Donegal man guillty of defilement as jury deliberate on rape charges

first_img 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebook Pinterest Pinterest News Previous articleNominations sought for Donegal business awardsNext articleGAA- Donegal and Tyrone to meet in Dr. Mc Kenna Cup Final News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsAppcenter_img Google+ By News Highland – January 28, 2010 Facebook Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Donegal man guillty of defilement as jury deliberate on rape charges Twitter WhatsApp A Donegal man has been convicted of having sex with a 15-year-old girl two years ago. The 23-year-old accused, who can not be identified for legal reasons, had pleaded not guilty at the Central Criminal Court to two counts of rape, and defilement of the girl on a date in February 2008.Last evening, the jury of seven men and five women returned a verdict of guilty on the charge of defilement following six hours of deliberation. It was day seven of the trial.The jury will resume its deliberations on the remaining two charges this morning. Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

Students launch jewelry company to help save rescue dogs

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Dogs Saving Dogs When sophomore Declan Feeley and senior Keith Wertsching joined the Society for Entrepreneurship, they had no idea they would later launch Dogs Saving Dogs, a jewelry business that donates 50 percent of its profits to save rescue dogs from being euthanized.The two founders now work with volunteer-based animal rescue organizations across the country to provide necessities such as food, bedding and medical care to dogs, according to Wertsching. Customers receive one stainless steel charm, shaped like a paw print, for themselves and one for their dog, Wertsching said.“A lot of people wear jewelry because it says something about them, and I think this portrays a very positive message,” Wertsching said. “This definitely shows people that you are informed, that you care about the rescue mission, and that you like looking good.”The charm sets, which are sold online and in several local boutiques, suit everybody because their purchase directly benefits animals in need, Feeley said.“People who buy this jewelry specifically know they are going to help a rescue dog,” Feeley said. “I just want to keep doing what we’re doing with more dogs and more people.”Their goal is to raise awareness about the unnecessary euthanasia of through jewelry that appeals to a wide audience, Wertsching said.“We want it to look good, but at the same time, we don’t want it to be tailored to one specific type of person,” Wertsching said. “We want to give everyone the chance to wear something to show support for rescue pets.”Feeley said his love of animals and passion for entrepreneurship motivated him to launch the company with Wertsching.“Even if you’re not necessarily adopting a rescue, you definitely have a strong connection with your dog,” Feeley said. “If we went bankrupt tomorrow, we still helped save dogs from being euthanized. We’ve actually done something to help.”As for donating half the company’s profits to shelters in diverse locations, Feeley said it seemed like the right thing to do.“We thought, ‘As much as we can possibly give, let’s just give,’” Feeley said. “We have a lot of fun.”Wertsching said his partnership with Feeley works well because they both remain devoted to expanding the company while prioritizing their charity efforts.“It’s a very surreal feeling when you’re able to represent something greater than yourself,” Wertsching said. “Every day, we get to wake up and say, ‘What am I going to do to save rescue dogs today?’”Feeley and Wertsching said they encourage other young entrepreneurs to pursue their passions while remaining realistic.“There’s always a way for you to start,” Wertsching said. “Entrepreneurship is 10 percent good ideas, 90 percent dealing with when those ideas fall through and 100 percent worth it.”Tags: dogs saving dogs, rescue dogs, society for entrepreneurshiplast_img read more

