Coal power plants flourish in the Philippines despite ‘climate emergency’

first_imgCoal has long been the primary power source in the Philippines, and large-scale power plants act as a safety crutch in the country’s quest for energy security.But the advent of cost-efficient renewable energy technologies is challenging coal’s dominance as the go-to energy source.President Rodrigo Duterte has voiced support for renewables but has yet to release an executive mandate that could propel the energy department to change its coal-dependent roadmap.Any meaningful shift to renewables would require drastic changes in priorities and perspective, according to an energy think tank. MANILA — In 1996, when a community in the Philippine municipality of Pagbilao agreed to house a coal power plant a few hours’ drive from Manila, the residents had high hopes. The fishing town saw in the dominating edifice full-time jobs and food on the table, says Warren Puno of the Catholic diocese of Lucena, the provincial capital.What they didn’t expect, however, was for additional coal plants to follow suit.After Pagbilao, another power station mushroomed in the nearby municipality of Mauban in 2000; the two plants have a combined generating capacity of 1,594 megawatts, earning the region the title of the “coal corridor” of the Philippines as it’s the only province to house two major coal plants. They also make the region the biggest power producer for the grid that serves the central island group of Luzon.President Rodrigo Duterte inaugurated a third plant (the 21st nationwide) on Oct. 16, the 500 MW San Buenaventura Power facility in Mauban, citing the venture as a prime example of “clean coal technology” and a significant addition to the country’s green energy roadmap.Environmental groups, however, are not convinced. “Coal is not clean, not cheap, and not sustainable,” Khevin Yu of Greenpeace Philippines said at a press conference on Oct. 21. “It is unfortunate that another coal plant has been inaugurated in the country, by no less than the president who seems to have been misled or misinformed by the coal industry and its ridiculous myth of ‘clean coal.’”While Duterte continues to voice support for renewables in his public speeches, his energy department has gone the other way: more coal-fired power plants have been approved for construction since Duterte assumed office in 2016, driving environmental groups to question the government’s commitment to reducing emissions from coal and its transition to renewables as mere lip service.Bucking the global coal declineSince the signing of the landmark Paris climate agreement in 2015, coal projects have declined across the world. But it’s a different story in the Philippines and in Southeast Asia. Threatened by looming energy insecurity and with industries dependent on fossil fuels, coal remains the prime power generation source for electrification in the Philippines.It’s the only country in Asia that gained a 1-gigawatt increase in power sourced from coal this year, which now accounts for 43 percent of the national energy mix. Given new investments, coal’s share of the pie will reach 50 percent in 2030. The energy sector is the biggest generator of the country’s carbon emissions and is at the forefront of its 70 percent emissions reduction pledge in the Paris Agreement, followed by the transport, waste, forestry and industrial sectors.Duterte, however, has always had misgivings about the Paris Agreement. “I did not sign it … my predecessor signed it,” he said after taking office in 2016. “It will hamper the country’s industrialization agenda,” he added. He threatened to pull out of the agreement but ratified it begrudgingly a year later, when a majority of his cabinet secretaries voted for it.Three years on, Duterte’s energy policies remain ambivalent, with the Department of Energy signalling a “conditional concurrence” to the deal, reflected in Secretary Alfonso Cusi’s “technology-neutral” bureaucracy. While the department signed renewable energy contracts in 2016, it also pushed for large-scale coal investments with seven committed projects that will provide 3,971 MW nationwide, spearheaded by San Buenaventura’s switch-on in October. “Coal still serves a purpose for our baseload,” Cusi said during his department’s budget deliberations, adding that a coal moratorium could “hurt” the energy sector.“There remains considerable uncertainty around how these commitments will be achieved … given that continued economic development is contingent on significant increases in power generation capacity,” according to a 2019 report from the Asian Development Bank.Further, the country’s power roadmap for 2016 to 2040 cements coal’s role in energy security. Both low-carbon and business-as-usual scenarios show anticipated annual supply growth rate from coal, with a 5.5 percent annual increase under business-as-usual and 4.9 under low-emissions scenarios.