Gov’t stops processing migrants at Texas border center after suspected flu outbreak

first_imgwingedwolf/iStock(MCALLEN, Texas) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection has stopped taking in undocumented migrants at a border processing center in McAllen, Texas, citing a “large number” of people in custody with high fevers and other flu-like symptoms. The center is one of the busiest spots along the Mexico border and a short drive to a Border Patrol station where a 16-year-old boy died earlier this week.CBP hasn’t said how many people have grown ill or where new migrants arriving at that part of the border will be sent. The agency said medical staff were on hand to treat people who were ill. “To avoid the spread of illness, the Rio Grande Valley Sector has temporarily suspended intake operations” at the Central Processing Center in McAllen, the agency said in a statement. “Individuals apprehended in RGV Sector will be held at other locations until this situation is resolved,” the agency added. An earlier proposal to fly migrants to U.S. border stations in coastal or northern states, including Florida, in a bid to lessen the burden at sites like McAllen was scrapped last week after the White House intervened and President Donald Trump declared via Twitter that no more undocumented migrants would be allowed past the southern border. The law requires that border authorities process migrants seeking asylum, and a federal judge has limited detention for children.The latest death of a child in custody was a teen who appears to have been traveling without his parents. CBP said he had been waiting at a U.S. Border Patrol station outside of McAllen, Texas, to get picked up by the Department of Health and Human Services when he was found unresponsive on Monday. He had been in government custody for a week waiting to be transferred to HHS, which overseas care for “unaccompanied” migrant minors. He was the third migrant minor to have spent time in U.S. custody in the past month, and the fifth child to die in six months.Acting Homeland Secretary Kevin McAleenan was scheduled to testify on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Democrats, who identified the teen as Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez, have already called for an investigation.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

13th ANNUAL LETTERS FOR LITERACY SCRABBLE® TOURNAMENT ANNOUNCED

first_imgRegistration is now underway for the thirteenth annual “SCRABBLE® Smackdown” (formerly known as Letters for Literacy SCRABBLE® Tournament) hosted by The Literacy Center. This annual event will be on Saturday, Feb. 27, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event will be held at Ivy Tech Community College’s main campus in Evansville, 3501 N. First Ave.The event is open to the public, and players of all ages and skill levels are encouraged to enter. Teams may consist of one to three players and the cost to play is $50 per team. Participants can play for prizes and recognition in the “Pro” division (formerly Competitive), Semi-Pro division (formerly Fun) or play for rule bending fun in the Rebel division. We have also added a Student division for high school and college age.Funds raised through the tournament will benefit The Literacy Center, a non-profit agency whose mission is to improve basic adult literacy in the community. The Literacy Center has been providing free reading improvement instruction for adults in the tristate area for fifty years.“We are super excited about the changes to the SCRABBLE tournament and think we have a division that will suit everyone’s competition level, “ said The Literacy Center’s Executive Director, Jennifer Wigginton. “We have some amazing items in the silent auction that takes place also and look forward to the event, rain, sleet or snow the tournament will go on.”For more information about the SCRABBLE® Smackdown Tournament or The Literacy Center, please visit www.litcenter.org or contact Jennifer Wigginton, Executive Director, at (812) 429-1222 or by e- mail at [email protected] FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Sir Alex Ferguson turned down chance to sign Thierry Henry before Arsenal, claims ex-Manchester United security chief

first_img Metro Sport ReporterMonday 25 May 2020 1:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link727Shares Sir Alex Ferguson is said to have turned down Thierry Henry before he went to Arsenal (Getty Sport)Sir Alex Ferguson turned down the chance to sign Thierry Henry because he had doubts over his fitness, according to Manchester United’s former security chief.Arsene Wenger signed Henry from Juventus in 1999 for £11 million and the French striker went on to become one of the greatest players in Premier League history.Henry remains Arsenal’s all-time top scorer with 228 goals during his eight-year spell with the club.The World Cup winner also played a pivotal role in helping Arsenal win two Premier League titles and two FA Cup trophies.ADVERTISEMENTBut according to Ned Kelly, Manchester United’s former head of security, Ferguson had the opporunity to bring Henry to United before he headed to Arsenal. Advertisement Comment Sir Alex Ferguson turned down chance to sign Thierry Henry before Arsenal, claims ex-Manchester United security chief Thierry Henry went on to become a Premier League legend with Arsenal (Getty Images)Kelly, who also acted as a bodyguard for Ferguson, Eric Cantona and David Beckham during his time at Old Trafford, claims Cantona’s brother, Jean-Marie, was the one who alerted United to the fact that Henry was willing to make the move to Manchester.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘In the tunnel after the game my phone goes, Eric’s older brother Jean-Marie [Cantona] says, ‘Ned, tell Alex [Ferguson] that Thierry Henry wants to come to the club’,’ Kelly said in an interview with beIN Sports.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors‘Now this was before he [Henry] went to Arsenal, his first choice was Manchester United.‘So I go to the boss and say, ‘boss, I’ve just had Jean-Marie Cantona on the phone, he had said Henry wants to come to the club’.‘He [Ferguson] says, ‘no way, he’s always f****** injured’. He went to Arsenal, the rest is history.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisementlast_img read more

Ibrahimovic and Manchester United to continue the Cooperation?