Rethinking conservation funding models in Africa (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Environment, philanthropy center_img Conservation in sub-Saharan Africa faces monumental challenges.Ultimately, effective and durable conservation efforts require major investments in protecting large landscapes through government, community, and private institutions, and in improving governance at multiple levels.A key to meeting the challenges to effective conservation at scale is providing resources that enable creative and effective conservation organizations to deliver lasting results.This post is a commentary – the views expressed are those of the authors. Conservation in sub-Saharan Africa faces monumental challenges. Rapidly growing human populations and resource consumption are creating growing pressures on land, water and other natural systems. Weak governance coupled with market demands means that illegal use of natural resources- from fisheries, to timber, to elephant ivory- is a major driver of over-exploitation. Ultimately, effective and durable conservation efforts require major investments in protecting large landscapes through government, community, and private institutions, and in improving governance at multiple levels.A key to meeting the challenges to effective conservation at scale is providing resources that enable creative and effective conservation organizations to deliver lasting results. Much of the discussion in conservation focuses on the limited amounts of funding available-. However, an important, but less discussed, issue is how funding is delivered and accessed. Recently, we brought together funders and conservationists working in Africa, to discuss funding approaches that can achieve greater impact on the ground. Here we draw on this gathering to summarize both challenges with existing funding models and possibilities for addressing those. Pair of orphaned elephant calves at a rescue center in Kenya. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Existing ChallengesLasting and effective conservation work depends heavily on innovative and capable local organizations that can develop new solutions and take them to scale. African conservation organizations, like organizations working for social and environmental change anywhere in the world, require enough funding to be creative, invest in their teams, and grow, and funding designed to increase on-the-ground impact. That means funding that rewards outcomes, and enables them to invest in core functions and capacity, particularly the recruitment and retention of top talent, staff development, and their core infrastructure. Building a successful organization with the ability to deliver great results takes time and therefore requires long-term funding.This kind of funding is all too scarce in African conservation. The default funding model in conservation is through projects. Project funding is typically short-term, restricted, non-renewable, and generally rewards activities (what one does) rather than impact (what one achieves). Restricted project funding usually limits the organization’s ability to adapt to changing circumstances and incorporate new ideas and insights. Project funding also frequently limits the ability of an organization to invest in core capacity and resources- particularly people- through arbitrary limitations on overheads or staff salary costs. Because conservation outcomes are rarely measured, funders often practice due diligence by heavily managing how grants are spent. This limits grantees’ flexibility, creates heavy transaction costs, and almost always starves organizations of capital to invest in growth and resilience.Moreover, funding is often not only prescriptive, but limited. While small-scale project funding (e.g. in the $10,000-$20,000 range) may be valuable during the initial stages of new initiatives, there is a ‘missing middle’ in conservation funding between those relatively small grants and funding available through large-scale development aid and public funding agencies. While the latter has the advantage of providing multi-year, large-scale funding, the heavy transaction costs of securing and managing such funding- daunting proposal, reporting, and compliance requirements inherent to most international public funding sources- creates barriers for many local organizations.A related challenge is the accessibility of funding ‘markets’. For field-based and local groups in Africa, finding and connecting with funders is a major challenge. Conservation funding sources and markets are highly fragmented; there are few shared marketplaces or forums for funders and practitioners to meet and exchange information. This strongly favors large organizations that have already overcome the hurdles to developing sophisticated marketing and public relations operations.Because of these problems, conventional conservation funding models can inhibit, rather than promote, the development of thriving organizations that meet the immense and growing challenges of African conservation. First, because time spent finding and reporting to funders comes at the expense of time spent on actions that drive impact. Second, restrictions on how funding can be used limit an organizations ability to quickly adapt and to invest in its core functions, internal development and future growth.These challenges can play a significant factor in limiting conservation impact. They make it harder for newer entrepreneurial organizations to secure funding and become established, and to take promising models to scale.Common zebra (Equus quagga) in South Africa. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Better Funding for Greater Impact Funders and local conservation groups in Africa need to collaborate to promote better ways of doing business. This will require a shift in funding approaches that aligns impact with investment, and channels more funding to the organizations that deliver the best results.One key measure is to focus on funding organizations, rather than projects. That means investing in an organization’s core strategic goals and outcomes, and providing flexible or ‘growth capital’ that an organization can invest in delivery of results and building its internal capacity. Some large private funders operating primarily outside the conservation space are increasingly calling for and adopting these approaches. For example, the Ford Foundation’s new BUILD program is investing $1 billion over five years to support core capabilities and development of 300 grantees.For their part, conservationists need to foster this kind of core investment by providing clear goals, priorities, and metrics in their strategies and plans. Funders and practitioners need to agree on key outcomes and metrics that are most appropriate for tracking and evaluating results.A second priority is to become bolder and more ambitious in the provision of long-term funding. Funders need to address the ‘missing middle’ in conservation funding by providing effective young organizations with the kind of capital they need to grow. This often means core and unrestricted funding on the order of $100,000 annually, significantly larger than the typical small grants available for much conservation work.Beyond that mezzanine-level funding, is the importance of making even larger ‘big bets’ in organizations that have a strong track record and are positioned for greater impact. An example of this is a grant announced earlier this year by the Wyss Foundation, of $65M to African Parks- perhaps the largest private grant ever made in African conservation- for them to expand their successful protected area management model across Africa.The growth of new financing models, such as trust funds, across the conservation field also provides a range of opportunities. These new long-term funds can potentially be directed at effective local organizations as a source of long-term support. This is part of the thinking behind a new Community Conservation Fund being developed by WWF and other local partners in Namibia. These kinds of long-term mechanisms for conservation funding stand in contrast to the relatively reactive, crisis-driven nature of much of African conservation funding.Dune 45 in the Sossusvlei area of the Namib Desert in Namibia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.African conservation funders and practitioners need to work together to develop a shared vision, reporting metrics, and partnership models that will enable both to achieve greater impact. To overcome communication barriers and reduce transaction costs, funders and practitioners need new virtual and physical spaces to come together and overcome existing barriers to communication and market fragmentation. An example of bringing funders and local conservationists from Africa and elsewhere together in new ways is the Wildlife Conservation Network’s annual Exposition events held in a number of US cities.Ultimately meeting African conservation challenges requires funding directed towards effective local organizations. New conversations and communications mechanisms – a better conservation marketplace – can more efficiently connect conservation funders and practitioners on the ground and result in better conservation outcomes. Funders and practitioners need to work together to build a conservation field in Africa that delivers greater impact, attracts more funding, and can tackle a world of growing threats.Fred Nelson is Executive Director of Maliasili Initiatives.Leela Hazzah is co-founder and Executive Director of Lion Guardians.John Kasaona is Executive Director of Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation in Namibia.Scott O’Connell works with the Acacia Conservation Fund, a philanthropic initiative supporting conservation organizations around the world.Peter Riger is Vice President of Conservation and Conservation Educa­tion at the Houston Zoo.Bernie Tershy is Adjunct Professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz and an advisor to the Mulago Foundation.last_img read more

