Asian elephants gang up in a bid to survive an increasingly human world

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, Research Adolescent elephants in south India are adapting to human-dominated landscapes, probably to learn from older bulls how not to get killed by people.These unusual associations, which can last for several years, were not recorded 20 years ago.Researchers say it’s important to use this information to mitigate human-elephant conflict, including by not removing old bulls that don’t raid crops, which can pass down this behavior to young elephants. Matriarch grandmas, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews: elephants, much like us, have complex social lives. But Asian elephants in southern India could be changing their social lives just to adapt to human-use landscapes that are fast replacing their natural habitats.Young male elephants, which are typically solitary, are now forming unusually large, and more long-term, all-male herds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports last week. This adaptation could be an effort to learn the ropes from older, more knowledgeable males on how to avoid getting killed in these areas that pose unnaturally high risks to elephants.To elephants, human-dominated areas near forests, such as agricultural fields that often replace natural forests and connect one fragmented forest with another, are much like supermarkets: there is always abundant food to choose from. And if you’re a hungry, fast-growing, young male elephant, there’s nothing like feasting on cultivated crops (cereals like paddy and millets are far higher in nutrients such as protein, calcium and sodium than forest fare such as wild grasses) to boost growth and health, both of which are important requisites to attain mates.Social interaction between younger and older male elephants. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Big risks, big gainsBut the risks an elephant has to run if it ventures into human-dominated areas are many: stress and physical injuries caused when people chase elephants away from crops, capture of “problem elephants,” as well as deaths due to retaliation, electrocution, train accidents and poaching. But though the risks are high, so are the gains. A study in northern Karnataka state, for instance, found that crop-based diets are so rich that they even lower the stress levels of crop-foraging elephants.Wildlife biologist Nishant Srinivasaiah would often spot such elephant herds moving across human-use areas, including farmland, near his long-term study site in Karnataka’s Bannerghatta National Park. His interest in elephant behavior even got him analyzing YouTube videos of human-elephant interactions from the region. That’s when he noticed something unusual: some of the elephant groups were comprised only or mostly of males.“Why were male elephants moving across human-use areas?” Srinivasaiah wondered. “Where were they going? But there were other individual males who stayed largely within the forest.“This got me interested in digging deeper into the individual idiosyncrasies and decision-making in male elephants in the landscape in general and their sociality,” he said.To find out if environmental factors such as habitat contiguity and human presence influenced the sociality of male Asian elephants (whether an individual preferred to be alone or in a group), Srinivasaiah and his colleagues first identified an approximately 10,000-square-kilometre (3,900-square-mile) landscape that included protected areas (Bannerghatta National Park, Cauvery and Cauvery North wildlife sanctuaries), reserve forests, human settlements and agricultural land across southern Karnataka and northern Tamil Nadu.Field surveys and information from forest guards helped the team short-list areas that both people and elephants used, to install camera traps. Of the 20,124 photographs of elephants they obtained between February 2016 and December 2017 from these camera traps, the team identified individual elephants from 1,430 photos and categorized them into three groups: mixed-sex groups (containing male and female elephants), all-male groups, and solitary males. The team then categorized each of the 248 male elephants they identified from these groups into age classes. Age correlates with sexual maturity, so the team could also classify every male as either a juvenile (less than 10 years old and sexually immature), adolescent or sexually mature but socially immature (10 to 20 years), or mature (both sexually and socially mature, more than 20 years of age).Recent long-term associationsAs expected, the photographs revealed that juvenile males were spotted mostly in mixed-sex groups; male elephants continue to stay in the herd they are born into until they hit adolescence. The results also revealed that in forest habitats, male elephants tended to become increasingly solitary with age. Male bulls were, therefore, mostly solitary. But adolescents were either solitary or in all-male groups, in equal proportions. These males were most likely to be part of all-male groups and grouped with other males in large herds of up to 12 elephants, almost exclusively in croplands also containing isolated forest patches — a sign that these recent all-male groups could be there in response to environmental factors.These all-male groups also stuck together for an unusually long time. While it’s common for some males to team up with others for a single season or a few weeks, these new all-male groups lasted for “a few years,” according to the authors. Interestingly, studies conducted in the same region more than two decades earlier don’t mention such large and stable all-male groups at all, the authors add.These male elephants forming long-term associations is more than just co-occurrence or grouping by chance, says Srinivasaiah. One possibility is “social buffering,” where the social support system derived from being part of a group can help “buffer” or reduce stress. While social buffering is a known phenomenon among elephants, there could be another reason these adolescent male elephants are grouping together, Srinivasaiah said.