Asian elephants gang up in a bid to survive an increasingly human world

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, human-elephant conflict, Human-wildlife Conflict, Research Adolescent elephants in south India are adapting to human-dominated landscapes, probably to learn from older bulls how not to get killed by people.These unusual associations, which can last for several years, were not recorded 20 years ago.Researchers say it’s important to use this information to mitigate human-elephant conflict, including by not removing old bulls that don’t raid crops, which can pass down this behavior to young elephants. Matriarch grandmas, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews: elephants, much like us, have complex social lives. But Asian elephants in southern India could be changing their social lives just to adapt to human-use landscapes that are fast replacing their natural habitats.Young male elephants, which are typically solitary, are now forming unusually large, and more long-term, all-male herds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports last week. This adaptation could be an effort to learn the ropes from older, more knowledgeable males on how to avoid getting killed in these areas that pose unnaturally high risks to elephants.To elephants, human-dominated areas near forests, such as agricultural fields that often replace natural forests and connect one fragmented forest with another, are much like supermarkets: there is always abundant food to choose from. And if you’re a hungry, fast-growing, young male elephant, there’s nothing like feasting on cultivated crops (cereals like paddy and millets are far higher in nutrients such as protein, calcium and sodium than forest fare such as wild grasses) to boost growth and health, both of which are important requisites to attain mates.Social interaction between younger and older male elephants. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Big risks, big gainsBut the risks an elephant has to run if it ventures into human-dominated areas are many: stress and physical injuries caused when people chase elephants away from crops, capture of “problem elephants,” as well as deaths due to retaliation, electrocution, train accidents and poaching. But though the risks are high, so are the gains. A study in northern Karnataka state, for instance, found that crop-based diets are so rich that they even lower the stress levels of crop-foraging elephants.Wildlife biologist Nishant Srinivasaiah would often spot such elephant herds moving across human-use areas, including farmland, near his long-term study site in Karnataka’s Bannerghatta National Park. His interest in elephant behavior even got him analyzing YouTube videos of human-elephant interactions from the region. That’s when he noticed something unusual: some of the elephant groups were comprised only or mostly of males.“Why were male elephants moving across human-use areas?” Srinivasaiah wondered. “Where were they going? But there were other individual males who stayed largely within the forest.“This got me interested in digging deeper into the individual idiosyncrasies and decision-making in male elephants in the landscape in general and their sociality,” he said.To find out if environmental factors such as habitat contiguity and human presence influenced the sociality of male Asian elephants (whether an individual preferred to be alone or in a group), Srinivasaiah and his colleagues first identified an approximately 10,000-square-kilometre (3,900-square-mile) landscape that included protected areas (Bannerghatta National Park, Cauvery and Cauvery North wildlife sanctuaries), reserve forests, human settlements and agricultural land across southern Karnataka and northern Tamil Nadu.Field surveys and information from forest guards helped the team short-list areas that both people and elephants used, to install camera traps. Of the 20,124 photographs of elephants they obtained between February 2016 and December 2017 from these camera traps, the team identified individual elephants from 1,430 photos and categorized them into three groups: mixed-sex groups (containing male and female elephants), all-male groups, and solitary males. The team then categorized each of the 248 male elephants they identified from these groups into age classes. Age correlates with sexual maturity, so the team could also classify every male as either a juvenile (less than 10 years old and sexually immature), adolescent or sexually mature but socially immature (10 to 20 years), or mature (both sexually and socially mature, more than 20 years of age).Recent long-term associationsAs expected, the photographs revealed that juvenile males were spotted mostly in mixed-sex groups; male elephants continue to stay in the herd they are born into until they hit adolescence. The results also revealed that in forest habitats, male elephants tended to become increasingly solitary with age. Male bulls were, therefore, mostly solitary. But adolescents were either solitary or in all-male groups, in equal proportions. These males were most likely to be part of all-male groups and grouped with other males in large herds of up to 12 elephants, almost exclusively