Chrysler recalls 48000 Pacifica minivans for suspension separation

first_img Chrysler Share your voice Enlarge ImageAffected owners will be notified by mail in April. Chrysler Occasionally, an automaker initiates a recall because it discovered a problem during routine inspections. Other times, a recall can come about because of reports from vehicles already in the field. Chrysler’s latest recall stems from the latter.Chrysler has issued a recall for approximately 48,000 examples of the 2018 Chrysler Pacifica minivan. The vehicles in question were all built at the Windsor Assembly Plant in Canada between Nov. 1, 2017 and Feb. 28, 2018, and that build range coincides with an increase in warranty claims for “buzz, squeak and rattle” related to the defect that spurred the recall.The problem stems from the suspension system. According to Chrysler’s recall documents, “a combination of loss of clamp load and inadequate joint engagement” might cause the right front lower control arm to come loose from the steering knuckle. If this happens, the driver might lose directional control of the vehicle, which can increase the risk of a crash.Chrysler discovered the problem after receiving a field report of this part separation, after which point it launched an investigation to determine what was happening. As of Feb. 18, the automaker says it is not aware of any accidents or injuries related to the issue. The automaker already has a remedy in place. After returning the recalled vehicles to dealerships, Chrysler technicians will inspect the right front steering knuckle and lower control arm, and the parts will be replaced as needed. Technicians will also install a larger pinch bolt. As with every recall fix, it will be performed free of charge, and the automaker will reimburse owners who paid for a repair prior to the recall announcement. Post a comment 74 Photos 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon: Holy hell Car Industry Minivans Tagscenter_img 0 2019 Dodge Durango SRT review: Three-row muscle car Plug in to Roadshow’s new long-term Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid Chrysler Recalls 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid: First hybrid minivan wins on fuel economy More From Roadshowlast_img read more

EU announces legal entity to keep up business with Iran

first_imgMinisters and officials including Iran’s foreign minister Javad Zarif arrive for a family picture after the last plenary session at the United Nations building in Vienna. Photo: ReutersThe European Union said Monday its members would set up a payment system to allow oil companies and businesses to continue trading with Iran in a bid to evade sanctions after the US withdrew from a nuclear agreement.Iran and the European Union announced their defiance towards US president Donald Trump’s administration after high-level talks at the United Nations among the remaining members of the accord.The countries said in a statement that they were determined “to protect the freedom of their economic operators to pursue legitimate business with Iran.”With the United States and the dollar dominating so much of global trade, the statement said the new mechanism would “facilitate payments related to Iran’s exports (including oil) and imports, which will assist and reassure economic operators pursuing legitimate business with Iran.”EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, speaking at the United Nations alongside Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, said the countries were still working out the technical details.”In practical terms, this will mean that EU member states will set up a legal entity to facilitate legitimate financial transactions with Iran and this will allow European companies to continue to trade with Iran in accordance with European Union law and could be open to other partners in the world,” she told reporters.She said that the remaining members of the so-called Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action — Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia — would also maintain their commitments to support Iran on civilian nuclear energy.”The participants recalled that these initiatives are aimed at preserving the JCPOA, which is in the international interest,” she said.Pressure on Iranian economyIn line with findings of UN inspectors, Mogherini reiterated that Iran has been in compliance with the nuclear agreement — under which Tehran drastically scaled back its nuclear program in exchange for relief from sanctions.The agreement was sealed in 2015 in a signature achievement for then US president Barack Obama.Trump pulled out of the agreement in May, describing it as a “disaster” and quickly moving to reimpose sanctions on Iran.Despite the protests of the European Union, a number of business including French energy giant Total and carmakers Peugeot and Renault as well as Germany’s Siemens and Daimler have already suspended operations in Iran for fear of triggering US sanctions.With Iran’s economy already feeling the pinch, US national security adviser John Bolton earlier Monday vowed to impose “maximum pressure” on Tehran, while insisting that Washington was not pushing for regime change.US Arab allies Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates as well as Israel have long sought for Washington to work to curtail non-Arab and predominantly Shiite Muslim Iran’s influence in the Middle East, including in war-torn Syria.The EU move comes a day before Trump and Iranian president Hassan Rouhani separately address the UN General Assembly, with the US leader expected to take a hard line on Iran.last_img read more

