Iconic musician Paul Simon announces tour supporting biodiversity

first_imgTwelve-time Grammy winner Paul Simon spoke to Mongabay during a recent conference in Durham, North Carolina.Proceeds from the tour will support the Half-Earth Project, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.He spoke to Mongabay about optimism, life on Earth, and more during an hour-long conversation.It was widely reported in 2016 that the performer was considering retirement from touring, but has now heeded Wilson’s call for saving biodiversity. DURHAM, North Carolina – Listening to Paul Simon talk is a little like listening to him sing. His voice is melodic and soothing; his words are thoughtful and evocative, capable of penetrating both heart and bones. A lyric comes to mind, and it enlarges to represent the motivation that brought Simon south from New York City to Environment Hall on the campus of Duke University in early March.I know what I know/I’ll sing what I said/We come and we go/That’s the thing that I keep in the back of my head.*Multi-Grammy winner Paul Simon joins renowned biologist E.O. Wilson on stage in Durham. Photo by Chris Sims, E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Simon was here to be of service to a friend. That friend – E.O. Wilson – is a legend of conservation with an audacious idea at a perilous time that has come late in life. Simon, sensing his own mortality, is eager to match Wilson’s unflagging energy and enthusiasm in the way he knows best. With his voice.The iconic master of the American songbook for more than a half century, winner of a dozen Grammys and the author of such enduring classics as “Sound of Silence” and “Bridge Over Troubled Water” participated in Biodiversity Days, a two-day conference here sponsored by the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.The conference aimed to promote the grand, central idea of Wilson’s recent book, Half-Earth – setting aside half of the Earth’s lands and seas to enable nature to recover from humanity’s global impact and vastly reduce the current rate of species extinctions.The 75-year-old songwriter has become an apostle of the 87-year-old biologist and conservationist, and hailed Wilson’s book as powerful and inspirational in a December essay in The New York Times. “Simply put,” he wrote, “if we don’t reverse the climate change that is causing sea levels to rise, and droughts and flooding to become chronic, the consequences will cause a collapse of the many ecosystems that are home to all living creatures and plants necessary for life itself to exist.”Not surprisingly, given a career of subtle musical activism (“Graceland”) and unheralded philanthropy (Children’s Health Fund), Simon agreed to Wilson’s request last fall to “do something” to help propel a potential Half-Earth movement.Wilson was supposed to announce Simon’s contribution to the cause to a sold-out audience at the Carolina Theater in downtown Durham on the evening of March 2. But in introducing his friend for a five-song set following an intense panel discussion on Half-Earth, Wilson simply forgot.Simon chose instead to break the news in his exclusive interview with Mongabay.This June, he and his band will embark on a 17-city U.S. concert tour that Simon believes will generate “millions of dollars” for the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation and raise awareness for the Half-Earth cause and its leader. Funds could possibly be used to promote the protection of lands in and around Wilson’s native south Alabama where intact ecosystems still thrive in the wetlands and pinelands.last_img read more

When it comes to rhino conservation, Asia and Africa can learn a lot from each other