in croplands also containing isolated forest patches — a sign that these recent all-male groups could be there in response to environmental factors.These all-male groups also stuck together for an unusually long time. While it’s common for some males to team up with others for a single season or a few weeks, these new all-male groups lasted for “a few years,” according to the authors. Interestingly, studies conducted in the same region more than two decades earlier don’t mention such large and stable all-male groups at all, the authors add.These male elephants forming long-term associations is more than just co-occurrence or grouping by chance, says Srinivasaiah. One possibility is “social buffering,” where the social support system derived from being part of a group can help “buffer” or reduce stress. While social buffering is a known phenomenon among elephants, there could be another reason these adolescent male elephants are grouping together, Srinivasaiah said.“These elephants need to learn to utilize the novel landscape efficiently and to avoid getting killed,” he said. “Hence, associating with older, more knowledgeable and experienced males is a strategy used by some of the younger males to survive and persist in high-risk landscapes. Otherwise, they would have had to do the same through trial and error, which could be costly.”The establishment of these all-male groups in response to anthropogenic factors, thereby modifying their own sociality, is an important finding that suggests not just how adaptable elephants are, but also how human influence is changing the natural life around us, Srinivasaiah said.Anthropocene woesWidespread habitat loss is one of the hallmarks of the Anthropocene, the geological age defined by pervasive human influence on the natural world. If elephant home ranges within forests continue to be taken over for non-forest activities, the animals will have to adapt to the change or perish, Srinivasaiah said.“Elephants are survivors, hence most often they will choose alternative ways to persist; and feeding from crop fields even if it’s risky cannot be discounted,” he said.Elephants are arguably one of the most adaptive of mammalian species, and their social behavior may vary depending on environmental conditions, says Prithiviraj Fernando, trustee of the Centre for Conservation and Research in Sri Lanka, who studies Asian elephants in the island nation and was not involved in the recent study in India.“For example in Sri Lanka, large all-male groups are observed primarily in areas with high resource availability,” he said.This study is one of the first to focus on male Asian elephant sociality and how it varies in relation to habitat conditions, he wrote in an email to Mongabay. “Conducting studies similar in other parts of the range would help determine whether the patterns observed by Srinivasaiah and his colleagues are unique to their study area or characteristic of Asian elephants everywhere,” Fernando said.A solitary adolescent male elephant caught on camera trap at night within forested habitat. Image courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.Mitigating conflictAccording to the authors of the study, it’s “imperative that future attention is focused on the management and conservation of [these] young dispersing males” to mitigate the potential for increased human-elephant conflicts in agricultural landscapes.“Young dispersing males are very impressionable and if associated with non-crop foraging older bulls, will not learn crop-foraging behavior or can even unlearn it,” Srinivasaiah said. Mitigation measures such as capturing key individuals within a bull group may therefore backfire, he said, as these older and experienced bulls are essential in a male elephant society to help guide the younger bulls and also discipline them when moving across villages, thus keeping conflict to a minimum.“The key to living with elephants may lie in understanding their social complexity and harnessing this new found knowledge to learn how to modify our own lifestyle practices to make them more compatible with the elephants’ use of an area, and be more flexible in our own approaches and behavior towards elephants,” Srinivasaiah said.Citations:Srinivasaiah, N., Kumar, V., Vaidyanathan, S., Sukumar, R., & Sinha, A. (2019). All-male groups in Asian elephants: A novel, adaptive social strategy in increasingly anthropogenic landscapes of southern India. Scientific Reports, 9(1). doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45130-1Sukumar, R. (1990). Ecology of the Asian elephant in southern India. II. Feeding habits and crop raiding patterns. Journal of Tropical Ecology, 6(1), 33-53. doi:10.1017/s0266467400004004Pokharel, S. S., Singh, B., Seshagiri, P. B., & Sukumar, R. (2018). Lower levels of glucocorticoids in crop‐raiders: Diet quality as a potential ‘pacifier’ against stress in free‐ranging Asian elephants in a human‐production habitat. Animal Conservation, 22(2), 177-188. doi:10.1111/acv.12450Banner image of an all-male elephant group moving toward a banana plantation on the outskirts of Bengaluru, India, courtesy of Nishant Srinivasaiah/FEP.center_img Article published by dilrukshilast_img read more

