Colombian community leader allegedly murdered for standing up to palm oil

first_imgAgriculture, Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Conflict, Environment, Forests, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Murdered Activists, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Ranching, Social Conflict, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Colombian community leader Hernan Bedoya, who defended collective land rights for Afro-Colombian farmers as well as local biodiversity in the face of palm oil and industrial agriculture expansion, was allegedly assassinated by a neo-paramilitary group on Friday, Dec. 5.Bedoya was owner of the “Mi Tierra” Biodiversity Zone, located in the collective Afro-Colombian territory of Pedeguita-Mancilla. The land rights activist stood up to palm oil, banana and ranching companies who are accused of engaging in illegal land grabbing and deforestation in his Afro-Colombian community’s collective territory in Riosucio, Chocó.According to the Intercelestial Commission for Justice and Peace in Colombia (CIJP), a Colombian human rights group, Bedoya was heading home on horseback when two members of the neo-paramilitary Gaitánista Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AGC) intercepted him on a bridge and shot him 14 times, immediately killing him.According to Foundation for Peace and Reconciliation (PARES), 137 social leaders have been killed across Colombia in 2017. Other observers have found lower numbers, but most track over 100 killed over the course of the year. Colombian community leader Hernan Bedoya, who defended collective land rights for Afro-Colombian farmers as well as local biodiversity in the face of palm oil and industrial agriculture expansion, was allegedly assassinated by a neo-paramilitary group on Friday, Dec. 5.Part of a rise in targeted assassinations of social leaders across the country, Bedoya was the second Afro-Colombian leader to be killed in the Bajo Atrato river basin region in less than 10 days after Mario Castaño was killed in late November. Overall, there have been three social leaders killed in the region over the course of the year.According to the Intercelestial Commission for Justice and Peace in Colombia (CIJP), a Colombian human rights group, Bedoya was heading home on horseback when two members of the neo-paramilitary Gaitánista Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AGC) intercepted him on a bridge and shot him 14 times, immediately killing him.Bedoya was owner of the “Mi Tierra” Biodiversity Zone, located in the collective Afro-Colombian territory of Pedeguita-Mancilla. The land rights activist stood up to palm oil, banana and ranching companies who are accused of engaging in illegal land grabbing and deforestation in his Afro-Colombian community’s collective territory in Riosucio, Chocó.As one of more than an estimated 8 million people afflicted by five decades of armed conflict in Colombia, Bedoya had returned to his land with family in 2012 after being displaced by the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) paramilitary group in 1996.Following his return to the community, Bedoya fought alongside non-governmental organization to push back against powerful palm oil, banana and cattle interests. He wanted to ensure that the collective Afro-Colombian territory was protected from ongoing “invasions” that were cutting into his community agricultural lands and destroying protected areas set aside for their rich biodiversity.Bedoya allegedly began receiving threats from illegal armed groups beginning in 2015. According to CIJP, the Colombian state, through the National Protection Unit (UNP), had given Bedoya a cell phone and a bullet-proof vest in an attempt to protect his life.In June, CIJP denounced an industrial agricultural company for “destroying primary forests and resources for illegal industrial agriculture,” also claiming that their the group’s lawyer had singled out Bedoya’s biodiversity reserve as a target for parcelization and development.“They are cutting the forests, destroying subsistence crops and causing displacement when they take over the family farms to plant plantain and palm oil projects,” said CIJP to local media.The human rights group claims the agro-industrial projects that are planned for the collective Pedeguita-Mancilla territory have been supported by the neo-paramilitary group AGC, and that the murder of the social leaders benefits a group of industrial agricultural landowners who took advantage of the armed conflict to expand their commercial ventures into the region.The Colombian Ombudsman announced on Twitter that it “rejected the assassination of the land reclamation leader” and called on the authorities to “quickly clarify the facts” surrounding the killing.In response to the two killings, international human rights organization Amnesty International called on the Colombian government to provide a “comprehensive response… ensuring respect for the boundaries of the humanitarian zones, guaranteeing the safety of their members and [an increased] presence of state security forces.”On Thursday, 25 social leaders from Bajo Atrato and Urabá regions in Choco and Antioquia, who had received death threats or had relatives who were murdered, met in Bogotá to demand guarantees that they would be able to return to their territories. In order to protect their identities, the leaders wore masks to the press conference.Social leaders from Bajo Atrato and Urabá wore masks to their meeting in Bogotá. Photo courtesy of Contagio RadioThe activists said they know of plans to kill several other land rights leaders in the region: Miguel Hoyos, Eustaquio Polo and María Ligia Chaverra, as well as two local communal leaders.Hernan Bedoya: No more palm oil in Pedeguita-MancillaFilmmaker Nico Muzi met and interviewed Bedoya while producing 2016 documentary short Frontera Invisible, which explored the expansion of palm oil into Colombia and the effect it has had on local rural communities across the country.In the interview, Bedoya told the history of his community and their struggle with paramilitaries and industrial agriculture. He denounced the communal council, who he said had struck a deal to illegally allow cattle ranchers, banana and palm oil companies into the collective territory.