“These elephants need to learn to utilize the novel landscape efficiently and to avoid getting killed,” he said. “Hence, associating with older, more knowledgeable and experienced males is a strategy used by some of the younger males to survive and persist in high-risk landscapes. Otherwise, they would have had to do the same through trial and error, which could be costly.”The establishment of these all-male groups in response to anthropogenic factors, thereby modifying their own sociality, is an important finding that suggests not just how adaptable elephants are, but also how human influence is changing the natural life around us, Srinivasaiah said.Anthropocene woesWidespread habitat loss is one of the hallmarks of the Anthropocene, the geological age defined by pervasive human influence on the natural world. If elephant home ranges within forests continue to be taken over for non-forest activities, the animals will have to adapt to the change or perish, Srinivasaiah said.“Elephants are survivors, hence most often they will choose alternative ways to persist; and feeding from crop fields even if it’s risky cannot be discounted,” he said.Elephants are arguably one of the most adaptive of mammalian species, and their social behavior may vary depending on environmental conditions, says Prithiviraj Fernando, trustee of the Centre for Conservation and Research in Sri Lanka, who studies Asian elephants in the island nation and was not involved in the recent study in India.“For example in Sri Lanka, large all-male groups are observed primarily in areas with high resource availability,” he said.This study is one of the first to focus on male Asian elephant sociality and how it varies in relation to habitat conditions, he wrote in an email to Mongabay. “Conducting studies similar in other parts of the range would help determine whether the patterns observed by Srinivasaiah and his colleagues are unique to their study area or characteristic of Asian elephants everywhere,” Fernando said.A solitary adolescent male elephant caught on camera trap at night within forested habitat. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Mitigating conflictAccording to the authors of the study, it’s “imperative that future attention is focused on the management and conservation of [these] young dispersing males” to mitigate the potential for increased human-elephant conflicts in agricultural landscapes.“Young dispersing males are very impressionable and if associated with non-crop foraging older bulls, will not learn crop-foraging behavior or can even unlearn it,” Srinivasaiah said. Mitigation measures such as capturing key individuals within a bull group may therefore backfire, he said, as these older and experienced bulls are essential in a male elephant society to help guide the younger bulls and also discipline them when moving across villages, thus keeping conflict to a minimum.“The key to living with elephants may lie in understanding their social complexity and harnessing this new found knowledge to learn how to modify our own lifestyle practices to make them more compatible with the elephants’ use of an area, and be more flexible in our own approaches and behavior towards elephants,” Srinivasaiah said.Citations:Srinivasaiah, N., Kumar, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Sukumar, R., & Sinha, A. (2019). All-male groups in Asian elephants: A novel, adaptive social strategy in increasingly anthropogenic landscapes of southern India. Scientific Reports, 9(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45130-1Sukumar, R. (1990). Ecology of the Asian elephant in southern India. II. Feeding habits and crop raiding patterns. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 6(1), 33-53. doi:10.1017/s0266467400004004Pokharel, S. S., Singh, B., Seshagiri, P. B., & Sukumar, R. (2018). Lower levels of glucocorticoids in crop‐raiders: Diet quality as a potential ‘pacifier’ against stress in free‐ranging Asian elephants in a human‐production habitat. Animal Conservation, 22(2), 177-188. doi:10.1111/acv.12450Banner image of an all-male elephant group moving toward a banana plantation on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India, courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.center_img Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

Hornbill heroes: A conversation with a top Indonesian bird conservation NGO

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler With their ostentatious bills, raucous calls, and unusual behavioral traits, hornbills are arguably one of the most charismatic groups of birds in the tropics. No country is home to more species than Indonesia, which has 13.Hornbills in Indonesia are particularly under threat due to habitat destruction. Some species are also targeted by the wildlife trade, including, most notably, the helmeted hornbill, whose dense casque is made up of “hornbill ivory” that’s highly sought in China.Until very recently, the decline in hornbill populations in Indonesia has been relatively under-appreciated. But that changed in 2013 when Yokyok “Yoki” Hadiprakarsa, founder of Rangkong Indonesia, published a report estimating that the wildlife trade killed 500 helmeted hornbills a month in West Kalimantan alone.In June 2019, Mongabay interviewed Yoki Hadiprakarsa and Dian Hardiyanti from Rangkong Indonesia about their work to protect hornbills in Indonesia. With their ostentatious bills, often colorful plumage, raucous calls, and unusual behavioral traits, hornbills are arguably one of the most charismatic groups of birds in the tropics. While hornbills are found widely across tropical Africa and Asia-Pacific, no country is home to more species than Indonesia, which has 13. Within Indonesia, Sumatra leads the way with 9 species, followed