first_imgZlatan Ibrahimovic and Manchester United have begun negotiations on the continuation of cooperation in the next season as well.To recall, this Bosnian experienced striker and club from Old Trafford agreed this summer to cooperate one plus one season.“I enjoy that I am playing in a fantastic club with great coach. I know Mourinho from earlier, he is the perfect coach for Manchester. There are not many players to get the opportunity to play for United,” said Ibrahimovic.Ibrahimovic is convinced that the fans will be happy because he won the championship in the Netherlands, Italy, Spain and France.“I am a type of person who, when goes into something, puts himself 200 percent into doing it. I start something, I’m going to ‘kill’ it and to go out. And when I go out, I do not want any complaints about what I did. I never leave the work unfinished” said Ibrahimovic.(Source: klix)last_img read more

‘The forest is our life’: Hope for change in Guyana’s forests (commentary)

first_imgCommentary, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Farming, Forestry, Forests, Gold Mining, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Logging, Mining Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Forestry is big business in Guyana. The sector contributed 2.27 percent to Guyana’s GDP in 2016, with total forest products exports valued at $41.9 million. Approximately 20,000 people, mainly in the rural and hinterland areas, are employed in the sector.Guyana’s laws provide for indigenous villages to obtain titles for the land they occupy and, currently, indigenous peoples own 14 percent of the country’s land. However, the process of granting legal ownership has been cumbersome and villages have complained of mining and forest concessions being granted on land they have customarily used for farming, hunting, and other activities, all without them being informed.Guyana’s forests have sustained people for generations. For this commentary, Gaulbert Sutherland traveled deep into the country’s hinterland to hear of the pressures that locals face, and their hopes for change.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. First, an American company came knocking. Then an Indian firm. A Chinese corporation soon followed.“Ten years doing logging? The amount of machines they wanted to bring… I said no, don’t interfere with our jungle, that is our jungle, leave it there,” recalled Mark George of one encounter with a company that was seeking approval to log the forests surrounding Annai, an indigenous village in Guyana more than 400 kilometers (about 250 miles) from the capital, Georgetown.“The people supported me,” said George, who was then the toshao or village chief. Promises of $5,000 per year for the village and salaries for the village council were made, an appealing offer in an area where poverty is rife and jobs are scarce. But, conscious of how much the forests contributed to their livelihoods, the people resisted, George said.That resistance has come to the fore time and again over the past decade as companies sought to operate in the vast forests that surround Annai and its sister communities, with the indigenous villages often the last to know as various companies were granted concessions for logging.Forestry is big business in Guyana. Forests cover approximately 87 percent of the country’s land or about 18.48 million hectares (roughly 45.7 million acres), much of it designated as State Forests managed by the Guyana Forestry Commission (GFC). The sector contributed 2.27 percent to Guyana’s GDP in 2016, with total forest products exports valued at $41.9 million. Approximately 20,000 people, mainly in the rural and hinterland areas, are employed in the sector.Nonetheless, Guyana has one of the lowest deforestation rates in the world. In 2017, forest loss was recorded at 0.048 percent, the lowest since 2010, when the country began monitoring such changes under a REDD+ pact with Norway. Over the years, gold mining has been the main driver of deforestation, accounting for 74 percent of the deforestation recorded in 2017.Forced from their landFor indigenous communities, the destruction wrought by mining has been alarming, as has the granting of forest concessions close to indigenous lands. Guyana’s laws provide for indigenous villages to obtain titles for the land they occupy and, currently, indigenous peoples own 14 percent of the country’s land. However, the process of granting legal ownership has been cumbersome and villages have complained of mining and forest concessions being granted on land they have customarily used for farming, hunting, and other activities, all without them being informed. With farms as well as hunting and fishing grounds being impacted — and sometimes destroyed — in some cases, people have been forced from the land, as it does not fall within the titled area.Forests continue to sustain the lives of Guyana’s Indigenous Peoples — as they have for generations. Indigenous Peoples account for 10 percent of the population and in the rural areas, where most live, poverty rates range from 61 percent to 94 percent, according to UNICEF. Jobs are scarce, and according to the UNICEF report, “for most of the Indigenous Peoples, poverty is not only lack of monetary resources, but it involves access to land, culture, medicine, food, education and safety.”Forests as a way of lifeAnnai is perched at the edges of the Rupununi savannah, where forest-covered mountains, the peaks often adorned in fleeting wisps of clouds, mark the beginning of the jungle. Like other indigenous communities, the people here turn to the forest for the necessities of life.Forests are essentially their “supermarket,” according to Mike Williams, the secretary for the village council and member of the board of the North Rupununi District Development Board, made up of 20 indigenous villages that collectively work on development issues, including those related to the forest.