“We are now hearing they want to plant another 1,000 hectares of palm [in our collective land],” Bedoya said. “But I don’t know where they will plant it because we are here in this land.They will have to remove us first from the territory if they want to plant those 1,000 hectares of palm.”Industrial agriculture taking advantage of armed conflictIn the 1990s, more than 8,000 individuals were forced to leave the Bajo Atrato region when the AUC launched a fierce attack to take over the strategically important drug-trafficking route along the Atrato river, which was previously controlled by left-wing guerrilla FARC and ELN, according to an investigative report by local media group Verdad Abierta.The report details that by 2000, local authorities and business leaders began pushing for the expansion of palm oil cultivation — or as they referred to it “green gold” — on lands that had been abandoned or sold at cut-rate prices by Afro-Colombian and mestizo farmers who had left the region fearing for their lives.Ex-paramilitary bosses reportedly testified that the Vicente Castaño — one of two brothers who led the AUC and its estimated 30,000 fighters from 1997 to 2006 — maintained relationships with the palm growers and cattle ranchers, inviting them to invest in the territory.To protect cultural heritage and identity, the Colombian Congress passed a law in 1993 that recognized the right of Afro-Colombian communities to hold communal lands. In 2000, 48,000 hectares in the Bajo Atrato region were granted to an Afro-Colombian community known as Pedeguita-Mancilla who had ancestral rights to the land.The AGC neo-paramilitary group accused of slaying Bedoya is a direct descendant of the AUC, which formed in 2008 following the extradition of AUC commanders to the U.S. The group has grown tremendously over the past decade, taking back most of the AUC’s drug trafficking routes along the Caribbean and the Pacific coasts, and is now the largest illegal armed group in Colombia.In the past few days, the AGC called an unilateral ceasefire as it prepares to surrender an estimated 7,000 members of the country’s largest drug trafficking organization to the Colombian government. The government in September asked Prosecutor General Nestor Humberto Martinez to talk with the group after leader “Otoniel” offered to surrender to justice.Dangerous situation for human and environmental rights leadersIn the past year, scores of human rights and environmental leaders have been killed in Colombia, provoking a human rights crisis that has international observers concerned for the long-term prospects for peace — even as the country’s former largest illegal armed group, the FARC, has demobilized over the past year.According to Foundation for Peace and Reconciliation (PARES), 137 social leaders have been killed across Colombia in 2017. Other observers have found lower numbers, but most track over 100 killed over the course of the year.“The vulnerability of leaders and human rights defenders in Colombia remains critical. The acts of violence against this population show high degrees of systematic behavior,” PARES stated in its report on the killings of social leaders.Hernan Bedoya. Photo courtesy of Frontera InvisibleThe PARES report said that the motivation of the killings are to “limit the participation of social leaders in politics, impede processes of truth-building, land restitution and environmental protection.”The United Nations’ refugee agency (UNHCR) agreed that there is a pattern to the killings of social leaders. William Spindler, spokesperson of the UN agency, pointed out that the majority of the killings have taken place in regions where the FARC gave up territorial control.“In many cases criminal activity has increased, in this case because of the [power] vacuum left by the FARC demobilization that was not filled by the state,” Splindler said in a press briefing.Colombia’s palm oil expansionWhile Indonesia and Malaysia account for around 85 percent of the world’s palm oil supply, Colombia is the fourth-largest producer globally and the largest in Latin America. The global commodity is widely used in food, and cosmetic products, and as as biodiesel — even though a European Commission study found the fuel source creates three times as much carbon as regular fossil fuel diesel.Driven by a worldwide boom in palm oil cultivation since the turn of the century, the amount of land cultivated with palm oil in Colombia has increased nearly 200 percent since 2000, according to palm oil producer organization Fedepalma, growing from 157,000 hectares to 466,000 hectares planted in 2015.The government and palm oil association Fedepalma have studied the country’s soils, and signaled that 16 million hectares around the country are suitable for oil palm cultivation. With the demobilization of the FARC, the government aims to open the doors to industrial agricultural development especially in areas that were previously off-limits due to the conflict.Proponents of the country’s palm oil boom boast it has not incurred the same levels of forest destruction that have been well documented in other countries, particularly in Southeast Asia.However, as illustrated by the death of Hernan Bedoya, the expansion of industrial agriculture may be coming at a social cost, with critics saying development is taking place on lands that were illegally seized by paramilitary groups or abandoned during the country’s half-century of armed conflict.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

