New monkey species found in Amazon forest area that’s fast disappearing

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Mammals, Mining, Monkeys, New Species, Primates, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img From a stretch of the Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará, researchers have described a new-to-science species of marmoset.The marmoset, with its distinct white tail, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós–Jamanxim interfluve.At the moment, given the scarcity of information on M. munduruku, the researchers recommend listing the marmoset as data deficient on the IUCN Red List.However, the Amazon forest that’s home to the newly described species is being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion, logging, mining, and infrastructure development. From an area of southern Amazonia, where forests are rapidly being cut for gold mining, agriculture, cattle pastures, and construction of dams, researchers have described a species of marmoset that’s new to science.“The spread of deforestation is pretty visible,” said Rodrigo Costa Araújo of the National Institute of Amazonian Research, Brazil.Araújo and his colleagues had been surveying the stretch of Amazon forest lying between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers in the Brazilian state of Pará for primates when they first spotted the marmosets, they report in a recent study published in PeerJ.“The first time I recorded the new species was a very exciting moment!” Araújo, lead author of the study, said in an email. “I saw a small group of three marmosets in the border of the forest, before entering the trail so I was surprised with such a lucky encounter. Immediately I took my binoculars and my heart started to beat hard when I saw their white tails.”White tails are very rare among primates that live in South America; only one other primate species, Leontocebus melanoleucos, is known to have one, Araújo said. (Leontocebus melanoleucos is one of the synonyms for Leontocebus weddelli melanoleucus, commonly known as the white saddle-back tamairn.)So the tail was an indication that the marmoset could be a new species. To confirm this, Araújo and his colleagues trekked through the forests and canoed up streams, recording details of every individual marmoset or troop they observed. They also collected five specimens of the monkey as well as samples of their muscle tissue in the field under appropriate permits. They later analyzed the specimens to confirm that the marmoset species was indeed new to science.The marmoset, with its distinct white tail, beige-yellowish lower half, white forearms with a beige-yellowish spot on the elbow, and white feet and hands, has been named Mico munduruku after the Munduruku, an indigenous group of people who live in the Tapajós-Jamanxim interfluve.A boat on Tapajós River with a view of the forest where Mico munduruku is found. Image courtesy of Rodrigo Costa Araújo.The discovery of M. munduruku wasn’t entirely unexpected. Only a handful of primate and mammal surveys have been conducted in the region between the Tapajós and Jamanxim rivers, the researchers say, and no marmosets have ever been collected from there. The forests in the area are also largely isolated from the range of other similar species by the rivers, Araújo said.“These facts triggered the expeditions to the Tapajos-Jamanxim interfluve and, although finding new species is quite unpredictable, I had a strong sense that a distinct species could be found,” he said.Moreover, people living in the region, including those who spend time in the forests mining gold, had told the researchers about the species. “They are aware of the marmosets and were able to give accurate descriptions of the species — locally these marmosets are called as soins,” Araújo said.At the moment, given the scarcity of information on M. munduruku, the researchers recommend listing the marmoset as data deficient on the IUCN Red List.A sketch of Mico munduruku. Image by Stephen NashHowever, the Amazon forest that’s home to M. munduruku is under tremendous pressure. The forests are being rapidly cut for agricultural expansion and logging, and four hydroelectric power plants have been approved for construction there, Araújo said. Gold mining is also rampant.“The region is a hotspot for gold miners, so there is dredging and digging of the river bed and its tributaries,” Araújo said in a statement. “It is a little-studied region and the biodiversity there is poorly known. Having a new primate species described here clearly demonstrates that the habitat of still unknown species are being destroyed.”It’s a race against time, but the researchers plan to continue to survey southern Amazonia and collect more data on all the marmosets that occur in the region, so that effective conservation actions can be designed.Rodrigo Costa Araújo was part of the surveying team that described the new-to-science species of marmoset. Image courtesy of Rodrigo Costa Araújo.Citation:Costa-Araújo, R., de Melo, F. R., Canale, G. R., Hernández-Rangel, S. M., Messias, M. R., Rossi, R. V., … & Farias, I. P. (2019). The Munduruku marmoset: a new monkey species from southern Amazonia. PeerJ, 7, e7019. doi:10.7717/peerj.7019last_img read more