“Each one of these villages depend on the forest for many things, for food, wildlife, fish, shelter, medicine, agriculture,” he said. Palm fronds form the roofs of many houses.At her home in Annai, while preparing to extract the toxins from cassava to make cassava bread, a staple of Indigenous Peoples’ diets, Zalita Moses points out that the matapee (a type of strainer used to squeeze out the “cassava water”), the sifter, and other implements used in the process all come from the forest, while the cassava is cultivated in jungle clearings because that is where the most fertile land is located.Abel Williams weaves a fan while his grandson Dylan Williams displays some of the products his grandfather produces using materials from the forest. Photo by Gaulbert Sutherland.“I feel more comfortable in the forest than at home in the village,” said Mark George, as he paused from clearing his farm of weeds. His and the surrounding farms are located on state land, which brings him some unease as a nearby non-indigenous community claims it, but they have agreed that the indigenous farmers can use the land. “This is our farming ground from very long [ago], our grandparents were here,” he said, disclosing that his sons and other relatives all farm in the area. Farming is their rotational livelihood and main source of income as they sell the excess produce.“The forest is important because that is how we live, we protect it, we conserve it, and we also collect food from the forest… collect materials for the house, for the craft, medicines,” said Veronica Farias, who, for the past 12 years, has led a group of women who produce various remedies for ailments.The group, called Medicine From Trees, utilizes plant materials, including crabwood seeds, harvested from the crabwood trees located deep in the forest where logging companies have previously expressed interest. Crabwood is a commercially valuable timber species but is not abundant in Guyana, and Farias is concerned at the implications should logging companies succeed in gaining access to the area.“If they touch that area where we depend on, and the crabwood trees, we would lose everything,” she said. “They will just extract the materials and where will we make ends meet for this project or for us?”Creating Space for Indigenous PeopleOn November 23, 2018, Guyana initialed a Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) with the European Union under the EU’s Forestry Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) program.The FLEGT program aims to reduce illegal logging by strengthening sustainable and legal forest management, improving governance, and promoting trade in legally produced timber. The initialing of the VPA followed six years of negotiations that saw the involvement of multiple stakeholders in Guyana.For Williams, who was involved in the process, the pact represents a new hope that the concerns of Indigenous Peoples will be treated with more seriousness. “The laws are there but it’s never really adhered to. But if we have to make the VPA work, all these things have to be abided with,” said Williams. He pointed out that if concessions are being allocated next to indigenous titled lands, the law says that the villages have to be informed, but this is not usually done. He said that changes have already been seen with extensive consultations and feedback and training.“I think they have done a good job. They’ve been the only entity that have been interacting and meeting the people,” he said of the GFC and the VPA negotiation process. “I think our concerns will be listened to more because of this process.”Laura George, of the Amerindian Peoples Association, an NGO that advocates for indigenous peoples’ rights, said that the process created spaces for their concerns to be heard. “To an extent, we can say that the VPA that was initialed… created a platform from which we can work to enhance forest governance and respecting rights, improving the system and reducing illegality,” she said. George added that as the process moves forward, they hope that resources can be made available to ensure the continued engagement and protection of indigenous peoples’ rights.In this way, observes Oda Almas of the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), the VPA could be a catalyst not just for enforcing existing laws, but for bringing Guyana’s national legislation into line with its international obligations on indigenous peoples’ rights.Research conducted by indigenous communities themselves, with assistance from APA, FPP, and the Rainforest Foundation US, has documented how village titles granted by the state overwhelmingly leave out large areas of the communities’ customary lands. In many cases logging concessions have been allocated in these areas — because the national legislation allows this.“The VPA could be very useful if it helps create a platform which leads to indigenous peoples’ rights to their customary lands being recognized and protected both in law and in practice, so that concessions and logging operations could not be carried out there on such lands without the free, prior and informed consent of the customary owners,” says Almas.The VPA process has propelled changes that otherwise would have taken longer.Kenny David, who heads Guyana’s FLEGT Secretariat, pointed out that Guyana’s overarching Forest Act was revised and codes of practice that govern forest operations were published. Laura Singh of Guyana’s Forest Products Development and Marketing Council observed that some requirements for those involved in the industry were not enforced previously but said that, influenced by the VPA process, this is now being done “because people need to ensure that they are legal in every sense, [including] the environmental, social and the economic component of it.”Attitudes among stakeholders have also changed. “Many times, when we went, people said, ‘Listen, this EU thing is not for us, we don’t wanna hear about it, we’ll sell our wood to whomever.’ But then you understand that if you don’t get it right… at the very start of that process, it’s gonna affect [the entire sector],” said David. Greater understanding, he said, has fostered an increased willingness to comply with regulations.In Guyana, illegal logging is not a major problem; improving governance and access to markets is seen as a bigger issue among stakeholders.“We said [that with] the VPA, for us, the motivation wasn’t to curb illegal logging because illegal logging was always quite small, but it was rather to improve our systems and give us access to markets which were the things we lacked,” said David.For stakeholders, the changes seen and promised have engendered hope of positive change for governance, markets, and rights.Mark George and his wife Norma George heading for their home from their farm. Photo by Gaulbert Sutherland.Gaulbert Sutherland is an award–winning Guyanese journalist specializing in human rights and the environment. This article is from a forthcoming report by the forests and rights NGO Fern, featuring reportage on various aspects of forest governance around the world by local journalists.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

How many fires are burning in the Amazon?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butler Deforestation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forests, Green, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, wildfires center_img The fires raging in the Amazon are nearly double over last year, but remain moderate in the historical context.The 41,858 fires recorded in the Amazon as of Aug. 24 this year are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when deforestation rates were very much higher.However, this year’s numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires.The hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have focused worldwide attention on the soaring deforestation rates in the Amazon as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. While fires burning in the Amazon have garnered worldwide attention due to last week’s midday “blackout” in urban São Paulo, more than 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) from the Amazon, analysis of historical data suggests the fires are well within the historical range of the past 20 years.Mongabay’s analysis of data from Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) shows that the number of fire hotspots recorded this year in the Amazon biome total 41,858 through Aug. 24, an increase of 89 percent over the end of August 2018, with still a week to go in in the month. (If August keeps its current pace, Amazônia will tally nearly 50,000 fires by the end of the month.)Aerial view of burned areas in the Amazon rainforest, in the city of Porto Velho, Rondônia state. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.The 41,858 fires recorded so far this year in the Brazilian Amazon are the highest number since 2010, when 58,476 were recorded by the end of August. But 2019 is well below the mid-2000s, when fire hotspots regularly topped 60,000 through this point in the year. Over the past 20 years, 2005 — a year of severe El Niño-induced drought — holds the record of 94,780 fires through August. 2019 currently stands roughly 4 percent above the 20-year average and is on pace to end the month at around 50,000 fires, or 19 percent above average.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.The situation is similar in the Cerrado, a woody, savanna-like biome that lies east and south of the Amazon. Through Aug. 24, 23,322 fires had been recorded there, which is slightly less than the 20-year average for this point in the year.Monthly fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.In terms of the extent of burning, INPE releases data on a monthly basis, so Mongabay could only look at numbers through the end of July, before the recent surge in fires. With 18,629 square kilometers (7,193 square miles) burned through July in Amazônia, 2019 was 62 percent higher than 2018, but below the 2016 figure.Area burned in the Brazilian Amazon through July each year since 2002. Data from INPE.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Trailing 12-month moving average of the area burned per biome in Brazil since 2002. Data from INPE.An important caveatThese numbers come with an important caveat: the satellites used for hotspot tracking in Brazil have limited capacity to detect sub-canopy fires. This is a significant limitation because the area affected by sub-canopy fires that burn into intact and otherwise healthy forests can be quite substantial: a 2013 NASA study published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B found that understory fires burn a larger extent of forest than the area deforested for agriculture and cattle pasture.And these fires do long-term damage to the rainforest, setting the stage for more destructive fires, forest die-off, and eventual deforestation. Long-running research initiated by scientist Daniel Nepstad when he worked at the Woods Hole Research Institute, found that forests that have previously been burned are twice as likely to be deforested as unburned forests.Nepstad, now the head of the Earth Innovation Institute, explained the context of the current situation in a blog post.