CITES 2019: What’s Conservation Got To Do With It? (commentary)

first_imgAnimals, Cites, Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Green, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img From August 17-28, the global community convenes in Geneva for the meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).Species whose very future on this planet will be debated include the African elephant, Southern white rhino, giraffe, tiger, jaguar, cheetah, and mako shark.Susan Lieberman, Vice President for International Policy at WCS, argues governments must not let their decisions be swayed by the pressures of those more interested in trade than conservation.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. From August 17-28, the global community convenes in Geneva for the meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The meeting was originally planned to take place last May in Sri Lanka, but due to the horrific terrorist bombings, the meeting was moved to Geneva, the headquarters of the CITES Secretariat.This is the 18th meeting of the CITES CoP in the history of the Convention, which entered into force in 1975. There are now 183 governments as “Parties” (members) to the convention, comprising the only intergovernmental forum that addresses the threat of international trade to wild species of plants and animals—both legal and illegal trade.I have had the privilege of attending all of the last 11 CoPs, as both a government and non-governmental representative. Governments attending will make decisions on whether to regulate international trade in certain species to prevent them from becoming threatened by trade, or to prohibit trade altogether for threatened or endangered species.Jaguar. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Species whose very future on this planet will be debated include the African elephant, Southern white rhino, giraffe, tiger, jaguar, cheetah, and mako shark. Several lesser known species will also be considered—among them the saiga antelope, helmeted hornbill, glass frogs, Indian star tortoise, and so many others.Many of these species are subject to significant poaching and trafficking—either for use of their body parts or for the pet trade. This illegal trade threatens species while undermining the rule of law, facilitating corruption, and harming the livelihoods and sustainable development of local communities.It is easy to imagine that in light of the well-documented biodiversity crisis—from threats such as climate change, habitat loss, trade, and the depletion of wildlife that are over-hunted and over-fished—species across the globe would receive the necessary protection. But that is not always the case. Too often, commercial interests work to block increased protection or regulation of species.There is one key conservation issue at play. If a species is found in multiple countries, and is declining or endangered in some and more secure in others, sound conservation practice and the precautionary principle dictate that international measures should focus on the populations needing the most help. Two examples highlight this point.Mongolia and the U.S. have proposed conferring upon the saiga antelope (a critically endangered species found in the open steppes of Central Asia) the highest level of protection. Formerly widespread and numbering well over 1 million individuals as recently as the 1970s, the species repeatedly experienced drastic declines in the late 20th century, reaching an all-time low of about 50,000 animals in the early 2000s.There has been some rebounding of populations, but the species is still threatened by poaching and illegal trade; the males’ horn is used in traditional medicine in China and Southeast Asia. In addition, disease outbreaks recently killed at least 200,000 saiga in the course of only three weeks.Wild male saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) visiting a waterhole at the Stepnoi Sanctuary, Astrakhan Oblast, Russia. Photo credit: Andrey Giljov [CC BY-SA 4.0]The saiga must go to CITES Appendix I (which prohibits international commercial trade in threatened species) at the Geneva meeting. However, some governments and trade interests have focused more on the less-endangered populations in Kazakhstan and elsewhere than the critically endangered Mongolian saiga population. If the species is to persist in healthy herds, governments should ensure that all saiga receive the highest level of protection.Another example is the giraffe, found in 19 countries in Africa. Giraffe populations are declining due to habitat loss, illegal killing and illegal trade, and climate change. Six African countries with giraffes have proposed CITES list the giraffe on Appendix II—which allows trade as long as it is sustainable and legal. Since there is evidence of some commercial and illegal trade, it is prudent to accept this proposal to ensure