UN and policymakers, wake up! Burning trees for energy is not carbon neutral (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, Alternative Energy, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Footprint, Carbon Negative Bioenergy, Carbon Sequestration, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Controversial, Emission Reduction, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, International Trade, Law, Monitoring, Plantations, Pollution, Renewable Energy, Research, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Trade, United Nations On September 23, the signatories of the Paris Climate Agreement will gather at the United Nations for a Climate Action Summit to step up their carbon reduction pledges in order to prevent catastrophic climate change, while also kicking off Climate Week events in New York City.However, the policymakers, financiers, and big green groups organizing these events will almost certainly turn a blind eye toward renewable energy policies that subsidize forest wood burned for energy as if it is a zero emissions technology like wind or solar.Scientists have repeatedly warned that burning forests is not in fact carbon neutral, and that doing so puts the world at risk of overshooting the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C target.But that message has fallen on deaf ears, as lucrative renewable energy subsidies have driven exponential growth in use of forest wood as fuel. The world’s nations must stop subsidizing burning forest biomass now to protect forests, the climate, and our future. This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author. The handfuls of wood pellets and the green sleeves seen here are part of a biomass industry-supported PR campaign claiming that burning wood to produce energy is carbon neutral. But it isn’t. Photo credit: #ODF on Visual hunt / CC BY.We’ve all watched in helpless horror as the Amazon and other forests have burned in recent weeks. But there’s another, deliberate forest conflagration happening, ironically a result of climate policy — burning forest wood at power plants to generate “renewable” biomass energy.While burning wood is widely treated as “carbon neutral,” the physical reality is that burning wood emits more carbon pollution than coal per unit energy. You don’t need modeling to understand that while trees may be technically renewable, cutting and burning a forest emits carbon quickly, but re-growing forests sequesters carbon slowly. Even burning forestry “residues” — the leftovers from logging jobs — causes carbon emissions to spike.The science shows that to avoid catastrophic climate change we must protect and restore forests, not cut and burn them for energy, and that climate mitigation can’t wait the decades to centuries required to regrow forests cut for fuel. Yet in a display of stunning defiance of such a basic principle, policymakers worldwide continue to shovel billions of dollars in renewable energy subsidies into so-called “zero carbon” tree-burning power plants, which devour forests, decrease the forest carbon sink, and pollute the air.A special culprit is the European Union, which sets renewable energy policy rules for member states. Despite abundant evidence that the biomass and wood pellet industry is trashing forests and increasing carbon emissions, the EU re-upped their renewable energy policy last year to continue subsidizing forest biomass for heat and power.  It didn’t seem to matter that the EU received a crush of input from scientists and advocates, including their own science advisors, who warned:The legal mandate to record forest biomass-fired energy as contributing to the EU’s renewable energy targets has had the perverse effect of creating a demand for trees to be felled in Europe or elsewhere in order to burn them for energy, thus releasing the carbon into the atmosphere which would otherwise stay locked up in the forest, and simultaneously drastically reducing the carbon sink strength of the forest ecosystems… The potentially very long payback periods for forest biomass raise important issues given the UNFCCC’s [the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s] aspiration of limiting warming to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels to ‘significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change’. On current trends, this may be exceeded in around a decade. Relying on forest biomass for the EU’s renewable energy, with its associated initial increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, increases the risk of overshooting the 1.5°C target if payback periods are longer than this.Adding to the pressure on forests, many countries, including the US and EU member states, also subsidize wood heating, which constitutes more than half the wood burned in the EU. Increasingly, thousands of firewood and wood pellet companies in the EU are hollowing out forests, including old growth beech forests in the Carpathian Mountains, home of Europe’s last tracts of wilderness. This subsidized wood burning is murdering forest ecosystems that will never recover in the lifetime of anyone alive today — all in the name of climate change mitigation.The special hypocrisy around biomass will be on display at the United Nations Climate Action Summit and during New York’s Climate Week (Sept 23 – 29), where countries and companies are set to announce their deepened commitments to climate mitigation.There it’s likely we’ll see countries trumpet emission reduction goals with nary a word about how much of this ambition relies on burning forest wood and simply not counting the emissions. These nations may meet their carbon pledges on paper — but nature will know they cheated.The UK, for example, has set a goal of net zero emissions by 2050, but currently pays over a billion dollars a year in renewable energy subsidies to the Drax power station, which burns millions of tons of wood pellets from trees stripped from forests of the US, Canada, Spain, Portugal, and Poland, as well as northern EU countries with fragile boreal bog forests — Estonia, Latvia, Sweden.The Drax power stations in the United Kingdom, one of the largest users of woody biomass for energy production. Shown here is the Drax biomass dome, which once burned coal. The UK has nearly eliminated burning coal for energy, cutting its official IPCC emissions, but is ramping up its burning of woody biomass. The uncounted carbon from Drax flows into the atmosphere, adding to climate change. Photo credit: DECCgovuk on VisualHunt / CC BY-ND.Few at Climate Week are going to want to acknowledge this inconvenient truth. Policymakers, corporations, financiers, and the big greens organizing the New York jamboree don’t want to pull this particular thread because to do so starts to unravel the whole sweater, revealing the massive assumptions involved in treating forest wood as carbon neutral.The money at stake surely plays a role — the billions in subsidies underpinning the last ten years of exponential growth in the wood pellet industry are reflected in the heady share prices of companies like US-based Enviva, which exports millions of tons of wood pellets to the UK, EU, and even Asia. Industry partnerships with the big greens designed to burnish “sustainability” credentials of wood pellets don’t exactly enhance transparency about impacts, either. The camel’s nose of the biomass industry is under every tent.Pine forests cut to provide wood pellets for power plants are replanted, so this energy resource could technically be called carbon neutral, but only over the long term. It takes many years for those new trees to become mature and for the carbon equation to balance out. Photo credit: ChattOconeeNF on Visualhunt.com / CC BY.What to do in the face of such blatant and deliberate damage? Working with allies, my organization, the Partnership for Policy Integrity, has filed reports with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) highlighting the systemic misrepresentations of the wood pellet industry and asking the SEC to require better disclosures of the actual emission impacts of burning biomass.When advocacy and science failed to add real forest protections to the EU’s renewable energy policy, we worked with colleagues to file a lawsuit against the EU for its misrepresentation of burning trees as climate friendly (the court has not yet determined whether it will hear the case).We’re putting this issue on the agenda at Climate Week too, with a documentary that rips the green veneer off the biomass and wood pellet industries, followed by discussion about the EU biomass lawsuit and bioenergy policy around the world. Policymakers are especially welcome to attend.Burning forest biomass is a triple hit to climate mitigation — it increases emissions, decreases the forest carbon sink, and soaks up subsidies that could instead be allocated to zero emissions technologies or efficiency.However, there’s a simple — though not politically easy — fix to this problem. The modern biomass and wood pellet industry is a house of cards, dependent on subsidies. Countries must stop subsidizing burning wood, and preferably, start subsidizing natural forest restoration. Cutting and burning forests for “zero-carbon” fuel should be considered a Climate Crime, not subsidized with tens of billions of dollars. We should have a renewable energy policy that doesn’t destroy forests — we owe it to the world.Mary Booth is an ecosystem scientist and the Director of the Partnership for Policy Integrity, a US-based nonprofit organization. This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Burbank Bus ridership leaps