first_imgDespite its proximity to Asian markets for trafficked rhino horn, Nepal has lost only four rhinos to poaching since 2011.Experts credit this success to a combination of top-down enforcement and efforts to involve the community in conservation.Protected areas in Africa that have collaborated with area residents have shown promising results, suggesting lessons from Nepal can be successfully applied elsewhere.In turn, conservationists say Nepal can benefit from African countries’ expertise in promoting wildlife tourism, and alternate models of benefit sharing. On June 14, a routine scanning of baggage at Johannesburg’s OR Tambo Airport revealed a grim contraband. A Vietnamese citizen’s suitcase contained 28.7 kilograms (63.3 pounds) of poached rhino horns worth an estimated $462,000 on the black market. The shocking discovery came only three days after two Chinese nationals were detained at the same airport with $385,000 worth of the same deadly cargo.These busts demonstrate the risk and difficulty smugglers accept when attempting to traffic rhino horn from Africa to distant Vietnam and China — and the immense profit motive that drives this illicit trade.  Yet ironically, the prevalence of complex intercontinental poaching networks in Africa highlights how skillfully one Asian country far closer to the horn markets has protected its own rhinos.Since 2011, only four greater one-horned rhinos (Rhinoceros unicornis) are known to have been poached for their horns in Nepal, while the country’s overall rhino population has grown by 21 percent. This contrasts dramatically with the more than 5,500 black and white rhinos (Diceros bicornis and Ceratotherium simum) slaughtered in South Africa alone over the same period, and the recent poaching uptick elsewhere on the continent. As African nations fight to stem the tide of poaching, they have increasingly sought to understand, and replicate, Nepal’s stunning success.A greater one-horned rhinoceros in Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, where the species is thriving. Photo by Alex Dudley.Figuring out what worksObservers attribute Nepal’s gains to a combination of top-down law enforcement and the economic enfranchisement of rural communities outside the national parks containing rhinos.While Nepalese army troops patrol against poaching inside the parks, the surrounding buffer zones facilitate a mixture of sustainable cattle-grazing, safari tourism and thatch grass and firewood collecting. Critically, a 1995 law mandates that buffer zone communities receive half the revenue generated from entry permits to Chitwan National Park, which holds the country’s largest rhino population. Although some NGOs criticize these policies for falling short of allowing full and effective participation by local communities, the changes in the law have strengthened the linkage between villagers and wildlife and given local people a direct financial stake in safeguarding rhinos.It wasn’t always this way. Nepal’s parks began with a strict protectionist approach. Upon the creation of Chitwan in 1973, around 20,000 villagers were evicted, and the park neglected community involvement. “We started out conservation with the guns, because the [rhino] population was gunned,” recalled Naresh Subedi, an officer of Nepal’s National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) in an interview in Kathmandu, commenting on the deployment of army troops in Chitwan in 1975.These patrols, and the extension of the park from 400 to 1,332 square kilometers (~155 to 515 square miles), helped raise the country’s rhino population from about 100 individuals in the 1970s to almost 600 by 2000, according to Subedi. Meanwhile, recognition of the need for a second population led to the translocation of 70 rhinos from Chitwan to the more remote Bardia National Park between 1986 and 2002.However, amidst the upheaval of the 1996-2006 Maoist insurgency in Nepal, the redeployment of army troops from the park provided an attractive environment for rhino poaching. Chitwan’s population fell from 500 animals to 370. As Bardia District witnessed some of the worst violence of the conflict, poachers slaughtered nearly all of the park’s rhinos, including all the translocated individuals. After the war, Nepalese conservationists realized the importance of local involvement in securing the survivors.At the same time that army patrols resumed within the parks and translocations from Chitwan to Bardia recommenced, the NTNC also promoted the deployment of voluntary youth patrols in the buffer zones to support the park authorities. “If somebody’s coming from the outside, [the youth patrols] scrutinize and observe the situation, and they report immediately if they find something wrong,” Subedi commented. “So that checks people [who] are going rhino poaching.” In this regard, Nepal branched from a strictly militarized anti-poaching policy to a more holistic and equitable approach.A female white rhino in Kenya. Although still threatened by poaching, Africa’s white rhino population has bounced back to more than 20,000. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.Sharing the benefits of conservationLikewise, a number of African rhino states have recently sought to allow local people to participate in, and prosper from rhino conservation.Many African parks originated in the late colonial period and sought to exclude pastoralists such as the Maasai from tarnishing “pristine” landscapes. The independent African states continued these exclusionist policies, depriving rural villagers of key grazing or agricultural land and much of the parks’ revenue.But following the decimation of rhino numbers across East and Southern Africa and the extinction of entire national populations during the 1970s and 80s, conservationists in the remaining strongholds recognized the need for grassroots empowerment.“Especially from Africa, what the Asian countries can learn is, how do you use wildlife to improve [the] livelihoods of local communities?” Shubash Lohani, Director of Sustainable Landscapes at WWF, said in an interview in Washington D.C. “I think that African countries have been doing it in a much better way than a lot of the Asian countries, like wildlife-based tourism and deriving benefits to the local communities.”“There is a lot we can learn from African countries in terms of increasing the level of benefits and distributing to the local communities,” Lohani added.Maasai women at a village near Ngorongoro Crater. Pastoralists such as the Masai were removed to establish many of Africa’s protected areas, but more recent conservation strategies seek to involve local people in conservation efforts. Photo by Colin J. McMechan via Flickr.One of the most striking parallels with Nepal’s model can be observed in Namibia, a key stronghold of the black rhinoceros. As in Nepal, rhino populations suffered heavy losses from poaching during the 1966-1990 armed struggle for liberation from apartheid South Africa. But once Namibia gained independence and shifted to black majority rule in 1990, the government recognized the importance of boosting wildlife populations on communal lands. These areas contained most of the country’s rural population but boasted few natural resources other than wildlife, which had been devastated by poaching and over-exploitation.In 1996, Namibia instituted the policy of rural conservancies registered and administered by communities, who would then receive limited rights to subsistence or tourist trophy-hunting, or safari tourism on their lands, and unconditionally receive 100 percent of the resulting profits. At the same time that these conservancies have generated tourism revenue and skills training for communities, their wildlife populations have risen dramatically.“I think that [Namibia] is one of the bright spots in Africa where the number of wildlife has been increasing and it’s not only the number of wildlife but also the benefits that people are deriving from wildlife that have been increasing,” Lohani said. “The number of conservancies is growing, so this is a fascinating example of how people and wildlife can coexist and it doesn’t have to be at the expense of each other.”A female black rhino. Poaching and habitat loss caused the species’ population to plummet in the 1970s and 80s, and it remains Critically Endangered. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.In particular, Namibia’s northwestern Kunene region has become a haven for the world’s largest free-ranging black rhino population. From only 66 individuals in 1982, the most recent census in 2003 revealed 142. Here as in Nepal’s Bardia Park, rhinos have been translocated to an area where they had nearly been exterminated, and herdsmen closely monitor against poaching.Recalling the youth patrols in Chitwan’s buffer zones, the Rhino Ranger Incentive Program offers advanced rhino monitoring and field equipment to participating community members, who even receive performance-based cash advances. Communities further profit from the unique opportunity offered to tourists at certain safari camps to track black rhinos on foot, a more intimate experience than viewing wildlife from the confines of a vehicle.Despite the dramatic contrast between the rocky desert where Namibia’s black rhinos roam and the lush floodplains that shelter Nepal’s greater one-horns, the same basic conservation principles have demonstrated similar success. In both countries, the revenue generated from rhinos compels communities to value live individuals more than dead ones.In African countries or parks where communities have not adequately benefited from safari tourist revenue, poaching has remained stubbornly high. This disconnect is demonstrated with the failure of militarized anti-poaching efforts to stem the loss of 520 rhinos in Kruger National Park, the epicenter of South Africa’s carnage, in 2013 alone.White rhino in Kruger National Park, where hundreds of rhinos are poached each year. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.“I went to Kruger… and found that the people are not so much involved in conservation,” NTNC Executive Director Ganga Jung Thapa reflected in an interview in Kathmandu. “It is really the park staff. The local people are not really involved in the conservation aspect.”Seeking to rectify this imbalance, the recent deployment of the Black Mamba Anti-Poaching Unit, comprised of women from communities outside Kruger, has demonstrated early success in stemming poaching. However, a 2016 sociological study of poachers and local residents outside Kruger revealed persisting mistrust toward the park among neighboring villages. The local perception that wild rhinos are valued more than rural black lives has encouraged poaching and frustrated cooperation between villagers and park authorities.Yet when top-down political commitment to conservation is combined with local participation, African states hold promise of replicating Nepal’s anti-poaching success. Thanks to heightened security and outreach to surrounding pastoralists, Kenya’s famed Lewa Conservancy has not seen any rhino poaching since 2012. Meanwhile, in Kenya as a whole, the integrated National Black Rhino Conservation and Management Strategy (NBRS) has led to steady population growth.From a low of 300 animals when the Kenyan Wildlife Service (KWS) launched the NBRS in 1985, the country now boasts 696, including the third largest black rhino population after South Africa and Namibia, according to Bas Huijbregts, GEF Global Reduction Coordinator at WWF. In the long run, KWS envisions at least 2,000 black rhinos in Kenya’s national parks, community conservancies, and private ranches,Both Kenya and Nepal’s success is owed to “Government ownership and a whole-of-government approach, with the government in the driving seat and civil society partners, together with private sector and communities, in a support role,” Huijbregts said in an email.Chitwan National Park’s lush riverine landscapes are an ideal habitat for water-loving one-horned rhinos, but also make it hard for tourists to spot wildlife. Photo by Stefan Krasowski via Flickr.Experts say that despite Nepal’s success at eradicating poaching, Africa has more successfully promoted its wildlife riches to foreign tourists. Moreover, if East and Southern Africa could also curtail poaching, rhinos there would have a much larger geographic area to recolonize than in South Asia due to far lower human population density.Lohani noted that Africa also offers the advantage of savanna landscapes that facilitate easier wildlife sightings than densely vegetated Asian rhino habitats like Chitwan. But he added that, “If we do promote or market [wildlife] in the right way, just adding that element of suspense and element of adventure, I think it will still be a very attractive destination for wildlife lovers, and that’s something that Asian countries can learn from Africa.”Such skillful promotion of rhinos in order to generate revenue is illustrated dramatically in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Crater. The world’s largest unflooded caldera (volcanic crater), Ngorongoro tempts tourists with the assurance of easy wildlife sightings in a confined area. Beyond its burgeoning herds and predator densities, Ngorongoro boasts the distinction of Tanzania’s last stronghold for free-ranging black rhinos, with about 30 today inhabiting the Crater. As one of the safari industry’s much-touted “big five” animals, any rhino spotted in the Crater soon attracts a large convoy of vehicles jockeying for a view.As in Nepal, critics argue that tourism revenue in Ngorongoro has tended to benefit Tanzanian elites and entrepreneurial classes in the tourism industry more than local indigenous communities. Yet unlike the country’s national parks, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area allows local Maasai to live alongside wildlife, including grazing their cattle. The absence of rhino poaching in the area over the last two decades suggests that both local residents and Tanzania’s tourism industry recognize the need to safeguard the animals.The Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania is an ideal site for wildlife viewing. Photo by Yoni Lerner via Flickr.Little data currently exists about the economic benefits of rhino conservation. However, Huijbregts noted that research on the effects of elephant poaching on African economies offers a useful comparison. According to a recent study, the ongoing ivory poaching crisis has cost African countries around $25 million in lost tourism revenue annually. “As with elephants in Africa, it seems that investment in rhino conservation is economically favorable across the majority of [the] African rhino range,” Huijbregts said.Of the more than half a million tourists who visit Ngorongoro Crater annually, generating $3.7 million in revenue, many come specifically hoping to see a black rhino. In fiscal year 2014-2015, Chitwan attracted 172,425 visitors, earning $2.4 million. That half the park’s revenue reaches the buffer zone communities clarifies the economic value of rhino tourism in Nepal.Despite the different cultural dynamics and vast geographic distance between Nepal and African rhino states, the fusion of top-down anti-poaching enforcement with community participation appears to hold the key to preserving rhinos in both.“It’s fascinating how geographically so distant and culturally so different regions can have…similar kinds of issues and the approaches to address those issues could be so similar,”Lohani said. “There is a lot that Asia can learn from Africa, and Africa can learn from Asia.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Black Rhino, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, One-horned Rhinos, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rhinos, White Rhino, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Isabel Estermancenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Protecting a forest in the land of the Indonesian deer-pig