“Satellites do NOT detect most fires that are burning beneath the canopy of standing forests. And it is these low fires, that rarely reach the knee, that do the most damage, burning slowly across the forest floor, killing giant trees with thin bark,” he writes. “Once these trees die, they fall to the ground, opening up huge gaps in the forest canopy that allow more sunlight to reach the forest floor, drying the fuel layer and making the forest more prone to further burning.”Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. According to Greenpeace’s research, 75 percent of the 23,006 hot spots the group recorded in the Amazon in the first 20 days of August occurred in areas were forest in 2017. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Aerial view of a large burned area in the city of Candeiras do Jamari in the state of Rondônia. Image by Victor Moriyama/Greenpeace.Nepstad notes that we don’t yet have a good understanding of the damage from the current burning season, but there is plenty to worry about based on preliminary evidence. For example, the fires are more persistent than in recent years, indicating that they are burning hotter, meaning they are burning more than pasture and dry scrub. And there’s lots of smoke.“We do not know with confidence how the area of fire compares with previous years, [but] it is important to bear in mind that the fire season has just begun, with most fires occurring from September to December,” he writes. “With forecasts of a long dry season, the number of fires could continue to be greater than usual.“We also know that it is a particularly smoky burning season. This is probably related to the large number of ‘deforestation fires’ — fires set to burn patches of forest that have been felled to make way for cattle pasture or crop fields. The smoke released from a fire that burns a hectare of felled forest releases far more smoke than a fire that burns a hectare of degraded pastureland. We do not know the area of standing forest that has burned. Forest fires, however, usually happen late in the dry season.”Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Amazon according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.Cumulative fire hotspots in the Brazilian Cerrado according to INPE. Note that the August 2019 data are through Aug. 24.While the current fires aren’t off the charts relative to the historical baseline, they are indeed concerning. But the silver lining to the crisis is that the hazy, dark skies over São Paulo have sparked worldwide attention to the soaring deforestation rates now occurring in the Amazon, as well as the pro-deforestation policies of President Jair Bolsonaro. High-level political blowback from the EU, street protests, and pressure on Brazilian companies has forced Bolsonaro to backtrack on some of his most heated rhetoric from the past week and start to take action, including sending in the army to battle fires. Volunteer fire brigades formed by landowners, indigenous peoples and NGOs have already been battling the fires for weeks.Cumulative deforestation through July for each year from 2008 according to INPE’s DETER system. Note that the chart switches from DETER to DETER-B in August 2016.According to INPE, deforestation in 2019 in the Brazilian is trending 57 percent ahead of last year through the end of July, the fastest rate of deforestation since 2008. Deforestation appears to be continuing at a high rate through August, but the picture is less transparent than usual because INPE has stopped releasing data publicly since Bolsonaro fired Ricardo Magnus Osório Galvão, the head of the agency, at the beginning of the month.last_img read more

UN and policymakers, wake up! Burning trees for energy is not carbon neutral (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, Alternative Energy, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Footprint, Carbon Negative Bioenergy, Carbon Sequestration, Clean Energy, Climate, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change Negotiations, Climate Change Policy, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Controversial, Emission Reduction, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forests, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Green Energy, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Impact Of Climate Change, International Trade, Law, Monitoring, Plantations, Pollution, Renewable Energy, Research, Sustainability, Sustainable Development, Trade, United Nations On September 23, the signatories of the Paris Climate Agreement will gather at the United Nations for a Climate Action Summit to step up their carbon reduction pledges in order to prevent catastrophic climate change, while also kicking off Climate Week events in New York City.However, the policymakers, financiers, and big green groups organizing these events will almost certainly turn a blind eye toward renewable energy policies that subsidize forest wood burned for energy as if it is a zero emissions technology like wind or solar.Scientists have repeatedly warned that burning forests is not in fact carbon neutral, and that doing so puts the world at risk of overshooting the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C target.But that message has fallen on deaf ears, as lucrative renewable energy subsidies have driven exponential growth in use of forest wood as fuel. The world’s nations must stop subsidizing burning forest biomass now to protect forests, the climate, and our future. This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author. The handfuls of wood pellets and the green sleeves seen here are part of a biomass industry-supported PR campaign claiming that burning wood to produce energy is carbon neutral. But it