“Investing in coal is investing in the climate crisis that is already impacting the lives and livelihoods of millions of Filipinos and costing the Filipino taxpayers billions every year,” Yu said, adding the government should “stop investing in coal, enact a moratorium on all planned coal projects, and enable an immediate energy transition towards clean and cheap renewable energy.”‘The time is ripe for renewables’Electricity prices in the Philippines remain among the highest in Southeast Asia, driven by high dependence on fossil fuel imports, high financing costs and uncompetitive market structures that have stifled innovation, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), an international think tank.“There is an unprecedented opportunity to redesign the market to attract lower prices and more investment,” an IEEFA report says. “The government should guard against abuse of market power and anti-competitive agreements such as price fixing without a bidding system.”But while renewable’s biggest opposition is its upfront high costs, especially for solar, the advent of new and cheaper technologies when matched with existing but underutilized financing schemes can tip the scales in favor of renewables, according to Gerry Arances of the local think tank Center for Energy, Ecology, and Development.“Solar’s share in the energy mix is still a low 6 percent,” Arances told Mongabay. “But in the past, it never breached the 1 percent mark. But now it jumped in two years — that goes to show that there is a huge, untapped market … and it is growing. The technology, policies, and mechanisms are there to fully transition to renewables. We simply need to fully implement it.”In the coal corridor, resistance against the fossil fuel ballooned after the energy department approved the construction of three new coal-fired power plants: Tangkawayan (1,000 MW), Atimonan (1,200 MW), and Ibabang (600 MW), in Pagbilao municipality.“The community started asking: ‘Why are they building here again?’” Puno says. “We are being turned into a trash can. We think coal is dirty and we are becoming a repository for all that dirt.”Theirs is not a lone sentiment. Around the Philippines, resistance against coal power is gaining ground in at least 12 provinces, with the most vocal opposition in Palawan, where the government approved a 15 MW plant that, according to local environmental groups, threatens the province’s biodiversity and overlooks cheaper renewable power generation options.“The energy department is in a better position to begin the transition because the renewables technology is there,” Arances says. “Prices won’t plummet if the industry is not ripe for renewables. It’s about time that the Department of Energy puts its act together and shepherd the transition.”Banner image of the coal-fired Quezon Power Plant in Mauban, Quezon. The 511-megawatt power plant was commissioned in 2000 and is owned and operated by Quezon Power Limited Co. Image by Lawrence Ruiz (Epi Fabonan III) via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change Policy, Coal, Energy, Renewable Energy Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by leilanilast_img read more

The tragedy of the fishermen of Ventanas, ‘the Chilean Chernobyl’

first_imgArticle published by Maria Salazar The sea near Ventanas, Chile, was generous in the 1980s. There were urchins, limpets, clams and fish. Tourists summered there and fishermen thrived.That all changed as the local industrial park grew. In 2000 the National Health Service discovered serious heavy-metal and fecal-bacteria contamination of local shellfish, and prohibited their sale, effectively shuttering the local seafood industry.Fishermen attempted to revive their aquaculture operations, despite a series of oil spills. But poisoning episodes in 2018 quashed that initiative.“Could they have seen us as a dumpsite? Like their backyard? … I don’t know how the government saw us,” said Carlos Vega, a longtime Ventanas fisherman. VENTANAS, Chile — The first time Carlos Vega saw white Japanese oyster flesh, he was surprised. He had only seen it in a shade of green. It was then that he realized that the seafood he harvested along the coast of Ventanas in central Chile was contaminated.Carlos and his fishing colleagues sold oysters on the beaches of Ventanas to wealthy tourists who spent summers there. Raw with lemon! Delicious oysters!They began cultivating oysters in 1996. But four years later, the National Health Service closed their operation down after a massive episode of poisoning that the service attributed to contamination by heavy metals. A stigma fell on Ventanas. The million-dollar investment in materials, labor and time that the fishermen had made with the help of a German NGO was suddenly lost.