by Kalimantan.Hornbills in Indonesia are particularly under threat due to habitat destruction. Vast areas of rainforest have been cleared for plantations and agriculture, while many of the forests that remain have been impacted by logging, which often focuses on trees hornbills depend upon for food and shelter. Some species are also targeted by the wildlife trade, including most notably, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil), whose dense casque (a showy protrusion atop the animal’s bill) is made up of “hornbill ivory” that’s highly sought in China.Rhinoceros hornbill in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.The loss of hornbills is having real and significant impacts on Asian forests, since hornbills are critically important seed dispersers. When they are extirpated from a forest, that ecosystem’s ecological function is degraded.Until very recently, the decline in hornbill populations in Indonesia was relatively under-appreciated. But that changed in 2013 when Yokyok “Yoki” Hadiprakarsa, founder of the Indonesian Hornbill Conservation Society, better known in Indonesian as Rangkong Indonesia, published a report estimating that the wildlife trade killed 500 helmeted hornbills a month in West Kalimantan alone. That finding shocked NGOs and the Indonesian government into action.Today, Rankong Indonesia is recognized as one of the leading organizations working on hornbill conservation in Indonesia. In a recent visit to Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan, Mongabay had an opportunity to travel with Dian Hardiyanti of Rangkong Indonesia to one of the group’s projects with the Dayak Iban community of Sungai Utik. After the visit, Mongabay also spoke with Rangkong Indonesia founder Yoki Hadiprakarsa. Below is an interview with the two hornbill conservationists.Dian Hardiyanti. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia.AN INTERVIEW WITH DIAN HARDIYANTI and YOKYOK HADIPRAKARSAMongabay: What is your background and how did you come to work with hornbills?Dian: My educational background is Bachelor of Science at Pakuan University, Bogor. My passion for conservation led me to do research on the illegal turtle trade for my final thesis. After finishing my studies, I met Yoki and he invited me to join a very ambitious hornbill research project: a hornbills’ population assessment in a district located in Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. I thought it would be a valuable opportunity to improve my understanding and expand my knowledge as a researcher and conservationist.Sunda wrinkled hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanWreathed hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahYoki: I have a passion for nature, that is why I took a wildlife biologist as my life path. In 1999, I received a research scholarship from Wildlife Conservation Society – Indonesia Program (WCS-IP) to spent a whole year to finishing my undergraduate research on hornbills in Way Canguk Research Station in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Sumatra. In the same year, I also initiated long-term hornbill monitoring there, which led me to be hired by WCS-IP as a junior wildlife biologist. After graduating in 2000 I had a great opportunity to present my first hornbill research in the 3rd International Hornbill Conference (IHC) in Thailand. This became a milestone because the experience exposed and introduced me the international hornbill community.In the early years of my professional career, I spent most of the time in the research station monitoring hornbill population and breeding. In 2004 I had a special opportunity to conduct province-wide hornbill survey in Southern Sumatra. Later, this research was used for my graduate work at the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia in the United States.For the 4th International Hornbill Conference in South Africa, I was appointed as co-chairman for the Asian Hornbill Network. As for now, I’m a member of the Steering Committee of the IUCN-SSC Hornbill Specialist Group and Research Coordinator for Helmeted Hornbill Working Group. At the national level, I was recently appointed as Chairman of the National Partnership for Indonesia Hornbill Conservation.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia / Nanang Sujana.Rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: What do you do? What does a day look like?Dian: I’m a research officer at Rangkong Indonesia. I focus on hornbill research in Kapuas Hulu District. Every month, we visit villages and forests to do interviews with local people. We ask villagers about their perspective on hornbills, like do they have local wisdom about hornbills, have they ever hunted a hornbill in the past, do they have customary laws to protect hornbills, do they use hornbill body parts for traditional ceremonies, and how they get hornbills from the wild. In general, the Dayak tribe has a strong relationship with hornbills, because hornbills were being used for customary needs and figures prominently in their mythology as a symbol of courage.On each visit we also spend 10 days in the forest to conduct a hornbill population survey, which cover eight hornbill species. We mark where we find hornbills and hornbill nests. We analyze whether the quality of habitat for hornbills, including the prevalence of trees important for their diets.In general, hornbills are very important for traditional Dayak culture.Helmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki HadiprakarsaHelmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki HadiprakarsaYoki: During my undergraduate research, I found hornbill conservation in Indonesia is lacking in many aspects, despite the fact that we have the richest hornbill assemblage with 13 species and the largest habitat for hornbills in Asia. For example, in a literature search I found only 40 scientific publications over four decades related to Indonesian hornbills. Most