New species of orange-red praying mantis mimics a wasp

first_imgFrom the Peruvian Amazon, researchers have described a new-to-science species of bright orange-red praying mantis that conspicuously mimics a wasp.The mantis mimics not only the bright coloration of many wasps, but also a wasp’s short, jerky movements. Such conspicuous mimicry of wasps is rare among mantises, which usually tend to resemble leaves or tree trunks, the researchers say in a new study.The researchers have named the praying mantis Vespamantoida wherleyi. In 2013, a team of researchers surveying insects in a research station on the banks of the Amazon River in northern Peru set up a light trap. The large, brightly lit sheet, meant to attract insects just like a porch light does in the dark, lured in an unexpected creature. Among the various beetles, flies, wasps and praying mantises that had flown into the sheet was a tiny, bright orange-red insect with a black abdomen, eyes and head.At first glance, it seemed like a species of wasp. But when Gavin Svenson, director of research and collections at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, looked more closely, he noticed that there was something odd about it.“It didn’t look quite like a mantis, it didn’t look quite like a wasp,” Svenson said in a video statement. “I went up and I grabbed it and I put it in a little vial and once we started observing it we knew we had something totally different.”Upon further analysis, Svenson and his team confirmed that it was actually a species of praying mantis that conspicuously mimics a wasp: not only does it mimic a wasp’s bright colors, but also a wasp’s movements. The mantis was, in fact, new to science, the researchers found, and they named it Vespamantoida wherleyi, in a new paper in the journal PeerJ.“Typically, the majority of species differentiation is discovered and confirmed within a lab or collection setting,” Svenson said in a statement. “To have that rare eureka moment where you know you have found something new in the field is incredibly exciting.”Most praying mantises rely on camouflage, both to avoid predators and to hunt. But they usually do so by mimicking leaves or tree bark and are brown or green. V. wherleyi, however, is brightly colored and has short, rapid, jerky movement patterns like those of many wasps. The mantis’s antennae movements are also similar to those of wasps, the authors write.“In nature, when you are intentionally conspicuous, you are advertising something,” Svenson said. “When you are a species that can be easily taken as prey, you advertise because you want predators to think that you are poisonous, or could injure them, or any combination of unpleasant factors that tell the predator to think twice before pursuing you.”The researchers found that the newly described species was quite similar to a species of praying mantis (formerly called Mantoida toulgoeti), previously described from French Guiana. The two species aren’t similar enough to be the same species, Svenson said. But the researchers concluded that the two species belonged to the same lineage or genus, which they have now named Vespamantoida, meaning wasp-mantis.A mantis mimicking wasps is rare, and the researchers now hope to study why this mimicry may have evolved.“I think the next natural thing is to study the evolutionary biology of the lineage,” Svenson said. “If wasp mimicry is successful in this lineage, why has it not evolved in the other lineages as well? Why have no other species within the family evolved brightly colored wasp mimicry? We’re just not sure.”Video of Vespamantoida wherleyi by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Banner image of Vespamantoida wherleyi by Gavin Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.Citation:Svenson, G. J., & Rodrigues, H. M. (2019). A novel form of wasp mimicry in a new species of praying mantis from the Amazon rainforest, Vespamantoida wherleyi gen. nov. sp. nov. (Mantodea, Mantoididae). PeerJ, 7, e7886. doi: 10.7717/peerj.7886 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Insects, New Species, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Tropical forests’ lost decade: the 2010s