Let there be lights, to help migratory cranes avoid power lines

first_imgAnimals, Birds, Conservation Solutions, Human-wildlife Conflict, Migration, Technology, Wildlife, Wildtech Article published by Sue Palminteri A test of a new system deploying ultraviolet (UV) lights on power lines greatly reduced potentially deadly collisions with the lines by migrating sandhill cranes.Developers of the Avian Collision Avoidance System, or ACAS, randomly assigned the system to be on or off each night of a four-month testing period.Turning on the lighting system reduced crane collisions by 98 percent and enabled crane flocks to more quickly and calmly avoid the power lines while in flight.Many birds can detect UV light, though humans cannot, so the system has potential to reduce a major threat to a range of migratory species without affecting the visibility of structures to humans. Cranes are celebrated for their large size, beauty, unique courtship dancing, and extensive annual migrations.Sandhill cranes (Antigone canadensis), for example, migrate north each year from wintering grounds in Mexico and the southwestern United States to breeding sites across Canada, the northern U.S., and eastern Siberia. Along the way, they stop to rest and refuel at various wetlands and river basins of the western and midwestern U.S.Stopover points are essential to the birds’ migrations and subsequent breeding periods. Although the loss of wetland habitats at stopover and breeding sites is the main threat to sandhills and other cranes, midflight collisions with power lines during migration affect 12 of the world’s 15 crane species, including sandhills.Every year, hundreds of thousands of sandhill cranes congregate on the Platte River in Nebraska during their spring migration, forming large flocks that use the river’s sandbars as a nighttime refuge before dispersing to local fields to feed during the day. Image courtesy of Larry Crist/USFWS.Electric utility companies mark power lines with glow-in-the-dark line markers to try to mitigate the problem. These attempts to make power lines more visible to these large birds have been only partially successful, however, as most collisions occur at night, when the power lines are least visible to birds.A new approach considers bird visionA team of engineering consultants at EDM International has developed a new system that shines near-ultraviolet (UV) lights on power lines, as many bird species are sensitive to UV frequencies. The team tested its system, which it calls the Avian Collision Avoidance System, or ACAS, at a major migratory stopover site for many thousands of sandhill cranes.Hundreds of sandhill cranes die each year by colliding with the power lines at their testing site, the Iain Nicholson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary in Nebraska’s Central Platte River Valley, despite the lines having previously been marked with line markers.Use of the new system substantially reduced the number of collisions between the cranes and a power line that crosses the Central Platte River. The team published its findings and system designs earlier this year with the hopes of advancing a solution to the conflict between human structures and migratory wildlife.In searching for a better way to reduce bird-power line collisions, lead author James Dwyer and colleagues learned that many groups of birds are sensitive to energy wavelengths shorter than what humans can detect, which is roughly 400 nanometers (nm). They developed the ACAS using near-ultraviolet wavelengths of 320 to 400 nm to make the power lines more visible to the cranes without increasing their visibility to people.A power line lit up by near-ultraviolet lights mounted on the line’s supporting structures. Many bird species are sensitive to UV wavelengths, suggesting that the Avian Collision Avoidance System UV lights can help birds see human structures at night. Image courtesy of James F. Dwyer/EDM International, Inc.The system design mounts the UV lights on the supporting structures of a problematic power line and shines the lights on the line itself.“The lights go on the existing tower that holds up the power line,” Dwyer told Mongabay. “Ideally they go on the crossarm or lattice arm that supports the wires.”The construction they tested consisted of four low-wattage UV-A lights, powered by two solar panels and storage batteries, a control box, cables connecting the various components, and a remote control. The authors estimated their total cost came to roughly $6,000, including some UV lights they tested but didn’t deploy in their final version.The ACAS setup on a power line over the Central Platte River in Nebraska. Solar panels and batteries power the system, lights mounted on the posts light up the lines that cross the river. Image courtesy of James F. Dwyer/EDM International, Inc.They tested the ACAS between February and June of 2018, the period when migrating sandhill cranes were in the area. The team randomly assigned the system to be on or off each night, and, from a blind, they watched the behavior of flocks of cranes flying along the river for about five hours on test nights, from dusk to four and a half hours after sunset.They recorded any collisions with the approximately 15-meter-high (50-foot) power line, the birds’ flight behavior after a collision, and their reactions as they approached the power line. The observers also estimated the perpendicular distances with which cranes flying up the river reacted to the power line, with reactions within 25 meters (80 feet) of the line considered risky or dangerous.The observers considered reactions that resulted in the cranes passing over the power line at heights less than 25 meters as “dangerous” flights, even if no collision occurred.A surprisingly strong resultDuring the four-month study, they recorded 916 flocks of cranes passing the power lines and 49 collisions, only one of which occurred when the ACAS system was on. In addition to this 98 percent reduction in collisions, they also documented 82 percent fewer dangerous flights and quicker, more controlled reactions by the cranes to avoid hitting the power lines when the system was on.Hundreds of thousands of sandhill cranes stop along the Platte River in the midwestern U.S. to rest and refuel on their annual migrations. They often travel at night, so the ACAS system’s aim is to help cranes and other birds see power lines and other human structures in the dark, enabling them to safely reach their destinations. Image courtesy of James F. Dwyer/EDM International, Inc.“We think the birds could clearly see the line in the dark even though it was still invisible to us,” Dwyer said.In a statement, Dwyer said he was surprised at the strength of the findings. “I thought perhaps there could be a more effective approach” to reducing collisions, he said. “I thought it would have some effect, but I didn’t dare think the ACAS would pretty much solve the sandhill crane collision problem at our study site on our first try.”A greater sandhill crane reacts to a bald eagle approaching the crane’s chick hidden nearby. Sandhill cranes are large and will aggressively defend their young from potential predators. Image courtesy of Tom Koerner/USFWS.The ACAS developers want to expand their project to other locations and species. “Installation and monitoring is 100% replicable,” Dwyer said. “We need to do more studies with other species, habitats, line configurations, etc., to see if the results are replicable.“We are very interested in collaborating at other sites to conduct additional testing,” he added.The authors suggest in their paper that UV lights could also help to reduce collisions of large migratory birds with wind turbines, as well as keep smaller migrants far from buildings, towers, and other structures that become deadly at night. As power lines and wind turbines proliferate, the authors propose testing various configurations of lights to illuminate the most problematic parts of structures and to be sure the lights don’t affect behavior of insects or other wildlife.Citation:Dwyer, J. F., Pandey, A. K., McHale, L. A., & Harness, R. E. (2019). Near-ultraviolet light reduced sandhill crane collisions with a power line by 98%. The Condor: Ornithological Applications, 121(2). doi:10.1093/condor/duz008FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesian officials foil attempt to smuggle hornbill casques to Hong Kong