first_imgThis story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on June 10, 2016. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. In a village in the northern part of Indonesia’s giant Sulawesi island, hunters pursue rare animals that are protected by the law.A local affiliate of NGO BirdLife International is working with locals to preserve the Popayato-Paguat forest block — and the dozens of endemic species within.The NGO is facilitating an ecosystem restoration project in the forest block. LEMBAH PERMAI, Indonesia — Joula Goni stepped out of her house cradling a skull. “A babirusa,” she explained, placing the bleached white cranium on a formica table on the patio. Babirusa are one of the island of Sulawesi’s unique menagerie of endemic animals. In Indonesian, the name of the animal translates to “deer-pig.” Unlike wild boars, the babirusa has a dramatic set of tusks. One set curves up from its lower jaw. The second, more pronounced, set emerges from its top jaw and curls over the animal’s eyes.Goni is one of the few indigenous Minahasa people in Lembah Permai village, Gorontalo province, in northern Sulawesi, one of the archipelago country’s largest islands. She said her husband happened upon the skull during a hunting expedition. “He only got the skull. Perhaps the animal died from old age or after being gored in a fight.” Her quip is justifiably defensive. Lembah Permai is famous among trophy hunters as a place to land rare endemic fauna that are protected under Indonesian law. “It’s true, a lot of hunting happens here,” said Sudirman Hasan, the village secretary of this mostly Javanese hamlet that sits at the forest edge. Hasan confessed he is uncomfortable with this notoriety. He hopes the situation will change with the signing of what Burung Indonesia — an affiliate of global NGO BirdLife International — calls a Village Nature Conservation Agreement, or KPAD.“The KPAD will outline what is allowed and not allowed in the forest,” he said.A babirusa skull. Photo by Christopel Paino for Mongabay.Home to many migrantsLembah Permai sits at the end of a rocky six-to-seven-hour drive from Gorontalo city, the provincial capital. It’s home mostly to “transmigrants” from the faraway island of Java, where more than half of the Muslim-majority nation’s 260 million people live.Here in Lembah Permai, the air is clear. Plentiful water flows. At one time, a Korean company considered building a microhydro electricity plant on the local Malango creek. They canceled their plans on account of the oil palm plantation on the opposite bank. “The plantation has had a bad effect on the Malango,” said village secretary Hasan. “It sucks up a lot of water. The Koreans decided against investing as a result of the plantation. They just went home.”Only a third of the 419 souls (114 families) that live in Lembah Permai are fulltime residents. The rest are regional migrants. The original village, established by the government’s transmigration department, had a designated area of 5,000 hectares, an area just smaller than Manhattan. When it was last surveyed in 2015 though, the village covered a mere 1,323 hectares. Many houses sit abandoned.Hasan thinks this is on account of the grade. He says the village land is steep and unsuitable for farming. Goni, whose husband found the babirusa skull, said that many Minahasan relatives who came to settle decided instead to move back to their home villages after seeing the conditions in Lembah Permai. For those migrants that stayed, their greatest hope is that they will be able to build up a cacao agroforestry system similar to the two other villages in the Popayato-Paguat forest area. Makarti Jaya and Puncak Jaya are larger settlements that Burung Indonesia — an affiliate of global NGO BirdLife International — is supporting in the development of village conservation agreements.A dirt road in Lembah Permai village, a short walk from the forest. Photo by Christopel Paino for Mongabay.Birds aplentyBurung Indonesia is facilitating an ecosystem restoration program in the Popayato-Paguat forest. According to the 2015 report, Popayato-Paguat’s zonation as a “production forest” fragments and therefore threatens endemic biodiversity. According to Global Forest Watch data, deforestation has been increasing in the Pohuwato area, particularly since 2013.“Popayato-Paguat is a center of connectivity between important forest blocks such as the Nantu, Matinan-Illeile and Panua,” the Birdlife Indonesia report says. “It unites the natural forest area. Ecosystem restoration work here will rebalance the function and type of habitat in this forest block.” Burung Indonesia’s technical memorandum describes the Popayato-Paguat as a dry deciduous forest spanning 84,789 hectares — bigger than Singapore — which includes 18,230 hectares of production forest and 66,568 hectares of “limited production forest.” The forest area is jurisdictionally split between two districts, Pohuwato and Boalemo.The report mentions that the Popayato-Paguat forest block has been deemed an Important Bird and Biodiversity Area since 2014. It has an A1 rating, meaning that it is home to endangered species, and an A2 rating, meaning that it is also home to birds with a limited distribution. There are 67 species of endemic bird and seven rare species present here. Locally present are also Globally Threatened Species including the maleo (Macrocephalon maleo), yellow-crested small cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea), blue-faced rail (Gymnocrex rosenbergii), Knobbed hornbill (Rhyticeros cassidix) and Sulawesi hornbill (Rhabdotorrhinus exarhatus).Also present are two endangered species – pigdeer (Babyrousa celebensis) and low altitude anoa (Bubalus depressicornis)- and four vulnerable species – the high altitude anoa (Bubalus quarlessi), black macaque (Macaca hecki), the tarsier known to be the world’s smallest primate variety (Tarsius tarsier) and the kuskus bear (Ailurops ursinus). Banner image: A babirusa sleeps beside a creek. The animal’s name, an Indonesian word, translates to “deer-pig.” Photo by Schristia/Flickr. Article published by mongabayauthor Agroforestry, Animals, Birds, Community Forestry, Community Forests, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecological Restoration, Endangered Species, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Human Migration, Hunting, Mammals, Rainforests, Restoration, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Jakarta reclamation project allowed to resume, but opposition remains