“It was the first time we fishermen realized what was happening,” Carlos told Mongabay Latam, looking at the industrial park by the sea. The park was home to four coal-fired power plants, a copper smelter and refinery, an oil refinery, a cement company, and five storage tanks for liquefied natural gas, among other installations. And it had brought them misery.View of the industrial park from Ventanas beach. Image by Michelle Carrere.The golden yearsIn 1964, when Carlos was only 20 years old, he started working for a copper smelter in Ventanas. He was also in charge of driving the truck that transported slag to a dumping site that continues to operate to this day. In his spare time, he scuba dived, a skill he learned from his father.When Carlos realized that he could earn more money from fishing, he quit his job and took up diving. The sea was generous in the 1980s. There were urchins, limpets, clams and fish to catch, and banks of big bivalves (Mesodesma donacium), known as machas in Spanish, “that we thought, ignorantly, would never run out,” Carlos said.Soon, Carlos raised enough money to buy modern diving equipment and a boat. He became a small-business owner, rented a house with a bathroom, and his business grew quickly. Others also invested in fishing. The boats would come back to the beach full of machas. But by the mid-to-late 1980s, the seafood stocks, which had seemed inexhaustible, were gone.Fishermen weigh seaweed, one of the only resources they can extract from the sea in Ventanas today. Image by Michelle Carrere.The elders chose Carlos and a few of his colleagues, the only ones who had completed their school studies, to lead a union they decided to create in 1987. Carlos became the secretary and Eugenio Silva was its president. “We understood that what we now call overfishing, existed,” Carlos said.Relying on their intuition and what they had observed underwater, the fishermen self-imposed extraction quotas to allow macha populations to recover. They also created a management area to sustainably cultivate and harvest resources, mainly abalone.In addition, as an alternative resource, they decided to plant a seaweed known as pelillo (Gracilaria chilensis) in a new cultivation area. It was in the bay, right in front of the growing industrial park, which the fishermen paid little attention to.“We were focused on our business. We did not worry about what the companies did or did not do. We did not suspect anything about what would happen,” recalled Carlos during a walk to a drain that runs directly to the sea without any treatment.Pelillo, sometimes called black gold and used to make agar-agar and as ingredients in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries, grows abundantly in southern Chile. With the support of the Catholic University of Valparaiso, the fishermen carried out studies and found that the local conditions were right to grow the algae. However, the pelillo did not take and the project failed.“Later we learned that the heavy metals that were in the seabed acted as an algicide and that’s why we lost the algae,” Carlos said. “When that happened, since we were stubborn, we decided to cultivate Japanese oysters, mussels and scallops in the water column.”Ventanas, community of Puchuncaví. Image by Michelle Carrere.In 1996, with the support of a German NGO, the fishermen obtained the resources to start cultivating shellfish. They put in the work: the hours of diving and maintenance, as well as the operating expenses such as fuel for the boats. The shellfish began to grow, as did the business. In the fourth year, they produced about 5,500 oysters. The market was still small, but they envisioned producing a million mollusks in the near future. The Japanese oyster was the star product.One day Carlos went to Horcón, a fishing cove located a few kilometers further north. There, local fishermen also harvested Japanese oysters. But the color of the oysters’ flesh surprised him. “The color was not the same as the ones we had,” he said. “Ours were greener.”The doomed yearsIn 2000, the National Health Service banned the commerce of green Japanese oysters and other marine resources from Ventanas because of contamination from heavy metals and fecal coliforms.