Go Go Gadget

2 min read How Success Happens Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. This story appears in the October 2006 issue of Entrepreneurs StartUps Magazine. Subscribe » October 10, 2006 We may or may not want to admit it, but many of us are addicted to technology. So what tools can’t entrepreneurs live without?”I take it everywhere,” says Donna Childs, 39, of her Hewlett-Packard tablet PC. As the founder of Childs Capital LLC, a Wall Street firm that seeks to alleviate poverty in developing nations by investing in private enterprise, her business trips take her around the world, from Africa to Latin America. “I detach the screen to take notes when I’m in the field or in meetings,” Childs says. “It’s great for portability.”Josh Kerr’s Palm Treo allows him to work as if he were in the office, whether he’s “on vacation, at an off-site client meeting or anywhere I get a cell phone signal,” says Kerr, 32. The founder of Ideal Science, an Austin, Texas, software developer, says his Treo helps him stay in touch while he’s on the go.Rich Rivaux, 33, knows what that means. He’s the founder of Intersec Tactical, a military and police equipment store in Galveston, Texas. While deployed in Honduras, Rivaux, a member of the Army Reserve, continued running his business with the help of his Innoport virtual phone system, which allowed him to receive faxes and voice mails via e-mail. “Automation is a must,” Rivaux says. “The more you automate, the less hassle you have to deal with.” Listen Now read more

Should You Be Worried About Apple Having Your Fingerprints

first_img Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. What will Apple do with your fingerprints?It is a uniquely modern question prompted by the dovetailing of Apple’s new technology, which uses a fingerprint-based Touch ID to unlock the latest iPhone, and the heightened focus on government intrusion and surveillance of emails and communications, as demonstrated by the National Security Agency scandal.Apple’s iPhones can read fingerprints. Presumably, somewhere, somehow, that information is stored – perhaps just on the phone itself. Apple itself is saying the right things, pointing out that individual fingerprint data is encrypted and kept “inside a secure enclave.”But there are a few reasons to worry. To wit:1. Does anyone trust encryption anymore?Time was, saying something was encrypted gave an added dose of safety. But the joint report by ProPublica, The Guardian and The New York Times suggested the NSA found a way around that issue. “For the past decade, N.S.A. has led an aggressive, multipronged effort to break widely used Internet encryption technologies,” said a 2010 memo describing a briefing about the NSA for the United Kingdom’s Government Communications Headquarters “Cryptanalytic capabilities are now coming online. Vast amounts of encrypted Internet data which have up till now been discarded are now exploitable.”So, saying something is encrypted now doesn’t mean it’s not accessible, just a little harder to unlock. And still, in the government’s own words, “exploitable.”Related: Cybersecurity Basics: Surf the Web Safely With These Browsers2. Will the iCloud be next?Apple is saying that fingerprint data won’t be accessible to the iCloud, but we aren’t too far away from the technology being more widespread. A fingerprint, after all, replaces a password. While fingerprints could be locally stored on a phone, it doesn’t take a big intellectual leap to see that biometric data captured in a larger, more global database.Such a database is vulnerable. Apple itself is one of the companies that was a feeder for the government’s PRISM program. That program mined chats, emails, photos and documents. Now, presumably, there will be a biometric database to tap.3. Fingerprints aren’t as unique as you think.You might think it doesn’t matter that someone has your fingerprints. After all, if you travel, you’re used to giving a print, banking uses the technology and many kids still get fingerprinted for safety. What’s the problem, you might argue, if your prints could be matched to a government database. It’s not like you’re committing a crime.Truth is, science has yet to prove that fingerprints are unique. In fact, even fingerprint matches in criminology are less about exactness than about a pattern of similarities. In the case of the new iPhone, that could mean someone with similar prints might be able to open your phone. Down the line, though, it could mean that your prints turn up wrongly in an investigation. That could happen now, given the government’s own database of fingerprints. But the chances rise the more print information is stored and available.Related: How to Avoid Getting Hacked (Infographic)4. There is already too much information about you out there.Databases are filled with information that is less quantitative and more qualitative. Apple has your fingerprints, but Facebook has your face, and its database of facial recognition data that presumably can be used to match you to, say, a video camera somewhere.Perhaps fingerprints won’t go the way of all the other data about you. Perhaps there is nothing to worry about, and folks can focus on other technologies, like the 64-bit speed, new case and different colors of the new iPhone.But the world has changed. Time was, you needed to protect your credit card and Social Security numbers. Now your fingerprints are at someone else’s fingertips. That’s reason to pause.Related: Web Startup Sniffs Out E-Commerce Fraud Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globalcenter_img September 10, 2013 4 min readlast_img read more