the giraffe trade is sustainable and does not further threaten the species.Yet several interests are pushing to block this protection for giraffes, claiming that the species is in good shape in southern Africa. It is correct that giraffes are much better off in South Africa, Botswana, and their neighbors, than elsewhere in Africa, but prudent conservation says that the species must be looked at in its entirety. We cannot let giraffes disappear in Central, East, and West Africa because it might be inconvenient for others to require permits and regulation.There are 57 species proposals and more than 100 other issues to be discussed in Geneva. When governments join a treaty such as CITES, they have agreed to act for the global good, and not only act or decide based on their own national or trade interests. Governments must not let their decisions be swayed by the pressures of those more interested in trade than conservation. I look forward to strong, precautionary, conservation decisions in Geneva—for the well-known giraffe, the strange saiga antelope, and so many other species in need of global collaboration and action.Glass frog in Costa Rica. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Susan Lieberman is Vice President for International Policy at WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).last_img read more

Mongabay editor arrested in Indonesia

first_imgEndangered Environmentalists, Environmental Journalism, Featured, Human Rights, press release Article published by mongabayauthor Mongabay editor Philip Jacobson was detained in Indonesia on December 17, 2019 over an alleged issue with his business visa.Jacobson was formally arrested on January 21 and is currently incarcerated in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan.This is a press release from Mongabay about a developing situation and may be updated.As of January 29, Jacobson is still under ‘city arrest’. [UPDATE] 1/31/2020 – Philip Jacobson was deported from Indonesia today, with the original charge against him dismissed. Read more here. Philip Jacobson, an award-winning editor for the environmental science news outlet Mongabay, has been arrested for an alleged visa violation in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, on Tuesday after being put under city arrest for a month.Jacobson, 30, was first detained on December 17, 2019 after attending a hearing between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), Indonesia’s largest indigenous rights advocacy group.He had travelled to the city shortly after entering Indonesia on a business visa for a series of meetings. The day he was due to leave, immigration authorities seized his passport, interrogated him for four hours and ordered him to remain in the city pending their investigation.On January 21, more than a month later, Jacobson was formally arrested and taken into custody. He was informed that he faces charges of violating the 2011 immigration law and a prison sentence of up to five years. He is now being held at a prison in Palangkaraya.Phillip Jacobson with his mother Elizabeth (left).“We are supporting Philip in this on-going case and making every effort to comply with Indonesia’s immigration authorities,” said Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler. “I am surprised that immigration officials have taken such punitive action against Philip for what is an administrative matter.”Jacobson’s arrest comes shortly after Human Rights Watch issued a report documenting rising violence against activists and environmentalists in Indonesia, and amid a growing sense that critical voices are being suppressed.“Journalists and people employed by journalism organizations should be free to work in Indonesia without fear of arbitrary detention,” said Andreas Harsono of Human Rights Watch, who knows Jacobson and understands his case. “Philip Jacobson’s treatment is a worrying sign that the government is cracking down on the kind of work that is essential to the health of Indonesian democracy.”Last month The Indonesian Alliance of Independent Journalists (AJI) issued a report documenting 53 incidents of abuse against journalists, including five criminal cases, in 2019.Press contactsAryo Nugroho (Indonesia)LBH Palangkaraya+62 852-5296-0916Rhett Butler (United States)[email protected]+1 6502604018Phillip Jacobson on a beach in Indonesia.Chronology of Phil Jacobson immigration caseSummary: Philip Jacobson is an employee of Mongabay, a non-profit environmental science news organization. Jacobson is an editor for Mongabay and splits his time between Indonesia and his native U.S. This document outlines events culminating in Jacobson’s detention in the Indonesian city of Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan on the island of Borneo.December 14: Jacobson, traveling on a multiple-entry business visa, arrived in Palangkaraya, the capital city of Central Kalimantan province, to meet with the local chapter of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), an indigenous rights advocacy group.December 16: Jacobson attended a dialogue at the parliament building between the Central Kalimantan parliament and the local chapter of AMAN.December 17: Jacobson was scheduled on a flight out of Palangkaraya, but before he could leave for the airport, immigration officers went to his guesthouse and confiscated his passport. The officials ordered Jacobson to come in the next day for questioning. It later became clear that someone had photographed Jacobson at the parliament building and reported him to immigration.December 18: Jacobson