“It was a dark and very sad time,” Carlos said, his voice almost breaking. The investment and their hard work over the years was reduced to nothing. “We still had the management area, but who was going to buy from us? We experienced the greatest misery.”The business with the canning company that bought the limpets, which were also contaminated, was as good as over, Carlos said. Tourists left the bay, scared. Restaurants closed and fishermen had to find jobs in the industrial park. Many emigrated. That same year, Carlos packed his things, said goodbye to his wife and three children and ventured south.Abandoned restaurant in Ventanas. Image by Michelle Carrere.Carlos began working as a diver for a salmon company in Puerto Montt, a community in southern Chile, more than a thousand kilometers (600 miles) from Ventanas and just over 12 hours by road. For 10 years, he worked 24 days a month, with six days of leave. In the last six years, that changed to 20 days of work for eight of rest. During each break, Carlos got on a bus and traveled to Ventanas to see his family, then returned to Puerto Montt. “That was my life until my children finished school. Professionals,” he said proudly.In May 2014, seated in front of a television, Carlos watched his colleagues in Ventanas hurled crabs at Codelco, the Chilean state-owned company that ran the copper smelter and refinery, and burn boats while screaming “When will it stop?!” He could not do anything from afar.The marine conservation organization Oceana and a laboratory run by Fundación Chile, which tested clams, limpets, abalone and crabs from the region, found that all the species were contaminated with copper, arsenic and cadmium. The highest rates of contamination were found among the abalone from the management area of Ventanas, with five times more copper and four times more arsenic content than Chilean regulations allow, and five times more cadmium than what European standards allow. The crabs had four times more copper and arsenic than Chile allows.Abandoned restaurant in Ventanas. Image by Michelle Carrere.The indignation and complaints of the fishermen had no effect. Four months after the protests, 38,700 liters (10,200 gallons) of oil spilled into the sea, according to a report from the Maritime Authority, after a connection broke between a ship and the port terminal. A second spill of about 500 liters (132 gallons) occurred in August 2015 when another ship was refueling. In 2016, another disaster joined the list when a ship leached slurry oil. The National Petroleum Company was liable for all three environmental accidents.Almost a year after the 2014 oil spill, the non-profit Fisheries Development Institute began to investigate the impacts of the accident on marine resources. It concluded that “in general, no evidence was found that the local populations of the main species of the management areas had been directly affected by any specific environmental disturbance event such as the oil spill.”Abandoned beach house in Ventanas. Image by Michelle Carrere.Environmental organizations claimed that the methodology of the study had serious irregularities. However, the complaints had no impact, and no new studies were initiated.After 16 years of exile, as Carlos likes to call that stage of his life, he returned to Ventanas to try and revive the management area — a patch of sea that has tried to survive despite everything — together with other fishermen. Today, he is the president of the union.The comebackThe fishermen now cultivate Chilean abalone. “A sacred place” is how Carlos refers to the area serving as a non-extractive reserve within the larger management area. They combine this harvesting kelp, a difficult and exhausting task, and fishing for hake, although it is scarce and its harvest is prohibited during the month of September.In addition, companies pay the fishermen $43 for a day of shoveling the coal that the sea throws onto the sand. “It’s an incentive for us to complain less,” said one of the fishermen, who prefers to remain anonymous because his son works for the company.Fishermen collect coal from the beach with shovels. Image by Michelle Carrere.Carlos has never wanted to collect coal. It’s “like a pride thing,” he said. But he does other jobs, also paid for by the companies, such as collecting algae from the Campiche estuary and cleaning the coastline. He also works as a commercial diver repairing boats and docks.On Aug. 21 last year, residents of the communities of Quintero and Puchuncaví began to arrive at the local hospital vomiting and fainting. The first to arrive were 50 children and two adults from three schools that were evacuated quickly. According to the Valparaíso branch of the National Emergency Office, at the end of that week, 408 people had suffered from food poisoning. Monitoring carried out by the Ministry of the Environment detected 120 gases in the air, all above permissible limits. Among them was methylchloroform, a volatile liquid prohibited in Chile since 2015.A few weeks later, on Sept. 4, a second poisoning episode affected another 100 people. Two days later, the environmental authorities delivered their verdict: “This Superintendency has reached the following conclusion: charge the company ENAP Refinerías SA, (…) for treating