Papaka (1) champions of Hekari Central Cup

first_imgIt was a strong second half performance that sealed the win for Papaka in front of over 500 spectators.Papaka took the lead in the 50th minute of play when Leana Rawali powered a shot into the nets to bring the crowd into a frenzy.Papaka continued to dominate possession and put the nail in the coffin in the 71st minute after a mix up in Kalo’s backline allowed striker Ryan Gerega to score.Papaka (1) walked away with K8,000. Runners up Kalo settled for K4,000.In third and fourth placing final, Keapara beat their brothers Alukuni 10-8 in a penalty shootout.Keapara picked up K2,000 while  Alukuni received K1,000.last_img read more

Human-wildlife conflict is decimating leopard numbers in one of their last African strongholds

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Cats, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Mammals, Predators, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation A research team led by Dr. Samual Williams of the Department of Anthropology at Durham University in the UK conducted a long-term trap survey from 2012 to 2016 in order to study the leopard population in South Africa’s Soutpansberg Mountains, one of the leopard’s last strongholds in Africa.They found that the cats’ population density decreased by 44 percent between 2012 and 2016. That means that, based on a previous estimate of their abundance, the leopard population in the Soutpansberg Mountains has decreased by two-thirds since 2008, Williams and his co-authors note in the study.While the researchers argue that, based on their findings, a current ban on leopard hunting in South Africa should not be lifted in areas where the species is facing sharp declines in numbers, they add that efforts to reduce often-lethal conflicts between leopards and humans might have an even bigger impact. South Africa banned the hunting of leopards last year amid uncertainty over the species’ numbers and ongoing threats to its survival posed by mismanagement of the trophy hunting industry and the illegal trade in its fur.Leopards (Panthera pardus) are notoriously difficult animals to study in the wild due to their secretive nature. They are primarily nocturnal creatures who live solitary lives and range over vast areas of land in search of food and mates. The hunting ban in South Africa is still in effect as more information on the leopard abundance is collected by authorities. The species is currently listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.According to the authors of a study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science last month that seeks to shed light on the population dynamics and conservation status of leopards living outside protected areas in South Africa, the species is declining in greater numbers and at a much more rapid pace than has been previously understood. But while the researchers argue that, based on their findings, the ban on leopard hunting should not be allowed to resume in areas where the species is facing sharp declines in numbers, they add that efforts to reduce often-lethal conflicts between leopards and humans might have an even bigger impact.A research team led by Dr. Samual Williams of the Department of Anthropology at Durham University in the UK conducted a long-term trap survey from 2012 to 2016 in order to study the leopard population in South Africa’s Soutpansberg Mountains, one of the leopard’s last strongholds in Africa. The team used 23 camera traps that ran continuously throughout the four-year study period and identified individual leopards by their unique coat markings to determine leopard numbers in the area. They found that the cats’ population density decreased by 44 percent between 2012 and 2016.That means that, based on a previous estimate of their abundance, the leopard population in the Soutpansberg Mountains has decreased by two-thirds since 2008, Williams and his co-authors note in the study — down from 10.73 leopards per 100 square kilometers in 2008 to 3.65 per 100 sq. km. last year.That is a pace of loss that the population simply cannot sustain for long, Williams said. “If the current rate of decline is not slowed down then there will be no leopards left in the western Soutpansberg Mountains by 2020. This is especially alarming considering that in 2008 this area had one of the highest leopard population densities in Africa.”As a means of establishing what exactly is driving leopard abundance down so rapidly, Williams and team fitted eight adult leopards with GPS collars, allowing them to track the cats’ movements. Six of those leopards died before the study was completed. The researchers discovered that the chief cause of those deaths was illegal, retaliatory killings by people who feared the leopards posed a threat to their livestock.“Illegal human activities like shooting, snaring and poisoning were the leading cause of death in the leopards we tracked,” Williams said. “This was often in response to a perception that leopards were a threat to livestock. There is a clear need for conservation efforts to address these illegal killings. Educating communities and supporting them to adopt non-lethal techniques to help protect their livestock is essential.”Williams adds that trophy hunting in areas like the Soutpansberg Mountains is still “a luxury that cannot be afforded.” “Large carnivores like leopards are hugely important to the ecosystem of an area and also carry significant economic and cultural importance,” he said. “Their loss would impoverish both the ecology of the area and human culture so it is vital that we understand the threats leopards face and act on this.”Protecting leopards in areas where they still exist in substantial numbers, like the Soutpansberg Mountains, is especially important given that their range has shrunk drastically in recent years. Large carnivores have, on average, lost 53 percent of their historic range, the researchers note in the study. Leopards are facing even worse circumstances, having lost 63 to 75 percent of their range worldwide. That figure is even higher in South Africa, where leopards have lost some 80 percent of their historical range.Combined with this sharp drop in habitable territory, trophy hunting has had an undeniable impact on leopard populations. But Williams and his co-authors write in the study that conflicts with humans are perhaps the more urgent threat to the survival of the species: “While improving the management of trophy hunting is important, we suggest that mitigating human–wildlife conflict could have a bigger impact on carnivore conservation.”Given that close to 70 percent of remaining leopard habitat in South Africa is outside of legally protected areas, the researchers argue, “leopard conservation efforts should be focused outside of protected areas, where leopards are most at risk.”An African leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) at the Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONWilliams, S. T., Williams, K. S., Lewis, B. P., & Hill, R. A. (2017). Population dynamics and threats to an apex predator outside protected areas: implications for carnivore management. Royal Society Open Science, 4(4), 161090. doi:10.1098/rsos.161090Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

360i Wins Digiday WorkLife Award for Most Committed to Social Good

first_imgDigiday’s inaugural WorkLife Awards showcase the media and marketing world’s best work environments as well as the values and cultural initiatives that make them unique. This year 360i was named a winner for Most Committed to Social Good (Large Agency), which recognizes the agency with the greatest level of commitment to social good and giving back to their community through extracurricular partnerships. 360i was honored to be recognized for our culture of curiosity – something that drives us to learn, set the bar higher, and challenge the status quo in pursuit of a better way.A major highlight of our efforts was ‘the den,’ or Digital Education for Nonprofits, a free day-long workshop meant to empower nonprofits to be smart marketers in the digital age through knowledge sharing, tools, and free resources. After two successful events in New York and Chicago, a third workshop is taking place in Atlanta on November 2.Whether we’re teaching digital marketing skills to underprivileged students as part of our 6-year partnership with Harlem Children’s Zone, or hosting courses on web design and development for high school students through New York on Tech, by donating our time and expertise, we aim to empower our employees and the communities we’re serving.To learn more about our commitment to social good, head to our website.last_img read more