first_imgBURBANK – Tricia Smith used to slide behind the wheel of her Ford Explorer, tune her radio to her favorite station and settle in for a comfy commute between her Santa Clarita home and her job in Burbank. Until the commute home from hell on the Friday before Memorial Day weekend. “It was horrendous – two hours not going anywhere,” said Smith, 37, a housing assistant for Burbank’s Housing Authority. Now the mother of two slides into the seat of a Metrolink train for a 39-minute ride, during which she can talk to friends and read her favorite magazines. Once at the Burbank train station, she hops on a city shuttle bus that zips her to the front door of her office on Glenoaks Boulevard. Nearly 54 percent of the 170 riders who responded to a Burbank Bus survey last month said they had been riding the system for just under a year – more evidence of recent public transit converts. “It’s telling me that people are looking for a more affordable alternative,” said Adrian Aguilar, a marketing coordinator for Burbank Bus. “In Southern California, we’re a car culture, and nobody’s willing to give up that freedom to give up that car. Now, with rising gas prices, it’s been enough. People are willing to make that trade-off.” Andrew Carrasco, Burbank’s transportation services supervisor, said commuters are also lured by Burbank Bus’s $1 rides. The bus is free for those with Metrolink monthly passes, which go for $139.25, and MTA’s monthly EZ Transit Passes, which cost $58, or $29 for senior citizens. “People are getting out of their cars and using public transportation,” Carrasco said. Meanwhile, the Beeline bus system in Glendale saw a 3.5 percent drop in riders – from 753,721 in the first four months of 2005 to 727,547 during the same period this year, statistics show. Jano Baghdanian, Glendale’s traffic and transportation administrator, attributes the drop to yearlong Brand Boulevard construction that altered some bus routes. He also said many of the city’s riders are regular customers who use the Beeline as their sole source of transportation because they don’t own cars. “A large number of our riders are local folks,” Baghdanian said. “So the external factors like inflation and gas prices do not necessarily change their habits.” The Metropolitan Transportation Authority recorded 126.9 million riders on its buses in the first four months of this year, compared with 117.9 million in the first four months of 2005, a nearly 8 percent jump, statistics show. In the same period, light-rail ridership jumped nearly 14 percent, from 24.5 million in the first four months of 2005 to 27.9 million this year. Metrolink is also seeing record numbers. The train service, which covers some 512 miles in Southern California, saw more than 1 million passengers in May as local gas prices hovered around $3.40 a gallon. “I remember being told that the people of Southern California would never switch from their cars,” said Metrolink Chief Executive Officer David Solow. “I dare say our passengers have proven them wrong.” [email protected] (818) 546-3306160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2The money she saves in gas – about $160 a month – goes toward her wardrobe. “It allows me to shop more,” Smith said. “I’m much happier. I will never drive my car to work again.” Smith has joined a growing number of commuters ditching their cars for public transit, fueling a jump in bus and train ridership across the Los Angeles region – especially at Burbank Bus, which provides service from local train and regional bus stations to offices and homes in the city. Burbank Bus carried 102,058 riders in the first four months of this year, compared with 72,617 in the same period last year, a 41 percent jump, according to the latest available statistics. Thirteen, 28-seat shuttle buses run along three routes to major points across the city – the Metro Red Line subway station in North Hollywood, the Empire Center and Metrolink stations in downtown Burbank and at the Bob Hope Airport. last_img read more