first_imgThe 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019 however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. The decade closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests.According to the U.N., in 2015 global forest cover fell below four billion hectares of forest for the first time in human history. The 2010s opened as a moment of optimism for tropical forests. Widely available satellite imagery via platforms like Google Earth brought new levels of accountability which, for the first time, meant the world couldn’t use ignorance as an excuse for not addressing the destruction of tropical forests. Deforestation in Earth’s largest rainforest — the Brazilian Amazon — was in the midst of a historic plunge, while governments around the world were pledging billions of dollars in new money toward a mechanism to compensate tropical countries for protecting their forests. Several countries closed out the decade with important new conservation initiatives, while activists, empowered with a new set of tools, pushed the private sector to begin adopting a new type of sustainability commitment: the zero deforestation policy for commodity production and sourcing. Some of the largest consumer-facing companies adopted these forest-friendly policies with near-term implementation targets. The world looked like it was on track to significantly reduce tropical deforestation by 2020.By the end of the 2019, however, it was clear that progress on protecting tropical forests stalled in the 2010s. On the climate front, a decade of science has mostly confirmed what we already knew 10 years ago: Tropical forests are deeply threatened by the current pace of climate change. Combined with ongoing deforestation, degradation, and fragmentation, the outlook for some of the planet’s largest forests, from the Amazon to Indonesia, is increasingly bleak. The 2010s were also marked by mixed progress for tropical forest conservation. Advances in remote sensing were undercut by backsliding on corporate and government commitments to protect forests. Gains in new protected areas were partially offset by a trend toward protected area downgrading, downsizing and degazettement (PADDD) in countries from Brazil to Indonesia. Efforts to recognize the value of healthy and productive natural forests were confronted with the challenging realities of implementation, public indifference and the punishing economics of rising demand for food, fiber and fuel in the context of unaccounted costs of environmental externalities. Political leaders in several important tropical forest countries turned a blind eye to — or in some cases even actively encouraged — threats against environmental defenders and the free press, contributing to hundreds of murders and assassinations of activists, indigenous leaders and journalists. The 2010s closed with rising deforestation and increased incidence of fire in tropical forests. According to the U.N., in 2015, global forest cover fell below four billion hectares (10 billion acres) for the first time in modern human history.last_img read more

Mongabay staffer Philip Jacobson released from jail, transferred to ‘city detention’