isn’t. Photo credit: #ODF on Visual hunt / CC BY.We’ve all watched in helpless horror as the Amazon and other forests have burned in recent weeks. But there’s another, deliberate forest conflagration happening, ironically a result of climate policy — burning forest wood at power plants to generate “renewable” biomass energy.While burning wood is widely treated as “carbon neutral,” the physical reality is that burning wood emits more carbon pollution than coal per unit energy. You don’t need modeling to understand that while trees may be technically renewable, cutting and burning a forest emits carbon quickly, but re-growing forests sequesters carbon slowly. Even burning forestry “residues” — the leftovers from logging jobs — causes carbon emissions to spike.The science shows that to avoid catastrophic climate change we must protect and restore forests, not cut and burn them for energy, and that climate mitigation can’t wait the decades to centuries required to regrow forests cut for fuel. Yet in a display of stunning defiance of such a basic principle, policymakers worldwide continue to shovel billions of dollars in renewable energy subsidies into so-called “zero carbon” tree-burning power plants, which devour forests, decrease the forest carbon sink, and pollute the air.A special culprit is the European Union, which sets renewable energy policy rules for member states. Despite abundant evidence that the biomass and wood pellet industry is trashing forests and increasing carbon emissions, the EU re-upped their renewable energy policy last year to continue subsidizing forest biomass for heat and power.  It didn’t seem to matter that the EU received a crush of input from scientists and advocates, including their own science advisors, who warned:The legal mandate to record forest biomass-fired energy as contributing to the EU’s renewable energy targets has had the perverse effect of creating a demand for trees to be felled in Europe or elsewhere in order to burn them for energy, thus releasing the carbon into the atmosphere which would otherwise stay locked up in the forest, and simultaneously drastically reducing the carbon sink strength of the forest ecosystems… The potentially very long payback periods for forest biomass raise important issues given the UNFCCC’s [the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’s] aspiration of limiting warming to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels to ‘significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change’. On current trends, this may be exceeded in around a decade. Relying on forest biomass for the EU’s renewable energy, with its associated initial increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, increases the risk of overshooting the 1.5°C target if payback periods are longer than this.Adding to the pressure on forests, many countries, including the US and EU member states, also subsidize wood heating, which constitutes more than half the wood burned in the EU. Increasingly, thousands of firewood and wood pellet companies in the EU are hollowing out forests, including old growth beech forests in the Carpathian Mountains, home of Europe’s last tracts of wilderness. This subsidized wood burning is murdering forest ecosystems that will never recover in the lifetime of anyone alive today — all in the name of climate change mitigation.The special hypocrisy around biomass will be on display at the United Nations Climate Action Summit and during New York’s Climate Week (Sept 23 – 29), where countries and companies are set to announce their deepened commitments to climate mitigation.There it’s likely we’ll see countries trumpet emission reduction goals with nary a word about how much of this ambition relies on burning forest wood and simply not counting the emissions. These nations may meet their carbon pledges on paper — but nature will know they cheated.The UK, for example, has set a goal of net zero emissions by 2050, but currently pays over a billion dollars a year in renewable energy subsidies to the Drax power station, which burns millions of tons of wood pellets from trees stripped from forests of the US, Canada, Spain, Portugal, and Poland, as well as northern EU countries with fragile boreal bog forests — Estonia, Latvia, Sweden.The Drax power stations in the United Kingdom, one of the largest users of woody biomass for energy production. Shown here is the Drax biomass dome, which once burned coal. The UK has nearly eliminated burning coal for energy, cutting its official IPCC emissions, but is ramping up its burning of woody biomass. The uncounted carbon from Drax flows into the atmosphere, adding to climate change. Photo credit: DECCgovuk on VisualHunt / CC BY-ND.Few at Climate Week are going to want to acknowledge this inconvenient truth. Policymakers, corporations, financiers, and the big greens organizing the New York jamboree don’t want to pull this particular thread because to do so starts to unravel the whole sweater, revealing the massive assumptions involved in treating forest wood as carbon neutral.The money at stake surely plays a role — the billions in subsidies underpinning the last ten years of exponential growth in the wood pellet industry are reflected in the heady share prices of companies like US-based Enviva, which exports millions of tons of wood pellets to the UK, EU, and even Asia. Industry partnerships with the big greens designed to burnish “sustainability” credentials of wood pellets don’t exactly enhance transparency about impacts, either. The camel’s nose of the biomass industry is under every tent.Pine forests cut to provide wood pellets for power plants are replanted, so this energy resource could technically be called carbon neutral, but only over the