their liquid industrial waste under conditions other than those environmentally approved.” The company rejected the accusations and announced that it would resort to “all legal actions and rights to demonstrate that it has no connection whatsoever with the claims.”The charges were subsequently dismissed. One year after the mass poisoning, the government said it couldn’t establish the causes for the pollution. “The poisoning events are related to VOC [volatile organic compounds]. We haven’t been able to determine the origin of these VOC, but we’ve determined they are in the air. The rest is being investigated,” Felipe Riesco, the subsecretary of environment, told the newspaper La Tercera.Sales of abalone have stopped for now. No one wants to eat seafood from Ventanas, “the Chilean Chernobyl,” as some call it. Even the company that buys the kelp did not want to buy the last harvest. The fishermen have alternated between anger and resignation at living in a gray version of a community where they once prospered.“Could they have seen us as a dumpsite? Like their backyard? … I don’t know how the government saw us,” said Carlos, getting flustered.“My father died with deep anger toward these companies,” he said, his voice rising. “You can’t even imagine what he said about those scoundrels. That rage, when he died, he passed it on to me.”Banner image by Michelle Carrere for Mongabay.This story was first published in Spanish at Mongabay Latam on Sept. 10, 2018. Edits by Shreya Dasgupta. Conservation, Environment, Fisheries, Fishing, Oceans, Pollution, Water Pollution center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Butler returns to score 21 points, Wolves beat Nets

first_imgKammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES TIP-INSNets: Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (right groin strain) and Caris Levert (sore left groin) were out of the lineup for Brooklyn. Hollis-Jefferson was injured in Friday’s game in Milwaukee and coach Kenny Atkinson wasn’t sure if he will return for the next game. Levert was a late scatch. … D’Angelo Russell was also held out for the second game of the back-to-back with the team managing his return from knee surgery. … G Isaiah Whitehead was recalled from the Long Island Nets of the G League earlier in the day. … Stauskas scored double-figures for the fourth time this season and the first time since he had 21 points on Dec. 27.Timberwolves: Butler has missed six games for Minnesota this season. The Wolves are 2-4 without Butler in the lineup. … Minnesota has lost back-to-back games six times this season, but hasn’t had a three-game losing streak. … The 11 points allowed in the first was the fewest by Minnesota this season and the 30-11 advantage was the largest lead after the first this season.ADVERTISEMENT Heat rally from 15 down, top Hornets View comments Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:48NBA: Kawhi, George seek more for Clippers than beating Lakers00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Jahlil Okafor scored 21 points, and Nick Stauskas added 15 for a short-handed Brooklyn squad that has lost six of eight games. Nets coach Kenny Atkinson was ejected in the fourth quarter after coming out on the court to argue a call. Players and coaches had to restrain the enraged Atkinson.After a lopsided loss in Milwaukee on Friday night, Brooklyn struggled mightily in the first quarter. The Nets shot 33.3 percent and had nine turnovers in the quarter. The Wolves built the lead to 26 early in the second before Brooklyn found some footing with its reserves in Okafor and Stauskas.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe lead would close to five early in the third before Towns made his impact.Towns, who was elected to his first All-Star game, was scoreless until 3:46 in the first half. He attacked the offensive glass, grabbing a career-high nine offensive rebounds. He had eight points in the third as Minnesota quickly countered Brooklyn’s run.center_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READ Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Brooklyn Nets center Tyler Zeller (44) fouls Minnesota Timberwolves guard Jimmy Butler (23) in the first quarter of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018, in Minneapolis. APMINNEAPOLIS — Jimmy Butler scored 21 points in his return to the lineup, Karl-Anthony Towns had 16 points and 19 rebounds for his NBA-leading 43rd double-double and the Minnesota Timberwolves beat the Brooklyn Nets 111-97 on Saturday (Sunday Manila time).Butler added six rebounds and five assists after missing four games with right knee soreness. Andrew Wiggins scored 21 points, and Jamal Crawford added 16 to help Minnesota snap a two-game skid.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more