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Extinction, Global Trade, Hunting, Law, Law Enforcement, Organized Crime, Over-hunting, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Indonesian authorities have arrested a woman for allegedly attempting to smuggle 72 helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) casques to Hong Kong.The distinctive-looking bird is critically endangered, its precipitous decline driven by poaching for its casque — a solid, ivory-like protuberance on its head that’s highly prized in East Asia for use as ornamental carvings.Tackling the hornbill trade will be on the agenda at next month’s CITES wildlife trade summit in Geneva. JAKARTA — Authorities in Indonesia have seized 72 highly prized hornbill casques and arrested a woman for allegedly attempting to smuggle them out of the country.The seizure occurred at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport outside Jakarta on July 17, with the ivory-like casques wrapped in tinfoil and hidden in biscuit cans. The woman, identified only as a 48-year-old, had placed the cans in her carry-on bag for a flight to Hong Kong, according to a statement from the environment ministry.“She claims she’s just a courier,” Sustyo Iriono, an enforcement official at the ministry, told Mongabay in a text message. He added that the woman had been charged under the 1990 Conservation Law, for which she could face up to five years in prison and up to 100 million rupiah ($7,200) in fines if convicted.Indonesian authorities present the seized hornbill casques and the alleged smuggler, third from right, to the press in Jakarta. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.The 72 seized casques come from the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil), a large bird with a distinctive helmet-like protuberance on its head that can account for up to an eighth of its total weight. The species is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List, its precipitous decline driven by demand for these casques, also known as red ivory and highly prized in East Asia for ornamental carvings.The helmeted hornbill is a protected species under Indonesian law. Sustyo said his office had launched an investigation to track down other members of what authorities suspect is a much wider poaching and trafficking network.“We continue to beef up security and monitoring for all activities of protected wildlife trade at airports, seaports and bus terminals,” he added.Yokyok Hadiprakarsa, executive director of the Indonesian Hornbill Conservation Society (IHCS), welcomed news of the seizure but said the incident proved that poaching of helmeted hornbills was still a serious problem.“The demand is still there and the offering price remains attractive: low cost, high profit,” he told Mongabay in an email. Yokyok added that poaching and illegal trade in wildlife appeared to be increasingly secretive and better organized.China and Hong Kong are top destinations for hornbill casques, Yokyok said. In January 2013, airport authorities detained four Chinese nationals for attempting to smuggle 248 casques out of the country to Hong Kong. They were also found to be carrying pangolin scales, another highly trafficked commodity. Later that same month, authorities in the Indonesian Bornean province of West Kalimantan arrested a Chinese man for attempting to smuggle 24 hornbill casques. He later told investigators that he typically sent the casques to Hong Kong and Taiwan.Two of the hornbill casques that were destined for Hong Kong before their seizure on July 17. Image courtesy of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.A 2013 investigation supported by the Chester Zoo Conservation Award found that 6,000 helmeted hornbills were killed for their casques in a single year in West Kalimantan.According to the wildlife trade watchdog TRAFFIC, 2,170 hornbill heads or casques were seized from the illegal trade in Indonesia and China between March 2012 and August 2014.“What’s interesting is that the trade of helmeted hornbill has led to the hunting and illegal trade of other hornbill birds,” Yokyok said.Pushing these birds toward extinction could also have severe repercussions for their forest habitats, he said. Helmeted hornbills feed mostly on fruit, and their long flying range means they’re hugely important in the dispersal of fruit trees throughout their habitat — “the forest’s true farmers,” Yokyok called them.He called on investigators to carry out DNA tests on the newly seized casques to determine where they came from, and also to assess the population status of helmeted hornbills in Borneo and Sumatra.He added that tackling the trade in helmeted hornbill parts would be on the agenda at next month’s summit of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in Geneva.“The threats from hunting and trade are still real,” Yokyok said. “Conservation actions at grassroots levels become important as it starts from there.”The helmeted hornbill is one of Southeast Asia’s most distinctive birds, with a large ivory-like casque that’s used by males for jousting. Dubbed “red ivory,” the scarlet-tinged casques are highly valued in East Asia for use as ornamental carvings. Image by Yokyok Hadiprakarsa/IHCS.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Ligue des champions : Haland, 19 ans et un triplé en moins d’une mi-temps

first_imgArrivé à Salzbourg cette saison, Haland, fils de l’ancien joueur de Manchester City Alf-Inge, a signé sa performance juste avant la pause pour devenir le troisième plus jeune auteur d’un triplé en C1, à 19 ans et 58 jours.Le plus jeune reste Raul (18 ans et 113 jours en 1995), juste devant Wayne Rooney (18 ans et 340 jours en 2004).LQ/AFP A seulement 19 ans, le Norvégien Erling Braut Haland a ravi la vedette à toutes les stars du football européen en réussissant le premier triplé de la saison en Ligue des champions lors de l’écrasante victoire du RB Leipzig devant Genk (6-2), mardi.L’international norvégien a ouvert le score dès la 2e minute avant de doubler son total personnel peu après la demi-heure de jeu (34e). Partagerlast_img read more

