alejandro Espinoza and Marcela Toledo.last_img read more

New Rules Prevent Undue Delays in Settling Labor Disputes

first_imgThe Ministry of Labor has instituted stringent measures aimed at protecting employers and employees at workplaces across the country.According to a statement issued by the entity’s Director of Communications J. Kortu Nyandibo, quoting Minister Neto Z. Lighe, the new guidelines, named; ‘Regulation 19’ is intended to “facilitate the speedy and expeditious disposition of all Labor actions filed before it.”The move is to afford the Ministry the opportunity to quickly arrest labor related matters, arising from workplaces.“Pursuant to Section 34.2(a) of the Executive Law which empowers and authorizes the Ministry to regulate and set guidelines for the protection of the rights of both employees and employers in the country, and in conformity with Section 4302 (3) of Chapter 42 of the Labor Practices Law of Liberia, the ministry announces the regulation setting forth the timing and duration of labor hearings,” Lighe declared.Providing details about the new rules, the Labor boss said Section 1 of Regulation 19 specifies and mandates that “all Labor hearings at the Ministry of Labor shall be concluded in a minimum of two months and the maximum of six months.’’“All hearing officers are mandated in the spirit of speedy and expeditious disposition of Labor actions or disputes, to declare null and void, all cases pending before the Ministry of Labor and which the parties litigant and/or their counsels have failed to proceed or continue after 120 days, for abandonment and failure to proceed.“Section 2 also assures that this mandate is in keeping with Article II Section 9 of Appendix No. 3 of the Labor Law and Labor Practices Law of Liberia,” he said.According to Lighe, pronouncement of this regulation becomes imperative owing to the increased number of protracted cases on the docket of hearing officers at the Division of Labor Standards.  It therefore is deemed expedient to guide against undue delays in handling labor disputes.It is in the same spirit and intent of speedy and timely investigation of labor cases that the question of default judgment was raised and regulated in several labor related laws introduced by the government of Liberia, said Lighe.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more