of this research was conducted by foreigners and there were no integrative conservation actions for Indonesian hornbills. It was a bitter finding that encouraged me to persistently work with the hornbills.Since then, I have taken every opportunity to work with hornbills, whether I had support or not. In 2009 I launched the Indonesian Hornbill Information Center website (Rumah Informasi Rangkong Indonesia – RIRI, in Bahasa). The idea was simple: provide any information on hornbills, both popular and scientific. I was also collecting information on hornbill sightings and scientific publications on hornbills. For this, I didn’t get any support, since it is difficult to get financial support for non-celebrity species like hornbills. Later, I also started using all mainstream social media along with the website.After returned from the U.S., I spent most of my professional career working with numerous development agencies on projects related to biodiversity and conservation. I also worked independently on sustainability-related issues on various concessions from mining to palm oil. During this period, I witnessed the beginning of the helmeted hornbill crisis and, with the generous support from Chester Zoo Conservation Fund, decided to conduct the first investigation on the issue. Those findings about the extent of the crisis shocked the world.Since then, I decided to establish Indonesia Hornbill Conservation Society/Rangkong Indonesia as part of a research unit in the Rekam Nusantara Foundation, which we established with Ridzki and four other colleagues. Afterward, I tried to advocate at the national and global level to persuade people to take action on the Helmeted hornbill crisis. Luckily this worked and policies have been put into place at both the international and national levels. These changes have impacted both directly and indirectly sources of threat: hunting and illegal trade.How? Well, today most famous big international conservation NGOs have prioritized the helmeted hornbill. The Indonesian government has launched a national conservation action plan for the next 10 years (2018 – 2028). This action plan is paramount for the government to allocate more budget and direct its partners to implement the plan. For assurance, the government established a National Partnership for Indonesian Hornbill Conservation, not just for helmeted hornbill.From a global perspective, the Global Conservation Action Plan is also in place and range state countries, as well as NGOs, have also prioritized hornbill conservation.I’m quite happy with these outcomes, which builds momentum on top of our earlier work. With Rangkong Indonesia and Rekam Nusantara Foundation, we are going always work on the frontline for Indonesia hornbill conservation.Yoki Hadiprakarsa in the field. Courtesy of Rangkong-Indonesia / Nanang Sujana.Sunda wrinkled hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus corrugatus). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanMongabay: Can you give more more specifics on your initiatives?Yoki: The helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) is the most hunted hornbills for its unique solid casque. In 2013, we found at least 6,000 birds were being killed by opportunistic or organized poacher groups across West Kalimantan alone. Many of the hunters live in the area where the Helmeted hornbill occurs and killed the birds for their daily survival. This is a bitter fact that we are facing.However, there are many success stories of beneficial relationships between people and birds through birdwatching tourism that gives people income while ensuring that the birds thrive. We strongly believe these communities have a great potential to be a conservation frontline for guarding hornbills. This idea is possible if there is an economic relationship between birds and communities without killing the birds.Three years ago, we initiated a hornbill guardian project in collaboration with Nature Conservation Foundation, India funded by the Whitley-Segré Conservation Fund. This project has laid the foundation for a hornbill guardian program with the Sungai Utik people and beyond. Such initiative will be the first in Indonesia.Oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: What have been some of the key findings of your work?Dian: We found helmeted hornbills are getting harder to find, even in the remote forest areas, which might be a full two days travel by boat. It’s surely the result of hunting and habitat loss. The best potential habitat for hornbills is still primary forest, but we find the best hornbill population in hutan desa (community forest). My hypothesis is that traditional people protect the forest. For example, when they go out hunting, they are also monitoring the forest.In the cultural context, hornbill is used in many traditional rituals, such as welcome dances for guests among the Iban and Punan tribes as well as wedding and birth ceremonies in Dayak Pangin and Dayak Punan.Dayak Punan and Iban communities have customary laws built around a mythology that hornbills are their heroes or gods. For example, there is a belief that if you hear a rhinoceros hornbill calling during tribal conflict, you follow the call because it will lead you to a safe place.Dayak culture is very closely tied to hornbills. Therefore if they let go hornbills go extinct, they will lose their culture.Yoki: At a species level, my studies found that hunting is seriously impacting the helmeted hornbill population in the wild. In some areas, helmeted hornbills have been extirpated due to the deadly combination of hunting and habitat loss, e.g Kutai National Park. Sadly, our ongoing project found that hunting is still occurring, despite a drastic fall in the population and increased law enforcement. Why is this still happening? The demand still out there! Including some indication of demand for live birds!At a local level, I’ve found that communities have great potential to benefit from the presence of hornbills via bird ecotourism.Rhinoceros hornbill (Buceros rhinoceros). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Aryf RahmanMongabay: In general, is the public very much aware of the status of hornbills?Dian: The general public isn’t that familiar with hornbills. Due to educational materials we have in school, they are more likely to know species from other countries than native fauna. People are often surprised to learn that hornbills are endangered.Even in public spaces, the authorities often make mistakes or misunderstand between hornbill species. Our role is to educate them about hornbills and their status in the wild. We are doing campaigns and awareness-raising in several villages and visiting schools.Yoki: At the global level, knowledge on Indonesian hornbills is still surprisingly lacking. Even mainstream media still confuse hornbills with toucans and make other mistakes like using the wrong name for species, let alone understanding their protection status. However thanks to social media, public awareness on hornbills is growing.The global wildlife conservation paradigm must be changed to to support non-celebrity or less-known species which face serious threats.Indonesian hornbills are one of our greatest biodiversity treasures. Their ecological function of nurturing our vast tropical rainforest is irreplaceable. Indonesians should be proud that we have them in our lives, now and in the future to come.Oriental pied hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris). Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Riki RahmansyahMongabay: Do you have advice for anyone wanting to pursue a career in conservation in Indonesia?Dian: Very few people in Indonesia work in conservation. People often think it’s hard, low paid, and requires going to remote areas that are seemingly dangerous. But, if are passionate and work hard, you will cope with all the challenges and find opportunities. If you’re going into conservation research as a career, you need to be serious, patient, and curious. If you’re a life-long learner, a career in conservation can be very rewarding.Banner image: A fresh helmeted hornbill head. Photo by Rangkong Indonesia / Yoki Hadiprakarsacenter_img Animals, Archive, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Illegal Trade, Indigenous Communities, Interviews, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

How many fires are burning in the Amazon?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, wildfires center_img The fires raging in the Amazon are nearly double over last year, but remain moderate in the historical context.The 41,858 fires recorded in the Amazon as of Aug. 24 this year are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when deforestation rates were very much higher.However, this year’s numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires.The hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have focused worldwide attention on the soaring deforestation rates in the Amazon as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. While fires burning in the Amazon have garnered worldwide attention due to last week’s midday “blackout” in urban São Paulo, more than 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) from the Amazon, analysis of historical data suggests the fires are well within the historical range of the past 20 years.Mongabay’s analysis of data from Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) shows that the number of fire hotspots recorded this year in the Amazon biome total 41,858 through Aug. 24, an increase of 89 percent over the end of August 2018, with still a week to go in in the month. (If August keeps its current pace, Amazônia will tally nearly 50,000 fires by the end of the month.)Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.The 41,858 fires recorded so far this year in the Brazilian Amazon are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when fire hotspots regularly topped 60,000 through this point in the year. Over the past 20 years, 2005 — a year of severe El Niño-induced drought — holds the record of 94,780 fires through August. 2019 currently stands roughly 4 percent above the 20-year average and is on pace to end the month at around 50,000 fires, or 19 percent above average.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.The situation is similar in the Cerrado, a woody, savanna-like biome that lies east and south of the Amazon. Through Aug. 24, 23,322 fires had been recorded there, which is slightly less than the 20-year average for this point in the year.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.In terms of the extent of burning, INPE releases data on a monthly basis, so Mongabay could only look at numbers through the end of July, before the recent surge in fires. With 18,629 square kilometers (7,193 square miles) burned through July in Amazônia, 2019 was 62 percent higher than 2018, but below the 2016 figure.Area burned in the Brazilian Amazon through July each year since 2002. Data from INPE.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Trailing 12-month moving average of the area burned per biome in Brazil since 2002. Data from INPE.An important caveatThese numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires. This is a significant limitation because the area affected by sub-canopy fires that burn into intact and otherwise healthy forests can be quite substantial: a 2013 NASA study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B found that understory fires burn a larger extent of forest than the area deforested for agriculture and cattle pasture.And these fires do long-term damage to the rainforest, setting the stage for more destructive fires, forest die-off, and eventual deforestation. Long-running research initiated by scientist Daniel Nepstad when he worked at the Woods Hole Research Institute, found that forests that have previously been burned are twice as likely to be deforested as unburned forests.Nepstad, now the head of the Earth Innovation Institute, explained the context of the current situation in a blog post.