Champions et anonymes ont rendu un dernier hommage à Raymond Poulidor

first_imgLes habitants de Saint-Léonard, ce bourg de Haute-Vienne où Raymond Poulidor résidait, étaient présents, comme Jeanine, «très triste. Il a tant fait pour la notoriété de Saint-Léonard. Lorsqu’en vacances nous parlions de notre village, les gens nous répondaient “le village de Poulidor”», dit-elle des sanglots dans la voix.À l’intérieur de la Collégiale, Claude Mazeaud, 82 ans, est venu de Lalinde, en Dordogne, à 2 h 30 de route. “J’étais coéquipier avec lui en 1962 et 1963. C’est très dur pour moi. C’est une image du cyclisme qui disparaît, notre génération. On était vraiment copains”, raconte-t-il. “Je suis allé le voir à l’hôpital quand il était malade, il souffrait.”À l’entrée de Saint-Léonard, une grande banderole postée au-dessus de la route saluait les visiteurs d’un message sobre : “Merci Poupou” accompagné de la photo de Raymond. Au-dessus du porche de la Collégiale, un grand portrait de “Poupou” dans ses vieux jours, mais toujours sur sa bicyclette, faisait un grand geste d’adieu souriant.D’anciennes gloires du cyclisme étaient présentes“Il va nous manquer. C’est sûr, ça fait un grand vide”, soupirait Bernard Thévenet, vainqueur de deux Tours de France, saluant un champion “connu de façon intergénérationelle. Connu par des gens qui ne l’ont pas vu sur un vélo ! Ce qu’on peut regretter, c’est qu’il ne verra pas tous les succès de son petit-fils Mathieu van der Poel.” Trés ému, Bernard Hinault n’a pour sa part pas souhaité s’exprimer tôt mardi.Peu après l’arrivée de la ministre des Sports, Roxana Maracineanu, le cercueil de Poulidor, salué par les applaudissements de la foule, est entré dans l’église, porté notamment par Thévénet et Hinault, au son d’un air d’accordéon qu’il aimait, “Bruyères corréziennes“.À l’intérieur de la Collégiale romane, dans le chœur, trônaient deux grandes images du champion aux prises avec ses deux rivaux historiques, Jacques Anquetil, lors d’un duel mythique des deux hommes au sommet du Puy-de-Dôme, et Eddy Merckx.La cérémonie devait durer toute la matinée, avant que le champion soit incinéré dans l’intimité l’après-midi.LQ/AFP Partager Plusieurs centaines d’anonymes assistaient mardi dans le village limousin de Saint-Léonard de Noblat aux obsèques de Raymond Poulidor, mort mercredi 13 novembre à l’âge de 83 ans.Sous un froid vif et un léger brouillard, les plus fidèles s’étaient massés dès l’aube derrière les barrières barrant l’accès de la collégiale, où près de 500 personnes ont pris place pour une cérémonie religieuse mêlant accordéon, évangiles et hommage du directeur du tour de France, Christian Prudhomme.last_img read more

