Manchester United midfielder Paul Pogba out until December with ankle injury

first_imgManchester United midfielder Paul Pogba is unlikely to play again until December due to an ankle injury, manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer has said.France international Pogba last featured for United in their 1-1 Premier League draw with Arsenal on Sept. 30.”I don’t think we’ll see Paul before December. He’ll be out for a while,” Solskjaer told reporters after his team’s 3-1 win at Norwich City on Sunday.”He needs time to fully recover. I don’t think he’ll be back, maybe for Sheffield United after the international break, but probably it will be December before we can see him.”I’m not a doctor but there is an injury there that needs healing. It’s his ankle.”Solskjaer’s assessment rules Pogba out of Manchester United’s next four matches in all competitions at a minimum, with the club not scheduled to play Sheffield United until Nov. 24.Also Read | Premier League: Liverpool battle past Tottenham, Manchester United claim 1st away winUnited have several other injured players, including Luke Shaw, Eric Bailly, Diogo Dalot and Nemanja Matic, although forward Anthony Martial made a scoring return against Norwich on his first Premier League start since August.The win lifted United, who are next in League Cup action against Chelsea on Wednesday, up to seventh in the tablelast_img read more

Industrialized worlds greenhouse gas emissions rising – UN report

“These findings clearly demonstrate that stronger and more creative policies will be needed for accelerating the spread of climate-friendly technologies and persuading businesses, local governments and citizens to cut their greenhouse gas emissions,” said Joke Waller Hunter, Executive Secretary of the UN Climate Change Convention.The so-called transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe are also starting to increase their emissions again as their economies recover from their early- and mid-1990s nadir, according to the report, “Compilation and Synthesis of Third National Communications” and based on projections provided by the governments themselves. As a result, the developed world as a whole – highly industrialized plus transition countries – will see its emissions increase by 10 per cent from 2000 to 2010.Developed countries saw their combined emissions actually fall during the 1990s, by 3 per cent, due to a 37 per cent decline in transition country emissions. They thus met the Climate Change Convention’s intermediate aim of keeping the group’s overall emissions at 1990 levels by 2000.But greenhouse gas emissions in the highly industrialized countries rose by 8 per cent during that period. The European Union’s total emissions decreased by 3.5 per cent from 1990 to 2000, with individual member States varying between a decrease of 19 per cent and an increase of 35 per cent. Emissions increased in most other highly industrialized countries, including New Zealand (5 per cent), Japan (11 per cent), United States (14 per cent), Australia (18 per cent) and Canada (20 per cent).The report will be considered at a two-week meeting of the Convention’s 190 member governments that formally opens in Bonn, Germany, tomorrow. Its projections, based on data from 2000-2001, can help governments plan their future climate change strategies. With a very few exceptions, the reporting governments underlined the importance of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol in shaping their domestic climate policy responses. They reiterated that their Kyoto targets are a first step towards long-term and continued emission reductions. read more