“Satellites do NOT detect most fires that are burning beneath the canopy of standing forests. And it is these low fires, that rarely reach the knee, that do the most damage, burning slowly across the forest floor, killing giant trees with thin bark,” he writes. “Once these trees die, they fall to the ground, opening up huge gaps in the forest canopy that allow more sunlight to reach the forest floor, drying the fuel layer and making the forest more prone to further burning.”Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. According to Greenpeace’s research, 75 percent of the 23,006 hot spots the group recorded in the Amazon in the first 20 days of August occurred in areas were forest in 2017. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Nepstad notes that we don’t yet have a good understanding of the damage from the current burning season, but there is plenty to worry about based on preliminary evidence. For example, the fires are more persistent than in recent years, indicating that they are burning hotter, meaning they are burning more than pasture and dry scrub. And there’s lots of smoke.“We do not know with confidence how the area of fire compares with previous years, [but] it is important to bear in mind that the fire season has just begun, with most fires occurring from September to December,” he writes. “With forecasts of a long dry season, the number of fires could continue to be greater than usual.“We also know that it is a particularly smoky burning season. This is probably related to the large number of ‘deforestation fires’ — fires set to burn patches of forest that have been felled to make way for cattle pasture or crop fields. The smoke released from a fire that burns a hectare of felled forest releases far more smoke than a fire that burns a hectare of degraded pastureland. We do not know the area of standing forest that has burned. Forest fires, however, usually happen late in the dry season.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.While the current fires aren’t off the charts relative to the historical baseline, they are indeed concerning. But the silver lining to the crisis is that the hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have sparked worldwide attention to the soaring deforestation rates now occurring in the Amazon, as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. High-level political blowback from the EU, street protests, and pressure on Brazilian companies has forced Bolsonaro to backtrack on some of his most heated rhetoric from the past week and start to take action, including sending in the army to battle fires. Volunteer fire brigades formed by landowners, indigenous peoples and NGOs have already been battling the fires for weeks.Cumulative deforestation through July for each year from 2008 according to INPE’s DETER system. Note that the chart switches from DETER to DETER-B in August 2016.According to INPE, deforestation in 2019 in the Brazilian is trending 57 percent ahead of last year through the end of July, the fastest rate of deforestation since 2008. Deforestation appears to be continuing at a high rate through August, but the picture is less transparent than usual because INPE has stopped releasing data publicly since Bolsonaro fired Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the head of the agency, at the beginning of the month.last_img read more

UN and policymakers, wake up! Burning trees for energy is not carbon neutral (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, Alternative Energy, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Footprint, Carbon Negative Bioenergy, Carbon Sequestration, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Controversial, Emission Reduction, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, International Trade, Law, Monitoring, Plantations, Pollution, Renewable Energy, Research, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Trade, United Nations On September 23, the signatories of the Paris Climate Agreement will gather at the United Nations for a Climate Action Summit to step up their carbon reduction pledges in order to prevent catastrophic climate change, while also kicking off Climate Week events in New York City.However, the policymakers, financiers, and big green groups organizing these events will almost certainly turn a blind eye toward renewable energy policies that subsidize forest wood burned for energy as if it is a zero emissions technology like wind or solar.Scientists have repeatedly warned that burning forests is not in fact carbon neutral, and that doing so puts the world at risk of overshooting the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C target.But that message has fallen on deaf ears, as lucrative renewable energy subsidies have driven exponential growth in use of forest wood as fuel. The world’s nations must stop subsidizing burning forest biomass now to protect forests, the climate, and our future. This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author. The handfuls of wood pellets and the green sleeves seen here are part of a biomass industry-supported PR campaign claiming that burning wood to produce energy is carbon neutral. But it isn’t. Photo credit: #ODF on Visual hunt / CC BY.We’ve all watched in helpless horror as the Amazon and other forests have burned in recent weeks. But there’s another, deliberate forest conflagration happening, ironically a result of climate policy — burning forest wood at power plants to generate “renewable” biomass energy.While burning wood is widely treated as “carbon neutral,” the physical reality is that burning wood emits more carbon pollution than coal per unit energy. You don’t need modeling to understand that while trees may be technically renewable, cutting and burning a forest emits carbon quickly, but