Things to know: Sharks’ Game 1 lineup takes form on eve of playoffs

first_imgEDMONTON, Alberta — Joonas Donskoi played arguably his best game in two months on Tuesday. Unfortunately for the Finnish forward, it came just a little too late.With Melker Karlsson set to return from injury against the Edmonton Oilers on Thursday, the Sharks forward group will be fully healthy for the first time since March 16 and just the second game since Gus Nyquist joined the team in a deal at the trade deadline on Feb. 26. Last time around, Donskoi ended up getting bumped from the …last_img read more

H-DNL football: Ferndale captures Little 4 title

first_imgLane Branstetter had two rushing touchdowns, Jenner Christiansen and Landon Gomes each threw a touchdown pass to Tristen Martin and Ferndale High captured its first outright Little 4 Conference title since 2012 with a 42-6 win over visiting Hoopa Valley, Saturday afternoon at Coach Carlson Wildcat Field.“Trusting my receivers is a big part of it,” Christiansen said. “We have a special team this year, we do lots of conditioning and its definitely paying off.”Each week during what has been a …last_img read more

Ida Not a Human Ancestor

first_imgIf Ida known then what I know now: the media-frenzied presentation of Ida (Darwinius masillae) as a distant relative of human beings last year has been debunked.  “Many lines of evidence indicate that Darwinius has nothing at all to do with human evolution,” said Chris Kirk (U of Texas) in an article on Science Daily.  Researchers publishing their analysis in the Journal of Human Evolution accused the presentation of ignoring decades of research and an enormous body of literature on the evolution of strepsirrhines, a primate group that includes lemurs and lorises.  Ida’s discoverer claimed it had characteristics suggesting a linkage to haplorhines “However, Kirk, Williams and their colleagues point out that short snouts and deep jaws are known to have evolved multiple times among primates, including several times within the lemur/loris lineage,” the article claimed.  “They further argue that Darwinius lacks most of the key anatomical features that could demonstrate a close evolutionary relationship with living haplorhines (apes, monkeys, humans, and tarsiers).”    The announcement about Ida included a book, a History Channel documentary, and an exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History.  Mayor Michael Bloomberg unveiled the specimen at a news conference in New York city.  The lead author of the new paper remarked, “Just because it’s a complete and well-preserved fossil doesn’t mean it’s going to overthrow all our ideas.”  For more on Ida, see the 05/19/2009 and 10/24/2009 entries.It’s nice when scientists criticize overblown claims of other scientists, but does it help to have one lie displace another?  Ida has nothing at all to do with human evolution, but it also has nothing at all to do with evolution.  A well-designed mammal lived, and it died.  Some variations existed between existing kinds of primates.  That’s all a strict empiricist should say about it.  Did you notice the fudging the new team had to make about convergent evolution?  They said certain traits are “known to have evolved multiple times among primates, including several times within the lemur/loris lineage.”  Known?  Would they swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?  The truth may not get you a book or History Channel documentary, but it has one major benefit over the alternative: it’s true.(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