first_imgPhilip Jacobson, an award-winning editor for the environmental science news outlet Mongabay, has been transferred from the Palangkaraya Class II detention center to ‘city detention’ in Palangkaraya.Jacobson was arrested and incarcerated on January 21 for an alleged visa violation.The story is developing. “Mongabay staffer Philip Jacobson was just moved from prison to ‘city detention’ in Palangkaraya,” said Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler on January 24, 2020. “We are grateful that authorities have made this accommodation and remain hopeful that Phil’s case can be treated as an administrative matter rather than a criminal one. We thank everyone for their continued support.”Philip Jacobson, an award-winning editor for the environmental science news outlet Mongabay, has been transferred from the Palangkaraya Class II detention center to ‘city detention’ in Palangkaraya. Jacobson was arrested and incarcerated on January 21 for an alleged visa violation.Phil preparing to enjoy some durian fruit after his release from the detention center in Palangkaraya on January 24, 2020.Jacobson, 30, was first detained on December 17, 2019 after attending a hearing between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), Indonesia’s largest indigenous rights advocacy group.He had travelled to the city shortly after entering Indonesia on a business visa for a series of meetings. The day he was due to leave, immigration authorities seized his passport, interrogated him for four hours and ordered him to remain in the city pending their investigation.On January 21, more than a month later, Jacobson was formally arrested and taken into custody. He was informed that he faces charges of violating the 2011 immigration law and a prison sentence of up to five years.Jacobson was held at Palangkaraya Class II detention center in a cell with five others. During his detention, he said we was treated well.On January 24, after meeting with U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Joseph R. Donovan, the Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs (Kemenko Polhukam) Mohammad Mahfud MD said he would order Jacobson to be deported from Indonesia “immediately.”“We are encouraged by the coordinating minister’s statement today,” said Mongabay’s Butler. “We’ve been hoping for quick resolution to this matter.”Header image: Philip Jacobson shortly after his release from the Palangkaraya Class II detention center on January 24, 2020. Environment, Environmental Journalism, Mongabay Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Budding gardeners invited to enter Buncrana Tidy Towns contest

first_imgBuncrana Tidy Towns are back with their popular annual garden competition with sponsors  Kavanagh’s SuperValu, Buncrana.The event was launched this week with a number of exciting changes. Committees Garden Competition Co-ordinator Anne Doherty said:“We are really grateful to SuperValu Buncrana for their continued support of our work. I would like to extend a special thank you to store manager Kieran Doherty for sponsoring the garden competition and assisting in the promotion of it. “We have revamped this year’s competition. If you’re a novice gardener, a budding Dermot O’Neill, got a garden full of pollinators or a vegetable patch you are super proud of we’ve got a category to suit you. We’ve also included a residential area category as we know of a number of residents associations who have worked hard to maintain and develop their common areas.“We have retained the best kept business award in recognition of local retailers, bars and restaurants tremendous flower displays in the summer months. Secret judging will take place throughout August and the awards ceremony will be held in September. Entry forms are available in SuperValu or by contacting us on Facebook and by email at [email protected]”Buncrana Tidy Towns Spokesperson Sinéad Ní Bhroin added, “We have also formally launched our annual competition season. With the support of George McDermott, Donegal County Council, Wild Inishowen, the Cli-mates, Buncrana Chamber of Commerce and many others Buncrana has been a Tidy Towns gold medal winner for the last four years. A big thank you to local photographer Adam Porter for providing us with a beautiful photo of Buncrana Pier for competition brochure. “We have also entered the Pollinator Plan Award, having won the regional Local Authority Pollinator Award for the North West & West Region in the Large Town Category over the last two years.“We are so close to winning the national competition and to do so would be an incredible boost for the town. Our work plan has significantly developed over the last year. In addition to our Pollinator Plan, environmental work, painting projects, annual tree-planting and beach clean-ups we have completed the first phase of the development of Buncrana’s Historical Quarter at the Stone Jug and Castle Bridge and are close to completing the second phase of our public seating project. In partnership with Denise Dowds and her wonderful Cli-mates we will also be launching Buncrana’s Toolkit to Create a Plastic Free Community.“With an extra push and the continued support of the community we believe this year will be our best yet.”Budding gardeners invited to enter Buncrana Tidy Towns contest was last modified: June 3rd, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Inbound Marketing Lessons from the Massachusetts Governor’s Office

first_img Originally published Mar 3, 2009 8:41:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Earlier this winter, HubSpot got  inbound marketing kit Deval Patrick Inbound Marketing . . a surprise visit Turns out, there’s a lot of  inbound marketing  from  Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlackcenter_img Topics: Inbound Marketing Kit Last week we invited Brad Blake, the governor’s director of interactive media, back to HubSpot to talk about how the governor is using the web to communicate with constituents and build support for his agenda. , the   going on in the State House. Here’s the full recording of our conversation: Learn more about inbound marketing and how to combine blogging, SEO and social media for results. Although state employees have significant bureaucratic and regulatory constraints that small business owners and professional marketers don’t have to worry about, the basic strategy is the same: Publish content, engage with your constituents (or customers) and your product or agenda will get more support. Download our Governor of Massachusettslast_img read more