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Indonesia’s central government has allowed work to resume on a project to build 17 artificial islands off the coast of Jakarta.The project, which proponents say will help address the city’s land subsidence and overcrowding problems, was suspended last year over environmental concerns and a corruption scandal.Opponents of the project include environmental activists, traditional fishermen and Jakarta’s newly inaugurated governor. JAKARTA — The Indonesian government has allowed work to resume on a $40 billion project to build 17 artificial islands off the northern coast of the capital Jakarta, overturning a suspension imposed last year.Construction activities on three of the reclamation project’s islets were halted in early 2016 following concerns from regulators and opposition from activists who said the development was causing environmental damage to the bay and destroying the livelihoods of local fishermen. The suspension also came amid a graft investigation by the country’s anticorruption watchdog, the KPK.“Following a string of coordinating meetings between ministries and the Jakarta administration, it’s decided that the North Jakarta Bay Reclamation no longer has any issues, either with its technical or legal matters,” said Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, the coordinating minister for maritime affairs, in a memo signed on Oct. 5.In addition to prompting protests from environmentalists and community organizations, resuming the project could stir up new tensions between the national government and Jakarta’s newly inaugurated governor, Anies Baswedan, who pledged during his campaign to stop the multibillion-dollar plan.In an earlier statement, Anies, a former education minister, promised to “put a halt to the Jakarta Bay reclamation in the interests of environmental conservation and the protection of fishermen, waterfront communities and all of the people of Jakarta.”Luhut, however, said the reclamation project would resume despite the governor’s objections.“Just because you’re a new government official, you can’t go and make changes as you please,” the minister said as quoted by local news outlet Kompas.An illustration showing the 17 artificial islands to be built under the Jakarta Bay reclamation development project. Image courtesy of FISIP Universitas Indonesia.KickbacksWork on two of the artificial islands, known as Islets C and D, was suspended in May 2016 after the Ministry of Environment and Forestry said it had identified several environmental violations.According to the ministry, project developer PT Kapuk Naga Indah (KNI) failed to identify from where it would quarry the sand to build the islets. The ministry also discovered increased sedimentation in the vicinity of the islets due to the developer’s activities.The ministry subsequently ordered the company to cease construction, resolve the issues, revise its environmental impact assessment (EIA) and conduct environmental management during the suspension.Last month, less than a year and a half after the suspension was ordered, Environment Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar told reporters that her office had allowed construction to resume because PT KNI had carried out the required measures.The development of a third island, Islet G, was temporarily halted in April 2016 by Luhut’s predecessor, Rizal Ramli.The suspension was ordered amid a corruption scandal involving property giant PT Agung Podomoro Land (APL), the parent company of Islet G developer PT Muara Wisesa Samudra (WMS). Ariesman Widjaja, at the time a director at PT APL, was charged with giving Jakarta city councilor Muhammad Sanusi a 2 billion rupiah ($148,000) kickback to help bypass spatial planning regulations for the reclamation project.Ariesman was last year convicted and sentenced to three years in prison, while Sanusi received a 10-year sentence.In October 2016, a high court in Jakarta ruled the reclamation project could resume. However, Environment Minister Siti called for several revisions to the environmental documents prepared by PT WMS before allowing work to continue on Islet G.A key concern came from the state electricity company, PT PLN, which operates a power plant that draws water from the vicinity of Islet G. The development of the island was expected to raise the water temperature in the area, thus disrupting the power plant’s operations.According to Minister Luhut’s Oct. 5 memo, though, these issues have since been resolved. The developer has revised its environmental assessment and agreed to build a system to regulate the water temperature so that the PT PLN plant can continue operating without any problems.“All administrative requirements have been completed by the developer of the island,” Luhut said.Construction taking place on Islet G. A recent ruling has cleared the way for work to continue on the land reclamation project. Photo by Sapariah Saturi/Mongabay-Indonesia.That sinking feelingJakarta, one of the world’s most densely populated conurbations on Earth, with more than 30 million people packed into the metropolitan area, is experiencing a higher rate of land subsidence than any other city. Some areas are sinking by 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) a year due to subsidence from groundwater extraction, leaving 40 percent of the city lying below sea level.To save the capital from being inundated by seawater, the national and city governments kicked off the so-called Giant Sea Wall project in 2014, a major component of which is the construction of the artificial islands, where property developers plan to build shopping centers, apartment blocks and more. Since the start, however, the plan has been marred by lawsuits, scandals and controversies, including forced evictions of traditional fishing and waterfront communities to make way for the project.The government’s most recent decision to lift the suspension has been welcomed by the Indonesian Employers’ Association (Apindo), the country’s biggest business lobby. “There will be new land and new economic growth,” said Apindo chairman Hariyadi Sukamdani, as quoted by state news agency Antara.For environmentalists, the main concern is the impact from the massive sand quarrying and coral mining needed to feed the construction of the new islets. A 2015 study by the Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Ministry warned the project would damage the marine ecosystem and lead to the erosion of nearby islands due to shifting currents.Researchers have also raised concerns that the sea wall would trap and concentrate sedimentation and pollution from the city’s 13 rivers, further degrading already threatened fisheries and coastal habitats.Fishermen attempt to shut down Islet G, an artificial island at the center of the controversy related to the Jakarta Bay land reclamation project. Photo by Sapariah Saturi/Mongabay-Indonesia.Ony Mahardika, campaign manager for the coast, oceans and small islands at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), an NGO, accused the government of failing to be transparent about the project’s environmental impact assessment before lifting the suspension.“Civil society must be involved in the environmental impact assessment process,” he said. “We believe that the EIA has procedural and legal defects.”The impact has also been severe for the fishing communities that have inhabited Jakarta’s coastline for generations but were evicted to make way for the project. The Indonesian Traditional Fishermen’s Union (KNTI) estimates the project will cost fishing communities over $2,000 per year for every hectare of seabed reclaimed. The Coalition to Save the Jakarta Bay, another NGO, pegs annual losses related to the project at IDR 178.1 billion ($13.2 million), accounting for the loss of fishing revenue and ecosystem services, increased flood risk, and reduced electricity generation at nearby power plants.Susan Herawati, secretary general of the People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice (KIARA), told Mongabay-Indonesia that her organization and the Coalition to Save the Jakarta Bay would take legal steps to challenge the government’s decision to lift the suspension on the reclamation project.“We will prepare the papers, and in the short-term, we will go for a judicial review,” Susan said.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Activism, Coastal Ecosystems, Conflict, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Politics, Fishing, Infrastructure, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Politics, Urban Planning last_img read more