re-growing forests sequesters carbon slowly. Even burning forestry “residues” — the leftovers from logging jobs — causes carbon emissions to spike.The science shows that to avoid catastrophic climate change we must protect and restore forests, not cut and burn them for energy, and that climate mitigation can’t wait the decades to centuries required to regrow forests cut for fuel. Yet in a display of stunning defiance of such a basic principle, policymakers worldwide continue to shovel billions of dollars in renewable energy subsidies into so-called “zero carbon” tree-burning power plants, which devour forests, decrease the forest carbon sink, and pollute the air.A special culprit is the European Union, which sets renewable energy policy rules for member states. Despite abundant evidence that the biomass and wood pellet industry is trashing forests and increasing carbon emissions, the EU re-upped their renewable energy policy last year to continue subsidizing forest biomass for heat and power.  It didn’t seem to matter that the EU received a crush of input from scientists and advocates, including their own science advisors, who warned:The legal mandate to record forest biomass-fired energy as contributing to the EU’s renewable energy targets has had the perverse effect of creating a demand for trees to be felled in Europe or elsewhere in order to burn them for energy, thus releasing the carbon into the atmosphere which would otherwise stay locked up in the forest, and simultaneously drastically reducing the carbon sink strength of the forest ecosystems… The potentially very long payback periods for forest biomass raise important issues given the UNFCCC’s [the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s] aspiration of limiting warming to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels to ‘significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change’. On current trends, this may be exceeded in around a decade. Relying on forest biomass for the EU’s renewable energy, with its associated initial increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, increases the risk of overshooting the 1.5°C target if payback periods are longer than this.Adding to the pressure on forests, many countries, including the US and EU member states, also subsidize wood heating, which constitutes more than half the wood burned in the EU. Increasingly, thousands of firewood and wood pellet companies in the EU are hollowing out forests, including old growth beech forests in the Carpathian Mountains, home of Europe’s last tracts of wilderness. This subsidized wood burning is murdering forest ecosystems that will never recover in the lifetime of anyone alive today — all in the name of climate change mitigation.The special hypocrisy around biomass will be on display at the United Nations Climate Action Summit and during New York’s Climate Week (Sept 23 – 29), where countries and companies are set to announce their deepened commitments to climate mitigation.There it’s likely we’ll see countries trumpet emission reduction goals with nary a word about how much of this ambition relies on burning forest wood and simply not counting the emissions. These nations may meet their carbon pledges on paper — but nature will know they cheated.The UK, for example, has set a goal of net zero emissions by 2050, but currently pays over a billion dollars a year in renewable energy subsidies to the Drax power station, which burns millions of tons of wood pellets from trees stripped from forests of the US, Canada, Spain, Portugal, and Poland, as well as northern EU countries with fragile boreal bog forests — Estonia, Latvia, Sweden.The Drax power stations in the United Kingdom, one of the largest users of woody biomass for energy production. Shown here is the Drax biomass dome, which once burned coal. The UK has nearly eliminated burning coal for energy, cutting its official IPCC emissions, but is ramping up its burning of woody biomass. The uncounted carbon from Drax flows into the atmosphere, adding to climate change. Photo credit: DECCgovuk on VisualHunt / CC BY-ND.Few at Climate Week are going to want to acknowledge this inconvenient truth. Policymakers, corporations, financiers, and the big greens organizing the New York jamboree don’t want to pull this particular thread because to do so starts to unravel the whole sweater, revealing the massive assumptions involved in treating forest wood as carbon neutral.The money at stake surely plays a role — the billions in subsidies underpinning the last ten years of exponential growth in the wood pellet industry are reflected in the heady share prices of companies like US-based Enviva, which exports millions of tons of wood pellets to the UK, EU, and even Asia. Industry partnerships with the big greens designed to burnish “sustainability” credentials of wood pellets don’t exactly enhance transparency about impacts, either. The camel’s nose of the biomass industry is under every tent.Pine forests cut to provide wood pellets for power plants are replanted, so this energy resource could technically be called carbon neutral, but only over the long term. It takes many years for those new trees to become mature and for the carbon equation to balance out. Photo credit: ChattOconeeNF on Visualhunt.com / CC BY.What to do in the face of such blatant and deliberate damage? Working with allies, my organization, the Partnership for Policy Integrity, has filed reports with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) highlighting the systemic misrepresentations of the wood pellet industry and asking the SEC to require better disclosures of the actual emission impacts of burning biomass.When advocacy and science failed to add real forest protections to the EU’s renewable energy policy, we worked with colleagues to file a lawsuit against the EU for its misrepresentation of burning trees as climate friendly (the court has not yet determined whether it will hear