10 Data Points You Need to Convert More Customers

first_img Originally published Dec 16, 2011 3:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Lead Nurturing There’s a dangerous misconception flying around that inbound marketing stops once you generate leads. Let’s squash that rumor like a bug right now since, well, it doesn’t. Effective implementation of inbound marketing follows leads throughout the sales cycle, especially considering the fact that only 50% of qualified leads are ready to buy immediately, according to Gleanster Research. This means that your leads are definitely in need of a little TLC, and that’s why lead nurturing is such a valuable asset in your inbound marketing toolbox.A great lead nurturing campaign takes someone who isn’t ready to buy, and nurtures that lead with content and offers tailored to that lead’s interests and stage in the sales process, pushing them closer to sales-readiness. Effective lead nurturing is personalized, targeted, timely, and appropriate. While there are a few methods for nurturing leads, one of the most commonly utilized methods for implementing a lead nurturing campaign is email. And there’s no question that this more targeted approach works. HubSpot’s own research indicates that lead nurturing emails generate an 8% click-through rate (CTR), compared to the measly 3% CTR that untargeted email blasts yield.So how do you create a lead nurturing campaign that makes use of all of those critical lead nurturing best practices we just mentioned? It’s all about the intelligence. Lead intelligence enables you to craft personalized, targeted lead nurturing campaigns that suit the needs of your leads. Convinced that you might benefit from implementing lead nurturing? Here are 9 pieces of must-have lead intelligence you need for effective lead nurturing segmentation and optimization.10 Must-Have Pieces of Lead Intelligence You Need for Effective Lead Nurturing1. Name: This sounds like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how few marketers personalize their communications with something as simple as the lead’s name. This is one of the simplest pieces of intelligence to gather from your leads, so why not use it? Addressing your leads with their names in lead nurturing emails is a great first step to a more personalized experience.2. Demographic Information: Gathering and analyzing demographic information such as age, gender, and location can give you a lot of insight into your leads’ wants and needs and can help you better qualify them up front. Do you sell products tailored to a more senior demographic? Then you probably don’t want to bother adding a rogue teeny-bopper lead to your lead nurturing campaign for those products.3. Industry: If you’re a B2B company and you sell products and services to people in various  industries, industry information can be extraordinarily helpful in determining the best nurture path. Do leads from that particular industry have specific needs and care about only certain products and services you offer? Plop these leads into lead nurturing campaigns that offer vertical content and information related only to the industry in which they work.4. Company Size: A small business has much different needs and goals than does an enterprise-sized business, so shouldn’t leads falling in these two different categories — and in between, for that matter — be nurtured differently, too?5. Job Title: A lead’s job title can tell you a lot about them. In which deparment do they work? What is their level of seniority within the company? After all, you’d likely market to a company’s CEO much differently than you would a junior manager at the company.6. Persona: Has your business crafted well-defined marketing personas that describe your ideal customer group(s) to a tee? Using the above information, where does your lead fit? Do you find that one marketing persona prefers one content format or topic over another? Focus your lead nurturing communication on providing information about that topic or content type.7. Pages Viewed: Which pages has the lead visited on your website? This information can be a great way to determine the stage of the sales cycle your lead is in. For example, if a lead has visited your product or case study pages, this is a good indication that the lead might be closer to a sale and thus ready to be nurtured with content and information that is more product-focused.8. Social Media Intel: Is this lead present on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn? What kind of information can you gather from their interactions on these sites? Based on their discussions and questions, do they seem to be interested in a particular problem your business solves? Nurture them with content that addresses those problems.9. Conversion Forms Completed, and When: How much has the lead already interacted with your business’ lead gen content? How many forms has he/she completed, what type of content (ebooks, webinars, product demos, etc.) were they for, and which topics did the content cover? If the lead has converted on a few forms for content on a specific topic, nurture them with more of that type of content. When did the lead first convert on your site? How long has he/she been around? A lead who has converted more is likely more educated about your company and what you offer than a new lead who has only converted once.10. Email Communications History: How much have you emailed the lead already? Are they already a part of one email list or lead nurturing campaign? Historically, how engaged have they been with your email communcations. Did they click any links? What links did they click on? Use your intelligence wisely, and be sure not to bombard leads with multiple campaigns and various types of email sends. It’s called lead nurturing, not lead pummeling. The pieces of lead intelligence data you use to inform your lead nurturing segmentation and the types of content, information, and offers you use within your communication will depend a lot on your specific business, industry, target audience, and the products/services you offer. Much of the intelligence we mentioned above can easily be obtained through lead-capture forms on your website’s landing pages, and you can use other marketing analytics and closed-loop data to glean many of the other insights. Using this valuable lead intelligence to better segment your leads and personlize your communication with them will result in more sales-ready leads for your sales team and a more efficient inbound marketing strategy.Have you leveraged lead nurturing campaigns in your marketing? What results have they produced?Image Credit: Jim Bahn last_img read more