As Amazon deforestation rises, sensational headlines play into Bolsonaro’s agenda (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all over Commentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Journalism, Forests, Green, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery Deforestation appears to be on the rise in the Brazilian Amazon, but sensational headlines are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.For example, administration officials are actively calling into question Brazilian space agency INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.” Pereira’s claim is completely unsubstantiated, but is nonetheless consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring.It is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In recent weeks, some media outlets have run eye-popping headlines on rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: “Deforestation of Brazilian Amazon surges to record high” read a June 4th headline in The Guardian; “Monthly deforestation up 88.4% compared with a year ago” stated a summary bullet-point The Guardian added to the top of a story syndicated from Reuters on July 3rd; and “Brazilian deforestation spiked 88 percent under Bolsonaro“, said a July 4th piece in The Hill. These sensational headlines, which aren’t an accurate interpretation of the numbers, are playing into the Bolsonaro administration’s campaign to undermine science-based monitoring of the Amazon.While deforestation does indeed appear to be climbing in the Brazilian Amazon, the data from the two leading sources that track deforestation in the region — Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and Brazilian NGO Imazon — do not put it anywhere near all-time records, as implied by the headline The Guardian, or nearly twice the rate of last year, as claimed in the other two stories. The mistake these headlines make is they fail to account for the high variability of deforestation during the rainy season and early dry season in the Amazon, when cloud cover can reduce the accuracy of short-term, alert-based satellite monitoring systems. An article Mongabay published in 2015 explains:Month-to-month deforestation is highly variable leading to frequent misreporting in the media. Both MODIS and Landsat [satellite sensors] cannot penetrate cloud cover, so during the rainy season — from roughly November to April — estimates are notoriously unreliable when compared to the same month a year earlier. Furthermore, most forest clearing in the Amazon occurs when it is dry. So if the dry season is early, deforestation may increase earlier than normal. For these reasons, the most accurate deforestation comparisons are made year-on-year. For Brazil, the deforestation “year” ends July 31: the peak of the dry season when the largest extent of forest is typically visible via satellite.Nonetheless, short-term MODIS data isn’t useless — it can provide insights on trends, especially over longer periods of time. Generally, comparing 12 consecutive months of MODIS data will provide a pretty good indication of deforestation relative to other years.So when a headline makes a claim that deforestation is “up 88%” over the prior year based on one month of data, it’s providing only part of the picture. An analysis should at least look at multiple months’ worth of data, especially when the time period in question is outside the peak deforestation season from June-September. For example, the accumulated deforestation according to INPE and Imazon’s alert systems for the 12 months ended May 31, 2019 is 4,633 square kilometers and 4,916 square kilometers respectively, representing an increase of 1 percent and 43 percent over the prior year. The trend was actually looking worse at the beginning of 2019, when the moving average was over 5,000 square kilometers according to each system. This doesn’t mean of course that deforestation won’t continue its upward trajectory. Why this mattersMisconstruing the numbers is a problem because it plays into the narrative the Bolsonaro administration is using to undercut the credibility of journalists, civil society groups, and scientists that track and report on deforestation. For example, administration officials are actively calling into question INPE’s data, according to BBC News, which last week quoted General Augusto Heleno Pereira as saying that data on deforestation rates in the Amazon are “manipulated.”“If you add up the percentages that have already been announced to date of deforestation in the Amazon, the Amazon would already be a desert,” he said.Pereira’s sentiments were echoed by Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina, who said in an interview with Globo’s CBN newspaper last week that “there are many distortions of information” regarding deforestation in Brazil. She added that Brazil needs to have “a single” and “correct” source of data.While neither the general’s remarks nor the minister’s statements indicate much depth of knowledge on Brazil’s own deforestation-tracking technologies or how deforestation is measured, they are consistent with a reported push by the Bolsonaro administration to privatize deforestation monitoring. Critics fear that effort could divert resources away from INPE’s system and foster uncertainty about the results it produces.More broadly, the comments square with the administration’s ongoing attack on science, scientific institutions, and environmental protection, including cutting funding for scientific research programs, education, and environmental law enforcement as well as policy moves like shifting the indigenous affairs bureau FUNAI under the control of the agriculture ministry.For these reasons, it is critically important that deforestation data is reported accurately by the media. The damage being wrought right now in the Amazon is certainly real and significant. There is no need to embellish or misrepresent the data. Doing so only furnishes the Bolsonaro administration with more ammunition for its war on journalism, science, and the environment.Header image: Google Earth image showing deforestation around Arara in the state of Pará.last_img read more