[Football] Barça – Real, un nul et 12 blessés

first_imgLe Clasico s’est achevé sur un score nul et vierge (0-0) au terme d’une rencontre marquée par les revendications politiques des supporters catalans.Dans un contexte tendu, avec une brève interruption du match par des revendications indépendantistes et une charge de police près du Camp Nou, Barcelone et le Real Madrid ont fait match nul 0-0 ce mercredi dans un Clasico accroché, et continuent, plus égaux que jamais, de se partager la première place du Championnat d’Espagne. Avec Messi, Benzema, certaines des plus grandes stars du ballon rond présentes sur la pelouse, et les deux meilleures attaques de Liga, on attendait des buts, et du spectacle… Mais c’est un constat évident qui s’est imposé: presque à mi-saison, les deux géants du foot espagnol font jeu égal, et ont fini par se neutraliser à 0-0, pour la première fois depuis 2002.Si le Barça reste leader au prix d’une victoire supplémentaire, le Clasico a été équilibré, engagé, rugueux… et parsemé d’erreurs techniques, car les joueurs ont semblé quelque peu timorés par l’enjeu sportif et le lourd contexte politique. «Il se dit beaucoup de choses autour mais en fin de compte, ce que les gens veulent voir, c’est un bon match de football», avait résumé Zidane mardi. Mais après des revendications politiques moins importantes qu’attendu, et un match bridé, les gens n’ont eu ni l’un, ni l’autre. Partager Le Real Madrid a eu la maîtrise du ballon pendant une grosse heure de jeu, multipliant les situations de danger dans la surface de Marc-André ter Stegen, en enchaînant les centres. Mais à l’instar d’un Raphaël Varane chahuté tour à tour par Ivan Rakitic, Sergi Roberto, et Gerard Piqué, le Barça n’a jamais su imposer suffisamment son physique pour faire la différence.Les Barcelonais, eux non plus, n’ont pas eu les occasions suffisantes en contre: les coups de génie de Lionel Messi, récemment couronné d’un sixième Ballon d’Or et qui disputait son 42e Clasico (un de moins que le recordman madrilène Sergio Ramos, 43), n’ont pas suffi cette fois. Comme sur cette reprise de volée opportune (30e) ou cette louche bien sentie pour Jordi Alba (40e), finalement infructueuses, “la Pulga” a manqué l’occasion de conclure sa fabuleuse année 2019 en beauté.Entre les attaquants Karim Benzema ou Antoine Griezmann, pour sa première, un joueur français aurait pu s’illustrer, pour le clasico le plus tricolore de tous les temps (cinq joueurs français ont été alignés pour la première fois sur les 22 titulaires mercredi, avec Lenglet, Griezmann côté blaugrana; et Benzema, Mendy et Varane côté merengue, sans compte Zidane).center_img Les Catalans scandent “Llibertat”Tifo géant, banderoles, cris “Llibertat!”: le public du Camp Nou a fait entendre ses revendications indépendantistes avant le coup d’envoi et pendant le clasico entre le FC Barcelone et le Real Madrid, ce mercredi soir. À  la 55e minute, des dizaines de ballons de plage ont été lancées sur la pelouse depuis les gradins, pour protester contre les balles en gomme tirées par la police pour réprimer les manifestations indépendantistes, ces derniers mois. Le match a donc été interrompu pendant une minute, le temps de dégager ces ballons de l’aire de jeu. Auparavant, avant le début du matc, un tifo géant a été déployé aux couleurs rouge, bleu et jaune, celles du Barça et de la Catalogne. L’hymne du club a été entonné par les près de 100.000 supporters présents au stade du Camp Nou. Et entre la fin de l’hymne et le coup d’envoi de la rencontre, des milliers de banderoles bleues ont été brandies sous les cris “Llibertat” (liberté, en catalan).C’était l’action prévue par la plateforme indépendantiste Tsunami Démocratique, qui a distribué ces banderoles bleues dès ce mercredi après-midi lors des manifestations qui ont réuni près de 5000 sympathisants autour du stade selon les forces de l’ordre. À noter qu’après la mise à feu d’une barricade à l’extérieur du Camp Nou, la police a chargé des centaines d’indépendantistes. Bilan : douze blessés chez les manifestants.last_img read more