was interrogated about his activities at the immigration office. Authorities took an official statement, known as a BAP, and ordered Jacobson to remain in Palangkaraya while they continued their investigation.December 20: The US embassy called the immigration office, which would not provide a timeline for the investigation or administrative process.December 24: Jacobson missed his international flight out of Indonesia for the Christmas and New Years holiday.December 26-January 7: Immigration continues to be evasive about the timeline for the administrative process.January 9: Jacobson was summoned to the immigration office, where he received a formal letter saying he is suspected of committing a visa violation and is being investigated. Authorities state that as long as Jacobson remained cooperative, he would remain under city arrest, rather than detained in an immigration cell.January 21 (Day 36): Immigration officers appear at Jacobson’s guesthouse room and instruct him to pack his belongings and come with them. He is taken into custody and transferred to a detention center.Press contactsAryo Nugroho (Indonesia)LBH Palangkaraya+62 852-5296-0916Rhett Butler (United States)[email protected]+1 6502604018center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

[L1] Lyon : Rayan Cherki, 16 ans, tout feu tout flegme

first_img“Il illustre à merveille le travail très bien fait du centre de formation de Lyon. Ce garçon en un match a démontré tout son talent”, a salué lors de l’émission Téléfoot Pape Diouf, ex-agent et ancien président de l’Olympique de Marseille. Courtisé par plusieurs grosses écuries européennes, le n°18 de Lyon a signé son premier contrat professionnel en juillet 2019, un bail qui s’étend jusqu’en juin 2022. Depuis, Lyon utilise sa pépite avec parcimonie. Rudi Garcia l’a certes lancé dans le grand bain en octobre, pour la première de ses trois apparitions en Ligue 1, mais l’entraîneur rhodanien ne l’a pas encore récompensé par une titularisation en championnat.Alors Cherki ronge son frein depuis le banc de touche en profitant des rares occasions offertes pour briller, comme lors des deux matches de Coupe de France disputés en janvier. Face aux amateurs de Bourg-en-Bresse (7-0), il est devenu le plus jeune buteur de l’histoire de l’OL. Et samedi, le dribbleur habile des deux pieds a encore élevé le niveau de plusieurs crans, ravivant le souvenir des anciens espoirs Karim Benzema et Hatem Ben Arfa, tous deux lancés à Lyon à 17 ans.Éviter la surchauffeKylian Mbappé, autre grand précoce du football français, s’est amusé de la pluie de commentaires élogieux qui s’est abattue sur la tête de Cherki, international français des moins de 16 ans à 2 reprises. “Faut pas trop lui parler d’âge hein”, a plaisanté sur Twitter le champion du monde âgé de 21 ans, en référence à la formule qu’il avait lui-même utilisée dans l’émission Intérieur Sport sur Canal Plus. L’attaquant du Paris SG avait expliqué que l’âge d’un joueur ne devait pas être un critère pour un entraîneur. “Dès que j’entendais l’âge, j’avais les sourcils qui fronçaient. Moi tu ne me parles pas d’âge. (…) Tu ne me parles que de football et de niveau”, avait dit Mbappé dans une séquence devenue virale.A la Beaujoire samedi, les partenaires de Cherki se sont néanmoins tous relayés face caméra pour calmer le jeu, tout en mettant en valeur son indéniable talent. “Peut-être qu’il vous a surpris, mais pas nous”, disait ainsi le gardien Anthony Lopes. “Rayan est sorti du lot, il a été décisif. C’est à lui de continuer sur cet esprit-là, de garder la tête sur les épaules”. Son entraîneur Rudi Garcia a également sorti l’extincteur, conscient que l’emballement médiatique autour de son jeune phénomène frisait la surchauffe. Même si “tout ce qui saute aux yeux ce soir, c’est les deux buts, le pénalty obtenu et les deux passes décisives, (…) mon rôle c’est aussi d’abaisser les niveaux parce que tout le monde va le porter aux nues”, a commenté l’ancien technicien de la Roma et de l’OM. “Ça va être un grand danger s’il ne m’écoute plus, qu’il ne travaille plus et qu’il pense que c’est arrivé, alors qu’il est encore loin du compte”, a-t-il encore insisté.Parfois tancé pour son individualisme et son goût modéré pour les tâches défensives, Cherki a démontré samedi qu’il pouvait gommer ces deux points faibles, selon Garcia. “S’il continue comme ça, il pourra continuer à progresser”. Avec les longues absences de Memphis Depay et Jeff-Reine Adélaïde, le jeune crack de l’OL aura probablement davantage de temps de jeu dans les mois à venir. Mais il devra aussi peut-être jouer des coudes avec de nouveaux venus, si Lyon venait à recruter d’autres attaquants lors du mercato d’hiver.LQ/AFP Partager “Peut-être qu’il vous a surpris, mais pas nous”. A 16 ans et cinq mois, le crack lyonnais Rayan Cherki crève l’écran avec une maturité qui n’étonne pas ses partenaires de l’OL, club formateur désireux de ne pas griller sa pépite.Samedi lors de la victoire à Nantes (4-3) en Coupe de France, l’attaquant dribbleur, né à Lyon le 17 août 2003, a livré un show complet en “prime time” avec deux buts en moins de dix minutes, suivis de deux passes décisives et d’un pénalty provoqué.Le récital du gamin surclassé tournait déjà en boucle sur les réseaux sociaux quand il s’est présenté, calme et lucide, devant les caméras d’Eurosport pour commenter sa performance. Cette maturité, “je l’ai acquise grâce à mes coéquipiers”, a déclaré celui qui explose un à un les records de précocité avec l’OL, club qu’il a rejoint dès l’âge de 7 ans en provenance de Saint-Priest.last_img read more