New species of orange-red praying mantis mimics a wasp

first_imgFrom the Peruvian Amazon, researchers have described a new-to-science species of bright orange-red praying mantis that conspicuously mimics a wasp.The mantis mimics not only the bright coloration of many wasps, but also a wasp’s short, jerky movements. Such conspicuous mimicry of wasps is rare among mantises, which usually tend to resemble leaves or tree trunks, the researchers say in a new study.The researchers have named the praying mantis Vespamantoida wherleyi. In 2013, a team of researchers surveying insects in a research station on the banks of the Amazon River in northern Peru set up a light trap. The large, brightly lit sheet, meant to attract insects just like a porch light does in the dark, lured in an unexpected creature. Among the various beetles, flies, wasps and praying mantises that had flown into the sheet was a tiny, bright orange-red insect with a black abdomen, eyes and head.At first glance, it seemed like a species of wasp. But when Gavin Svenson, director of research and collections at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, looked more closely, he noticed that there was something odd about it.“It didn’t look quite like a mantis, it didn’t look quite like a wasp,” Svenson said in a video statement. “I went up and I grabbed it and I put it in a little vial and once we started observing it we knew we had something totally different.”Upon further analysis, Svenson and his team confirmed that it was actually a species of praying mantis that conspicuously mimics a wasp: not only does it mimic a wasp’s bright colors, but also a wasp’s movements. The mantis was, in fact, new to science, the researchers found, and they named it Vespamantoida wherleyi, in a new paper in the journal PeerJ.“Typically, the majority of species differentiation is discovered and confirmed within a lab or collection setting,” Svenson said in a statement. “To have that rare eureka moment where you know you have found something new in the field is incredibly exciting.”Most praying mantises rely on camouflage, both to avoid predators and to hunt. But they usually do so by mimicking leaves or tree bark and are brown or green. V. wherleyi, however, is brightly colored and has short, rapid, jerky movement patterns like those of many wasps. The mantis’s antennae movements are also similar to those of wasps, the authors write.“In nature, when you are intentionally conspicuous, you are advertising something,” Svenson said. “When you are a species that can be easily taken as prey, you advertise because you want predators to think that you are poisonous, or could injure them, or any combination of unpleasant factors that tell the predator to think twice before pursuing you.”The researchers found that the newly described species was quite similar to a species of praying mantis (formerly called Mantoida toulgoeti), previously described from French Guiana. The two species aren’t similar enough to be the same species, Svenson said. But the researchers concluded that the two species belonged to the same lineage or genus, which they have now named Vespamantoida, meaning wasp-mantis.A mantis mimicking wasps is rare, and the researchers now hope to study why this mimicry may have evolved.“I think the next natural thing is to study the evolutionary biology of the lineage,” Svenson said. “If wasp mimicry is successful in this lineage, why has it not evolved in the other lineages as well? Why have no other species within the family evolved brightly colored wasp mimicry? We’re just not sure.”Video of Vespamantoida wherleyi by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Banner image of Vespamantoida wherleyi by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Citation:Svenson, G. J., & Rodrigues, H. M. (2019). A novel form of wasp mimicry in a new species of praying mantis from the Amazon rainforest, Vespamantoida wherleyi gen. nov. sp. nov. (Mantodea, Mantoididae). PeerJ, 7, e7886. doi: 10.7717/peerj.7886 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Insects, New Species, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Conservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade ban

first_imgIn an effort to curb further spread of the deadly Coronavirus, China has temporarily banned the sale of wildlife.The virus outbreak that has killed 56 people in China has been traced to a market that sells wildlife.NGOs have embraced the move, and are calling for it to be made permanent.This comes as China prepares to host the 2020 Convention on Biological Diversity, a major conservation congress that aims to curb the current extinction crisis, in October. Conservationists are welcoming news that the Chinese Government has temporarily banned the sale of wildlife in markets, restaurants and over e-commerce as part of an effort to contain the Coronavirus outbreak, which has already claimed 56 lives. Defined as a zoonotic disease since it’s normally relegated to wildlife, it may have originated from a snake and has been traced to a market in the city of Wuhan known for selling wild animals for consumption, including turtles, rats, snakes, hedgehogs and marmots.“China is to be congratulated for taking such a bold move to ban the wildlife trade and we should encourage China to keep this ban in place permanently,” Steven Galster, founder of the anti-wildlife-trafficking group Freeland, said in a statement. “A sustained ban will save human lives, and contribute to a recovery of wildlife populations worldwide.”Christian Walzer, chief global veterinarian for the Wildlife Conservation Society, concurred.“The Chinese government’s announcement today to temporarily ban the sale of wildlife in markets, restaurants and over e-commerce needs to be permanent,” Walzer said in a press release. “The banning of such sales will help end the possibility of future outbreaks of zoonotic diseases, such as the Wuhan coronavirus. We learned this lesson with the outbreak of another zoonotic disease, SARS, in 2002. The pattern will keep repeating itself until we ban, not only in China, but in other countries, the sale of wildlife, specifically for food and in food markets.”China is the world’s largest market for wildlife products. Consumption of several rare and endangered species — for example, pangolins, rhinos, elephants, and totoaba — are considered among the biggest threats to their survival in the wild.Wildlife in a market in Asia. Photo by Rhett A ButlerBut while China’s temporary wildlife ban is seen as a positive for wildlife, it’s not certain that its overall response won’t result in a lot of dead animals, if the SARS outbreak is any indication, said Freeland.“China must avoid certain measures it took under SARS when it killed thousands of animals to prevent further outbreaks,” added Onkuri Majumdar, Managing Director at Freeland-Asia. “This is not the animals’ fault. If we leave them alone, leave them in the wild, such outbreaks won’t occur. This problem is caused by human consumption, lack of enforcement, and human greed.”“Keep the ban in place, enforce it, and watch the world’s biodiversity recover,” said Freeland’s founder Galster.“China can become the world’s new wildlife conservation leader,” added Kraisak. “We need one.”Pangolins rescued from wildlife traffickers. These individuals are at a rehabilitation center in Cambodia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Biodiversity is an issue that is garnering more attention in China of late as the country prepares to host the 2020 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a major conservation congress that aims to curb the current extinction crisis, in October. Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingProbing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, China wildlife trade, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Wildilfe, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking, Zoonotic Diseases last_img read more