[Cyclisme] Le phénomène Evenepoel

first_imgLes médias belges n’ont (presque) d’yeux que pour lui. Remco Evenepoel (19 ans) jouit d’une cote hors norme dans un pays qui en a déjà fait le successeur d’Eddy Merckx.À le croiser furtivement dans les couloirs de l’hôtel Suitopia, ce petit gars n’attire pas forcément le regard. Pourtant, du haut de son 1,71 m et de ses 61 kg, sa carrure est inversement proportionnelle à son statut. À 19 ans, Remco Evenepoel incarne l’espoir de tout un pays. Son nom revient inlassablement sur les lèvres des journalistes belges.Son histoire semble sortir tout droit d’un conte de fées. D’une légende. Celle d’un jeune footballeur d’Anderlecht, international U16, passé du jour au lendemain au cyclisme avec une insolente réussite. En 2017, ses premiers coups de pédale marquent les esprits des suiveurs.Un an plus tard, certains d’entre eux viennent entendre le phénomène fraîchement sacré aux Mondiaux juniors sur route d’Innsbruck. «Lors de sa conférence de presse, même le chef de la rubrique cyclisme de La Gazetta dello Sport était là. Quelque chose s’est passé…» Cette confidence est signée Stéphane Thirion. Journaliste cyclisme au journal Le Soir depuis 1999, il fut «sidéré par l’aisance avec laquelle ce gamin s’exprimait. Que ce soit en français, néerlandais ou anglais.» Au-delà de son élocution, son verbe séduit. «Il ne parle pas, il dit quelque chose. Il y a de la matière. Je ne dis pas que c’est quelque chose de rare dans l’univers du sportif de haut niveau, mais c’est appréciable», fait remarquer Christophe Vandegoor, journaliste chez Sporza. Remco Evenepoel pèse-t-il pour autant ses mots? Quand le jeune homme annonce qu’en cette année 2020 ses objectifs sont «Liège-Bastogne-Liège, les JO de Tokyo, un titre au Mondial et le Tour de Lombardie», ça interpelle. «Si on ne le connaissait pas, on aurait presque tendance à se demander : mais pour qui il se prend?» Je n’ai jamais vu un coureur de son gabarit rouler aussi bien en contre-la-montreMais voilà, à écouter Christophe Vandegoor, le natif de Schepdael peut se le permettre. «Un autre verrait cette ambition lui être reprochée. On y verrait de la prétention. Or, de par sa façon d’être, son sourire et sa gentillesse, ce n’est pas le cas. D’ailleurs, sa popularité en Belgique a vite augmenté.» Cette cote, Remco Evenepoel la doit, évidemment, à ses performances, mais aussi à une forme d’emballement médiatique. «Les Belges n’ont pas leur pareil pour trouver de nouveaux Eddy Merckx. On l’avait trouvé en Fons De Wolf, Daniel Willems, Frank Vandenbroucke…», s’amuse Stéphane Thirion, tout en rappelant que le Cannibale lui-même a récemment déclaré qu’Evenepoel «est plus fort que (lui)». Cette comparaison ne date pas d’hier, mais de l’an dernier lorsque les médias la faisaient déjà ici même à Calpe, en présence du phénomène.Cet engouement, Patrick Lefevere prenait soin de la tempérer, arguant que son poulain allait disputer sa première saison chez les pros. Pour le patron de Deceuninck Quick-Step, considéré par Evenepoel comme «son deuxième père», dixit Christophe Vandegoor, pas question de lui brûler les ailes. Celles-là même qui, aux Mondiaux d’Innsbruck, malgré une chute et deux minutes de retard, lui permirent de remonter seul tout un peloton et de s’imposer en solitaire. «Bon, des gars qui font des exploits chez les juniors, j’en ai vu 150, mais lui, c’est autre chose», assure un Stéphane Thirion admiratif : «Je n’ai jamais vu un coureur de son gabarit rouler aussi bien en contre-la-montre. Il dégage une telle puissance.»«Ce qui est fou, c’est qu’on a l’impression qu’il ne force pas», ajoute Christophe Vandegoor marqué par son succès au Tour de Belgique et son numéro lors d’une 2e étape où Victor Campenaerts, recordman de l’heure, qui tentait de rester dans sa roue, partit à la faute dans un virage. «Ce jour-là, note Stéphane Thirion, il s’empare du maillot de leader et le défendra avec une grande maîtrise. Et même si c’est peut-être plus facile de le faire sous le maillot de la Quick-Step qu’avec un autre, c’est à souligner.». Tout comme son numéro dans la Clásica San Sebastián. «Lâché à 50 bornes de l’arrivée, il revient sur le groupe de tête, jauge ses adversaires et part seul à quinze kilomètres de l’arrivée pour l’emporter.» En 2020, Patrick Lefevere le dit lui-même, sa pépite ne «pourra pas compter sur l’effet de surprise». Alors, autant mettre cartes sur table d’emblée.Vendredi matin, La Gazetta dello Sport venait de recueillir la confidence de Remco Evenepoel lui-même qu’il disputerait bien le Giro. De quoi susciter une pointe d’envie chez les compatriotes du coureur. Si l’intéressé s’y présentera pour y fourbir ses armes, Stéphane Thirion ouvre la boîte à souvenirs. «Jurgen Van den Broeck avait fait 3e en 2010 et 4e en 2012 du Tour de France, mais des coureurs capables de gagner un grand tour, la Belgique n’en a pas eu depuis… depuis longtemps.» Depuis Johan De Muynck, vainqueur du Tour d’Italie 1978 alors qu’il s’y alignait comme lieutenant de Felice Gimondi. «On ne se souvient pas de moi? C’est normal. J’ai peut-être roulé dans la pire période finalement… Il y avait tellement de bons coureurs belges», déclarait De Muynck en mai 2018 à la RTBF.Aujourd’hui, Remco Evenepoel est peut-être le seul Belge à pouvoir inscrire son nom, à l’avenir, au palmarès d’un Grand Tour. Mais avant, il ambitionne de succéder à Philippe Gilbert, dernier champion du monde belge (2012). Coqueluche de tout un pays, trait d’union parfait entre les communautés flamande et wallonne, Gilbert est, selon Stéphane Thirion, «le plus grand coureur belge depuis Roger De Vlaeminck». Une succession qu’est appelé à assumer l’ambitieux mais populaire Remco Evenepoel.Charles Michel Partagerlast_img read more

