India vs Bangladesh: Rohit Sharma gives India injury scare, gets hit on thigh during practice

first_imgIndia captain Rohit Sharma was hit on his left thigh while taking throwdowns here on Friday, forcing him to leave the net session ahead of Sunday’s T20 International against Bangladesh.Rohit, who will lead India in the three-match series in Virat Kohli’s absence, received the blow early into the net session. After a few throwdowns, one sharp delivery hit Rohit on his left thigh.He immediately left the nets and it was visible that he wasn’t happy with the pace at which the throwdown delivery was hurled at him.The Indian team has a designated a left-arm throwdown expert in Sri Lanka’s Nuwan to counter left-arm seamers in the opposition, Mustafizur Rahaman in this particular series.Usually, the batsmen take throwdowns in order to get some rhythm before facing bowlers in the nets.Since the practice pitches at most Indian grounds are not of great quality, players want to be cautious during the net sessions.It was learnt that Rohit was taking treatment for the blow and didn’t take further part in the net session.”Rohit is getting treatment and we will update you when we get the details,” a team source told PTI.The practice session was a good enough indicator that Sanju Samson will not be keeping wickets as he was seen fielding with others and number one choice Rishabh Pant was seen devoting extra time to his glove work.All eyes were on big-hitting Mumbai all-rounder Shivam Dube who was seen talking to head coach Ravi Shastri.advertisementAlso Read | Zlatan or Ishant: Rohit Sharma comes up with cheeky throwback photoAlso see:last_img read more

Industrialized worlds greenhouse gas emissions rising – UN report

“These findings clearly demonstrate that stronger and more creative policies will be needed for accelerating the spread of climate-friendly technologies and persuading businesses, local governments and citizens to cut their greenhouse gas emissions,” said Joke Waller Hunter, Executive Secretary of the UN Climate Change Convention.The so-called transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe are also starting to increase their emissions again as their economies recover from their early- and mid-1990s nadir, according to the report, “Compilation and Synthesis of Third National Communications” and based on projections provided by the governments themselves. As a result, the developed world as a whole – highly industrialized plus transition countries – will see its emissions increase by 10 per cent from 2000 to 2010.Developed countries saw their combined emissions actually fall during the 1990s, by 3 per cent, due to a 37 per cent decline in transition country emissions. They thus met the Climate Change Convention’s intermediate aim of keeping the group’s overall emissions at 1990 levels by 2000.But greenhouse gas emissions in the highly industrialized countries rose by 8 per cent during that period. The European Union’s total emissions decreased by 3.5 per cent from 1990 to 2000, with individual member States varying between a decrease of 19 per cent and an increase of 35 per cent. Emissions increased in most other highly industrialized countries, including New Zealand (5 per cent), Japan (11 per cent), United States (14 per cent), Australia (18 per cent) and Canada (20 per cent).The report will be considered at a two-week meeting of the Convention’s 190 member governments that formally opens in Bonn, Germany, tomorrow. Its projections, based on data from 2000-2001, can help governments plan their future climate change strategies. With a very few exceptions, the reporting governments underlined the importance of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol in shaping their domestic climate policy responses. They reiterated that their Kyoto targets are a first step towards long-term and continued emission reductions. read more