long term. It takes many years for those new trees to become mature and for the carbon equation to balance out. Photo credit: ChattOconeeNF on Visualhunt.com / CC BY.What to do in the face of such blatant and deliberate damage? Working with allies, my organization, the Partnership for Policy Integrity, has filed reports with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) highlighting the systemic misrepresentations of the wood pellet industry and asking the SEC to require better disclosures of the actual emission impacts of burning biomass.When advocacy and science failed to add real forest protections to the EU’s renewable energy policy, we worked with colleagues to file a lawsuit against the EU for its misrepresentation of burning trees as climate friendly (the court has not yet determined whether it will hear the case).We’re putting this issue on the agenda at Climate Week too, with a documentary that rips the green veneer off the biomass and wood pellet industries, followed by discussion about the EU biomass lawsuit and bioenergy policy around the world. Policymakers are especially welcome to attend.Burning forest biomass is a triple hit to climate mitigation — it increases emissions, decreases the forest carbon sink, and soaks up subsidies that could instead be allocated to zero emissions technologies or efficiency.However, there’s a simple — though not politically easy — fix to this problem. The modern biomass and wood pellet industry is a house of cards, dependent on subsidies. Countries must stop subsidizing burning wood, and preferably, start subsidizing natural forest restoration. Cutting and burning forests for “zero-carbon” fuel should be considered a Climate Crime, not subsidized with tens of billions of dollars. We should have a renewable energy policy that doesn’t destroy forests — we owe it to the world.Mary Booth is an ecosystem scientist and the Director of the Partnership for Policy Integrity, a US-based nonprofit organization. This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets worldwide to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rare songbird recovers, moves off endangered species list

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta The Kirtland’s warbler, a species that was close to extinction five decades ago, is now thriving and has been removed from the U.S. federal list of endangered species.Where there were fewer than 200 breeding pairs of the warbler in the 1970s and 1980s, today there are more than 2,300.However, the warbler’s continued survival is conservation-reliant, which means it will still depend heavily on continued conservation efforts.Conservationists say the bird’s comeback is testament that the Endangered Species Act works, and warn that current attempts by the Trump administration to roll back conservation policies could lead to other protected species going extinct. The recovery of a rare bird species that was close to extinction five decades ago is now being heralded as a conservation success story.The Kirtland’s warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii), also known as the jack pine warbler, a small songbird that nests only in young jack pine forests in northern Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, was never really considered to be an abundant species. During the first ever census of the bird in 1951, birders and researchers counted 432 singing males (a rough proxy of the number of breeding pairs). A decade later, the number rose to 502 singing males. The third census in 1971, however, revealed a population crash: researchers counted only 203 singing males, a number that saw subsequent slight dips and rises, but remained low throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Consequently, the warbler, known for its distinct yellow throat, chest and belly and blue-gray head and back, became one of the first species to be listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).But thanks to decades of conservation actions, the bird is now thriving, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) says. There are more than 2,300 singing males (or breeding pairs) of the warbler as per latest estimates, and due to its recovery, the species has been removed from the federal list of endangered species.“The delisting of the Kirtland’s Warbler is cause for celebration and proof that the Endangered Species Act works,” Shawn Graff, vice president of the American Bird Conservancy’s (ABC) Great Lakes program, said in a statement.Dan Eichinger, director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, added that delisting marked the “latest chapter in a remarkable wildlife success story.”“The bird’s recovery provides dramatic testimony to what conservation organizations, governments and businesses can accomplish when they come together for the good of the resource,” he said in a statement.However, the warbler’s survival into the future is conservation-reliant, conservationists say, which means that it will still depend heavily on continued active management efforts.For example, the warbler needs large stands of young jack pine habitat to nest, and historically, wildfires helped create those vast tracts of habitat. But practices like fire suppression and timber harvesting in the early 1900s reduced the area the birds could breed in, according to the USFWS. To counter this, authorities developed a rigorous management plan that mimicked the natural processes within jack pine forests and increased the warbler’s breeding habitat. In addition, they had to work to control brown-headed cowbirds, birds that lay their eggs in warbler nests, forcing the warbler parents to raise larger cowbird chicks that easily outcompete the smaller warbler babies.“This bird flew off the endangered species list because the Endangered Species Act works,” Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement. “This success story highlights the danger of the Trump administration’s efforts to cripple laws protecting our wildlife and natural landscapes. Without the Endangered Species Act, the Kirtland’s warbler might have vanished forever. Many other species will disappear if we don’t stop Trump’s efforts to gut conservation policies.”A male Kirtland’s warbler in a jack pine forest in Michigan, U.S. Image by Jeol Trick/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesian politician at heart of permit scandal dies ahead of graft trial