Tuna supply chains under scrutiny as Bumble Bee brand changes hands

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Last month, Taiwan-based Fong Chun Formosa Fishery Company (FCF), one of the top three global tuna traders, bought U.S. canned-tuna brand Bumble Bee Foods for $928 million.The acquisition will significantly boost FCF’s economic clout and give it a public face through the sale of Bumble Bee products.FCF president Max Chou emphasized the companies’ mutual “commitment to sustainability and global fisheries conservation.”But differing definitions of what constitutes sustainability in the complex tuna industry, as well as concerns over workers’ rights, suggest there’s work to do to build confidence in the environmental and ethical pedigree of the cutely cartooned tuna cans on supermarket shelves. On Jan. 31, Taiwan-based Fong Chun Formosa Fishery Company (FCF), one of the top three global tuna traders, bought U.S. canned-tuna brand Bumble Bee Foods for $928 million.Bumble Bee, a 120-year-old business that holds a 22% share of the U.S.’s shelf-stable seafood market, declared bankruptcy late last year after pleading guilty to price-fixing alongside two other canned-tuna giants, StarKist and Chicken of the Sea.FCF has supplied Bumble Bee with tuna for the past three decades. The acquisition will significantly boost the company’s economic clout, and will also give it a public face through the sale of Bumble Bee products.In a statement following the sale, FCF president Max Chou emphasized the companies’ mutual “commitment to sustainability and global fisheries conservation.” But differing definitions of what constitutes sustainability in the complex tuna industry, as well as concerns over workers’ rights on distant-water fishing vessels, suggest there’s work to do to build confidence in the environmental and ethical pedigree of the cutely cartooned tuna cans on supermarket shelves.What does responsibility look like?Global tuna supply chains can be difficult to unravel: there are “a lot of layers of complexity” to the industry, Chris Anderson, a fisheries economist at the University of Washington, told Mongabay. Tuna are highly migratory, deep-ocean fish, “so there’s no one country that can possibly be in charge of ensuring [their] sustainability, because the individual animals swim throughout large regions of the ocean, and enter into the EEZ [exclusive economic zone] of many countries, and spend a lot of time where in fact nobody’s in charge,” he said. “So that makes it difficult on the regulatory side. It can also make them difficult to count.”In recent years, governments and industry and civil society groups have made concerted efforts to improve how they manage the world’s tuna stocks. Many canned-tuna brands now offer nods to sustainability on their packaging, though their claims often require scrutiny: “wild-caught,” for instance, means little in an industry in which very few fish are actually farmed.At face value, Bumble Bee’s sustainability credentials look robust. There’s a “Trace My Catch” page on its website, where customers can track the origin of every can of tuna, including the species, region, vessel and fishing technique used. The company is also a founding member of the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF), a global partnership between scientists, tuna processors and the international conservation NGO WWF.Even so, the NGO Greenpeace’s 2017 Tuna Shopping Guide gave Bumble Bee a failing grade for its sustainability and ethics, ranking the company 17th out of 20 well-known brands in the U.S. market. While it lauded Bumble Bee for its transparency via its catch-tracing website and its creation of a separate sustainable brand called Wild Selections, it criticized the company’s failure to provide any “responsibly caught” options under its flagship brand. Greenpeace defines “responsibly caught” as using methods that target mature tuna and limit bycatch, such as pole-and-line and trolling.Phillipine purse seine fishing. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Bumble Bee gets its skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) from purse seiners, which enclose all the fish in an area in a large net that’s drawn tight at the top and bottom. When used in conjunction with fish-aggregating devices (FADs), the nets catch large numbers of juvenile fish and considerable bycatch of other species. The company’s albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) comes from longliners, which also yield a lot of bycatch, including seabirds, sharks, turtles and dolphins. In fact, U.S. consumers last year brought lawsuits against Bumble Bee, StarKist and Chicken of the Sea for falsely labeling their products as “Dolphin Safe” despite using the above techniques, which are known to harm and kill dolphins.Greenpeace has also critiqued the validity of the ISSF as an industry front designed to protect companies from criticism on environmental and employment issues. However, Anderson said the ISSF has “done a pretty good job of … providing some industry pressure to do good science-based management of the stocks that they depend on. These people have plants that cost tens of millions of dollars to build, and they’ve got boats that are worth tens of millions of dollars — they want to be able to use these to make money catching and selling fish for the long term.”Anderson also said the skipjack and albacore stocks that Bumble Bee sources its fish from “are in good shape.”. He added that while FADs accumulate a higher proportion of bycatch than other methods, they make fishing trips very efficient. “The tradeoff presented by FADs is that you catch some other stuff, because there’s no single-species fish-attracting device,” he said, “but it saves a lot of fuel.”Anderson also said that the environmental impacts of tuna harvest are relatively low compared with many other protein sources. “If somebody is concerned about sustainability, and they’re looking at a can of tuna or a hamburger, there’s a very clear environmental choice, right?” he said. “The way that most of the tuna is caught, the fish stocks are sustainable and the carbon footprints are pretty low; it’s really among the more environmentally sustainable choices you can make.”Doubts over dataLisa Tsai, the East Asia lead for Greenpeace’s ocean campaign, told Mongabay the general lack of transparency in the industry calls into question the idea that tuna — and bycatch — is actually being taken out of the ocean at sustainable levels. She said Greenpeace has been pushing FCF and other tuna traders to make their catch and bycatch data public, “so that not only the authorities but also the academics will be able to do more studies to assess this situation.”Tsai also said that longliners benefit from monitoring loopholes. While all purse seiners in the Pacific are required to carry observers who check compliance with sustainability requirements, only 5% of longliners are required to do so. Longliners are also allowed to offload their catch to other vessels at sea, a practice known as transshipment, rather than returning to port to do so. “So it’s really hard to monitor what’s happening,” she said. “We should either increase observer coverage efficiently, or limit the time of these fishing vessels at sea, or ban transhipment at sea.”Greenpeace is not the only organization concerned about the lack of monitoring. In a June 2019 statement, 13 environmental NGOs, including Greenpeace and the ISSF, called for the world’s regional fisheries management organizations, international bodies that manage fish stocks in particular areas, to require observer coverage on all industrial tuna-fishing vessels.Bumble Bee and FCF are currently involved in a fishery improvement project (FIP) — a multi-stakeholder effort to improve the sustainability of a fishery — for longliners in the western and central Pacific Ocean. The project aims to increase observer coverage to 100% in five years’ time. FCF offers two FAD-free tuna programs, one of which is also certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). The company also has a sustainability policy that emphasizes traceability and meeting international standards, though it’s somewhat light on specifics.Frozen albacore tuna (Thunnus alalonga) on fishing boat in Pacific Ocean. Image courtesy of Greenpeace.Human rights on the high seasTsai said she’s concerned that the FIP is too slow-moving, and that while observers will be tasked with monitoring fishing data and illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, they won’t track labor conditions. In December 2019, a Greenpeace report exposed inhumane conditions for migrant workers on distant-water fishing vessels operating out of Taiwan — including some that supply FCF.Taiwan has different labor regulations for inshore and distant-water vessels. Many workers on distant-water vessels are migrants, and the regulation to protect them “is relatively weak,” Tsai said. The report authors found that agents who recruit workers often took large cuts of the wages they’d promised, and sometimes the money disappeared entirely. Once at sea, many workers reported being subjected to abuse, neglect, overwork, and denial of access to urgent medical care, which has resulted in a number of deaths.An FCF spokesperson declined to comment on questions from Mongabay. In a statement responding to an earlier (2018) Greenpeace report on the issue, FCF president Chou said that the human rights abuses referred to had already been addressed and that the company requires its fleet to meet social responsibility requirements and is committed to “ensuring respect for all fishing laborers.” However, he also acknowledged “considerable challenges related to our supply chains and eclectic providers.”Given FCF’s long-standing supplier relationship with Bumble Bee, and the monitoring challenges she outlined, Tsai said there’s a good chance that Bumble Bee consumers have already unwittingly consumed tuna that’s been caught using forced labor — thus contravening U.S. import laws. “These seafood giants like FCF and Thai Union need to have clear policies to deter these practices,” she said. “And that should apply to their whole supply chain.”Shoaling skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). Image by Tomas Kotouc.Monica Evans is a freelance writer based in Aotearoa, New Zealand, who specializes in environmental and community development issues. She has a master’s degree in development studies from Victoria University of Wellington. Find her at monicaevans.org.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporations, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Forced labor, Human Rights, Marine, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish, Sustainability, Tuna last_img read more