the case).We’re putting this issue on the agenda at Climate Week too, with a documentary that rips the green veneer off the biomass and wood pellet industries, followed by discussion about the EU biomass lawsuit and bioenergy policy around the world. Policymakers are especially welcome to attend.Burning forest biomass is a triple hit to climate mitigation — it increases emissions, decreases the forest carbon sink, and soaks up subsidies that could instead be allocated to zero emissions technologies or efficiency.However, there’s a simple — though not politically easy — fix to this problem. The modern biomass and wood pellet industry is a house of cards, dependent on subsidies. Countries must stop subsidizing burning wood, and preferably, start subsidizing natural forest restoration. Cutting and burning forests for “zero-carbon” fuel should be considered a Climate Crime, not subsidized with tens of billions of dollars. We should have a renewable energy policy that doesn’t destroy forests — we owe it to the world.Mary Booth is an ecosystem scientist and the Director of the Partnership for Policy Integrity, a US-based nonprofit organization. This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: The sounds of tropical katydids and how they can benefit conservation

first_imgAnimals, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Conservation, Environment, Insects, Interviews, Podcast, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Laurel Symes is assistant director of the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University in the United States. We’ve frequently featured bioacoustic recordings here on the Mongabay Newscast, and it’s not been uncommon for the researchers we spoke with to have used recording equipment designed at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, or to have received support and research assistance from staff at the Lab. So we thought it would be useful to get Symes to start off by telling us a bit about the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and what it does.Symes’ own research is currently focused on using machine learning to detect and identify tropical katydids via the sounds they produce. Katydids are grasshopper-like insects that are important to the rainforest food web, as they eat a lot of plants and are in turn eaten by a lot of other species, including birds, bats, monkeys, frogs, and more.Symes is here today to discuss how the study of katydids might benefit tropical forest conservation efforts more broadly, how machine learning is aiding her bioacoustic work, and to plays for us some of the katydid sounds that she’s captured.Here’s this episode’s top news:2019 was second-hottest year on record, 2010s hottest decadeIndigenous lands hold 36% or more of remaining intact forest landscapesUpdate to biodiversity treaty proposes protecting at least 30% of EarthOne six-week expedition discovered ten new songbird species and subspecies in IndonesiaPhylloptera dimidiata. Photo by Laurel Symes.Lamprophyllum micans. Photo by Hannah ter Hofstede.Katydids can be as small as your thumb or as big as your hand — and can weigh as much as a bird, as Symes tells us in this episode of the Mongabay Newscast. Photo by Laurel Symes.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Laurel Symes, a biologist who is using bioacoustics to study tropical katydids in Central America. She is also assistant director of the Center for Conservation Bioacoustics at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at Cornell University in the United States.Symes’ research is focused on using machine learning to detect and identify tropical katydids via the sounds they produce. Katydids are grasshopper-like insects that are important to the rainforest food web, as they eat alot of plants and are in turn eaten by alot of other species, including birds, bats, monkeys, frogs, and more.Symes is here today to discuss how the study of katydids might benefit tropical forest conservation efforts more broadly, how machine learning is aiding her bioacoustic work, and to plays for us some of the katydid sounds that she’s captured. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we speak with Laurel Symes, a biologist who is using bioacoustics to study tropical katydids in Central America.Listen here:last_img read more

Sierra Leonean President Maada Bio Visits President Weah

first_imgPresident Weah greets his Sierra Leonean counterpart at his Foreign Affairs officePresident George Manneh Weah has received in audience the newly-elected President of the Republic of Sierra Leone Julius Maada Bio during a one-day working visit to Liberia, according to an Executive Mansion release.President Maada Bio used his visit to extend an official invitation to President Weah, to attend his inauguration scheduled for Saturday, May 12, 2018 in Freetown, Sierra Leone.President Maada Bio and delegation arrived on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at the Roberts International Airport (RIA). The two leaders later proceeded to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs where a reception was held in honor of the Sierra Leonean leader.Both presidents also held discussions in an atmosphere of mutual respect centered on peace and security, economic development and the strengthening of bilateral ties subsisting between the two Mano River Union (MRU) countries.The visit is the Sierra Leonean leader’s first official visit to Liberia, following his historic election and subsequent swearing-in on April 4, 2018, in keeping with Sierra Leone’s Constitution. He is expected to be inaugurated on Saturday, May 12, 2018.President Julius Maada Bio, a retired army officer, served with the Economic Community of West African Monitoring Force (ECOMOG), a multi-national force sent to Liberia by ECOWAS in 1990 to restore peace and security in Liberia. He and delegation departed Liberia the same day.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more