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Darwan Ali, a former politician from Borneo who was charged in a corruption case and at the center of a palm oil licensing scandal, died on Nov. 18 before he could stand trial.Darwan’s death in Jakarta at age 64, from heart disease, came a month after he was charged in connection with embezzlement of district funds for a port construction project in Seruyan district, which he led from 2003 to 2013.Darwan was also the central figure in an extensive investigative report by Mongabay and the Gecko Project in 2017, which uncovered how he presided over an elaborate scheme to use shell companies as vehicles for selling oil palm plantation permits to firms owned by the billionaire Kuok and Rachmat families for millions of dollars.His children, who participated in the palm permit scheme, continue to hold key positions in local political office. JAKARTA — Darwan Ali, an Indonesian politician at the center of a palm oil licensing scandal and charged in a separate corruption case, died on Nov. 18 before he could stand trial.Darwan, 64, died at a hospital in Jakarta after a long history of heart illness. He was buried the next day in his home village of Sembuluh in the Bornean district of Seruyan, which he ran as district chief from 2003 to 2013.His death came a month after he was charged with corruption for allegedly conspiring to inflate the budget for project to build a seaport in Seruyan’s Segintung Bay between 2007 and 2012. Investigators at Indonesia’s Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) said the scheme resulted in 20.84 billion rupiah ($1.48 million) in losses to the state.The KPK alleged that Darwan steered the contract for the project to developer PT Swa Karya Jaya, in exchange for the company backing his 2003 election bid.Marianto Sumarto, a local sawmill owner who worked on Darwan’s campaign team in 2003, said at the time that he wasn’t surprised that Darwan was charged, adding that he tended to ignore the rules during his time as district chief.“[I]t’s appropriate [that he was charged],” Marianto told Mongabay Indonesia. “Throughout his 10 years of leadership, there’s a lot of games which didn’t follow the regulations. The intention was good. He wanted to develop [Seruyan].” But the development process, he said, didn’t follow the prevailing mechanisms, and was instead centered on Darwan’s “personal ego as the local chief.”Darwan was also the central figure in an extensive investigative report by Mongabay and the Gecko Project in 2017. Part of the award-winning “Indonesia for Sale” series, the report uncovered how Darwan, while head of Seruyan, presided over an elaborate scheme to use shell companies as vehicles for selling oil palm plantation permits to firms owned by the billionaire Kuok and Rachmat families for millions of dollars.The scheme threatened to turn the southern reaches of Seruyan into a sea of oil palm. Local activists reported Darwan to the KPK in this case, and the agency investigated him but never pressed charges.Condolence message from the district government of Seruyan for Darwan Ali. Image courtesy of Seruyan district administration.At his funeral on Nov. 19, mourners were full of praise for the former district chief.Wahyudi K. Anwar, the former head of neighboring East Kotawaringin district, said Darwan had left a positive legacy from his decade-long rule.“Darwan Ali was a good figure, hopefully he receives the best spot beside Allah,” he said as quoted by the Antara news agency. “He’s commendable for bringing development to Seruyan during his two terms of leadership there.”Taufiq Mukri, the East Kotawaringin deputy district chief, called Darwan a good role model for the younger generation, saying he was able to emerge as a powerful political force despite being born into an ordinary family.Four of Darwan’s five children are also local politicians. One of them, Iswanti, is the current deputy district chief of Seruyan. Another, Ahmad Ruswandi, was a former speaker of the Seruyan district legislature, while a third, Muhammad Rudini, is a current deputy speaker of the East Kotawaringin legislature. A daughter, Rizki Amalia, is a member of the Central Kalimantan provincial legislature. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: Darwan Ali, the former district head of Seruyan in Central Kalimantan province. center_img FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Corruption, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Warriors on TV: NBA drops two games from national schedule

first_imgNo longer a marquee attraction, the injury-riddled Golden State Warriors are losing out on the kind of prime-time exposure they’ve enjoyed for years.The NBA has removed two Warriors games from the upcoming national TV schedule and it’s easy to see why. Without superstars Steph Curry and Klay Thompson, Golden State owns the league’s worst record at 4-18 and aren’t exactly must-see TV material.The Warriors were scheduled to play on ESPN against Utah on Dec. 13 and against Portland on Dec. 18. …last_img read more