[Volley] Kamil Rychlicki, 2 ans chez le champion d’Europe !

first_imgLe joueur luxembourgeois va rejoindre le club italien de Cucine Lube Civitanova, récent champion d’Europe.C’est ce qu’on appelle une trajectoire fulgurante. Après avoir joué de longues années à Strassen, Kamil Rychlicki est passé pro à Maaseik, où il a évolué pendant deux saisons avant de rejoindre le club italien de Ravenne, cette saison.Le réceptionneur attaquant luxembourgeois a brillé de mille feux, en terminant cinquième meilleur scoreur du championnat transalpin, l’un des meilleurs au monde. Auteur de 495 points en 25 matches, il a visiblement tapé dans l’œil des plus grands puisqu’il s’est donc engagé pour deux ans (et une troisième année en option) pour le club qui vient de s’imposer à Berlin, face au Zenit Kazan, en finale de la Ligue des Champions. Actuellement au Monténégro, où il prépare les JPEE, le joueur de 22 ans n’en finit pas de gravir les marches vers les plus hauts sommets.Wëllkomm KamilDiamo qui il #benvenuto al nostro nuovo opposto Rychlicki! #wellkommkamil.#noisiamolube #finoallultimopunto #convoi #WMHA #campioniditalia #campionideuropa #lubevolley #civitanovamarche #clvolleym #volleyball #superlega pic.twitter.com/VQim7LXrdB— A.S. Volley Lube Civitanova (@VolleyLube) 22 mai 2019 Partagerlast_img read more

“Neymar veut revenir”, confirme le vice-président du Barça

first_imgLe dirigeant a assuré que le Barça était avant tout concentré sur l’aspect départs en ce début de mercato, afin d’équilibrer ses comptes et de dégager de la trésorerie. “Pour le moment, nous sommes dans la phase où nous décidons sur quels joueurs nous ne compterons pas l’an prochain”, a souligné Cardoner. “Nous ne recrutons personne en ce moment, encore moins ce joueur (Neymar) avec lequel nous n’avons pas été en contact”, a-t-il assuré. LQ/AFP Deux ans après son retentissant départ du Barça vers le PSG en échange de 222 M €, record mondial, Neymar anime à nouveau le marché estival des transferts : plusieurs médias ont rapporté que le club parisien ne fermerait pas la porte à un départ en cas d’offre XXL pour le Brésilien, actuellement blessé (il a dû renoncer à la Copa America) et visé par des accusations de viol. La presse a néanmoins fait état de contacts noués via des intermédiaires entre le PSG et le Barça, qui risque de devoir se séparer de plusieurs grands noms, comme Philippe Coutinho ou Ousmane Dembélé, pour financer un éventuel retour du Brésilien. Depuis que l’avenir de Neymar à Paris paraît incertain, le Barça a été cité comme un point de chute possible : le Brésilien, qui y a passé quatre saisons (2013-2017) et gagné une Ligue des champions (2015), reste très ami du capitaine Lionel Messi et de l’avant-centre Luis Suarez, avec qui il formait jadis un redoutable trio offensif baptisé “MSN”. Partagercenter_img “Ce qui est correct, à l’heure actuelle, ce que j’ai lu, ce que j’ai entendu, ce qui semble exact, c’est que Neymar veut revenir au Barça”, a déclaré Jordi Cardoner lors d’une conférence de presse au Camp Nou. “Mais que le Barça soit en train de s’occuper du recrutement de Neymar, c’est une partie (de la question) sur laquelle je ne peux pas être d’accord. Pour le moment, la seule chose qui est en train de se passer, et pas seulement avec Neymar, c’est qu’il y a de nombreux joueurs qui veulent pouvoir jouer dans une grande équipe comme le FC Barcelone. Nous verrons ce qui arrivera en temps utile”, a-t-il ajouté. Le quotidien catalan Sport a pour sa part écrit mardi que Neymar (27 ans) aurait trouvé un “accord verbal” avec le Barça sur un retour et un contrat de cinq ans. Jordi Cardoner, premier vice-président du club et fidèle du président Josep Maria Bartomeu, a néanmoins assuré jeudi que le dossier Neymar n’avait pas été évoqué par le comité de direction. “Il est probable que Neymar veuille revenir au Barça mais nous, en comité directeur, nous n’avons pas étudié ce sujet, cela n’a pas été mis sur la table”, a-t-il dit. “Neymar veut revenir au Barça”, a confirmé jeudi Jordi Cardoner, vice-président du FC Barcelone, tout en assurant que la direction blaugrana n’avait pour le moment pas étudié ce dossier ni pris contact avec l’attaquant brésilien du Paris SG, dont l’avenir suscite toutes les spéculations. last_img read more