Unbeatable – St Hugh’s star extends golden streak at Prep/Primary Swim Champs

first_imgTen-year-old Zaneta Alvaranga, the toast of at last Saturday’s 18th annual Mayberry Investments Primary and Prep Schools Swimming Championships, says she will be looking to remain unbeaten for the rest of her Prep school career and continue her rich vein of form at the high school level. The decades-old meet serves as one of the traditional development events for upcoming local swimmers. The St Hugh’s Prep swim star has been unbeaten for the last three years, while emphatically smashing a record per event. On this occasion, she copped four individual meet records and anchored her school to a relay record at the National Aquatics Centre. Her meet records include the 50m backstroke (girls 9-10) in 35:19 seconds; the 50m freestyle in 29:23; the girls 12 and under 100m freestyle in 1:07.08; and the 50m butterfly for girls 9-10 in 31.97. She also anchored her school to a new 200m freestyle relay record of two minutes, 33:71 seconds, for girls 9-10. “I feel good leaving with four individual medals and helping my team win a relay medal in all records. I didn’t get to train as much as I would have wanted to because of GSAT, but I feel good that I could finish victorious,” she told The Gleaner. Alvaranga is hoping to move on to the high school of her choice, Immaculate Conception High and her father/coach, Rory Alvaranga, says Immaculate will be the best choice, not only based on its successful swimming program, but “excellent Caribbean Examination Council (CXC) and Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) grades”. “If you give Zaneta a choice of swimming or school, she is going to choose the water,” he added of what he believes will be a natural choice for her to pursue eventually as a career. St Hugh’s Prep finished in fifth place on 109 points, with young Alvaranga earning the high point trophy award for the girls 9-10 age group after amassing 36 points.last_img read more

UST big man Akomo hospitalized due to head trauma, blood clot

first_imgUniversity of Santo Tomas center Steve Akomo suffered a head trauma and is confined at UST Hospital in Manila, as per The Varsitarian, the school’s official publication.ADVERTISEMENT Akomo sustained the head injury after getting hit with what appeared to be a shoulder block from Adamson big man Papi Sarr last September 22.He also has a blood clot in his brain, according to reports.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThe 6-foot-8 Akomo has already missed the Growling Tigers’ last two games against La Salle and University of the East.UST is currently in sixth place in the standings with a 2-4 record. The Tigers face fourth-running University of the Philippines next on Wednesday. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Phoenix Suns fire general manager Ryan McDonough Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View commentslast_img read more

Education Ministry to work with Int’l Narcotics Board

first_img…to tackle drug use in schoolsThe Education Ministry will be working along with the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) to clamp down on the use of drugs among students in schools across Guyana.A team from INCB, comprising Stefano Berterame and Dr Raul Martin del Campo Sanchez, met with Chief Education Officer (CEO) Marcel Hutson and other senior officials of the Education Ministry on Thursday at the Brickdam boardroom.During the meeting, the two parties discussed how they can work together to eradicate and mitigate drug use in schools across the country. Further, the INCBCEO Marcel Hutson along with the INCB representatives and other officials from the Education Ministry posed for a photo after the meetingwanted to be apprised of where the Ministry was with regard to the Drug Production and Trafficking Legislation.According to the INCB officials, such feedback is necessary so that they can proffer advice and make recommendations to the Education Ministry where necessary.It was further revealed during the meeting that 39 teachers from 20 schools within Georgetown have been trained to integrate drug prevention training and strategies within the existing curricula for secondary schools.In 2017, the focus was mainly on conducting sensitisation sessions in schools that were vulnerable to drug use.Currently, the Education Ministry is working out the modalities to address referral protocols and preliminary screening for students and teachers who are suspected drug users. The Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) and the World Health Organisation are currently assisting the Ministry with this process.A study conducted in 2013 on the prevalence of drug use among secondary school students in Guyana has revealed an alarming trend showing that students as young as 12 years old are engaged in the use of both licit and illicit substances.The Secondary School Drug Prevalence Survey Project was done by the Organisation of American States (OAS) Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD), in collaboration with the Government of Guyana. Some 1890 students from 28 schools participated in the study – 92.5 per cent from public schools and 7.5 per cent from private schools. These students were from Grades 8, 10, 11 and Sixth Form. Approximately 43.8 per cent of the participants were between the ages of 11 and 14.The report indicated that alcohol, cigarettes, inhalants and marijuana were the most commonly used drugs among the student population. It was noted that 19 per cent of the students have admitted using an illegal drug at least once in their lifetime, while 52 per cent said they have consumed alcohol. However, the findings showed that there was a higher prevalence of drug use among private school students.The following percentages of participants also admitted to using these other drugs once in their lifetime: 10.8 per cent of the participants admitted to having used inhalants/solvents; 16.8 per cent used tobacco; 6.6 per cent used marijuana: 3.2 per cent used tranquilisers; 1.6 per cent used ecstasy and 1.4 per cent used cocaine. Eighteen per cent of these students are from public school, while some 24.5 per cent are private school students.However, 7.6 per cent of the students said they have tried an illegal drug for the first time within the past year (dated from when the survey was done). More alarmingly, it was outlined that students as young as 10 years, eight months are using inhalants, while those 12 and above were using substances such as alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana.Most of the students said they usually get alcohol from shops, while marijuana and cocaine were acquired from friends and relatives. Moreover, marijuana was found to be the most accessible illegal drug, while cocaine was the least accessible.last_img read more